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By The Proud Owner Of The Koll Islands

Tim Koen
Civilizations for
Curious Leaders
Timothy Koen Thursday, June 5, 2014 9:15:11 AM Pacific Daylight Time 70:56:81:af:cd:55
SECTION 1
Crystal-clear water laps against the
white sand. An abundance of what
could be coconut trees stand tall, and
surround the perimeter of the island.
Boars, and fish are abundant. The
boars are big, fierce, and won’t give
up, but the fish, you can easily trick,
they are tropical, and bright in color,
they are beautiful. The bugs bite
you, vicious, and relentlessly. The
Introduction
1
This image displays the geography on which the civilization of the Koll Islands will thrive upon.
Timothy Koen Thursday, June 5, 2014 9:15:11 AM Pacific Daylight Time 70:56:81:af:cd:55
sun shines, sand sucks in walkers feet, hot, burn-
ing, and excruciatingly painful. At night, the is-
land becomes freezing, and surprisingly unaccom-
modating, the sand feels like ice, and the water
like frost. Some people get a chance to enter what
the natives call ‘The Tall-Tree Forest’ beware. Crea-
tures from ‘Hell’ lurk in there. Snakes so vicious,
some legends are
based off of them.
One snake called
the two-step is
dark, and brown. It
has honed its skills
of camouflage. It is
slow, and looks like
a stick. Legend says
that if someone steps on it, the victim only has
two-steps until they drop dead. Another legend is
the one of the sea serpent; it ate a boat of fisher-
men, like it was nothing. This place can be beauti-
ful, but just as much dangerous. Beware.
Upon this land will
be made the civiliza-
tion of the Koll Is-
lands. A civilization
with which inspira-
tion comes from pre-
vious civilizations
such as the ancient Romans, the Greeks, Mayans,
Aztecs, and the Arabs. This book will instruct,
and record the steps necessary to create a thriving
empire.
2
1.2
An Ancient greek ship sails
the oceans.
1.1
Dangerous snake lurks in the
trees
Timothy Koen Thursday, June 5, 2014 9:15:11 AM Pacific Daylight Time 70:56:81:af:cd:55
“Earth provides enough to satisfy every man’s needs, but
not every man’s greed.” Mahatma Gandhi
CHAPTER 1
3
Modifications
This is an example of Chinampas, used by the ancient Mayans
Timothy Koen Thursday, June 5, 2014 9:15:11 AM Pacific Daylight Time 70:56:81:af:cd:55
SECTION 1
Part I - Analysis of the problem
Every civilization has to address the
basic needs of humans, such as food,
shelter, and clothing. These are the
following problems that the Koll Is-
lands face:
1.With little to no land for farming,
there could be little food, except for
the animals we catch, which could
Cook Islands Source: http://www.high-definition-wallpaper.com/photo/tahiti_beach_wallpaper/35.html#.UlW8-Raz7ww
Human Changes to the Land
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go extinct, or just scarce. Fishing would also be
hard, because of lack of navigation. Fishers could
get stranded and die, or not catch anything, as
fishing is very hard.
2.The civilization has lots of water, but none to
drink. All the water is salty, and undrinkable, peo-
ple could get dehydrated, and die. If people did
go to drink the water, they could get sick, or per-
haps crazy. To get a stable, and drinkable water
supply would be hard, and The Plantains may not
have the resources.
3.Shelter could be hard because of limited land,
and resources. If the Koll Islands crammed Kol-
lians into a small space, disease could spread
easily, people, livestock, and crops would be in
danger.
Part II - Proposed Solutions
Modification is important in every civilization, if
the civilization can not modify their environment
to better suit their needs, like food, and water,
they could perish. A modification is when any be-
ing(s) make a change to their own environment to
better suit them. For example, clearing a forest for
resources, and space to build, is a modification.
Plowing land to farm is also another modification.
A civilization that cannot make modifications, or
will not make modifications, is sure to die out, es-
pecially if the civilization cannot modify their en-
vironment to gain access to food, or clean drink-
able water. The Mayans expanded their land by
building underwater walls, and then filling them
in with land, this is very useful for any civiliza-
tion.
Food is a big
problem,
with little
food on land;
the Koll Is-
land hunters
fished quite
often. Naviga-
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2.2
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tion was also a problem; fishermen got lost at sea,
and could not find good fishing spots. As a solu-
tion the fishermen stayed close to shore, and did
not stray too far (as suggested by Frey, 248.) The
Greeks used this, and it was very effective, they
also offered sacrifices to the ‘gods’ to increase
safety.
Shelter was also hard on such a small island;
with so little land disease could have spread like
wildfire. To prevent this from happening, the Kol-
lians did what was very similar to what the an-
cient Aztec’s did. (Frey 274) The Aztecs created lit-
tle artificial islands or “Chinampas”, what the Kol-
lians did do is build little underwater walls, and
then fill the four connected walls in with debris.
This gave the Kollians a better farming opportu-
nity, and also more places for housing. With these
walls, the Kollians also had land to build tall de-
fenses (huge walls, spikes, etc.). The Kollians also
did what the Aztecs did; we built a large center
for sacrifice, almost like a pyramid.
Water was extremely hard, and time consum-
ing. With every drop of water in sight undrink-
able, the Kollians did the unthinkable: they built a
dam. But over the artificial river that was created
was a giant blanket that gathered the water drop-
lets without the salt. This certain technique is not
used today, but was inspired by some of the great
dams today.
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“Among the weeds choking out growth and good government are the hundreds of boards,
commissions, and advisory committees that have sprouted over the years. They devour time, money,
and energy far beyond any real contribution they make.” Mitch Daniels
CHAPTER 2
7
Law and Government
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SECTION 1
There are many lessons that the civilization of the
Koll Islands can learn from the leader Julius Cae-
sar, one of the most important is to make people
happy. Julius Caesar was a powerful man, loyal
to his land and people. He expanded his ruling
power to different countries such as Gaul, and
Spain, then reduced taxes but still got a substan-
tial amount of money. This made him look like a
good guy, all the while really getting what he
wanted. The people had a lower tax, and spread
Figure 2.1 Protestors shouting at riot police at the Occupy Portland Protest
Maintaining Civil Order
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their influence to Gaul, Spain, and other countries.
He also kept the poor entertained by staging
gladiator fights, and helped improve the rate of
unemployment by starting to build projects such
as roads or coliseums. Julius Caesar however
made some mistakes. To his peers he seemed out
of control with power, a threat, his charisma and
political strength worried those around him. Ju-
lius Caesar was like a king in all but word, and
this worried the senates that had spent so much
hard work forming an amazing democracy, so of
course they ended the threat by destroying Julius,
as a historical source states “As an unarmed Cae-
sar entered the Senate building, a group of sena-
tors attacked him with daggers, stabbing him 23
times” (Political Leadership of Julius Caesar.) The
Koll Islands can learn many techniques and help-
ful things from Julius, yet the most important is
make your people happy, and they will forget
about what is really going on.
Code of Laws
What Makes for a Successful Civilization?
There are many major threats presented to
the civilization of the Koll Islands. From petty
theft to fraud, and everything in-between, is cov-
ered by the fantastic laws granted by the foun-
der of the Koll Islands civilization. The founder
explained that laws are not only to keep order,
but to layout the ground rules. We must also ad-
dress the laws about protecting the vulnerable,
as in those who may not be able to provide for
themselves or their family or any underprivi-
leged people. As a whole unit, all of our ‘gears’
must be greased and functioning for the big pic-
ture to come together.
It is written that all people shall follow these
laws:
I. No family may exceed the child limit of 2; go-
ing over the limit will cause the family to pay a
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fine. (Depending on the severity and population
level, they must pay a minimum of $500)
II. Using any type of weapon in a harmful way
to society, humanity, or overly excessive harm to
nature will cause in an immediate confiscation
of the weapon and the perpetrator will be sen-
tenced to a minimum of 3 weeks in prison
III. A border checkpoint must be in order at all
time, the immigrant will be asked to show their
passport, work visa, and all belongings will be
thoroughly inspected. If the immigrant does not
have the necessary documents, them and their
family will be deported until they fulfill the re-
quirements. Even if they do meet the require-
ments, acceptance into the country depends on
the state of the economy, and if said job is
needed, and furthermore the population levels
must be regular in order for the immigrant to be
accepted into the Koll Islands.
IV. The government must provide for all qualify-
ing underprivileged families/people. Any fraud
associated with this matter will result in serious
consequences that will depend on what is seen
as ‘fair’ at the time
V. Everyone age 18 or younger must be able to
acquire an education. If for some reason they
cannot/will not go to school, a government offi-
cial will personally go to their place of residence
and evaluate the current financial state of the
family. If they qualify, a free education will be
provided until said student acquires their bache-
lors degree
Political Leadership of Augustus
Augustus was a great leader, but some of the de-
cisions he made were not the best for the An-
cient Rome. Augustus started (and completed)
many architectural projects, which helped econ-
omy, and improved the life of ancient romans.
Augustus also pushed to restore temples, and as
a bonus made tax collecting more fair and effi-
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cient. But as all good things come to an end, so
did August’s good decision making skills suffer.
Augustus started to reward those with many chil-
dren and that had been married for a prolonged
amount of time. Although at first glance this
may seem like a good idea, yet Augustus seized
the rights of all those who didn’t not want to be
married, or give birth to many children, by cap-
turing their right to inherit money and property.
This overall upset the population of Ancient
Rome. To stop this from happening, the civiliza-
tion of the Koll Islands will take many steps in
tax reduction, all the while not overspending on
architectural projects. To do this, the government
of the Koll Islands will have a strict budget for
the improvement of the civilizations appearance,
and when new money comes in, the civilization
will not spend it on lavish parties, but will save
it for the best.
Lessons from the Decline of the Western Roman
Empire
The Falling of a Once Great Empire
Rome was an amazing civilization, but years
later, it started to deteriorate; values went down
the sink, all civilized actions that make a civiliza-
tion, were gone. 32,000 prostitutes invaded the
empire like a virus, horrific and savage gladiator
fights were held, while blood-splattered hea-
thens would cheer and place bets upon the un-
tamed fighters. Some people may speculate why
the decline of the Western Roman Empire was,
but the main reason was clearly the deteriora-
tion of expectations. They expected to be a won-
der of the world, but clearly weren’t doing any-
thing to amend their mistakes. The affluent
seemed to be holding lavish parties (probably
with prostitutes) while the poor had to come up
with creative ways of surviving, such as stealing
or murder. As Frey states, “A rise in crime made
the empire’s cities and roads unsafe”. The civil-
ians of Rome acted as if no one person’s life mat-
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tered, and each person was clawing at each other
to survive.
The Koll islands can clearly learn a lot from
the decline of the Western Roman Empire, and
there are certain steps in which the civilization
of Koll Islands can take to not be a safe-haven
for prostitutes and criminals. The Koll Islands
will be sure to make the cost of everything
known, so overspending will not happen. There
will be a zero tolerance of prostitutes, and all
brothels will be terminated. All tax funds will
go towards education, and the enforcement of
law and government. The Koll Islands will also
make sure to implement a ‘care’ system for those
in need so they do not stray towards crime.

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“This is my simple religion. There is no need for temples; no need for complicated philosophy. Our
own brain, our own heart is our temple; the philosophy is kindness.” ~Dalai Lama
CHAPTER 3
13
Belief Systems
Timothy Koen Thursday, June 5, 2014 9:15:11 AM Pacific Daylight Time 70:56:81:af:cd:55
SECTION 1
Imagine a world in which everyone
knows what is wrong, and what is
right is ideal. The way in which we
“enforce” these moral values is with
a belief system. Any civilization
would want to be depicted as a
peaceful, artisan, and intelligent soci-
ety. A belief system may be incorpo-
rated into a religion, and as a relig-
ion typically does, it will cause con-
Impact of Belief Systems
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flict but also unite the people. Religions such as
Buddhism have ultimately taught the act of self-
lessness and peace. If any civilization can create
something like this, the belief system will be
breathtakingly useful and efficient. Ultimately a
belief system is important because of its impact it
can have on people, even impacting their daily
lives. The decline of moral values will be the fail-
ing of any civilization, but there is one way to pre-
vent this, a belief system. As The Decline of West-
ern Roman Empire states, “The decline of moral
values ultimately lead to the falling of Rome.”
This then means that having a belief system to
keep moral values in check will decrease the rate
of decline in the Koll Islands.
In order to better understand the importance of be-
lief systems within a civilization and how they
can influence the actions and decisions of a peo-
ple, please consider the following moral dilemma:
A Callous Passerby
Roger Smith, a skillful swimmer, is out for a lei-
surely stroll. During the course of his walk, he
passes by a deserted pier from which a teenage
boy who apparently cannot swim has fallen into
the water. The boy is screaming desperately for
help. Smith recognizes that there is absolutely no
danger to himself if he jumps in to save the boy;
he could easily succeed if he tried. Nevertheless,
he chooses to ignore the boy's cries. "Why should
I inconvenience myself for this kid," Smith says to
himself, and passes on.
If Roger Smith were a Buddhist, the Eight-Fold
path would guide his moral decisions. As Bud-
dhists believe, you should not harm any being,
and that you should promote right actions. Roger
Smith would know that saving a boy at the sacri-
fice of his convenience (which is a craving) is the
right thing to do. As The Right Effort states “Pro-
mote good actions and prevent evil actions”.
(Frey 180) This means that Roger Smith would
definitely have an obligation to at least try to save
the boy.
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Although every single belief system discussed
(Buddhism, Confucianism, and Hinduism) would
save the boy, they would have different reasons
for doing so. If Roger Smith followed the teach-
ings of Confucius, he would once again save the
boy, as Frey stated, “Confucius taught that society
worked well when all people acted properly
based upon their roles and their relationships
with others” (208). This then means that there
would be multiple reasons for a Confucian to save
the boy.
Whereas a Confucian would save the boy as a
role model, a Hindu would do it for the respect of
all living things, and the possible reverb Karma
would have if the Hindu did not save the boy. As
Frey states “For Hindus, the law of karma meant
that the universe was just, or fair. Souls were re-
warded or punished for the good and evil they
had done”. This shows that Roger Smith would
have a strong moral obligation (and incentive) to
save the boy. In the Hindu culture, one is pun-
ished for bad actions, and rewarded for good
ones.
In conclusion, although all the belief systems
are different in how they worship and what they
worship, they ultimately have a strong sense of
wrong and right, therefore deterring the decline of
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moral values, and proving a point as to why belief
systems are important.
In an effort to create a successful civilization, the
people of the Koll Islands have established their
own belief system. This belief system shares simi-
lar moral values and teachings with other world
religions and helps the people of the Koll Islands
be on the pursuit of knowledge and give back to
the society.
The first moral value that the people of the
Koll Islands want to be known for is intelligence.
To practice this moral value, the people will daily
clear their mind (meditate) and come to a deeper
level of understanding. This practice is called In-
tory, and will promote knowledge and a deep
level of thinking. This practice is just like the basic
teachings of Confucianism as Confucians strongly
value intelligence.
The second value that the people of Koll Is-
lands would like to be known for is loyalty. To
practice this, the rich would give donations to
beneficial organizations, and the poor. This prac-
tice is called kyoshutsu, and promotes strong men-
tal well being, and financial well being for those
in need. This practice is just like Zakat in the Is-
lamic religion; as Frey states, “Muslims believe
that wealth becomes pure by giving some of it
away and that sharing wealth helps control
greed” (98). This shows that both the practice of
Kyoshutsu and Zakat are very much alike.
The third value that the people want to be
known for is Catio, which is based around educa-
tion. To practice Catio, you must devote part of
your day to education, whether it is reading or
keeping up to date with historical sites. It pro-
motes a strong level of understanding and is also
just like the practices of Confucianism.
The civilization of the Koll Islands has made
an effort to successfully incorporate moral values
into the daily lives of the citizens. This belief sys-
tem will help guide the civilians, give them a
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sense of freedom, and all the while keep them in
order.
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SECTION 2
Coat of Arms Blazon
In this coat of arms, the represen-
tation of strength, whether it is of
mind or body, and pure willpower,
are abundant. In medieval times, a
coat of arms was a way to recognize
each warrior. You could identify
their moral values, who they were as
a person, and perhaps their fighting
strategies. Because most people
Figure 3.1 Koen Coat of Arms
Coat of Arms
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where illiterate back then, this was important, and
acted like a modern day ID. In the Koen coat of
arms, a Leopard, rising fist, heart, and crescent are
seen. The leopard represents agility, elegance, and
a swift killer instinct. The rising fist represents
power and being able to stand up for what you be-
lieve to be right. The heart represents courage and
passion. Finally, the crescent represents the famil-
ial status of the knight, as this one happens to be
the second born in the family.
The Church in medieval Europe used scare
tactics and manipulation to get what they wanted,
they bribed and made scary decisions. Most all
people in the time of 1050 located in Europe were
illiterate, and as the Churches power grew, they of-
fered salvation and literacy. They also collected
taxes (tithes) that were 10% of the income of every
person. As Frey states “The medieval church
added to its wealth by collecting a tithe, or tax,”
(33). They illumi-
nated manu-
scripts to give
the illiterate a
sense of what
was going on. Be-
cause the prom-
ised salvation,
they manipu-
lated peoples
poor minds. In
1095 the current Pope used scare tactics to play
around with a powerful idea. He said that the Is-
lamic people took over their holy land, and that
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anyone who went on the crusade would achieve
salvation, and go to heaven. Most of the popula-
tion in that time had a horrible life, and were
poor. This offering of salvation was a godsend to
those people, and so they went and killed hun-
dreds of thousands (maybe millions) of ‘savages’.
The church was powerful, and manipulative, and
ironically was a crucial part of society. They of-
fered hope, gained power, and got what they
wanted, all the while giving the people freedom,
and guidance with their earthly soul, and their
heavenly soul.
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“ Before the throne of the Almighty, man will be judged not by his acts
but by his intentions. For God alone reads our hearts” - Mahatma
Gandhi
CHAPTER 4
22
Advancing New Ideas
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SECTION 1
Humanist Concepts
The Humanist ways of thinking drastically af-
fected the superior Roman Catholic Church and
European Society. Not only did Humanists ques-
tion everything, but also encouraged European
Society to advance in science, art, nature, in addi-
tion strongly went against what the church had
tried so hard to endorse. The people started to
conduct their own research instead of blindly fol-
Figure 4.1 The great Colosseum stand tall while tourists explore.
http://www.rome-museum.com/immagini/colosseum-2[big].jpg
How New Ideas Advance and Threaten a Society
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lowing what the church had to offer. The Euro-
pean Society changed as a whole; the people real-
ized the individual importance of each person (in-
stead of the family status). The people questioned
everything, and could find out for themselves
what was important. Authors explored what they
wanted to, and artists had a much more natural
taste. Inventors and engineers such as DaVinci
sprung about, freely questioning the laws of phys-
ics, and astronomy. DaVinci used a secret code to
hide his wonderful inventions, and created
(among many) a parachute, which defied the laws
of gravity, and questioned the fact of momentum.
This invention also questioned the fact of why one
should fall, and whether or not people should be
able to fly. As Frey states, “They began to create a
philosophy based on the importance and dignity
of each individual” (Frey 320). As many have
seen, not only did the humanists question every-
thing, but as a result of the curiosity changed the
European Society massively.
The affect of Humanist Ideas on Civilizations
If Humanists had a strong impact on the civiliza-
tion of the Koll Islands, nuances within the laws
and belief system would be tinkered with. As the
Koll Islands’ laws have a strong Humanist connec-
tion, the Humanists probably would not question
much within the law system. The humanists
would strongly value the law that “Everyone age
18 or younger must be able to acquire an educa-
tion. If for some reason they cannot/will not go to
school, a government official will personally go to
their place of residence and evaluate the current
financial state of the family. If they qualify, a free
education will be provided until said student ac-
quires their bachelors degree” (Koen). The reason
that Humanists would value this is because of
their strong appreciation of science, nature, curios-
ity, and education. Within our belief system, the
Koll Islands’ does not have a set religion; while
Buddhism is encouraged, it is not forced. As the
Koll Islands leader states, “The Buddhist religion
is a beautiful one, which strongly enforces peace,
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and individualism” (Koen). The humanists could
value this idea of individualism, yet may at first
be wary of the religion. In conclusion, the Human-
ists would change nuances within the law system,
yet the belief system might be a risky move. Over-
all the Humanists would value the Koll Islands
Civilization and their ideas.
The Danger of New Ideas
By the Late Middle Ages, two main problems
were scraping away at the Catholic Church, and
little by little, were revealing corruption and politi-
cal conflict between the pope and European Mon-
archs. The reason for these problems and many
people losing faith and then eventually creating
Protestant faiths began with the Humanist ideas
and ideals. The Humanists could freely question
anything and everything in sight. So when the
multiple popes showed up (people were already
thinking that was strange) were dressed up in em-
bellished robes, had jeweled hats, and lived lav-
ishly, the Humanists were ready to question every
detail of this opulence. When the three popes
showed up, it was called the Great Schism. The
reason for that name was that the European Soci-
ety felt divided and didn’t know whom to follow.
The peoples’ faith was placed upon whom they
felt was doing a better job, and this happening
greatly revealed many political conflicts. As Frey
states, “For nearly 40 years, the various lines of
popes denounced each other as impostors…Catho-
lics were divided and confused…The Great
Schism lessened people’s respect for the papacy
and sparked calls for reform” (349). Upon the
Great Schism, the church began to practice sim-
ony and sell indulgences. Instead of the Catholic
Church being a place of blessing, and holiness, it
became a store. The indulgences meant that the
rich upper classes were able to buy forgiveness
and then not have any consequences for bad
deeds. As Frey states, “People who received indul-
gences did not have to perform good deeds to
make up for their sins” (348). As stated, the
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church also began to practice the concept of sim-
ony, which was the selling of church offices. As
Frey states, “The church also sold offices, or lead-
ership positions…this practice is called simony. In-
stead of being chosen for their merit, buyers sim-
ply paid for their appointments” (348). This quote
shows that not only did the church sell offices, but
also forgiveness, and as stated before, became a
store. This great divide was scary for many peo-
ple, and the humanist way of thinking lead to ref-
ormation.
Many Protestant Reformers wanted to make a
more personal relationship in the church between
the people and God. The way the protestant re-
formers did this was doing away with corruption,
and impurity. This threatened the church im-
mensely, and the people of the church got wor-
ried. The level of corruption in the Roman Catho-
lic Church angered most everyone. People such as
Martin Luther ordered for change within the
church and for the church to return to its former
self. The questioning of the position of power
brought on by the humanist way of thinking chal-
lenged the church and ultimately got the person
who was questioning the church excommuni-
cated. These thoughts crazily went against what
everyone was thinking only about two hundred
years ago. Before the Reformation and the bloom
of the Renaissance, many people seemed to follow
exactly what the church said blindly, and lived in
fear of going to hell. In the early 1500’s Martin Lu-
ther was stirring up chaos in the church by nailing
his ninety-five theses to the church wall. As Frey
states, “Luther nailed his list of 95 arguments,
called the Ninety-five Theses, to a church door in
Wittenberg. Church leaders condemned the ideas
in this document” (352). Many other people like
Luther wanted to stand up for what they believed
should have changed in the church. One person
like Martin Luther was Jan Hus. Unlike Luther,
Jan Hus was charged with heresy for his ideas.
And one year after the charge of heresy, Hus was
burned at the stake.
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Timothy Koen Thursday, June 5, 2014 9:15:11 AM Pacific Daylight Time 70:56:81:af:cd:55
If and when people challenge the Koll Islands’
beliefs, values, or government, the way that any
political/religious figure reacts is dependent upon
the relativity of the argument, the popularity of it,
and finally how much it affects the target. If the
consequences for the civilization are very little,
our government or religious figure will simply ig-
nore the problem. Whence the problem’s results
are relatively inconsequential, and the following
is substantial, the figure will acknowledge the ar-
gument, and then simply refute it. If the idea af-
fects many people, and has an amazingly substan-
tial following, the figure will personally go to the
questioner and have a formal debate with the
leader. This set of strategies will significantly help
the Koll Islands’ civilization be successful by en-
suring that no one idea is offended or completely
shutdown. However, in history there have been
many examples of scientifically revolutionaries be-
ing primarily considered as insane. One example
is of the Wright brothers. While at first they were
laughed at, they were ultimately respected and
honored. This strategy would not anger anyone,
and thus be an amazing strategy, and be able to
suppress the dangerous ideas brought on by possi-
ble revolutionaries.
If the Koll Islands society were able to invite
one person of choice from the Renaissance, the
people would invite William Shakespeare, the
amazing English poet and playwright. William
Shakespeare would contribute greatly to the thriv-
ing civilization of the Koll Islands. With Shake-
speare’s immensely creative vocabulary would cre-
ate ease in everyday activities. William would in-
troduce amazing plays and stories for the more ar-
tistic side of the Koll Islands culture. As Frey
states, “Many common sayings come from Shake-
speare, such as ‘Love is blind’ and ‘All’s well that
ends well’” (342). This quote shows that not only
would Shakespeare bring a great cultural experi-
ence, yet also much ease in the everyday English
language.

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Timothy Koen Thursday, June 5, 2014 9:15:11 AM Pacific Daylight Time 70:56:81:af:cd:55
Bibliography:
Frey, Wendy. History Alive!: The Ancient World. Palo
Alto, CA: Teachers' Curriculum Institute, 2011. Print.
Frey, Wendy. History Alive!: The Medieval World And
Beyond. Palo Alto, CA: Teachers' Curriculum Institute,
2011. Print.
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BIBLIOGRAPHY
Timothy Koen Thursday, June 5, 2014 9:15:11 AM Pacific Daylight Time 70:56:81:af:cd:55