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22 56
LES STROUD
Take a peek behind the
scenes of Survivorman.
By Barri Segal
COVER
28
78
ASG_1310_TOC 9/20/13 4:58 AM Page 4
5
14 INTRODUCTION
16 CHILL AND GRILL
Turn to the grill if the grid goes down!
By Torrey Kim
18 REAL WORLD SOLUTIONS
Seven key items you’ll need for the next big
power failure. By Steve Maxwell
30 ROAM FREELY
The EarthRoamer Xpedition paves the way into
the backcountry. By Torrey Kim
32 INTRODUCTION
34 FREEZING FORESIGHT
Use these tips to survive bitter temperatures.
By Tony Nester
42 CABIN FEVER
Been inside too long? Here are some quick
remedies. By Amber Erickson Gabbey
50 RUNNING HOT AND COLD
Learn how to withstand dehydration and
hypothermia. By Garrett Kim
61 INTRODUCTION
64 SPECIAL REPORT: BACKCOUNTRY
COMMUNICATIONS
A Call For Help: What to do in dire situations.
By Larry Schwartz
70 EAT TO LIVE
Finding food when bugging out. By Larry
Schwartz
74 SAVED BY THE BOW
Snowshoe hares: a valuable resource for winter
survival. By Peter Schoonmaker
84 INTRODUCTION
86 MAP QUEST
Four maps that can help you navigate in an
emergency. By Ted Florence
90 EARTH SAVERS
Start your own urban composting project.
By Kristin Webb-Hollering
94 THE LONG WAY HOME
A get-home plan is an essential aspect
of survival. By Abe Elias
110 INTRODUCTION
112 GOT YOUR GOAT?
Raising goats can help you go the distance for
long-term survival. By Kristin Webb-Hollering
116 GET TO THE ROOT OF IT
A root cellar is a great way to extend the life of
your produce. By Torrey Kim
GENERAL
PREPAREDNESS
WINTER
PREPAREDNESS
WILDERNESS
PREPAREDNESS
URBAN
PREPAREDNESS
HOMESTEADING
PREPAREDNESS
FEATURES
BUYER’S GUIDES
120 102
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22 FOOD AND WATER
56 WINTER JACKETS
78 BOWS AND GEAR
102 BUG-OUT BAGS
120 GUNS
THE COVER
Photographer: Laura Bombier
Model: Les Stroud
Designer: Jesse Cao
COLUMNS
6 FIRST WORDS
8 NEWS, NOTES
12 NEW PRODUCTS
127 PREPPING WITH RALSTON
130 CLOSING WORDS
ISSUE 7 | WINTER 2013
112
18
ASG_1310_TOC 9/20/13 4:58 AM Page 5
6
FIRST WORDS
ISSUE 7 / WINTER 2013
EDITORIAL
Group Editor: Doug Jeffrey
Editor: Barri Segal
Managing Editor: Jolene Nolte
Art Director: Jesse Cao
CONTRIBUTORS
Abe Elias, Amber Erickson Gabbey, Erin Hatfield, Garrett
Kim, Torrey Kim, Steve Maxwell, Thomas J. Nardi, Tony
Nester, Peter Schoonmaker, Larry Schwartz, Kristin
Webb-Hollering
ADVERTISING
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DIRECT MARKETING GROUP
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LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material from
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responsibility by Beckett Media, LLC as to the legality,
completeness or technical accuracy.
BY BARRI SEGAL
MY WINTER ATTITUDE
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“I don’t care if
you’re a global
warming realist
or a climate
alarmist, but a
survivalist
doesn’t count on
the weather.”
THIS JUST IN: THE WEATHER’S SCREWY. It was hotter and colder this summer
in Southern California than most on record. My daughter joked about taking
hockey lessons instead of tennis and my poor poodle was shivering on Bastille Day.
I’m a Philly girl, and when I grew up, seasons made almost poetic sense. Spring
meant warmth, birth and beginnings. Summer was hot, living outside and soaking it
up in something skimpy. Shorter, colder days heralded autumn’s harvest and win-
ter’s cold cleared the slate so that by spring we could rise again like zombies and
do it all again.
Good luck with that these days. According to the State of the Climate Report,
released by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), we had historic summer
lows in much of the country, yet 2013 was the sixth hottest year on record. All I
know is my dog’s winter coat is already growing back and he’s sweating like a pig.
I don’t care if you’re a global warming realist or a climate alarmist, but a sur-
vivalist doesn’t count on the weather.
Hot or cold, the American winter experience is a time to review, remember
and evaluate, alone and with others. Look at your accomplishments and concerns.
Consider your future. Appreciate all you have, all you do to protect that and how
worthwhile it is to be prepared. From simple first aid to earthquake evacuation,
emergency supplies for the home and vehicles, generators, extra blankets, water
and food stockpiles, evacuation kits… look at what you do and why.
The world is not getting any friendlier, but sometimes the harshest weather is
in your mind.
ASG_1310_EDIT.CX 9/26/13 1:24 AM Page 6
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ASG_1310_7 9/20/13 3:53 AM Page 7
8
READING LIST
A Must-Have Book to Add
to Your Collection
WHEN YOU THINK about dehydrated foods,
you’re probably picturing beef jerky or sun-dried
tomatoes—which are both delicious and well-
preserved. But the world of dehydrated foods
expands far beyond those treats to include
everything from desserts to pet snacks. You’ll
discover this widespread world, along with tips
on how to achieve dehydration bliss, with The
Complete Idiot’s Guide to Dehydrating Foods by
Jeannette Hurt.
The book came out earlier this year and is
therefore fully up-to-date on the latest technolo-
gies for food dehydration success. For survival-
ists, a few of the main benefits outlined in the
book include the fact that you can stock your
pantry with foods that don’t spoil quickly, and
you can use every last cherry or celery stalk that
you painstakingly grew in your garden when you
preserve them before they spoil. This leads to
zero waste as well as a bounty of delicious and
healthy meals for you all winter long when your
garden is out of commission.
The book goes into great detail about the dif-
ferent methods of dehydration, reminding you
that you don’t necessarily need a fancy com-
mercial dehydrator.
Sun-drying, room-drying, and microwave-
drying are all feasible methods that can help you
achieve your goals.
After you perfect your dehydrating technique,
the book offers myriad tips on how to store your
freshly-dried foods so they will remain safe to
eat and delicious for the long haul. And with
recipes for everything from Dehydrated Cottage
Cheese to Madagascar Vanilla Brownies, your
dehydrating hobby will make everyone in the
house happy.
The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Dehydrating
Foods is published by ALPHA Press and is avail-
able at booksellers nationwide as well as on
Amazon.com.
REAL LIFE
How a Stranded Teen Survived
WE ALL THINK WE HAVE the survival spirit and would immediately know how to handle
being stranded in the wilderness—but in reality, many people tend to panic.
That wasn’t the case for a teen whose dinghy capsized in bad weather in August. After
finding himself washed up on an abandoned island in New Zealand, the teen realized that
his lighter and phone—both of which could have been life-saving—had washed away when
his boat capsized.
To stay alive in the absence of his emergency tools, Tainui Hale curled up in a ball under
an old tree and made small cups out of kawakawa leaves. He sat them
in the open so they could collect rain, and he lived off the
rainwater for nearly three days until a group of fisher-
men flew overhead on a helicopter and happened to
see him. The subsequent helicopter rescue was
just in time, as the teen was showing the first
signs of hypothermia.
“What would Bear Grylls do?” Hale said to
Aukland’s 3News after the rescue, when asked
about making cups out of leaves.
“Maybe he could take a leaf out of my book
for a change!”
PHOTO BY THINKSTOCK
“Sun-drying, room-drying,
and microwave-drying
are all feasible methods
that can help you
achieve your goals.”
P
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STORING
RAINWATER
In a non-emergency situation, a
popular way to store rainwater is in
barrels. A good choice is food-grade,
55-gallon models, which typically costs
less than $10. You can find these
online in any garden store as well as
at home improvement stores
everywhere.
ASG_1310_NEWS 9/20/13 5:09 AM Page 8
9
HOT OFF THE PRESS
A New Book that Covers It All!
DUE OUT in November,
2013: The Prepper’s Work-
book: Checklists, Work-
sheets, and Home Projects
to Protect Your Family
from Any Disaster.
This is a comprehen-
sive, step-by-step work-
book of checklists and
DIY projects that prepare
home and family for any life-threatening catastrophe,
by Scott B. Williams and Scott Finazzo.
Williams and Finazzo cover it all: hurricane, earth-
quake, pandemic, terror attack, solar flare, riot or civil
unrest. They tell how to plan, prepare and survive any
disaster in a format that allows readers to breakdown
each aspect of prepping into simple, manageable steps
that won’t consume excessive free time or money.
Topics include evaluating and building food stores,
personal and home security, preparing vehicles for an
evacuation and acquiring medical supplies to treat
injuries and illness in the absence of outside help.
PHOTO BY THINKSTOCK
WATER WRECKAGE
Stay Safe During a Flood
YOU MAY THINK of flooding as an inconvenient byproduct of “bigger” weather-
related calamities, including tornadoes and hurricanes—but the reality is that flood-
ing causes more damage in the U.S. than any other severe weather-related event.
In fact, that total rings up to an average of $5 billion per year, the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) says.
If you hear a flood warning on your radio or television, you can break down the
potential severity by following these three levels that the NOAA created:
Minor flooding: Minimal or no property damage expected, but some public threat
or inconvenience could take place.
Moderate flooding: Some structures and roads near streams will be inundated,
and some people will be evacuated to higher elevations.
Major flooding: Extensive inundation of structures and roads is expected, with
significant evacuations of people and/or property transfer to higher elevations.
Floods typically occur when prolonged rainfall or an ice or debris jam causes a
river or stream to overflow and flood the surrounding area, the NOAA explains. Flash
floods, on the other hand, occur within six hours of a rain event or a dam/levee fail-
ure, and they can catch people off-guard and unprepared. If you live in an area
prone to flash floods, create a plan ahead of time to ensure you’ll be able to evacu-
ate to higher ground quickly and safely.
Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/floodsafety/floodsafe.shtml
“If you live in an area prone to
flash floods, create a plan
ahead of time to ensure you’ll be
able to evacuate to higher
ground quickly and safely.”
ASG_1310_NEWS 9/20/13 5:09 AM Page 9
ASG_1310_10 9/20/13 3:54 AM Page 10
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NEW PRODUCTS
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MSRP: $71
Specifications:
• Overall Length: 16.5 inches
• Blade Length: 10.5 inches
• Blade Thickness: 1/8 inch
• Blade Steel: Carbon steel blade hardened to Rockwell
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• Blade Finish: Black powder coating
• Handle: 6-inch ash hardwood, nylon wrist strap
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• Weight: 23 ounces
Defining Features:
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Manufacturer’s comment: “It was just a backwoods
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• Fish Hooks: Two #8 offset Eagle Claw
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• Cable Ties: Two four-inch, rated at 18 pounds
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• Glow Light: Glows up to 12 hours (179
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Defining Features:
The Adventure Bracelet is the survival toolbox you wear.
Packaged with at least 16 different components, it gives
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Particular components of the Adventure Bracelet are
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Manufacturer’s comment: “This is the most complete
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13
3. NITRO-PAK
PRODUCT: AQUAPOD KIT
WEBSITE: www.nitro-pak.com
MSRP: $24
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• Dimensions: 40 x 80 inches
• Capacity: 65–100 gallons of water, depending on
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• Storage Lifespan: Eight weeks (single use only)
Defining Features:
The AquaPod Kit is a convenient, safe way to store a
lot of water for an emergency. The plastic bladder fits
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disposable liners, a siphon pump and lock. Filter not
included. The kit permits storing 14 days’ worth of
water for a family of four. The kit shelf-life is up to ten
years depending upon storage. Made in America.
Manufacturer’s comment: “This is what you use
when a flood or hurricane is anticipated. Depending
on humidity and temperature, this kit will keep an
individual with fresh water for up to eight weeks.”
—Aaron Curley, IT Manager
4. SURVIVAL BAGS, INC.
PRODUCT: WYVERN AXE
WEBSITE: www.survivalbagsinc.com
MSRP: $225
Specifications:
• Overall length: 18.9 inches
• Blade Material: 5160 Steel
• Handle: Micarta
• Blade Finish: Black Texture Epoxy Powder Coat
• Sheath: Spec Plus Leather Cordura
Defining Features:
The Wyvern Axe was developed in conjunction with
U.S. Military special operators to serve as a “crash
axe” and breaching tool for military, first responders
and civilians. Because of the shape of the breaching
claw, the axe is named after the dragon-headed
creature of mythology. Featuring a multi-surface
breaching pick and breaching claw, the Wyvern Axe
is a tool for most situations.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “If you are ever in a jam,
this hand tool could be the difference between life
and death.” —Mike Haller, President
5. MAJOR SURPLUS
PRODUCT: FIRST AID KIT IN A CAN
WEBSITE: www.majorsurplus.com
MSRP: $35
Specifications:
• One #10 Can with resealable plastic lid
• One Can Opener
• Five Sterile Sponges, 4 x 4 inches
• Two Bandage Gauzes, 4 inches x 4 1/2 yards
• Five Bandage Strips, 3 x 3/4 inches
• One Triangular Bandage
• Five Butterfly Closure Strips
• Five Burn Cream/First Aid Packages
• One Abdominal Pad, 5 x 9 inches
• Five Alcohol Prep Pads
• One Stainless Steel Tweezers
• One EMT Shears, 5 1/2 inches
• Two Pair Nitrile Gloves
• Five Non-Aspirin Pain Relievers
• Five Povidone, Iodine Prep Pad
• Five Triple Antibiotic Ointment
• One Combi Pads, 7 1/2 x 8 inches
• Four Roller Gauze, non-sterile
• Dimensions: 7 inches in height x 6 1/2 inches
diameter
• Weight: 1.32 pounds
Defining Features:
First Aid Kit In A Can includes necessary items to
help you treat minor cuts, scrapes and sprains.
Easy to store, airtight and waterproof, it is ready
when you need it. It comes with a simple can
opener and resealable plastic lid. Made in America.
Manufacturer’s comment: “First Aid Kit In A Can
comes with all the things you will need to help you
treat injuries and more, all easy to access.”
—Jared Clarke, Director, Sales and Marketing
3
4
5
CAN'T GET ENOUGH ASG? WHEN YOU'RE NOT OFF
THE GRID, BE SURE TO FIND US ON FACEBOOK.
ASG_1310_PRODUCTS 9/20/13 5:13 AM Page 13
14
ALL PREPPERS KNOW that being prepared
is a key to survival. So, what happens if the
grid goes down and you need to use a
power tool or cook a meal? What if you’re
lost and need to be rescued? These ques-
tions—and more—are answered right here,
so pay attention and make sure that you’re
onboard with the latest and greatest tips
and tricks to keep you safe and alive if you
need to bug out!
P
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ASG_1310_GENERAL 9/20/13 5:16 AM Page 14
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ASG_1310_15 9/20/13 3:58 AM Page 15
16
HETHER YOU’VE BEEN HIT BY A
STORM, SUFFERED A RANDOM POWER
OUTAGE, OR YOU’VE RECENTLY
DECIDED TO LIVE COMPLETELY OFF
THE GRID, ONE OF YOUR MAIN CON-
CERNS IS HOW YOU’LL COOK YOUR MEALS UNTIL
YOU’VE GOT POWER ONCE MORE.
But even if you don’t have any burgers or dogs in the refrig-
erator, you can still make a square meal on your outdoor grill.
ALL INGREDIENTS ARE FAIR GAME
Many of us feel adventurous when we toss some corn or a
slice of eggplant on the grill, but the reality is that the world is
your oyster—or your brownies or rice—when you’ve got a grill.
“If you’re inventive, you can cook anything you want as long
as it will fit inside the grill,” says Derrick Riches, About.com’s
guide to Barbecue and Grilling.
Don’t Panic when the
power goes out:
you can make just about
anything on your grill
W
Chill
AND
Grill
By Torrey Kim | PHOTOS COURTESY OF THINKSTOCK
SAFETY FIRST
Just because you’re cooking your meal outside doesn’t mean you
should abandon your food safety routines. Follow these tips from the U.S.
Department of Agriculture (USDA) to ensure that you stay safe while eat-
ing from the grill:
• Keep hands, utensils and surfaces clean.
• Bring separate plates and cutting boards for raw and cooked foods so
that juices from raw meat don’t contaminate meat that you plan to eat.
• Use a food thermometer to make sure foods are cooked to a safe inter-
nal temperature.
• Don’t let food sit out for more than an hour in hot weather.
• Never use an outdoor grill inside your house or garage, because the
carbon monoxide it produces could kill you.
When making bread on
the grill, be sure not to
have the temperature
too high or the outside
will burn while the
inside remains doughy.
ASG_1310_GRILL 9/20/13 5:18 AM Page 16
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Therefore, if you have no power, you
can select any ingredients you want to
cook and prep them for grilling. First,
however, you must choose the best
cookware that will most effectively
prepare your meal for grilling.
“Any type of pot that’s oven-safe will
work on the grill,” Riches tells American
Survival Guide. “With most of your stove-
top cookware, the plastic handles won’t
take the heat and you can just melt the
rivets right out of them. Therefore, oven-
safe is key.”
If you have camping pots and pans,
you should dig those out of the garage
and bring them grillside. If not, get your
cookie sheets, stoneware, cast iron pans,
Dutch ovens, and other oven-safe pots
and pans to make your meal.
FOLLOW YOUR RECIPES
You can typically make your meal
according to your standard recipe when
grilling, but the one thing that requires
your close attention is the grill tempera-
ture. Unlike when you’re barbecuing ribs,
a grill will need to remain a very constant
temperature if you’re cooking items like
cupcakes or a roast beef on the grill.
“This is where it gets tricky, because
many grills have a thermometer on the
hood, but that doesn’t tend to be terribly
accurate,” Riches says. “I’d recommend
that you pick up an oven thermometer.
They are relatively cheap, and you can
put yours right on the cooking grate and
use that to gauge your temperature.”
What’s key when you’re reading your
temperature gauge is to put the food
where the gauge is.
“Your indoor oven works by convec-
tion and maintains a standard tempera-
ture from top to bottom,” Riches says.
“But a grill could be 50 degrees different
in the spot where the gauge is versus the
other side of the grill, and that may be
where you want to put your food. So put
the gauge very close to where you’ll be
cooking, particularly if you plan to do
some baking.”
IN CONCLUSION
Although this may not be everyone’s
go-to during an emergency, you should
definitely keep it in mind. When the
power goes down, just chill—and use the
grill!
FOR MORE INFO
To get more great grilling tips, recipes, and gear recommendations, visit bbq.about.com,
where Derrick Riches doles out new expert advice each week.
KEY
ESSENTIALS
• Oven-safe pots and
pans (no plastic
handles!)
• Cookie sheets
• Stoneware
• Oven thermometer
“If you’re inventive, you can cook anything you
want as long as it will fit inside the grill.”
–Derrick Riches, About.com’s guide to Barbecue and Grilling.
Tortillas are one of the
easiest things to make
on an outdoor grill.
People have been
preparing soup over an
open fire for hundreds
of years.
Preparing pizza on the grill
is easier than you think.
The key is to keep a close
eye on the meal because it
cooks very quickly.
GRILLED
SOUP?
Soup is another
meal that cooks well
on the grill, but how
you prepare it will
depend on whether
you’re making soup
from scratch or from
a can.
“For soup inside
a grill, I’d recom-
mend a Dutch oven,
cast iron pot, or
something along
those lines,” Riches
advises. “If you’re
making soup from
scratch, I grill the
ingredients I’m
putting in my soup
first, and then put
those into the soup
pot to give my soup
the smoky flavor.
But if you’re just
opening a can of
soup and putting it
on the grill, it will
come out pretty
much just like if you
cooked it in a pot.”
ASG_1310_GRILL.CX 9/24/13 10:57 PM Page 17
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“Even a little
bit of power is
a wonderful
thing when the
grid goes down.”
ASG_1310_TOOLS 9/20/13 5:23 AM Page 18
19
HINK ABOUT IT: IF THE GRID GOES DOWN, ALL
THOSE GREAT POWER TOOLS YOU OWN WILL
BE WORTH NOTHING. HOW DO YOU FIX SOME-
THING? HOW DO YOU BUILD SOMETHING?
The power goes down all the time on the rural island
where I’ve lived for the last 25 years—sometimes for days at a time.
This reality has forced me to come up with real-world solutions for
self-reliance that include these top picks for power failure gear.
1. CLEAN POWER GENERATOR
Even a little bit of power is a wonderful thing
when the grid goes down.
This is especially true for the millions of
us who rely on wells for water.
Without a generator, no power can
mean no drinking water, no flush
toilets and no cooking.
The hidden danger is that most
generators can cause damage to
the kind of sensitive electronics that
are part of a lot of items these days.
Regular generators are fine for
fridges and freezers and water pumps,
but they’ll fry computers, cell phone
chargers, the electronic controls on
appliances and even some cordless tool
battery chargers. That’s why not just
any generator will do if you really want
to prepare yourself for long-term self-
reliance when the grid goes down. The
most versatile portable generators
offer tri-fuel capabilities, able to run on
gasoline, natural gas or propane—
whichever is available.
TEXT AND PHOTOS BY STEVE MAXWELL
T
REAL WORLD
SOLUTIONS
THE
ESSENTIALS
• Clean power generator
• Chainsaw
• Headlamp
• 18-volt impact driver
• Cordless drill
• Hand-held circular saw
• Utility knife and blades
seven essential ITEMS for surviving the next big power failure
“Without a
generator,
no power
can mean
no drinking
water, no
flush toilets
and no
cooking.”
ASG_1310_TOOLS 9/20/13 5:23 AM Page 19
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2. CHAINSAW
Grid failure often happens when bad
weather wrecks your neighborhood, and
if trees grow where you live, they’ll be
down and blocking road travel. Without
a chainsaw at times like these, you’ll be
completely immobile after a big storm,
unable to travel,
unable to help oth-
ers and unable to
be helped by emer-
gency crews.
A chainsaw with
a sharp chain and a
supply of fresh,
mixed gas and chain
oil is nothing short
of freedom at times
like these. Start up
your saw and run it
for a few minutes
every month or so,
to make sure it
runs when you
need it. And don’t
buy some cheap
consumer-grade
saw, either. Name
brand, pro-grade
models do cost a
little more, but they pay back many times
over in reliability and performance. I paid
top dollar for my first professional saw in
1989, and it still starts and runs as well as
the day it was new, even after cutting
more than 300 cords of firewood.
3. HEADLAMP
A good headlamp is incredibly useful
because it lets you work with your hands
in the dark. No survival-ready home
should be without one.
I use my headlamp all the time for
working outside at night, even when the
power doesn’t go out. It delivers the best
source of light for the least amount of
energy input, but there’s a big difference
in headlamp design. The best are built
around an LED bulb. These use far less
energy than standard incandescent head-
lamp bulbs, multiplying battery life by five
to 10 times. We have four headlamps at
my place, but the best include dimma-
ble light output. Dial down the illu-
mination when you don’t need as
much light to save on battery life.
And speaking of batteries,
you’ve got two options to
consider. Most headlamps
take three AAA batteries, and
while you could keep a bunch of alkalines
in stock, there’s one particular type of
rechargeable that’s better. Most recharge-
able AAA and AA batteries rely on ordi-
nary nickel metal hydride chemistry, and
these lose significant charge in storage
between uses. It’s quite likely they’ll be
dead when you need them. Sanyo’s
eneloop rechargeables are nickel metal
hydride, too, but they hold a charge in
storage as long as alkalines, and they also
last a long time between charges.
After testing every major type of
rechargeable battery on the market,
these are my favorite by a long shot.
With good rechargeables at your place
and a generator, you’ll have virtually
unlimited power for lighting and small
electronics.
4, 5, 6. CORDLESS
TOOL TRIO
An 18-volt impact driver, a cordless
drill and a handheld circular saw are all
essential building tools for general use,
but they’re also unbeatable for making
emergency repairs when floods or wind
damage happen along with grid
failure. Today’s best cordless tools use
lithium-ion batteries, which are far better
than older tools that take nickel cadmium
battery packs. Besides delivering more
work per charge, lithium-ion batteries
hold a charge for months in storage,
unlike nickel cadmium, which are often
nearly dead when you first grab them off
the shelf.
7. UTILITY KNIFE AND
BLADES
This sounds simple, but don’t be
fooled. A good utility knife is an incredi-
bly useful thing when life is reduced to
basic realities. The best utility knives
these days have flip-style blades that fold
up small and are locked so the knife can
SOLUTIONS

KNIFE
KNOW HOW
Choose a flip-style
utility knife that folds up
to fit in your pocket and
opens in one smooth
motion.
GENERATOR BASICS
Tri-fuel capabilities are key for a
generator; it should be able to run on
gasoline, natural gas or propane.
“A good headlamp is
incredibly useful
because it lets you
work with your hands
in the dark. No survival-
ready home should be
without one.”
ASG_1310_TOOLS 9/20/13 5:23 AM Page 20
21

safely sit in your pocket. Whip it out,
press the lock release, flip the handle,
and the blade folds out and locks open in
one smooth motion.
My current favorite is Milwaukee’s
Fastback flip knife, but don’t just take my
word for it. There’s a reason you’ll find
glowing online reviews for this tool
everywhere. The latest version of this
knife offers on-board blade storage,
which fixes the only weakness of the ini-
tial version.
THE TAKEAWAY
There’s a lot more to preparing for
grid failure than just these five pieces of
gear, but after dealing regularly with
power failures over the last 25 years of
rural, self-reliant living, I know these top
picks will serve you well.
Steve Maxwell is survival-minded, self-reliant Canadian
who lives with his wife and family in a stone house they
built themselves on an island. They never have to worry
about the frequent blackouts that happen in their quiet
corner of the world.
BATTERY SENSE
Rechargeable batteries are
great, but they are not all cre-
ated equal. Make sure you get
ones that are reliable, like
Sanyo’s eneloop models.
Make sure you opt for
lithium-ion batteries instead of
nickel cadmium battery packs
for cordless tools.
Sources:
Sanyo’s eneloop batteries:
www.us.sanyo.com
Milwaukee’s Fastback flip knife:
www.milwaukeetool.com
ASG_1310_TOOLS 9/20/13 5:23 AM Page 21
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F
O
O
D
&
W
A
T
E
R
Food and water
on the go
WHEN DISASTER STRIKES—whether natural or manmade—
securing safe shelter should be the top priority. For many
people, the next focus is securing food and water. A good
rule of thumb is to keep 72 hours’ worth of supplies on hand,
as it often takes that long before utilities and emergency
crews can restore services.
Maintaining a stockpile of these goods can be a daunting
undertaking, especially when considering the shelf life of food
and water and the cooking conditions you can face during an
emergency situation.
There are a number of options for long shelf life food and
water, many of which don’t require any prep time. Added
bonus: the following products are also suitable to include in
your survival kit or bug-out bag.
Starting at $12.95, Portable rations and
products for emergency situations
BY ERIN HATFIELD
1
$59.99
MOUNTAIN HOUSE
2
$17.99
THE SAUSAGE MAKER, INC.
ASG_1310_BG_FOOD 9/20/13 5:29 AM Page 22
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buyer’s
Guide FOOD WATER
MOUNTAIN HOUSE
Model: Just in Case… 72-Hour Kit
www.mountainhouse.com
MSRP: $59.99
Key Features: One-person kit; three meals per day
Description: The Just in Case 72-hour Kit contains a
three-day supply of three complete meals per day for a
single person. It features Mountain House’s own freeze-
dried foods consisting of a variety of breakfast, lunch
and dinner entrees such as scrambled eggs with bacon,
beef stroganoff with noodles and pasta primavera. Care-
fully stored, Mountain House pouches taste best if they
are consumed within 10 years of manufacture.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “What sets our kit apart from
others is truly the shelf life of our food. They will not only
be safe to eat, but tasty for years—if not decades—after
the official ‘shelf life,’ although you may notice a slight
change in flavor or texture. We’ve personally sampled 30-
year old pouches and 40-year old cans and found them to
be quite good.”
—MOLLY ISHKANIAN, PR SPOKESPERSON WITH MOUNTAIN HOUSE
1
THE SAUSAGE MAKER, INC.
Model: Jerky Assortment Kit
www.sausagemaker.com
MSRP: $17.99
Key Features: Two-person kit, two-serving meals to share
Description: The perfect choice for anyone making jerky for
the first time or for an experienced jerky-maker who likes
variety, this seasoning assortment kit gives you enough
seasoning to make five pounds of each of our five favorite jerky
flavors. Also includes enough Insta Cure No. 1 to prepare 25
pounds of jerky.
Kit contains:   Uncle Abe’s Jerky Seasoning,  Cajun Jerky
Seasoning, Barbeque Jerky Seasoning, Mesquite Jerky Sea-
soning, Teriyaki Jerky Seasoning   and Insta Cure No. 1.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “From one kit, you can make 25
pounds of jerky. That’s a lot of value for the money.”
MAJOR SURPLUS & SURVIVAL
Model: Retort Emergency Water
www.majorsurplus.com
MSRP: $12.95
Key Features: Long-lasting, easy-to-carry, five-year shelf life
Description: Major Surplus & Survival’s Retort Emergency
Water kit features 100 pouches of drinkable water, making it
ideal for any emergency situation. The long-lasting, easy-to-
carry water supply is even U.S. Coast Guard approved, as it
meets the Guard’s exacting packaging requirements necessary
for survival and lifeboat use. Each tough triple layered retort
pouch holds 4.227 fluid ounces (125 mil.) of water and will
store for a minimum of five years.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “While our Retort Emergency Water
pouches will reportedly store for a minimum of five years, we
think they’ll actually store for 15-20 years.”
2
3
3
$12.95
MAJOR SURPLUS & SURVIVAL
“They will not only
be safe to eat, but
tasty for years—if
not decades—
after the official
‘shelf life’…”
ASG_1310_BG_FOOD 9/20/13 5:29 AM Page 23
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buyer’s
Guide FOOD WATER
LONG LIFE FOOD DEPOT
Model: 72 Hour MRE Emergency Supply for 1
www.longlifefood.com
MSRP: $65
Key Features: Meets Red Cross and FEMA prepared-
ness recommendations, heater pouches
Description: Long Life Food Depot’s 72-Hour MRE
Emergency Supply Kits contains at least a three-day
supply of familiar, non-perishable, ready-to-eat foods
for one person. The kit comes with a mix of nine
entrees, available with or without meat, as well as
sides, baked goods, condiments, desserts and drink
mixes. New to the kit are heater pouches to warm the
food items.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “Real food for real emer-
gencies. Contains 33 food items that are ready to eat
(entrees, sides, spreads, bakery items, desserts and
beverages), along with accessory packets full of comfort
items and flameless heater pouches for safe heating. A
great value with free and fast shipping.”
—THE FRIENDLY STAFF AT LONG LIFE FOOD DEPOT
GSI OUTDOORS
Model: Outdoors Bugaboo Backpacker Cookset
www.gsioutdoors.com
MSRP: $69.95
Key Features: Small size, contains just what you need
to feed two
Description: You may be eating dinner in the wild, but
you can still keep some of your kitchen items on hand.
This set includes two bowls, two insulated mugs, two
Sip-It lids, a two-liter pot with lid, a frypan, a pot grip-
per, a welded sink basin that doubles as a carry bag
and a stuff sack. It weighs in at just one pound 12.8
ounces and measures 8.2x5.4 inches.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “GSI Outdoors prides itself
on manufacturing top-quality products at affordable
prices. The Backpacker Cookset is just one example.”
—DON SCOTT, CO-OWNER OF GSI OUTDOORS
FOOD FOR HEALTH
Model: FSD QVC 72-Hour Food Supply Kit
www.foodforhealthinternational.com
MSRP: $99.95
Key Features: Vegetarian, requires water, up to 20-
year shelf life, two-person kit
Description: The 72-Hour Food Supply Kit is designed
to feed two adults for 72 hours. These 17 meal
pouches produce 80 servings and provide 2,350
calories per day. They are similar to military-issued
MREs, cook in eight to ten minutes with just water,
have a shelf life up to 20 years and are easily trans-
ported. Entrees include Southwest white bean chili,
Texan sunrise skillet and Nantucket potato soup, as
well as a number of side dishes and 16 milk servings.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “Emergencies happen
when you least expect them, so make sure you have a
food supply at the ready with these vegetarian dry mix
meals.”
4
5
6
5
$69.95
GSI OUTDOORS
“make sure
you have
a food
supply at
the ready
with these
vegetarian
dry mix
meals.”
6
$99.95
FOOD FOR HEALTH
ASG_1310_BG_FOOD 9/20/13 5:30 AM Page 24
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buyer’s
Guide FOOD WATER
4
$65
LONG LIFE FOOD DEPOT
“Real food for real emergencies.
Contains 33 food items that are ready to eat…”
A TIP
Be sure to sample your
emergency food options prior
to stocking up. You wouldn’t
want to be stuck with a
month’s worth of food that
you don’t like!
ASG_1310_BG_FOOD-CX-p25only 10/2/13 8:58 AM Page 25
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buyer’s
Guide FOOD WATER
HI MOUNTAIN SEASONINGS
Model: Home Sausage Making Kit
www.himtnjerky.com
MSRP: $20.99
Key Features: Supply your own meat, includes everything else
Description: Whether you’ve snared a deer or you’ve simply
bought meat from the local store, you can make your own
summer sausage to round out your survival pantry, thanks to
this kit that includes everything you need. Bring it along on
your travels, and you won’t have to mess with recipe cards and
jars of seasonings because everything is packaged for you.
Add your desired cut of meat to the kit’s ingredients, and you
could be churning out up to 30 pounds of summer sausage—
surely enough to keep your family energized on the trail.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “This is the perfect way to spice
up any game you catch or meat you have onhand!”
STERIPEN
Model: Freedom
www.steripen.com
Key Features: USB-rechargeable, quickly sterilizes water
MSRP: $149.95
Key Features: USB-rechargeable, quickly sterilizes water
Description: Making your water safe to drink is one of the pri-
mary requirements of being out on the trail, since we can’t live
without H2O. The SteriPEN Freedom is a handy way to treat
your water and make it safe to drink, and it takes up very little
space in your pack. Weighing just 2.6 ounces, the Freedom can
sterilize 8,000 water treatments of 16 ounces each, and its UV
light destroys germs in 48 seconds. What we loved about it
during our test was that it includes rechargeable batteries that
you can juice using either AC power or USB charger—which is
helpful since many solar chargers accept USB cords.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “The SteriPEN provides sterilized
water when you’re off the grid so you don’t have to worry
about this essential survival item.”
8
7
7
$20.99
HI MOUNTAIN SEASONINGS
8
$149.95
STERIPEN
“The
SteriPEN
provides
sterilized
water when
you’re off
the grid”
ASG_1310_BG_FOOD 9/20/13 5:30 AM Page 26
ASG_1310_27 9/20/13 3:59 AM Page 27
28
VER BEEN DROPPED IN THE
WILDERNESS WITH NOTHING BUT
YOUR CLOTHES, A CAMERA AND
SOME EVERYDAY ITEMS?
Les Stroud certainly has, and he has not
only survived, he’s thrived.
Perhaps best known for his hit TV series
Survivorman, Stroud created, wrote, produced,
directed, served as cameraman and hosted what has
become one of the highest-rated shows in the
history of OLN Canada, the Science Channel US and
Discovery Channel US. In addition, he has written
numerous books on the subject of survival and
serves as an advanced survival trainer for the
Canadian Elite Military.
We talked to Stroud to find out more about his
background, and let’s just say we weren’t exactly
surprised. He’s done it all survivor-wise, and he’s
still here to tell about it.
THE SHOW
In the show, Stroud was placed in a number of
different survival situations, equipped with only his
clothes, camera equipment, his harmonica, a multi-
tool and some “everyday items” relevant to the
episode’s particular survival situation or locale. He
carried an emergency satellite phone for safety pur-
poses and had radio contact with his support crew.
“Often, my emergency phone didn’t work, which
left me alone. At times I was worried that my rescue
crew could become stranded with me, but things
always worked out for the best,” Stroud told us.
“The main challenges in each episode were find-
ing food, water and things to make fire and shelter,”
said Stroud.
Stroud talked more about life on the show:
“It’s the craziest thing. Every year hunters and
anglers head out into the great outdoors without
carrying so much as a pack of matches on them. Yet
I have always stressed that, depending on the cir-
cumstances, above all, give me a no-fail way to get a
fire going, and I can make it through most survival
ordeals unscathed. Being caught without matches or
a lighter in the wilderness is a serious mistake. Try-
ing to make fire without them is nearly impossible,
no matter how cool I make it look on Survivorman.”
LES IS MORE
BY BARRI SEGAL | PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAURA BOMBIER
E
STROUD KIT
ESSENTIALS
We asked Stroud what his
top essentials for surviving are,
and he didn’t hesitate. He
named water, food, shelter and
communication without batting
an eye. He stressed that once
you have these in place, you
can deal with other emergency
situations much more easily.
He recommends keeping an
emergency kit both in your
house and your car containing
the following must-haves: a
week’s worth of water, a flash-
light, a radio for contact,
matches, rope, a cutting tool
and a first aid kit.
Stroud encourages everyone
to customize their own kit to fit
their individual needs.
START A FIRE
IN A FLASH
Stroud cautions that this can
be dangerous, so you should do
this only in an extreme emer-
gency and be very careful.
• Take your flashlight (Mag lite
or any other type of tube
flashlight) and gently remove
the bulb and lightly tap the
glass until it breaks. Be care-
ful not to break the filament
inside.
• Now you have a bulb with an
exposed filament.
• Put the flashlight back
together, broken bulb and all.
• Put a little cotton ball on and
around the filament.
• Turn the flashlight on, and
you will have one shot at the
cotton igniting.
• Transfer to your ready-to-go
tinder bundle on fine, dead
and dry material.
C
O
V
E
R

S
T
O
R
Y
AN INSIDE LOOK AT LES STROUD’S
ASG_1310_COVERSTORY 9/20/13 5:34 AM Page 28
29
“To me, fire is one of the most pro-
found advantages you can have in a sur-
vival situation. You can get warm. You
can cook your food. You can boil your
water. And most important; it keeps
away the boogieman. But how do you
make it without a lighter, matches or any
other kind of fire starter? Well, there’s
rubbing two sticks together. A perennial
favorite of the Boy Scouts everywhere,
the fire bow, hand drill and fire plow
remain some of the most difficult meth-
ods to learn. But hunters carry a few
items with them that can be manipulated
to make a life-saving fire.”
TRAINING
Stroud trained with David Arama,
nicknamed “The Survivorguy” and John
“Prairie Wolf” McPherson, an expert on
primitive living and author of three books
on the subject. Once he got the hang of
things, Stroud continued to grow and
develop his survival skills, becoming one
of the best-known figures in the field.
“These guys really jumpstarted my
lifelong interest in the field, and I learned
a lot from them,” reports Stroud.
In 2006, Stroud and his family built an
off-the-grid house, about which he pro-
duced a 90-minute documentary called
Off the Grid with Les Stroud. It chronicled
his journey as he bought property, refit-
ted a farm house with solar and wind
power and made other adaptations for
this style of living.
“I figured if I was going to write about
it and make TV shows about it, I should
live the lifestyle,” Stroud told us.
JUST THE BEGINNING
Stroud is dedicated to the movement
and revered by his peers. Expect to see a
lot more from him while he continues to
survive and thrive in whatever situation
he’s thrown into, because he plans to
keep on goin’ for years to come.
“To me, fire
is one of
the most
profound
advantages
you can
have in a
survival
situation.”
FUN FACT
Stroud is also a celebrated musician
and songwriter, and has shared the stage
with big names including Robbie Krieger,
Blues Traveler, Tesla, Alice Cooper, Steven
Stills, Tommy Shaw, Jacob Dylan, Randy
Bachman, Chicago and The Roots. He wrote
all the theme songs for his TV shows and
has recorded a number of CDs. His har-
monica-playing style ranges from
art-folk-roots rock to contem-
porary art rock.
ASG_1310_COVERSTORY 9/20/13 5:34 AM Page 29
30
OW FAR CAN YOU TRAVEL ON 90 GALLONS OF GAS?
THAT’S A KEY QUESTION IF YOU’RE BUGGING OUT OR
TRYING TO SURVIVE IN THE WILDERNESS!
In the EarthRoamer Xpedition vehicle, you could get more than
1,000 miles from home before you have to fill up your tank.
With another 90 gallons of water and solar panels on board, you’ll be self-
sufficient in all of your travels, whether you stay on the road or you decide to
pave your own trail.
Two main features separate the EarthRoamer from the other RVs you’ve
seen traveling the roads, says EarthRoamer’s president and CEO, Bill Swails.
“When I originally designed it, I wanted a vehicle that had the off-road
capability to get to very remote places such as four-wheel drive trails and
places that typical RVs just aren’t designed to go,” he says. “Secondly, once you
get to those remote locations, I wanted it to be a totally standalone vehicle—
shelter, cooking and bathroom would all be built-in without the need for
hookups.”
Whereas a traditional RV needs power, water and sewer hookups, the
EarthRoamer is designed to visit remote locations using its standalone solar
power and high capacity water and fuel tanks.
ROAM FREELY
BY TORREY KIM | PHOTOS COURTESY OF EARTHROAMER
H
This self-sustaining off-roader can allow you to make
your way into the backcountry indefinitely
“Every EarthRoamer is
built for the user.”
— EarthRoamer president and CEO,
Bill Swails
ASG_1310_EARTHROAMER 9/20/13 5:36 AM Page 30
31
“The biggest factor of how long
you can be out in the EarthRoamer
is how long you can make that 90
gallons of water last,” Swails says.
“If someone takes a long shower,
they could pump out 90 gallons all at
once, but most survivalists are able
to go a week or two—or longer
with the 90-gallon tank.”
“We have one customer who
likes to go to Baja and camp on the
beach,” Swails says. “He gets plenty
to eat from fishing, so we created a
vehicle that pumps water in from
the ocean, has a special unit that’s
powered by the solar panels that
takes salt out of the water and
makes fresh water for him, so he
can stay in the vehicle indefinitely
since it’s parked and doesn’t
require more gas.”
If you’re interested in finding
your way off-road in an Earth-
Roamer, you won’t just pluck
one off the shelf.
“Every EarthRoamer is built
for the user,” Swails says. “We
have several base layouts and
basic interior configurations, and
then we tailor the vehicle to meet
the needs of the individual.”
Torrey Kim is a freelance writer living in North
Carolina.
THE XV-LT
MODEL
SPECIFICS
EarthRoamer’s XV-LT model
is based on a Ford F-550
commercial duty truck chas-
sis and has seven model con-
figurations that include the
following customizable fea-
tures:
• Three Ford cabs available:
The Regular Cab, Super
Cab, and Crew Cab
• Lengths ranging from 22.6
feet to 27.5 feet
• Three EarthRoamer camper
sizes: LT, LT Stretch, and
LT Super Stretch
• With the Regular Cab, this
vehicle has a turning radius
of only 21.2 feet
• The Crew Cab has sleeping
quarters for up to four
adults
THE XV-HD
MODEL
SPECIFICS
The bigger XV-HD model of
the EarthRoamer is based on
a Ford F-650 commercial
duty truck chassis, with
sleeping quarters for up to
eight people and lengths
ranging from 19.7 feet to
more than 38.8 feet. This
model has the following pos-
sible configurations:
• A four-wheel drive Xpedi-
tion vehicle
• A fifth-wheel motor home
that can tow a heavy horse
trailer, a racecar trailer, a
boat, or other items.
• A toy hauler model that can
carry vehicles like quads,
dirt bikes, or golf carts.
• A one-piece molded com-
posite body requiring no
internal metal structure for
support, allowing it to be
highly durable and equal in
quality to a luxury aircraft.
FOR MORE INFORMATION
To get more information and to find out how you can build your own EarthRoamer, visit www.earthroamer.com.
THE
NUMBERS
[
$260,000
]
The base price for an entry-level
EarthRoamer.
[
$500,000
]
The price an EarthRoamer can
cost after customization.
DIESEL FUEL
EarthRoamer vehicles
run on turbocharged
diesel engines, and
diesel fuel is also used
for the stove’s cooking
requirements. Owners of
2011 and newer Earth-
Roamer vehicles have
reported that they’ve
achieved mileage in the
11 to 12 miles-per-gal-
lon range while on the
highway, which is typi-
cally better than most
competing RVs.
ASG_1310_EARTHROAMER 9/20/13 5:37 AM Page 31
32
WINTER IS UNFORGIVING, harsh and
downright tough to survive in for most. We
realize that it’s no cakewalk to bug out during
this time of year, so we devoted a section in
this issue to help you prepare for the bitter
months should you find yourself outdoors.
Survival expert Tony Nester provides tip
and tricks to weather winter, and we present
a nice array of jackets to protect you from
the elements. In addition, you can learn to
prevent hypothermia and dehydration, two
enemies of survivalists out in the cold. And
should you find yourself going stir-crazy
because you’re stuck inside, just read about
how to deal with cabin fever and keep your-
self occupied and mentally alert during what
can be a very stressful experience!
P
H
O
T
O

B
Y

T
H
I
N
K
S
T
O
C
K

ASG_1310_WINTERINTRO.CX 9/24/13 11:30 PM Page 32
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ASG_1310_33 9/20/13 3:59 AM Page 33
FREEZING
ASG_1310_WINTER 9/20/13 5:46 AM Page 34
F YOU’RE NOT PREPARED, WINTER CAN KILL YOU.
Make a mistake in the wilds in June and you may have a long
night ahead with a great story to tell your friends, but make the
same mistake in January, and you may lose some fingers or toes
and possibly your life.
The first rule of winter travel is to respect the season.
Read along to find out how to battle freezing temperatures
and win. I
TIPS AND TRICKS TO HELP YOU
SURVIVE HARSH WINTER WEATHER
TEXT AND PHOTOS BY TONY NESTER
P
H
O
T
O

B
Y

T
H
I
N
K
S
T
O
C
K

FORESIGHT
ASG_1310_WINTER 9/20/13 5:47 AM Page 35
36
CLOTHING
When selecting clothing, avoid
100 percent cotton at all costs due
to its poor insulating value when wet
and its inability to wick moisture
away from the body. Many hikers
who “die of exposure” in the wilds
are often wearing cotton (“cotton
kills” was coined for a reason).
Instead, select items made of
poly/cotton, nylon/cotton, fleece,
wool, or silk. Most of my clothing is
wool and was found for pennies (and
practically brand new) at second-
hand or army-surplus stores.
UPPER BODY LAYERS
For the first layer, I wear a long-
sleeved shirt of silk, merino wool or
polypropylene. For the second layer,
I don a turtleneck followed by a
wool button-up style shirt. Depend-
ing on my activity level and the out-
side temps, the remaining layers are
a heavyweight wool or fleece
sweater, followed by a parka or
down jacket. Strive for two to five
layers here. One thing I do, regardless of the season,
is to stow a spark rod firestarter in each of my jack-
ets along with a vial of cottonballs smeared with
Vaseline. Fire is life in the wilds, especially during the
brutal months of winter.
LOWER BODY LAYERS
Choose Army surplus or Filson wool pants for
one layer. For another, bring lightweight polypropy-
lene or silk long-underwear. Nylon windbreaker
pants are also helpful, but the weave of my
Army surplus wool pants is so tight
they are windproof.
SOCKS
Make sure you have one or two pairs of heavy
socks from fabrics such as Smartwool or Ragwool.
Avoid cotton or athletic “tube” socks as they don’t
wick moisture away from the skin and can cause
severe blisters.
FOOTWEAR
Take one pair of insulated boots with removable
wool liners. The most common winter pac boots
available for wet, slushy conditions are Sorel Pac-
boots. These are clunky and cumbersome but per-
FREEZING
“A sleeping bag should be an
essential component of your
survival gear during the winter,
and it can prevent you from
burning up precious calories
constructing a large shelter.”
My preferred
accouterments for
winter travel when
the temps hover in
the 20+ Fahrenheit
range and little or
no snow is present:
insulated anorak,
mittens, Thinsulate
boots, sunglasses
and wool hat.
Lighters and spark rods should be secured to your wrist when used in the cold.
Numb fingers and a loss of dexterity in the cold could cause you to drop one of
these critical tools in the deep snow.
ASG_1310_WINTER 9/20/13 5:47 AM Page 36
37
fect for those times when you are not moving around much. On
occasion when hunting, I will wear Thinsulate boots if the temps
are above freezing and the ground conditions are not wet. For
the finest cold-weather footwear available, when the tempera-
ture drops below 20 degrees, Steger Mukluks are my first
choice. These are based upon the traditional footwear of the
Polar regions and their ultralight design makes them ideal for
trekking and snowshoeing.
HEADWEAR
For serious winter, you’ll need a heavy wool or mad bomber-
style hat. For milder weather, a wool hat will suffice, but when
temps dip below zero, an insulated mad bomber hat will keep
that survival tool between your ears operational.
HANDWEAR
Heavy wool or surplus mittens are a must-have item to pro-
tect your hands while on the trail, and I rarely wear gloves
except for driving. Look online for Air Force surplus mittens
THE RULES
Remember these four rules of winter safety and sur-
vival, and you will be on your way to enjoying nature’s
most challenging season.
• Respect the season and dress for the worst possible
weather.
• Leave a travel plan.
• Always carry three firestarters in your pockets.
• Bring a quality survival kit and calorie-laden foods.
Fire-making under adverse conditions is a hallmark outdoor skill. Here,
instructor Mike Masek demonstrates how to make a platform fire in the
snow. The bundles of green pine needles were used later to demonstrate
how to create a signal fire.
ASG_1310_WINTER 9/20/13 5:47 AM Page 37
38
with removable liners as these are the best. I coat
mine with Scotchguard or silicon spray several times
during the winter.
EYEWEAR
To help prevent sunglare and snowblindness, I
prefer the type that wrap around the contours of
the face.
SLEEPING BAG WEAR
What? A sleeping bag is part of your clothing set
up? You bet. On longer dayhikes, and especially
roadtrips, I always bring a down sleeping bag. A
sleeping bag should be an essential component of
your survival gear during the winter, and it can pre-
vent you from burning up precious calories con-
structing a large shelter.
YOUR INNER WOODSTOVE
So far, we’ve looked at how to take care of the
body from the outside. Now let’s take a look at how
to keep the human engine revved.
Food intake needs to be drastically increased the
colder it gets. This is your excuse to chow down on
high-fat/high-calorie foods, which, in turn, will help
keep your internal woodstove roaring.
I have had students on winter survival courses
complain of being chilled in the middle of the night
while they slept in the 20 degrees Farenheit setting
of a Quinzee in their below zero sleeping bag. This
was due to their internal woodstove running out of
fuel and their body failing to produce adequate
metabolic heat. To help prevent this, I recommend
having some trail mix, raisins or other bite-sized
snacks next to your bedroll that you can down in
the middle of the night to stoke your body’s stove.
I remember a winter survival course in the sub-
arctic where we were sleeping in lean-tos around a
central fire at night or in para-tipis. Temps were
around -40 Fahrenheit at night while “warming up” to
-10 Fahrenheit during the day. Some nights we had
sleeping bags while others we were “fire hungry.”
Meals were provided and we kept track of our food
intake, which averaged around 9000 calories a day
FREEZING
“The first rule of winter travel is to respect the season.”
MELT IT!
For a passive
snow-melting
device, wrap a
Nalgene bottle in
black duct tape
and place it in the
sun during breaks
on the trail.
A two-person lean-to
with a central firepit. This
method is often employed
by the author during
cold-weather survival
courses. After one night,
the debris bed needs to
get replenished.
ASG_1310_WINTER 9/20/13 5:47 AM Page 38
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40
per person! Breakfast and lunch consisted of a bagel with cream
cheese, a slice of ham and a slab of butter. For dinner we had a
large one-pot dish with a block of cheese, five-pound bag of pasta,
block of butter and several rabbits, squirrels or slabs of venison.
Additionally, during breaks, we often downed the classic
hypothermia-prevention elixir, which was a cup of hot chocolate
with a teaspoon of butter. Now, all of this would seem like the
ultimate nightmare-diet to a cardiologist, but it provided the nec-
essary fuel to keep our internal woodstoves roaring given the
outside temps and our demanding daily workload.
Some other foods to consider are cheese and salami. These
should be pre-cut and sorted in Ziplocs prior to your trip as
they will be a challenge to cut in the field.
FREEZING
“Food intake needs to be
drastically increased the
colder it gets. This is your
excuse to chow down on
high-fat/high-calorie foods
which, in turn, will help
keep your internal wood-
stove roaring.”
1. When there is only a scant layer of
snow on the ground but enough tim-
ber for a lean-to, you can make a
hybrid shelter with snow boulders in
a U-formation.
2. The structure is then covered with
a Heatsheet or tarp held in place
with stakes driven through the mate-
rial and anchored in the boulders.
These will freeze in place eventually.
3. Lastly, prop up the interior using a
branch, ski pole or shovel but make
sure to place some bark, bandanna
or spare gloves between the support
and tarp to prevent a puncture.
1
2
3
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For trips where you can heat up a pot
of water over the campfire, packets of
instant soup or bouillon cubes are a great
addition. These will help you rehydrate,
replenish salts lost to sweating and warm
you up at the same time.
Last, if you want a long-lasting and
easy-to-consume food to stow in your
vehicle for the winter, buy a package of
shortbread cookies. The above are all
high-calorie, high-fat foods that will pro-
vide much needed nutrients in between
meals.
SHELTER
Let’s say you weren’t prepared or
ran into Murphy’s Law and are now
faced with enduring a night in the back-
country without a sleeping bag. Don’t
think igloo, think field-expedient shelter.
Again, life in the wilds is about conserv-
ing your precious sweat and calories, not
reality show theatrics.
What you construct will be based, in
part, on whether there is snow on the
ground. If the snow is knee-deep or
higher than a snow-trench, a Quinzee, or
snow cave, may be in order. If very little
or no snow is present, then my first
choice will always be a lean-to and fire
combination. Once more, being prepared
with a sleeping bag and the proper cloth-
ing means you may not have to build
something labor-intensive.
Lean-to construction is simple. Select
a rock-solid ridgepole as thick as your leg
and two feet longer than your height.
Lash one end to a tree at chest height.
Cover the backside with branches and
debris at a roughly 60 degree angle. This
angle prevents your shelter interior from
being too cavernous (important for heat
retention) and sheds rain well. You can’t
cover this type of shelter with enough
insulation, so pile on a two to three foot
layer of debris, and then fill the interior
with a foot of pine boughs or more
debris. The trench fire should be about
two feet away from the shelter.
I like to finish my lean-to with a fire
reflector using rocks, logs or heaps of
dirt. This will make a huge difference as it
reduces fuel consumption by 50 percent
and radiates the heat into your shelter.
A night in a survival shelter during the
winter is not like sleeping in a cozy ski
lodge. Survival and comfort don’t go
together. You will sleep for a few hours
by the warming blaze and then your body
will jar you awake in two to three hours and remind you to toss
more wood on the fire. Then you will sleep again for a few
hours before starting another cycle of feeding the fire and
snoozing. One winter survival course I taught where the night-
time temps dipped below zero saw us go through a cord of
wood per two-person shelter. After such a night, you may never
be caught without a sleeping bag as part of your winter kit!
Tony Nester is the author of six books and several DVDs on survival. His school, Ancient
Pathways is the primary provider of survival training for the Military Special Operations com-
munity, and he has served as a consultant for the NTSB, FAA, and the film Into the Wild.
MORE INFORMATION
For more information on Tony’s books or survival courses, visit apathways.com
RESEARCH
For more information on winter skills, check out A Snow
Walker’s Companion by Garrett Conover and Alexandra Conover
Bennett or Snow Caves for Fun and Survival by Ernest Wilkinson.
ASG_1310_WINTER 9/20/13 5:47 AM Page 41
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ASG_1310_FEVER 9/20/13 6:00 AM Page 42
43
AVE YOU EVER BEEN COOPED UP FOR SO
LONG YOU FEEL LIKE YOU’RE ABSOLUTELY
LOSING YOUR MIND?
Cabin fever is a very real concern for survivalists
(or anyone else!) who for whatever reason become
isolated for an extended period of time.
Restlessness, lack of enthusiasm and abnormal sleeping
behaviors are all common responses to cabin fever, and they’re
all detrimental to survival.
Simple preparation can help relieve cabin fever, but that isn’t
always possible. For storms or natural disasters with advanced
warning, prepare as much as you can. To find out more about
the subject, we consulted Chelsey Byers, a family life educator at
the University of Illinois.
CABIN
FEVER
BY AMBER ERICKSON GABBEY
H
20 TIPS FOR SURVIVING
THE FEELING OF ISOLATION
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“Have you ever been cooped up for so long you
feel like you’re absolutely losing your mind?”
CABIN FEVER:
THE SIGNS
• Restlessness
• Lack of enthusiasm
• Abnormal sleeping behaviors
• Anxiety
• Depression
• Irritability
INDOOR FUN
“Go shopping for family activities,
make sure kids bring work home with
them from school, stock up on food and
supplies and stockpile any necessities to
sustain your family for weeks or even
months,” suggests Byers.
If you have the space, consider doing
the shopping and stockpiling prior to
needing them. When disaster hits, every-
one will be attempting to stock up,
severely limiting available supplies. Being
prepared can help save your lives and
your sanity.
“The goal is to keep your mind active,
your body engaged and your emotions in
check,” says Byers.
Here are some indoor suggestions for
surviving cabin fever.
Play board games or card
games—Make sure you have a variety of
games, with varying length, complexity
and age level. Consider researching new
card games to learn.
Play computer/Ipad/handheld
device games—Either alone or multi-
player, utilize technology to play games.
Systems like Wii have family-friendly
games with learning or exercise compo-
nents to them.
Watch movies—Stock up on DVDs
or use an online streaming service like
Netflix to keep a fresh stream of movies,
from entertaining to educational.
Read or catch up on magazines
or newspaper collections—Find
books for all levels of readers and con-
sider getting some books to read as a
family.
Do arts and crafts—Create a spe-
cial arts and crafts bin with markers,
paints, glitter, crayons, stickers, stamps,
ink, various paper supplies, beads, string
and other supplies. If you need help
thinking of ideas, find a family-friendly
craft book with fun or practical creations.
Start or practice a hobby—Utilize
your time to work on crafts, knitting,
sewing, woodcarving or other hobby.
Consider learning to play an instrument
or starting a new hobby.
Stay active by doing aerobics,
exercising or rough-housing—Every-
one, especially kids, will have excess
energy to burn. Channel that energy into
physical activity or structured rough play
in the house. Consider exercise videos to
help stay motivated.
OUTDOOR FUN
Many activities can be done indoors,
but sometimes there is nothing better
than getting outside, moving your body,
removing the physical barriers of walls
and getting fresh air. Beware of outdoor
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STOP COMPLAINING!
Cognitive behavior therapists often
cite the 11th Commandment as “Thou
Shall Not Whine.” Complaining about a
situation does not make the situation
better. It only serves to make you feel
worse. So, stopping complaining! Focus
on keeping busy rather than devoting
energy to whining. Don’t stew, do.
PHOTO BY THINKSTOCK
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play time when the temperatures are
cold. In the summer, you can do most
things outdoors to alleviate cabin fever,
including eating meals, playing, even
sleeping.
“The winter is more challenging and
outdoor time is much more limited,”
warns Byers.
Just getting outside can help alleviate
cabin fever, and the following activities
will give you something to do.
Play in the snow—Build snowmen
or snow forts, have snowball fights or
just spend time outside.
Take a hike—Often we stay indoors
and limit our exposure to the elements.
Being out in a snowstorm can be a great
way to connect with nature and take in
the beauty of the season. Taking a hike is
a great way to burn excess energy, get
exercise and pass the time. Make sure
you choose an easy route, as it might be
very difficult to walk through the snow.
Bring any necessary emergency supplies
with you in case of danger.
Shovel your driveway or walk-
ways—Just spending fifteen minutes
outside shoveling can help relieve the
stress of cabin fever. Take turns shovel-
CARBIN
“Being prepared is half the
battle and applying what you
know is the other half.”
“Restlessness, lack of
enthusiasm and abnormal
sleeping behaviors are
all common responses
to cabin fever, and
they’re all detrimental
to survival.”
FEVER, SUMMER STYLE
Although most often associated with
the cold, dark months of winter, fever
can also occur in the summer. When
soaring temperatures and high humidity
levels prevent outdoor activity, fever
can set it. During extreme heat waves,
people are cautioned to stay inside.
They are told not to go out unless they
must. The feeling of being trapped are
the same, whether due to snow or to
sun. Both can stress you out. And, the
urge to strangle the next person who
asks, “Is it hot enough for you?” is a
good index of reaching your own emo-
tional boiling point.
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47
YOU FEEL TRAPPED. The
walls seem to be closing in.
Is this what claustrophobia
feels like, you wonder?
“Let it snow, let it snow,
let it snow” sing happy car-
olers on the radio. You are
anything but happy that the
“weather outside is fright-
ful.” You want to scream as
you quickly change the
channel. It has been snow-
ing heavily, on and off, for
too many days for you to
feel like advocating for
more snow.
You punch in the old
classic rock station. Meat-
loaf’s “Two out of three
ain’t bad” is playing. You
hear him sing “the snow is
really piling up outside.”
Oh, no! Now you do
scream. You don’t need
another reminder. The
snow had been piling up
and you have been trapped
at home for days. The roads
are not plowed and won’t
be until the snow stops.
You wonder what will hap-
pen first: the plowing of the
neighborhood streets or
your nervous breakdown.
“Patience” is only a
word in a dictionary for you
as you even scare yourself
with your short and explo-
sive temper. You are defi-
nitely not yourself as every-
one and everything seems
to be getting on your
already frayed nerves.
Visions of Jack Nicholson in
The Shining flash through
your mind and you start to
wonder if all work and no
play does, indeed, make
Jack a dull boy. Are you
losing your mind?
Not necessarily. You
may be experiencing fever.
Although not an “official”
psychiatric disorder, it is a
very real phenomenon.
First described in 1918,
fever connotes being stuck
in a cabin, isolated from
the outside world, for a
prolonged period of time.
Some of the more common
symptoms of fever include
anxiety, a sense of dread
and foreboding, depression,
restlessness, crankiness
and irritability. Oftentimes
people report feeling like
they “want to jump out of
their skin.” They are quick
to snap at those around
them, who quite often, are
feeling just as volatile.
MORE THAN
BOREDOM
Those with fever are
affected by a lack of stimu-
lation. That is, they feel like
they have nothing to do.
Nothing seems to interest
them. And, what does inter-
est them soon loses its
appeal. Fever, however, is
much more than simple
boredom. Fever is much
more pervasive and drain-
ing. Fever can deplete the
person’s energy and moti-
vation in a way that simple
boredom could never do.
With low energy and little
motivation, the person
becomes even less active.
The lack of activity then
increases the fever, thus
creating a negative feed-
back loop, or vicious cycle.
It is not uncommon for
those with fever to have
sleeping problems. They
may tend to sleep too
much, almost as if trying to
hibernate. Or, they may not
be able to sleep at all. Their
lower than usual expendi-
ture of energy may mean
that they are not tired
enough to sleep soundly.
PLAN AHEAD
It is easier to prevent
fever than to cure it. By
planning ahead, you can
reduce your risk of feeling
trapped and overly stressed
even when you are house-
bound.
If you know bad weather
is on the way with the risk
of you being unable to
leave your house, prepare
yourself. Stock up on provi-
sions to feed your body and
your mind. Too often fever
is fed by junk food. Eating
junk food may be fast and
easy, but it, too, will con-
tribute to a vicious cycle.
The junk food may tem-
porarily satisfy, but will
lead to more lethargy, trou-
ble sleeping, and a down
mood. The simplest solu-
tion? Have a good supply of
healthy food available and
feed your mind by keeping
things available that will
stimulate your thinking.
GET OUT!
Studies show that even
mild exercise can be help-
ful in lifting one’s spirits.
And, even if the weather is
bad, sometimes just getting
outside for a quick break
can be quite therapeutic.
Stepping out into the cold,
or even the freezing, air
can help energize and revi-
talize you. Just don’t stay
out too long.
Remember, although
you cannot prevent being
snowbound, you can pre-
vent fever.
Being prepared is half
the battle and applying
what you know is the other
half. With some preplan-
ning and a little effort you
may find that being inside
can, indeed, be tolerable if
not downright delightful.
Thomas J. Nardi, Ph.D. is the
Director of the Counseling pro-
grams at Long Island University
Hudson Graduate Centers in
Orangeburg, NY and West
Point. He is the creator of Eclec-
tic Cognitive Behavior Therapy.
WHEN THE
WEATHER OUTSIDE
IS FRIGHTFUL AND
BEING INSIDE IS
NOT DELIGHTFUL
by Thomas J. Nardi, Ph.D.
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ing so everyone can have a few minutes of
alone time. Be careful to not overdo the
shoveling, especially with wet or heavy
snow conditions.
Go sledding, cross-country skiing
or snow-shoeing—If you have the gear,
utilize a warmer day by going out for some
wintertime fun. Be sure to choose safe,
familiar routes and bring ample supplies
with you including food, water, first-aid kits
and extra layers for warmth.
EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES
OR CHORES
“While having fun is preferred, if you’re
stuck at home for long periods of time, you
will need to ensure you are keeping up with
household chores and educational opportu-
nities, especially for kids,” cautions Byers.
Perhaps the first couple days feel like a
vacation, but at some point, you will have to
do some of these more menial tasks.
Attempt to make them fun, include the
whole family and turn them into a game to
pass the time and avoid stress and fighting.
Homeschool activities—Take time
every day to work on homework, reading,
math problems or other educational activi-
ties. Just because school is cancelled or you
can’t get there doesn’t mean it’s vacation.
Take time to challenge your mind, whether
a kid or adult. Work on learning a new lan-
guage, brush up on skills or take turns
teaching each other something new.
Work on career projects, business
planning or extracurricular activi-
ties—There are always new things we want
to do or work on, but time just doesn’t
allow. Use this time to commit to these
other projects. Apply for school, research
new opportunities, update your resume,
take an online class, plan a new business,
create marketing materials, build a website,
brainstorm ways to create new revenue
streams or whatever it is you’ve been
meaning to do for your career or yourself.
AIN’T IT AWFUL
One remedy for fever comes
from Cognitive Behavior Therapy
(CBT). People who have fever
have convinced themselves that
it is awful and catastrophic to be
cooped up in the house. These
thoughts only increase their
anger and frustration. A therapist
using CBT would help challenge
the “awfulness” of the situation.
Yes, you may not like it, but you
can stand it. Remind yourself it is
only as awful or tolerable as you
convince yourself that it is. What
message will serve you better:
“It is awful,” or, “It is bad, but I
will get through it”?
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Cooking and/or baking—Being home can be challenging.
Hopefully you have ample supplies to continue cooking and eat-
ing the foods you’re used to. The tendency will be to eat more
junk or pleasure foods, but maintaining your eating habits will
keep you happier, physically and mentally. Take time to try new
recipes or cook complex meals or desserts.
Clean and/or organize your home—Sometimes being
holed-up can help you get to projects you normally don’t have
time for. Use the extra time to go through closets, deep clean
your house or find new uses for old clutter. Catch up on laun-
dry, give walls a fresh coat of paint or do a thorough cleaning.
Do household projects—Find the projects you never
started, or never got around to finishing, and do them. Cross
the old to-do items off the list, create a new wish list and
fix the things you’ve been meaning to fix.
OTHER TIPS
The hardest part about cabin fever is long
periods of time together with little escape,
boredom, frustration and not knowing how
much longer it’s going to last.
Buyers suggests, “To help maintain a stable
outlook, plan ahead as much as you can, keep yourself busy and
attempt to maintain some sort of routine. “
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A
Here are a few other tips to survive cabin fever.
Sleep at regular times—Beware of the desire to sleep
more out of boredom. Go to bed at normal times and attempt
to wake at normal times. Set an alarm if necessary to get up and
start your day. Holding onto some routine will help many people
get through cabin fever.
Eat normally—Try to eat foods you are familiar with and
resist the urge to splurge on junk food. To stay mentally sharp
and physically strong, maintain good eating habits and attempt to
eat meals at normal times.
Strive to have some alone time—Whether you do an
activity by yourself or go outside for a bit to have a moment,
having some time to yourself will be important to surviving cabin
fever. Too much together time can lead to arguments, especially
if everyone is a bit irritable anyway. Consider
scheduling quiet time where all family members
do their own activities, preferably in separate
areas of the house.
Communicate—If you’re holed-up because of
weather or some other emergency, keep the lines of com-
munication open. Discuss your feelings, share your concerns
and work to obtain as much information as will calm your fears.
Most likely, everyone in the house will be feeling similarly and
sharing these feelings can create solidarity and comfort.
Amber Erickson Gabbey, MA, is a Boulder-based freelance writer, holistic health expert and yoga teacher. She enjoys hiking, mountain biking, identifying wildflowers and exploring new lands
with her husband, Erik, and hound puppy, Dude.
ASG_1310_FEVER 9/20/13 6:01 AM Page 49
50
RUNNING
HOT AND
COLD
THIS WINTER, MAKE SURE YOU AVOID
DEHYDRATION AND HYPOTHERMIA
By GARRETT Kim
OU DO THE WORK. YOU PREPARE FOR THE
WORST. IT COMES. YOU BUG OUT. YOU DIE
FROM DEHYDRATION OR HYPOTHERMIA.
Rewind: You keep in mind these two dangerous
conditions and make adjustments accordingly to sur-
vive any conditions you face.
If famous hikers and mountaineers, who have the best
equipment money can buy, are sometimes victims of hypother-
mia or dehydration, what makes us think that we are immune
to these deadly conditions?
Although the risk of these issues will always exist, we can
minimize our chances of suffering from them with a few
essential precautions.
Y
“The human body loses heat 25
times faster in water than it does in air,
making staying dry imperative to survival.”
—Josh Martin, DNP, FAWM, CEN, Owner of Northern Cairn
ASG_1310_HYPO 9/23/13 12:02 AM Page 50
51
PHOTO BY THINKSTOCK
ASG_1310_HYPO 9/23/13 12:02 AM Page 51
52
HYPOTHERMIA
“Keep in mind, however, that severe dehydration might
require IV fluid replacement, in which case the patient
should be evacuated to a hospital immediately.”
— Paul Nicolazzo, director of the Wilderness Medicine Training Center, Inc.
Snow sports increase
your potential of getting
wet while already cold.
Make sure you wear
waterproof, insulated
clothing so your skin
doesn’t get wet.
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DON’T ASSUME YOU’RE
IMMUNE TO HYPOTHERMIA
One common way that hikers become hypothermic
is because the weather is nice when they set out for a
trek. Then they either climb to higher elevations or
the sun sets, and they can fall victim to low tempera-
tures. To stave off this potential issue, always travel
with the appropriate equipment that will keep you
well insulated if the weather changes quickly or the
temperature drops.
HYPOTHERMIA:
THE SIGNS
• Uncontrollable shivering
• Change in mental state
HYPOTHERMIA:
THE FIXES
• Rapid, aggressive core
rewarming
• Food and fluid
• Simple carbohydrates
• Avoid exercise
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53
HYPOTHERMIA CAN
STRIKE FAST
Hypothermia strikes when your core
body temperature dips below 95 degrees.
Although it can take hours, or even days,
before your temperature gets that low,
once it does, you are at high risk of get-
ting sick very quickly.
Hypothermia is likely to take over 12
hours to solidify in a person’s body “even
at temperatures below zero,” says Josh
Martin, DNP, FAWM, CEN, owner of
Northern Cairn LLC, which offers
wilderness, remote, and travel medicine
training.
Avoiding moisture against your skin is
very important in avoiding hypothermia.
The human body loses heat 25 times
faster in water than it does in air, making
staying dry imperative to survival, Martin
tells American Survival Guide.
Sometimes preventing hypothermia
can be as simple as picking the best
clothes to wear.
“Clothing systems that are useful in
the prevention of cold injury include syn-
thetic fabrics that inhibit the body’s ability
to shed heat through the four mecha-
nisms of heat loss, also fabrics that do
not retain moisture,” Martin adds.
KNOW THE SYMPTOMS
A great way to prevent hypothermia
is by stopping it when you see the first
symptoms of it.
“The best warning signs for impending
hypothermia are inability to control shiv-
ering and mental status changes to
include lethargy and inappropriate deci-
sion-making,” Martin says.
“This would herald mild hypothermia,
which means a core body temperature
below 95 degrees Fahrenheit. Once the
patient declines in mental status, he/she
moves into ‘unresponsive.’ The patient
will cease to shiver and continue to cool.
This occurs when body core tempera-
ture drops below 90 degrees Fahren-
heit,” he adds.
In situations where someone in your
party does start to show signs of
hypothermia, there are ways to help.
“In the event that someone is exhibit-
ing signs and symptoms consistent with
hypothermic core temperatures, the
patient should receive rapid aggressive
core rewarming to include heat concen-
trated around the head, neck, thorax and
back, insulated from the four mechanisms
of heat loss,” Martin says.
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THE FOUR MECHANISMS OF HEAT LOSS
Martin says that as long as patients are dry and insulated from the four mechanisms of heat loss,
they should be safe from hypothermia. Likewise, if the patient begins showing symptoms of
hypothermia, you must insulate them from these four essential mechanisms, which are as follows:
• Convection: When air is able to flow past your skin and carry away the heat as it flows past you.
• Conduction: Your body heat is transferred to something cold that you’re touching, sitting on, or
lying on, such as a cold rock.
• Radiation: The heat from your body is given off to the atmosphere.
• Evaporation: When you sweat, your body perspiration cools your skin.
ASG_1310_HYPO 9/23/13 12:02 AM Page 53
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HYPOTHERMIA
In addition, he recommends providing
them with food and fluid.
“Simple carbohydrates are best,” he
says. “One of my favorites is hot cocoa
with butter melted in it.”
And contrary to what many people
think, you shouldn’t try and get a
hypothermic person to do jumping jacks
to warm them up.
“If you suspect that the patient may
be approaching mild hypothermia, exer-
cise should be avoided,” Martin says.
DEHYDRATION
IN WINTER?
In addition to facing potential
hypothermia issues in the winter, you
should also be on the alert for dehydra-
tion. Although many people think this is
just a summertime problem, that’s not
the case. The reality is that dehydration
can occur any time of year.
Dehydration simply means “water
loss is greater than intake,” advises Paul
Nicolazzo, director of the Wilderness
Medicine Training Center, Inc. When
dehydration occurs, the patient will have
a progressively increasing pulse and respi-
ratory rates followed by decreased blood
pressure. You’ll also know a patient is
suffering from dehydration if you monitor
their urine output and concentration,
Nicolazzo says.
“If urine output decreases and is dark
yellow or orange-brown in color, that
means the patient hasn’t had enough flu-
ids,” he adds.
When a patient is dehydrated, the
goal is to replace fluids and electrolytes
with water and either a commercial or
improvised solution. Administer the
drink to the patient slowly (at one liter
per hour) to prevent vomiting, Nicolazzo
says. In addition, you can replace elec-
trolytes with foods high in simple sugars,
potassium, and sodium such as bananas
or raisins.
“Keep in mind, however, that severe
dehydration might require IV fluid
replacement, in which case the patient
should be evacuated to a hospital imme-
diately,” Nicolazzo says.
AVOIDANCE TACTICS
If you’re aware of the signs and
dangers of dehydration, it’s pretty simple
to avoid it. Take care to stay hydrated
and warm, and you’ll be on your way
to surviving the elements even in the
most challenging of situations.
HOW MUCH
WATER?
While there is a lot of
emphasis on the importance
of drinking plenty of water
every day, when it comes to
knowing how much to drink,
there isn’t a simple rule that
works for everyone. Water
intake depends on many fac-
tors, including your health,
how active you are, the cli-
mate and where you live.
To prevent dehydration,
you need to drink more water
than you lose in a day—but
how much is that? The aver-
age urine output for adults is
about 1.5 liters, or six cups, a
day, and you could lose close
to an additional liter of water
through breathing, sweating
and bowel movements.
Drinking eight cups of
water every day—about two
liters—is commonly recom-
mended and is a good start to
staying well hydrated.
The Institute of Medicine rec-
ommends a bit more: 13 cups
daily for men, and nine for
women.
Source: http://www.dukehealth.org
ABOVE: Remember to stay hydrated even when it’s cold
outside. Dehydration can occur in any temperature.
INSET: Even if it’s not that cold out when you embark on a
hike, bring heavy, waterproof gear as a precaution, since it
could get cold and wet quickly when the sun sets or a storm
breaks out, and then hypothermia could set in.
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IMPROVISED
HYDRATION RECIPE
If you don’t have access to a commercial elec-
trolyte replacement beverage, you can create an
improvised Oral Rehydration Solution using the
following recipe from Nicolazzo’s book, The Art
and Technique of Wilderness Medicine:
½ teaspoon salt (sodium chloride)
¼ teaspoon salt substitute (potassium chloride)
½ teaspoon baking soda
2 to 3 tablespoons of table sugar, honey, or
Karo syrup
1 liter of water
Mix all ingredients together. The ratio of salts
to sugar should be at least one part salt to two
parts sugar for proper absorption.
Source: The Art and Technique of Wilderness Medicine by Paul Nicolazzo,
available at http://www.wildmedcenter.com/the-art—technique-of-wilder-
ness-medicine.html.
FOR MORE INFORMATION
To learn more about Josh Martin and Northern Cairn, LLC, visit www.northerncairn.com.
For more from Paul Nicolazzo, including a link to his online textbook, where he discusses
cures for many survival-oriented medical conditions, visit www.wildmedcenter.com.
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ASG_1310_HYPO 9/23/13 12:02 AM Page 54
ASG_1310_55 9/20/13 4:01 AM Page 55
J
A
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K
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T
S
CARHARTT
Model: Insulated Bad Axe
Jacket (# 100728)
www.carhartt.com
MSRP: $299
Key Features: Waterproof,
breathable, zippered underarm
and side vents
Description: Carhartt’s Insulated
Bad Axe Jacket is constructed of
a rugged nylon shell with a Storm
Defender waterproof breathable
membrane. The jacket is lined for
comfort with a polyester tricot
bonded interior. Zippered under-
arm and side vents add
ventilation, and hook-and-loop
adjustable cuffs help seal out the
wind and rain. The attached hood
with draw-cord adjuster adds
protection, and the draw-cord
adjustable hem provides a great
fit. The left-chest map pocket
features a media port to inner
garment for cell phones and other
portable electronics, and two
lower-front slash pockets provide
storage. The jacket is constructed
with triple-stitched main seams
along with stretchable heavy-duty
nylon overlays on elbows and
shoulders, plus heavy-duty nylon
reinforcements.
Manufacturer’s Comment:
“When you have to punch the
weather in the mouth to get the job
done, only the best of the best will
help you deliver the blow: our Insu-
lated Bad Axe Jacket.”
1
1
$299
CARHARTT
ASG_1310_BG_JACKETS 9/23/13 12:12 AM Page 56
57
FREEZING COLD TEMPS can kill you if you’re not prepared,
so choosing the proper outerwear is extremely important for
cold-weather situations.
The right jacket can dramatically increase your odds of
survival, enabling you to stay warm and dry in snow and
freezing temperatures.
Following are our top choices for jackets to help brave
winter’s cooler temps, as well as snow and ice.
Proper outerwear can dramatically
increase cold weather survival odds
BY ERIN HATFIELD
MUSTANG SURVIVAL
Model: Ice Rider™ Endurance Jacket (#MJ6275)
www.columbussupply.com
MSRP: $351
Key Features: Safety flotation, Quick Venting System, reflective piping
Description: Ice Rider Endurance jackets incorporate safety flotation
to keep you afloat and reduce the risks of hypothermia in the event of
an ice-breakthrough or cold water immersion. The Ice Rider Endurance
features a Triple Layer System including a DWR-coated (Durable Water
Repellent) outer shell to ensure durability. The inner core
contains Mustang Survival’s patented AirSoft foam to help minimize
the effects of hypothermia in case of ice water submersion by
providing flotation and thermal insulation. The interior mesh lining
provides air circulation and superior drainage in the event of water
immersion. Ice Rider Endurance jackets also feature the QVS (Quick
Venting System) vents for improved breathability and 3M Scotchlite
Reflective Piping and Film for extreme visibility.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “Built for total mobility and designed with
rugged and durable materials, the Ice Rider Endurance will keep you
comfortable and protected throughout the most demanding rides.”
DRI-DUCK
Model: Eclipse (#5321)
www.driduck.com
MSRP: $120
Key Features: 3M Thinsulate insulation, water-resistant shell,
zippered pockets
Description: The Dri-Duck Eclipse jacket provides warmth and protec-
tion in a low-profile jacket. The shell is constructed of 100 percent
mini-ripstop polyester, providing water-resistant protection. The 3M
Thinsulate Insulation provides exceptional warmth, high durability and
effectiveness when wet. Zippered chest and hand pockets, as well as
inside pockets, provide on-the-go storage. The Eclipse features a drop
tail design for extra coverage and protection from the elements.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “The Eclipse is tough without the puff. The
combination of our water-resistant mini-ripstop shell and the exception-
ally warm 3M Thinsulate Insulation is what sets the Eclipse apart from the
competition.”
2
3
buyer’s
Guide WINTER JACKETS
3
$120
DRI-DUCK
2
$351
MUSTANG SURVIVAL
Dress for
Survival Success
ASG_1310_BG_JACKETS 9/23/13 12:12 AM Page 57
58
buyer’s
Guide WINTER JACKETS
COLUMBIA
Model: Trophy Shot Jacket
www.columbia.com
MSRP: $200
Key Features: Omni-Heat Reflective lining,
waterproof, breathable
Description: Columbia’s Trophy Shot is a perfor-
mance jacket that combines a silent, supremely
waterproof-breathable fabric with Omni-Heat
thermal reflectivity and insulation for the highest
level of lightweight, long-lasting warmth. The
Omni-Heat Reflective lining reflects and retains the
body heat generated even during chilly treks. It is
fully waterproof but breathable, with convenient
features such as a unique hood cinching system
with a brim that forms to a hat nicely and utility
pockets inside and out. The hand pockets also fea-
ture the Omni-Heat Reflective material to keep your
fingers nice and toasty while not in use.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “What folks notice right
away about the Trophy Shot jacket is how comfort-
able it is. “
ROTHCO
Model: Reversible Lined Jacket with Hood
www.rothco.com
MSRP: $56.49
Key Features: Waterproof shell, fleece lining,
drawstring hood
Description: Rothco’s Reversible Lined Jacket with
Hood is designed to keep wearers warm and dry.
The jacket features a waterproof nylon outer shell,
which protects users from outside elements, such
as rain and snow. The jacket also features a 100
percent polyester fleece lining, which will keep you
warm by locking in body heat. As 90 percent of the
body’s heat is released through the head, the jacket
also features a drawstring hood to help retain that
heat, as well as side pockets.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “This reversible jacket
features a waterproof nylon outer shell with a fleece
lining, keeping wearers warm and dry!”
REFRIGIWEAR
Model: Insulated Soft Shell Jacket (#0490)
www.refrigiwear.com
MSRP: $100
Key Features: Water-repellent, simulated down
insulation, wind-tight exterior
Description: The RefrigiWear Insulated Soft Shell
jacket provides seriously comfortable warmth with
six-ounce synthetic down insulation and a super-
soft sateen reflective lining in sleeves and torso.
The outer shell is durable, windproof, stretchy and
water-repellent, with charcoal insets for added
style. A tunnel collar prevents zipper chafing, and
soft velcro wrist tabs and a draw-cord hem seal out
the cold. Zippered hand-warmer pockets and a
chest pocket provide extra storage.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “At work, at home, or at
play, RefrigiWear’s Soft Shell Series will keep you
warm and comfortable.”
4
5
6
4
$200
COLUMBIA
“This reversible jacket features
a waterproof nylon outer shell
with a fleece lining…”
ASG_1310_BG_JACKETS 9/23/13 12:12 AM Page 58
59
buyer’s
Guide WINTER JACKETS
5
$56.49
ROTHCO
6
$100
REFRIGIWEAR
BUYING TIPS
When looking for a cold-temperature jacket, pay
attention to materials. Cotton is a poor insulator, so seek
out synthetic materials, which are known for their insu-
lative properties. Fabrics such as polypropylene, nylon
and rayon have hollow fiber, which traps air that is
warmed by body heat or the environment, and these
materials retain heat even when they are wet. Look for
outer layers that are both breathable and waterproof.
“RefrigiWear’s Soft Shell
Series will keep you
warm and comfortable.”
ASG_1310_BG_JACKETS 9/23/13 12:12 AM Page 59
60
buyer’s
Guide WINTER JACKETS
UNDER ARMOUR
Model: ColdGear® Infrared Alpinlite Max
Jacket (Men’s & Women’s)
www.underarmour.com
MSRP: $199
Key Features: Lightweight Primaloft insulation,
water and snow repellant, media pocket
Description: Under Armour’s ColdGear Infrared
Alpinlite Max Men’s Jacket features a full, loose fit
for enhanced range of motion and breathable,
water-repellent comfort. The women’s jacket has all
of the same benefits in a semi-fitted profile. Both
styles contain a Primaloft layer that provides light-
weight, water-resistant, breathable insulation and
can be compressed without losing warmth.
ColdGear Infrared uses a soft, thermo-conductive
inner coating to absorb and retain your own body
heat, as well as cuffs that add stretch and warmth
while shutting out the chill. The men’s model
includes a chest media pocket with interior escape;
the women’s jacket contains a fixed three-piece
hood and stand collar for extra protection.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “Primaloft gives you
unrivaled lightweight insulation, and the ColdGear
Infrared interior pattern delivers a patented print tech-
nology that actually traps warmth, meaning the jacket
heats up faster and stays that way longer. This jacket
is just absurdly warm.”
BLIZZARD SURVIVAL
Model: Blizzard Survival Jacket
www.blizzardsurvival.com
MSRP: $32.79
Key Features: Compact packed profile, reusable,
Reflexcell thermal material
Description: The Blizzard Survival Jacket is a
unique garment with a tiny, packed size. The thigh-
length jacket is a hooded body warmer covering the
entire torso and made from exclusive Reflexcell
material. Reflexcell has unique thermal qualities
and is an effective tool for the prevention and treat-
ment of hypothermia. Clear plastic sleeves provide
protection from the wind and rain. This resuable,
durable jacket enables the wearer to be protected
and rewarmed while remaining completely mobile,
making it an ideal survival solution for mountain
walkers and climbers and aiding the walking
wounded from emergency situations.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “The Blizzard Survival
brand and its exclusive Reflexcell Technology have
become the new standard in thermal protection for
military, emergency preparedness, law enforcement,
outdoor sports, disaster relief, and more.”
7
8
7
$199
UNDER ARMOUR
8
$32.79
BLIZZARD SURVIVAL
“This
jacket is
just
absurdly
warm.”
“its exclusive Reflexcell
Technology HAS become
the new standard in
thermal protection.”
ASG_1310_BG_JACKETS.CX 9/24/13 11:01 PM Page 60
61
DOES THE GREAT OUTDOORS APPEAL TO YOU?
Do you see yourself being self-sufficient in a wilderness
situation? If the answer is yes, this section is for you. We
offer tips and tricks on how to survive in the wild. We
present valuable information on finding your way, using a
bow and arrow for food and learning how to communi-
cate from your bug-out position. With winter approach-
ing, it’s particularly important to be well prepared for a
journey into the unknown. Make sure you pay close
attention and arm yourself with all the information you
can so that you can survive when the going gets tough.
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ASG_1310_WILDERNESS 9/23/13 12:17 AM Page 61
WWW.RUGER.COM/1022TAKEDOWN
CONVENIENT FOR STORAGE AND TRANSPORTATION
RELIABLE PERFORMANCE FOR WHEN YOU NEED IT MOST
The Ruger
®
10/22 Takedown
®
combines all of the features and functionality of the 10/22
®
rifle, America’s
favorite rimfire rifle, with the ability to easily separate the barrel/forend and action/buttstock for convenient
storage and transportation. The simple reassembly of the barrel and action is secure, ensuring an accurate
return to zero for consistent, reliable performance when you need it most. Packed in a rugged, ballistic nylon case
(included with rifle), the Ruger
®
10/22 Takedown
®
makes it easy to keep America’s favorite rimfire by your side.
20'' 18.5''
ASG_1310_62 9/26/13 8:58 AM Page 62
©2013 Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc. 021113
ASG_1310_63 9/26/13 8:59 AM Page 63
64
A CALL FOR
GET THE 411 ON DEVICES YOU NEED FOR 911 SITUATIONS
BY LARRY SCHWARTZ
SPECIAL REPORT: BACKCOUNTRY COMMUNICATIONS
ASG_1310_COMM 9/23/13 12:19 AM Page 64
65
HY WOULD YOU WANT TO
COMMUNICATE WITH SOMEONE
BACK IN THE CIVILIZED WORLD IF YOU
ARE OUT ENJOYING GOD’S COUNTRY IN
ALL ITS NATURAL BEAUTY?
Well, sometimes Mother Nature can wreak her havoc and you
wind up in a situation where you need to call—or yell—for help.
There are plenty of reasons to stay connected with the folks back
home should you choose to bug out or in the event of an emergency,
and they all play into your choice of backcountry communication
device or devices. To get the 411 on these devices, we talked to
Mikele D’Arcangelo, Marketing Director at ACR Electronics.
Make sure you know which kind of communication you’ll be using,
because it very well could save your life.
HELP
W
PHOTO BY THINKSTOCK
“Mother Nature can
wreak her havoc
and you wind up
in a situation where
you need to call—
or yell—for help.”
ASG_1310_COMM 9/23/13 12:19 AM Page 65
66
THE BIG THREE
D’Arcangelo explained that there are three
main categories of emergency communication
devices, ranging from simple to complicated:
Personal Locator Beacons (PLB): Simple radios
that send an emergency message with your loca-
tion to a satellite that relays it to emergency per-
sonnel.
Satellite Emergency Notification Devices
(SEND): More sophisticated devices can send your
emergency message and location information to
emergency personnel but can also send text mes-
sages to contacts you have set up in advance.
Satellite Phones: The most sophisticated tech-
nology as it includes the voice communication
capability you expect with a phone but also allows
you to send text or email messages in some cases.
PERSONAL LOCATOR BEACONS
(PLB)
The simplest of the three categories, D’Arcan-
gelo reports, is PLBs: manually activated radio
transmitters that send out two different signals
that serve two different purposes.
The first is the 406 MHz signal that goes to the
LEOSAR and GEOSAR satellite constellations of
the international COSPAR/SARSAT rescue organi-
zation to tell emergency personnel that you are in
trouble and where you are located. This is one of
the features of PLBs that make it the most robust
of the three categories. Since the signal goes to
two different satellite constellations, they have two
ways of determining where you are; if your PLB
doesn’t have a built-in GPS or if it can’t get a lock
on the GPS satellites, the two constellations can
still determine your location using the Doppler
shift. This is a capability that the SEND device and
the satellite phone technologies cannot do.
The second signal is a 121.5 MHz homing bea-
con that emergency personnel can use to pinpoint
your location. This is also a feature that the SEND
and sat phone technology does not offer.
Since a PLB is designed to use as a last resort,
it utilizes a stronger signal than the other two cat-
egories. As a result, it can punch through obsta-
cles like heavy cloud cover and trees that might
block the signal from SEND devices or satellite
phones, although like the other two categories, all
PLBs do need an unobstructed view of the sky to
CALL
THE
ULTIMATE
You can get the best
of all worlds by going
with a low-cost PLB,
like the SARLinkView
from ACR Electronics.
With its strong battery
life and signal strength,
you can couple it with
the inReach SE from
Delorme, which gives
you full texting and
route tracking capabili-
ties. You can also con-
nect your smartphone to
the satellite phone net-
work and the GPS func-
tionality Delorme offers
through its Earthmate
smartphone app.
“I always encourage people to update the ‘Additional Information’ field of the
PLB registration...” —Mikele D’Arcangelo, Marketing Director at ACR Electronics
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The inReach
SE device
acts like a
satellite
hotspot you
can pair
with your
smartphone
to provide
access to
the text
messaging
and naviga-
tion func-
tions found
in the
Delorme
Earthmate
GPS smart-
phone app.
ASG_1310_COMM.CX 9/24/13 11:03 PM Page 66
67
be most effective. In addition, since the battery is
normally rated for five years and there isn’t any
annual or seasonal subscription fee to pay for
using the device, the PLB is also your cheapest
solution, although it doesn’t have a dedicated text
or voice capability.
Your PLB will not be of any use to you if you
do not register it before you go on your trip. The
registration gives you a Unique Identi-
fier Number (UIN), which is transmit-
ted when you trigger the PLB, along
with your GPS location if your PLB
has a built-in GPS.
As part of the registration, you
enter your name as a minimum, but
D’Arcangelo advises you to do more.
“I always encourage people to
update the ‘Additional Information’
field of the PLB registration, how long
they will be there, who is also going,
and any medical information about the
attendees to make it easier for SAR.
You can take hours out of the search
and rescue process by giving them
that kind of information. You can also
update the information in your regis-
tration each time you go out so that
SAR can ensure they are equipped for
the emergency when they get to you.”
SATELLITE EMERGENCY
NOTIFICATION DEVICES
(S.E.N.D.)
Not designed solely for use in an
emergency situation like the PLBs,
SEND devices blend emergency notifi-
cation features with text messaging
and GPS positioning capabilities that
allow the backcountry traveler to keep
the folks at home up to date on what
is going on or to let them know you
need help but it’s not an emergency.
With some devices, you can also
show a track of your travels on
Google Maps so friends (and more
importantly, SAR) can see where you
have been and where you were the
last time you were not in an emer-
gency situation.
D’Arcangelo advises, “Like the
PLBs, your SEND device won’t be of
much use to you or SAR if you don’t
register it with GEOS using the
instructions that come with your
device. Make sure to fill in your per-
sonal information as well as any other
useful information about the people in
your party and where you are going.”
Although there are new companies
coming out with SEND devices of late,
the main players in the market are the SPOT fam-
ily of devices from SPOT LLC and the inReach
products from Delorme. Both companies provide
devices that either work in a standalone capacity
or as a satellite communications hot-spot, allowing
your smartphone to connect to the satellite phone
network when you can’t get a signal from your cel-
lular phone network.
HOW FAR CAN
YOU GO WITH
TECHNOLOGY?
All technologies have
limits, and satellite-based
communication devices
are no exception. When
using any of these
devices, keep in mind:
• The device must have a
clear view of the sky to
allow it to have a good
line of sight to the satel-
lites, both the communi-
cation satellites and the
GPS satellites.
• You should avoid any
area that limits your
view of the sky, such as
dense forests, deep
canyons or ravines, and
areas with tall buildings,
which would only allow
for a narrow view of the
sky.
• Satellites may move out
of view while you are
making a call or sending
an emergency signal; if
that happens, you can
resume the call in a few
minutes when the next
satellite passes over-
head, or your device will
continue sending your
emergency signal until it
sends.
• All of these devices run
on battery power, so
keep an eye on your
power levels and
replace or recharge the
batteries when needed.
A solar power recharger,
like the Goal Zero Guide
10 Plus Solar kit, is a
good thing to have
along. The Guide 10 Plus
includes a solar panel
and a battery pack that
the panel charges so
that you can still
recharge your electron-
ics even if the sky is
overcast or at night.
An emergency message from any of the devices covered here fol-
lows the same path whether it is sent to the government-run SARSAT
system from a PLB or to the commercially run GEOS system from a
SEND device or a satellite phone. Every message goes from:
• Your signaling device (with or without your GPS location), to a
• SAR satellite system that relays your personal ID to a
• Local User Terminal (LUT), which pulls up your personal information
and any information about your party and trip plans and sends it to a
• Mission Control Center (MCC), which then forwards it to the
• Rescue Coordination Center (RCC) who will locate the nearest emer-
gency or SAR resources, which then come to your location.
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The inReach
product line
gives you the
most function-
ality of any of
the SEND
devices, in
particular the
ability to text
back and forth
with friends
and family.
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CALL
PROS/CONS
Satellite Phone
PROS
• Can use voice communications
• Sends one-way or two-way text messages,
either pre-defined or free-form
• Can send GPS location if available from
satellites
• Sends emergency message to commercially
run GEOS emergency notification center
CONS
• Cannot send location without getting it
from GPS satellites first
• Needs a clear view of the sky
• No homing beacon
• Requires an annual or seasonal
subscription fee to use it
Satellite Emergency Notification Device (SEND)
PROS
• Sends one-way or two-way text messages,
either pre-defined or free-form
• Can send GPS location if available from
satellites
• Sends emergency message to commercially
run GEOS emergency notification center
CONS
• No voice communication capability
• Cannot send location without getting it from
GPS satellites first
• Needs a clear view of the sky
• No homing beacon
• Requires an annual or seasonal subscription
fee to use it
Personal Locator Beacon (PLB)
PROS
• Strongest signal strength
• Cheapest solution with no
subscription/usage fees
• Two signals, one emergency and one
homing beacon
• Can determine location when GPS
information is not available
• Sends emergency message to the
government-run COSPAS/SARSAT
emergency notification center
CONS
• No text messaging capabilities
• No voice communication capability
• Needs a clear view of the sky
“Inexperience is the number one factor in backcountry rescues.”
—Matt Cashell, a Ravalli County Sheriff’s Office
Although only some
satellite phones have
texting capabilities,
the ability to actually
talk to someone
about your situation,
emergency or not, is
a great benefit when
in the backcountry.
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PHOTO COURTESY OF KIRK EDGERTON
ASG_1310_COMM.CX 9/24/13 11:03 PM Page 68
69
While the SPOT product line was the first in
this market niche, the inReach products provide a
wider range of capabilities with two-way messag-
ing, a more robust satellite constellation, and inte-
gration with the GPS products and smartphone
apps from their parent company, Delorme.
SATELLITE AND CELLULAR
PHONES
Satellite phones are the most sophisticated and
at the same time the simplest in some ways,
D’Arcangelo says.
Most satellite phones have GPS capabilities and
some allow you to send and/or receive text
messages of various lengths. And, of course,
they all have a voice capability as well.
To send an emergency message
using a satellite phone, you either
dial 9-1-1, just like you would do at
home or on your cell phone, or
press an emergency button on your
phone, which will dial it for you.
This 9-1-1 call will be sent to either
the GEOS center that the SEND
devices use or to a national 9-1-1
routing system that will take your
information and then route it to the
nearest emergency response teams
in your area. You don’t need to
know the phone number of the local
fire and rescue.
“Some of the sat phones on the
market also allow you to track where
you are and display it on Google Maps
or some other website just like the
SEND devices do. Just keep in mind that this fea-
ture will use more battery power and may affect
your minutes with your service provider,”
reported D’Arcangelo.
IN SUMMARY
As you can see, there are a number of devices
out there to help you keep in touch with friends
and family back home and to contact emergency
services if you need to. When deciding which
device makes the most sense for you and your
needs, keep these three things in mind:
If you just want something to send out an
emergency call, then a PLB is your best choice as
that is what it is designed to do and it has
the strongest signal of the three cate-
gories of devices.
If you, or your
family and friends,
want to know that
you are ok while
you are in the
backcountry, then
a SEND device is
probably your best
choice.
If you want or
need a full function
device with voice,
text and GPS, then
a full featured
satellite phone like
the Iridium 9575 is
going to be your
best choice.
QUICK
TIPS
Matt Cashell, a mem-
ber of the Sheriff’s Office
who works with local SAR
team members in Ravalli
County, Montana,
summed up emergency
communications in the
backcountry.
“Inexperience is the
number one factor in
backcountry rescues. The
most experienced back-
country travelers tend to
be more prepared and
have the best equipment,
including backcountry
communication devices.
However, most rescues
are of inexperienced
backcountry travelers,
and they tend to be ill
prepared, including fail-
ing to carry a communi-
cation device. So the peo-
ple that need that secu-
rity the most don’t have
it.”
If you are going to go
out into the backcountry,
or anywhere that you
would need to be able to
reach emergency ser-
vices quickly, you owe it
to yourself and those with
you to have the basic
skills to operate in that
environment, either to
keep yourself from get-
ting into an emergency
situation or to act when
you are in one. We should
each know how to:
• Use a map and com-
pass rather than
depending on a GPS,
which can only show
you where you are, not
pick the safest route
from point A to point B.
• Build a shelter and
make a fire, even in wet
or cold weather.
• Evaluate injuries and
provide basic first
aid/first responder
assistance.
Stand-alone SEND
devices like this SPOT 3,
and the Delorme inReach
SE, give you the ability to
send out an emergency
call to the GEOS Interna-
tional Emergency
Response Center, as well
as sending and receiving
texts to keep the folks at
home up to date.
P
H
O
T
O

C
O
U
R
T
E
S
Y

O
F

K
I
R
K

E
D
G
E
R
T
O
N
The SAR-
LinkView is one
of the most
powerful of the
PLBs on the
market today.
Like other PLBs,
it has an emer-
gency signal to
notify SAR per-
sonnel that you
have an emer-
gency, and a
homing beacon
to help emer-
gency personnel
pinpoint your
location.
P
H
O
T
O

C
O
U
R
T
E
S
Y

O
F

A
C
R

E
L
E
C
T
R
O
N
I
C
S
ASG_1310_COMM 9/23/13 12:20 AM Page 69
70
EAT
TO
LIVE
EMERGENCY
FOOD PLANNING
FOR SURVIVAL
ASG_1310_EAT.CX 9/24/13 11:41 PM Page 70
71
OOD: WITHOUT IT, YOU RUN LOW ON
ENERGY, YOUR THINKING SUFFERS, AND
YOUR BODY DOESN’T DO WHAT YOU WANT
AND NEED IT TO DO.
You can definitely survive for a number of days with-
out food, but you won’t be functioning very well after just a day
or two.
So, how should you handle this important survival need? Do
you carry food with you wherever you go? How many days
should you plan for? Should you just plan on finding food where
you are by foraging? How do you cook things?
The simple answer: It all depends on the situation, and care-
ful planning is the way to go.
1. CALORIE REQUIREMENTS
With moderate activity, and depending on age and weight,
the average adult needs between 1,500-2,500 calories per day.
Since most adults also have some fat reserves, your emergency
rations really only need to maintain your
metabolism running to keep you warm
and mentally aware. Therefore, my emer-
gency rations normally range between
1,000 to 2,000 calories per day. If you
choose foods that provide at least 100
calories per ounce, this doesn’t need to
be a lot of food or weight. Meal replace-
ment bars, energy bars and even select
candy bars like Snickers provide between
250 and 400 calories per bar, so keeping
a few in your pack or pocket can fill the
need for your emergency rations. You
can always forage to help augment what
you brought with you, but to be on the
safe side, I always plan for the situation
where I am injured and can’t move or do
any foraging or build a shelter.
2. CARRY IT OR FIND IT?
Although a person can find enough food in their environment
to keep them alive, it takes time, skill, preparation and experi-
ence to be able to do that. When I hit the woods or backcoun-
try, I always carry some high-energy foods with me to cover an
overnight emergency/survival situation. The road network here
F
text and photos BY LARRY SCHWARTZ
You shouldn’t use
wild plants as part of
your diet in the back-
country unless you
absolutely know what
it is and if it is good
for you. For example,
to the untrained eye,
these two plants look
the same; the Queen
Anne’s Lace (top) has
an edible flower and
root while the hem-
lock (seen here) is
what killed Socrates!
BERRY SENSE
When trying to decide if those
berries are good to use keep these
three verses in mind:
White and yellow, kill a fellow.
Purple and blue, good for you.
Red…could be good, could be dead.
A GOOD GUIDE
Although anyone who ventures out into the backcountry should have
studied guides for plant and animal identification, a good beginner’s
guide for learning what you can and can’t eat in the wild is a book by
Euell Gibbons titled, Stalking the Wild Asparagus.
“I always
bring
emergency
rations since
I plan for the
worst case
situation
where I might
be injured
and can’t
move or do
any foraging
or build a
shelter.”
P
H
O
T
O
S

B
Y

T
H
I
N
K
S
T
O
C
K

ASG_1310_EAT.CX 9/24/13 11:38 PM Page 71
72
on the East Coast is so well developed
that if I have to spend the night outdoors,
I can always walk in a straight line in the
morning for a few hours, and I will hit a
road that will lead me back to civilization.
If I get injured, the people I left my emer-
gency information with will know where I
was going to be and they should be able
to find me within a day or two. For those
reasons, I don’t carry more than a day or
two of extra rations with me.
It’s important to carry some food, but
you can also find it.
3. FORAGING 101
Some plants are ok to eat, others
have some parts that are edible, some
are poisonous and some are just deadly.
Easily recognized, safe plants to eat
include:
Dandelion: All parts of this ubiqui-
tous plant are edible. You can eat the
leaves raw or cooked and boil the root.
It can be the basis for a nice salad.
Cattail: Often called the supermar-
ket of the outdoors, you can eat many
parts of the cattail. You can bake, roast
or boil the root, and you can use the
brown furry part on the top of the stalk
like flour. You can eat the white core of
the stalk raw or cooked like a leak.
Acorns: All acorns are edible,
although some may be more bitter than
others. Take off the shell and then soak
the acorn meat in water for a day or
two, changing the water twice a day. This
will remove much of the tannic acid that
makes them bitter. You can eat the meat
after boiling it or pound it and dry it for
use as flour for baking.
Pine: The nuts or seeds in the
pinecone are good to eat; you just need
to dig them out. Seep the leaves or nee-
dles in water to make a
refreshing drink.
4. WHAT NOT
TO EAT
It’s easier to tell you
what not to eat instead of
what you can. While
these may rule out some
edible plants, these ten
characteristics will help
you rule out plants that
are most likely poisonous:
• Avoid anything that smells like almonds.
• Berries white (or orange) is a poisnous
sight.
• Do not eat plants with thorns.
• Don’t use plants containing beans or
plants with seeds inside a pod.
• Get rid of it if the sap is milky or discol-
ored.
• If it has shiny leaves, avoid it.
• Leaflets three, like poison ivy, let it be.
• Mushrooms are a bad choice. Even if it
looks like something you found in the
grocery store, it can still be a deadly
look-a-like.
• Stay away from these plants with
umbrella-shaped flowers.
• Finally, if it tastes bitter
or soapy, spit it out.
5. KITCHEN ON
THE GO
If you are going to eat,
be prepared to cook. Due
to the explosion of inter-
est in backpacking and
backcountry hunting over
the past decade, there are
some excellent small,
EAT
“You can definitely survive for a number of days without food,
but you won’t be functioning very well after just a day or two.”
COOKING
ESSENTIALS
• Small, lightweight stove
• Pot or pan
• Skewers made from
branches
FOODS
TO CARRY
• Meal replacement bars
• Energy bars
• Some candy bars
NUMBERS
Calories needed:
1,500-2,500
Days one can exist and function
normally without food:
1 or 2
ASG_1310_EAT.CX 9/24/13 11:38 PM Page 72
lightweight backpacking stoves available
that fit nicely into a day pack or even a
fanny pack to carry your ten essentials.
These either incorporate a pot of their
own for boiling water or doing simple
cooking, or they can fit inside a small pot
that you can get on you own.
If you need a way to cook or roast
some wild game or fish you took, you
can use a green branch as a skewer and
cook it over an open fire or coals. For
something (like a fish) that might not
work well on a skewer, you can bend a
thin branch around to form an oval, lay
the fish inside of the oval, and then inter-
lace shorter thin branches over the fish
and the oval branch to hold the fish in
place for cooking.
PRACTICE MAKES
PERFECT
You should practice your new skills
before you need to use them. Don’t wait
for an emergency to find out how you’ll
survive in the wilderness. Get a good
field guide, find a mentor and start learn-
ing sooner than later.
Larry Schwartz is a seminar speaker, writer and backcoun-
try skills teacher whose experience includes camping and
tracking in the Boy Scouts, time in the military, and his
current passion for bowhunting and the outdoors.
LEFT TO RIGHT: A few meal replacement bars, energy bars, or some candy bars like Snickers stuck in the bot-
tom of your pack will give you plenty of calories to hold you over during an unexpected night in the woods.
• Small backpacking stoves like the Esbit (solid fuel tabs) on the left or the Jetboil (isobutane fuel mixture) on the
right should be part of your base survival equipment. They will fit nicely in your pack and don’t weigh very much.
• Keeping a small pot and stove stashed in my pack with high energy foods in it ensures I can keep myself warm
and helps make that unexpected night in the woods a lot nicer.
Although it’s harder
to secure game to
eat than plants, tak-
ing along a bow and
arrow, rifle and/or
shotgun will go a
long way in helping
you get meat in a
survival situation.
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ASG_1310_EAT.CX 9/24/13 11:39 PM Page 73
74
“Even in the dead of winter …
you can find food, especially in
the form of the snowshoe hare.”
ASG_1310_BUNNIES 9/23/13 1:36 AM Page 74
75
f you find yourself in the wilderness with no food, you will need to
act. It’s just that simple.
A bow is a great survival tool that can help keep you alive if
things get tough.
Even in the dead of winter, with help from your trusty bow,
you can find food, especially in the form of the snowshoe hare. I
speak from experience….
PHENOMENAL CHALLENGE
The varying hare, true to its name, is camouflaged for all seasons
as it changes from a summer coat of brown to a winter coat of white.
The snowshoe rabbit, as they are referred to in my neck of the
woods, provides a great winter alternative. Like the whitetail,
the snowshoe rabbit relies on its acute hearing, sight
and smell to warn it of danger. The white rabbit’s
habitat and territorial range is a scaled down ver-
sion of the whitetail’s. Both the hare and the deer
eat the same types of food. Alder thickets and
conifer-clad swamps, with their dense under-
growth, provide both food and protection from
the elements and predators.
The average white rabbit is around 20 inches
in length, is eight to nine inches tall at the shoulder
and weighs an average of two to four pounds. The
tracks of the varying hare stand out from all other
tracks because of the wide snowshoe form of the hind foot.
The five-and-a-half-inch snowshoe on this rabbit looks out of propor-
tion but serves its purpose well by carrying the winter hare over the
snow its predators can’t travel, at speeds up to 30 miles per hour or
about 44 feet per second.
Snowshoe rabbit habitat has a trail system just like whitetail deer
have their common trails through preferred feeding and bedding
areas. Hare trails in winter can become ruts in the mounting snow
that can hide all but its eyes and ears. If you happen into the same
cover in the absence of snow, you will find the same trail ruts in the
ground. Whitetail tracks reveal a creature of habit that travels
between food, water and bedding. These worn trails indicate repeated
activities. So do the network of trails of the snowshoe rabbit. The
varying hare feed mainly at night, but they are also very active on
dark, overcast days. These are the best days to track and hunt as the
SAVED BY
THE BOW
SNAG A SNOWSHOE HARE FOR FOOD IN A SURVIVAL SITUATION
TEXT AND PHOTOS BY PETER SCHOONMAKER
I
HARE’S DEFENSE
• Keen sight and smell.
• Good camouflage.
• Hind foot with snowshoe design.
• Runs at speeds of 30 mph!
Check out the giant
snowshoe hare tracks!
IMPORTANT
TOOLS
• Good bow and arrow.
• Modern snowshoes.
ALL ABOUT
TIMING
The best time to hunt rabbits
is early in the morning and
just before sunset when
they are most active.
ASG_1310_BUNNIES 9/23/13 1:37 AM Page 75
76
diffused light of the overcast sky gives
much better definition of the shadow and
shape of tracks, as well as the white rab-
bit’s outline against the snow.
SNOWSHOES
Tracking this white rabbit with its
five-toed front feet and four-toed
hind feet enlightens you to the
design of the ultimate snow-
shoe. Long guard hairs over
dense-haired feet serve a
variety of purposes in both
design and function, includ-
ing prevention of heat loss,
support in deep snow, good
grip on ice and reducing body
scent in the tracks by not
allowing snow to stick or build up
on their feet.
Manmade snowshoes have evolved
from early northern woodland Native
American designs like the Ojibway, which
are constructed of flexible wood frames
webbed with twisted bands of basswood
or the slippery-elm inner bark. I have
always been a stickler for tradition when
it comes to snowshoes. I
have worn the oval semi-bear
paw design for hunting brushy cover and
the long narrow pike design with its long
tail for covering ground in open timber.
Unlike the ski, the snowshoe is not
made for speed. But designs in recent
years with durable metal frames and flex-
ible webbing, featuring a swiveling har-
ness with cleat tracks, allow the winter
woods wanderer to cover a wide variety
of terrain as well as climb steep inclines
with ease.
SUCCESS AT LAST
It was partly cloudy that February day
when I suited up in my father’s World
War II snow parka and my 21st-century
SAVED
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When hunting on
snowshoes, be
sure to go with a
modern design and
harnesses with
cleats that allow
easy travel over a
variety of terrain.
PRESERVE
IT
> Smoke it <
> Dry it for jerky <
> Cure it with salt <
> Make confit <
> Pickle it <
ASG_1310_BUNNIES 9/23/13 1:41 AM Page 76
77
snowshoes and headed into the ever-
green swamp with bow and arrow. As
soon as I entered the cover, fresh rabbit
tracks in the newly fallen snow indicated
a busy night of feeding. It was quite time-
consuming, following the hare trails and
thrashing covers with my snowshoes. I
was afraid my opportunity had come and
gone when I missed the rabbit. But I truly
enjoy following fresh tracks, any tracks.
My afternoon was winding down, and I
wasn’t gaining on the rabbit that I had
shot low on. As several tracks intermin-
gled, I paused.
My eyes followed a lone set of tracks
that left the dense surroundings of the
swamp. In long strides, the prints headed
toward a tall blue spruce 35 yards away.
At the outer limits of a low-hanging
bough, my eyes locked on a snowshoe
rabbit sitting in the classic crouched
pose, convinced of its security. The vary-
ing hare was slightly quartering away
from me. It was a shot waiting to happen.
But this time I made a quick check with
the rangefinder. The snowshoe rabbit
was just within my bow range. It was just


g
o



i













C






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WHERE TO BUY
SNOWSHOES
Atlas Snow-Shoe Company
www.atlassnowshoe.com
Havlick Snowshoe Co.
www.havlicksnowshoe.com
Crescent Moon
www.crescentmoonsnowshoes.com
Northern Lites
www.northernlites.com
SHOOT IT
• Focus on back tension and bow arm
angle.
• Use a thin or relaxed bow grip.
• Come down on target when you aim.
• Practice long-range shots.
• Hook the trigger with finger.
CLEAN IT
• Cut off the head and the lower half of
each leg.
• Peel back the skin at the neck and
grasp one of the front legs by the mus-
cle, peeling off the skin.
• Starting at the neck or just below the
rib cage, cut through the belly as far as
you can, then cut between the hind legs
to expose the end of the small intestine.
• Remove the guts and the greenish
gland embedded in the liver, making
sure not to puncture it, so the bile
doesn’t taint the meat.
• Chop the rabbit into pieces for easier
cooking.
COOK IT
The easiest way to cook your hare is to
panfry; you can bread it first or just fry it
up plain. Adding vegetables and liquid to
it can make for a nice stew if you cook it
for a couple of hours.
that the white lump of rabbit didn’t
resemble the 35-yard bull’s-eye I can hit
in my yard. To clear some limbs, I knelt
down, drew the bow, and launched. The
485-grain arrow arched toward the rab-
bit. I have to admit I was more than sur-
prised when the arrow hit the hare. My
first snowshoe rabbit with a bow and
arrow!
ASG_1310_BUNNIES 9/25/13 12:24 AM Page 77
78
B
O
W
S
WHEN EVALUATING SURVIVAL WEAPONS, bows are often over-
looked in favor of firearms.
But bows can be effective weapons for both hunting and protec-
tion. Unlike firearms, bows don’t require heavy ammunition, nor do
they generate attention-grabbing noise when deployed.
An added bonus: one arrow can be reused several different times.
New technology is making bows faster, quieter and more accurate
weapons for just about any situation.
Following is a collection of bows and accessories that would be a
great addition to any survival tool kit and help put food on the table or
keep you and your family safe.
Often overlooked, bows can be
effective survival weapons
BY ERIN HATFIELD
“Mathews has
introduced new
bow models
designed with the
discriminating
archer in mind!”
1
$999
MATHEWS
Follow Your Arrow
ASG_1310_BG_BOWS 9/23/13 1:45 AM Page 78
79
buyer’s
Guide BOWS
2
$149.99-$169.99
IQ BOWSIGHTS
MATHEWS
Model: Creed Bow
www.mathewsinc.com
MSRP: $999
Key Features: Balanced system,
lightweight, compact
Description: New from Mathews is
the Creed bow, featuring the all-new
SimPlex Cam. This technology makes
the Creed one of the smoothest-draw-
ing, high-energy single cam bow ever
created. The Creed is designed
around a balanced synergistic sys-
tem, giving it an amazing blend of
speed, quietness and accuracy all in a
lightweight, compact bow. Axle to
axle, the Creed measures 30 inches
with a seven-inch brace height, and it
features IBO speeds of up to 328 feet
per second. Reported draw weights
are 50-70 pounds; draw lengths are
26-30 inches.
Manufacturer’s Comments: “Math-
ews has introduced new bow models
designed with the discriminating archer
in mind! Creed is the signature bow
offered and is fueled by an all-new
high-performance SimPlexCam. The
Creed truly is Advanced Simplicity.”
—ALICIA CAPTILLO, MATHEWS SPOKESPERSON
IQ BOWSIGHTS
Model: IQ MICRO BOWSIGHT
www.iqbowsights.com
MSRP: $149.99-$169.99
Key Features: Three-, five- or seven-
pin configuration, tool-free locking
knobs
Description: The IQ Micro Bowsight
with Retina Lock Technology enables
archers to shoot longer distances and
tighter groups than ever before. The
bowsight features micro adjustment
control and .019 fiber optic pins for
even greater accuracy and precision.
Retina Lock instant feedback technol-
ogy controls muscle memory, form
and consistency, allowing you to
shoot longer distances with tighter
groups. Available in both right- and
left-hand configurations, the bowsight
also contains micro-adjust windage
and elevation knobs, tool-free locking
knobs, built-in sight level, and an
adjustable second axis.
Manufacturer’s Comments: “If
shooters torque their bows, or their
anchor point is off, even a 1/4-inch, the
shot can be off more than 10 inches at
40 yards. The IQ Micro Bowsight will
increase your effective shooting range
by 20 yards or more and increase your
confidence. IQ stands behind this state-
ment with a bold, money-back guaran-
tee!”—KIM CALAHAN, IQ BOWSIGHT SPOKESPERSON
1 2
“The IQ Micro
Bowsight will
increase your
effective
shooting range
by 20 yards or
more and increase
your confidence.”
ASG_1310_BG_BOWS 9/23/13 1:45 AM Page 79
80
buyer’s
Guide BOWS
BEAR ARCHERY
Model: Empire Compound Bow
www.beararcheryproducts.com
MSRP: $849.99
Key Features: New grip design, smooth draw, high efficiency
Description: Bear Archery’s Empire bow’s speeds are fueled by a combina-
tion of the all-new S13 Cams and the Max Pre-Load Quad Limbs. The fastest,
smoothest and most versatile cam on the market, the S13 incorporates
every critical aspect: speed, smooth draw cycle, maximum efficiency and
ease-of-adjustment. Empire’s new advanced grip is designed to eliminate
hand torque and deliver unmatched accuracy—regardless of your desired
grip setup. Axle to axle, the Empire measures 32 inches with a seven-inch
brace height, and it features IBO speeds of up to 330 feet per second.
Reported draw weights are 50-70 pounds; draw lengths are 24-31 inches.
Manufacturer’s Comments: “We don’t think about a bow as being ‘just any
bow.’ To us, they’re highly efficient, precise tools of the trade—exactly why
each bow in our lineup must be light, fast, smooth, shock-free, and absolutely
silent. The all-new Empire is every bit of those characteristics and more.”—
JASON PICKERILL, MEDIA SPOKESPERSON
MISSION ARCHERY
Model: Ballistic bow
www.missionarchery.com
MSRP: $499
Key Features: Smooth draw, incredible speed, quiet release
Description: The Mission Archery Ballistic bow features the Advance Vec-
toring Cam System, proven technology known for its smooth draw and
incredible speed. Its highly efficient modular AVS cam system offers the per-
fect combination of adjustability and performance on just one set of limbs,
so you can go from 26-30 inches in draw length and 50-70 pounds in draw
weight without using a bow press. It also comes with a Dead End string stop
and String Grubbs to dampen residual noise and vibration. The Ballistic mea-
sures 30.5-inch axle-to-axle, with a seven-inch brace height and IBO rating
of 330 feet per second.
Manufacturer’s Comments: “Our goal at Mission is to build bows that out-
perform their price,” says Jon DuMars, Director of Mission Archery. “The Ballis-
tic not only looks like a high-end bow, it performs like one too. It’s comfortable
in hand, quiet, fast and deadly accurate.”
PSE ARCHERY
Model: X-FORCE Dream Season DNA
www.pse-archery.com
MSRP: $899.99
Key Features: Ultra-light, smooth performance, high tuneability
Description: The Dream Season DNA by PSE was created by using a riser
forged out of state-of-the-art, ultra-light and ultra-strong aluminum alloy,
the new DNA weighs in at only 3.7 pounds. It features PSE’s new Center Pull
technology that places the arrow in the exact center of the bow for unparal-
leled tuneability and exceptional performance. The new Core cam produces
speeds of up to 352 feet per second, has five inches of draw length adjust-
ment on the inner-cam and is incredibly smooth. The DNA measures 31
inches axle-to-axle with a brace height of six inches.
Manufacturer’s Comments: “When the Drurys challenged the engineers at
PSE to design a lightweight, high performance hunting bow, it seemed impossi-
ble. Stripping down a current model or creating a bow that was too expensive
for most hunters was not an option. Instead, PSE’s engineers set out to design
a bow that was entirely different, all the way down to its DNA.”
3
4
5
3
$849.99
BEAR ARCHERY
“Our goal at Mission
is to build bows
that outperform
their price…”
ASG_1310_BG_BOWS 9/23/13 1:45 AM Page 80
81
buyer’s
Guide BOWS
5
$899.99
PSE ARCHERY
4
$499
MISSION ARCHERY
“each bow
in our
lineup
must be
light, fast,
smooth,
shock-free,
and
absolutely
silent.”
“PSE’s engineers set out to design
a bow that was entirely different,
all the way down to its DNA.”
ASG_1310_BG_BOWS 9/23/13 1:45 AM Page 81
82
buyer’s
Guide BOWS
7
$699.99-$799.99
QUEST BOWHUNTING
6
$549.95
PARKER
QUEST BOWHUNTING
Model: Drive
www.questbowhunting.com
MSRP: $699.99-$799.99
Key Features: Smooth draw, low noise and vibration
Description: Quest Bowhunting’s Drive bow features
the new Flux Cam, which provides an extremely
smooth draw, allowing any hunter to make a quiet
and steady draw in the woods. Drive also provides a
stable platform with its newly designed machined
riser to create one of the most forgiving and accurate
bows Quest has developed. Drive also features the
patent-pending I-Glide Flex, which reduces cam lean
by 25 percent by minimizing side load from the
cables, while creating an incredibly smooth draw. The
Drive delivers IBO speeds of up to 330 feet per sec-
ond, measuring 33.25 inches axle-to-axle with a
seven-inch brace height.
Manufacturer’s Comments: “Quest has spent count-
less hours behind the CNC machines and out in the field
to develop a bow that is geared towards forgiveness,
smoothness, and accuracy. The all-new Drive by Quest
is a bow that every hunter will trust to take down the
next mountain or up the next treestand.”
—DAVID HAWKEY, MARKETING DIRECTOR
7
PARKER
Model: BlackHawk Crossbow
www.parkerbows.com
MSRP: $549.95
Key Features: Ultra-compact, light-
weight, optimally balanced
Description: The BlackHawk crossbow
features Parker’s proprietary Advanced
Split Limb Technology with integrated
Fulcrum Pocket System, making it
ultra-compact while delivering IBO
speeds of more than 320 feet per sec-
ond. With the Bull-Pup trigger and
ergonomic textured pistol grip, the
BlackHawk is easy to maneuver in a
treestand or ground blind. At a mere
6.5 pounds, the BlackHawk is also
lightweight and optimally balanced for
a steadier aim on the target. The Black-
Hawk features Parker’s EZ pull system
that reduces cocking effort, making
Parker crossbows the easiest to cock in
the industry.
Manufacturer’s Comments: “Perfect
for ground blinds with its spider web
black finish, the BlackHawk is the
fastest, lightest and most compact
crossbow on the market.”
6
“the BlackHawk
is the fastest,
lightest and
most compact
crossbow on
the market.”
ASG_1310_BG_BOWS.CX 9/24/13 11:09 PM Page 82
83
buyer’s
Guide BOWS
8
$999
BOW TECH ARCHERY

BOW TECH ARCHERY
Model: Experience
www.bowtecharchery.com
MSRP: $999
Key Features: Ultra-low vibration,
Extinguish Dampening System
Description: BowTech Archery’s Experi-
ence is an incredible compound bow built
to deliver a smooth draw and silent shot
with ultra-low vibration and pinpoint accu-
racy every time. The new features added to
BowTech’s technology platform include
CarbonCore Limbs that deliver intense effi-
ciency, stability and consistency with every
draw and the Extinguish Dampening Sys-
tem that reduces noise and vibration, both
in the shot and after release. Experience is
also built on a specially designed riser that
repositions the CarbonCore limbs for a
smoother draw cycle and rock solid stabil-
ity at full draw. Delivering IBO speeds up to
335 feet per second, the Experience mea-
sures 32 inches axle-to-axle with a seven-
inch brace height.
Manufacturer’s Comments: “BowTech
has built a bow that no other manufacturer
can match,” said Samuel Coalson, Director of
Marketing for BowTech. “The technologies
implemented in the Experience are so
advanced that they add proficiency to every
aspect of the shot. Every draw is smooth and
every shot is quiet, vibration-free and deadly
accurate without compromising speed.”
8
“The technologies
implemented in the
Experience are so
advanced that they add
proficiency to every
aspect of the shot.”
“The all-new Drive
by Quest is a bow
that every hunter
will trust to take
down the next
mountain or up the
next treestand.”
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84
SURVIVAL IN THE CITY might even be tougher than in
the wilderness! Urban environments provide lots of lux-
uries, but in an emergency scenario, it pays to know
what to do to get out fast. We show you what maps
you’ll need and give you a get-home plan to boot. And
don’t forget: Just because you live in the big city doesn’t
mean you can’t do a little urban “homesteading;” check
out how to compost and do yourself and the environ-
ment a favor!
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ASG_1310_85 9/20/13 4:04 AM Page 85
86
MAP
“What happens when you’re
in unfamiliar territory
and a disaster hits?”
PHOTO BY THINKSTOCK
By Ted Florence
ASG_1310_MAP 9/23/13 1:56 AM Page 86
87
QUEST
ISASTER HITS. YOU’RE IN UNFAMILIAR
TERRITORY. NOW WHAT?
A disaster can be as simple as a flat tire on a
remote road or a major weather event, but in any
case, proper preparation is always the best route
toward survival.
Being somewhat familiar with a new area is the first step
to surviving there, and a good way to familiarize yourself is
to consult a map. Keeping a variety of maps as part of your
essentials is key in times of disaster.
D
FOUR TYPES OF MAPS THAT CAN
HELP YOU GET YOUR BEARINGS IN
AN EMERGENCY SITUATION
ASG_1310_MAP 9/23/13 1:56 AM Page 87
88
Visiting new locations can
be an adventure, but in any
unexpected emergency, safety
should be a priority. Having a
map with you can at least
ensure you’ll be able to find
your way around, which can
go a long way in staying safe.
Take a look at the follow-
ing different aspects and
types of maps to give you
some direction!
IMPORTANCE OF
SCALE
Today, there is a variety
of maps to suit every activity
under the sun—from a simple
recreational map to a detailed
topographical one featuring
trails, landforms and physical
landmarks. Having multiple
maps is recommended, but
not always possible. How-
ever, in an emergency, having
a couple of maps of various
scales is beneficial as a large
scale map of your immediate
location shows more detail
while a small scale map can
show the surrounding area
with features such as high-
ways, nearby towns and cities
where shelter and help may
be found.
Keep in mind that publish-
ers continually update paper
maps to include the latest
road and landmark changes.
However, it’s possible to run
into a topographic map of a
large landmass, such as a
mountain range, that may not
have been updated since the
last land survey, which in
many cases can be decades. In
these cases, some maps may
not address current elevation
changes or demarcations that
have been affected by flood,
earthquake or fire. With
many running at a scale of
1:10,000 to 1:500,000, some
may not offer the helpful
details that other maps may
include. Having the most cur-
rent maps will be essential in
seeking safety in any disaster.
TOPOGRAPHIC,
NAUTICAL AND
ORTHOIMAGERY
MAPS
As mentioned, topo-
graphic maps are useful when
traveling over land. They
offer detailed elevation val-
ues, which provide an impres-
sion of the landscape and spe-
cific features such as roads,
railways and sometimes, even
building footprints. Using a
topographic map in a flood
disaster, for example, could
provide a quick view of low-
lying areas where water levels
are elevated, as well as high-
ground areas to take shelter.
For years, people have
used topographic maps in the
wilderness. Depending on its
scale, these maps often
demarcate landmarks such as
ranger stations and watch
towers. Elevation markings
also aid as an invaluable tool
to understanding the changing
landscape as it relates to a
current location.
Nautical maps provide a
glimpse of the soundings of a
body of water and are helpful
if you’re near the ocean or a
lake. However, they often
lack detail of the surrounding
land, and unless it’s a highly
accurate nautical map, many
aren’t deemed suitable for
navigational purposes as
depths and hazards can easily
fluctuate.
Orthoimagery maps are
typically high-resolution aerial
images that combine visual
attributes with spatial infor-
mation on a map and can
serve as a function base map
to start. The difference
between topographic and
orthoimagery maps is that
topographic maps tend to
generalize certain features of
a landscape due to scale
whereas an orthoimagery
map will show as much detail
as a photo can show, includ-
MAP
“Being somewhat familiar with a new area will go a long way, and keeping
a map as part of your essentials is key in times of disaster.”
An example of an orthoimagery map. Here is a Yokohama Transit map in a different language
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TYPES OF MAPS
Topographic Nautical Park/Transit Orthoimagery
ASG_1310_MAP 9/23/13 1:56 AM Page 88
ing man-made landmarks.
Both are informational but
orthoimagery maps may be
harder to come by.
“URBAN” MAPS:
PARK AND TRAN-
SIT MAPS
The most easily accessible
maps are park and transit
maps, which are updated on a
regular basis.
Many of these maps are
large scale, so they display
details of roads, buildings
and many other visual land-
marks. Trails and dirt roads
may not show up on mass-
produced topographic maps,
but park maps are created to
provide the most detailed
snapshot of the area, making
these the easiest to navigate
for map readers.
LOCAL
LANGUAGE
If you travel out of the
country often, storing a map
written in the local language
can also make communication
easier in an emergency. Some
consider maps a “universal”
tool, as they works off of
images and drawings that
most can understand.
However, in an urban
environment with street
names and landmarks to
contend with, reading maps
in another language is stress-
ful. As an example, a map in
English may suit an American
tourist in Japan, but in a time
of distress or dire need,
more than likely you’ll have
to resort to asking a local
for extra direction. Using a
map with Japanese text can
make finding a destination an
easier process if locals
understand where you want
to go or need to show you
where you are.
PAPER VERSUS
DIGITAL
Technology has changed
how maps are used today, but
will the paper map ever be
completely replaced? More
than likely, no. Often times,
we’ll take for granted that a
Google-type app with turn-
by-turn directions will get us
anywhere, but the fact is, in
times of disaster when band-
width goes out or electricity
may not be available for long
periods of time to recharge a
battery or when traveling
internationally where cell ser-
vice isn’t accessible, you might
be left to your own devices—
literally; or in need of a map
and supporting app that can
work offline.
Although paper maps and
digital maps both have strong
points and drawbacks, they
are both useful and generally
not really mutually exclusive.
Digital maps, when paired
with a GPS device, can serve
as the most practical tool for
any lost traveler. Today,
emergency providers who
once carried a briefcase of
large cumbersome maps to
track and service a disaster
now regularly utilize digital
maps to relay position, track
a fire, and communicate with
ground and aircraft personnel
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“The most easily accessible maps
are park and transit maps, which
are updated on a regular basis.”
MORE INFORMATION
Want to find out more about iOS and Android maps?
Check out www.avenza.com or call 416-487-5115.
quicker. Similarly, in an emer-
gency, carrying a variety of
maps digitally on a mobile
phone can be a valuable sub-
stitute when paper maps
aren’t available.
THE WRAPUP
Whether it be a topo-
graphic, nautical, orthoim-
agery or urban map, keeping
a hold of a paper or digi-
tal map that covers your
route to and from your
destination is always a
good rule of thumb as it
can be referenced at any
point. Even the most
basic map is better than
none at all as it ensures
you have alternatives when a
disaster may cut off your
original plans.
Ted Florence is the president of Avenza
Systems Inc., a private Canadian company
that develops, markets and supports com-
puter software products and royalty-free
map data for the mapping geographic
information (GIS) industries including the
popular PDF Maps mobile app for iOS and
Android.
WHAT URBAN
MAPS DISPLAY
• Details of roads, buildings
and many other visual
landmarks.
• Detailed snapshots of
trails and dirt roads.
PAPER OR DIGITAL?
• Paper: Always able to use it.
• Digital: When the grid goes down,
you’re out of luck.
• Solution: Use both!
ASG_1310_MAP 9/23/13 1:56 AM Page 89
90
F YOU FIND SELF-
SUFFICIENCY ATTRAC-
TIVE AND YOU LIVE IN AN
URBAN ENVIRONMENT,
YOU FACE A BIT OF A
PARADOX. CITIES ARE
SYSTEMIZED GRIDS—
FROM THE SIGNAL LIGHTS
ON THE ROADS TO THE
ELECTRICITY IN YOUR HOUSE.
WHILE YOU MAY NOT THINK
OF IT AFTER WALKING OUT
YOUR TRASH, YOUR GARBAGE
IS NO EXCEPTION. SO WHAT
HAPPENS WHEN THE GRID
GOES DOWN?
If you want to start building
habits now that will prevent a heap-
ing pile of stench in the event of a
disaster—while also helping reduce
the load on our landfills now—read
on about urban composting.
I
EARTH
SAVERS
ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY IDEAS TO
START AN URBAN COMPOST PROJECT
BY KRISTIN WEBB-HOLLERING
PHOTO BY THINKSTOCK
ASG_1310_COMPOST.CX 9/24/13 11:06 PM Page 90
91
GETTING STARTED
Before you start throwing your food
scraps in a pail, check with your landlord
or community organizer to ensure you are
in keeping with environmental guidelines.
The United State Department of Agri-
culture Natural Resources Conservation
Service (www.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs)
reminds us to “check on any local or
state regulations for composting in urban
areas—some communities may require
rodent-proof bins.”
There are two popular methods of
indoor composting that are easy to start
and do not require a lot of upkeep. One
is called “compost in a bag” and the
other is vermicomposting, which utilizes
worms in mixing up your scraps. Both
are relatively easy and portable ways to
cut down on your waste production and
help the environment.
We went to Cindy Salter, coordina-
tor of Ask an Expert for eOrganic and edi-
tor of eOrganic articles and short
courses, to talk about composting.
She emphasized that “success with
composting, whether indoor or outdoor,
requires making a commitment to the
process and finding a method that fits the
needs of the household. While not partic-
ularly difficult, indoor composting requires
thoughtful planning to be successful.”
BAG IT
Bag composting is as simple as finding
a plastic trash bag! Because composts
need circulating air to help break down
the plant material, you will need to cut a
few holes in the trash bag. Over time
HOW TO VERMICOMPOST
> 1. Build or buy a home for your worms from wood or plastic. Remember to drill holes to
allow for air at the top and drainage at the bottom.
> 2. Don’t let your worms get too hot or too cold. 60- to 75-degrees Fahrenheit is the perfect
temperature for them to do their dirty work.
> 3. Make their quarters nice and cozy with a mixture of moistened old papers, cardboard,
and soil.
> 4. Digging up worms from your compound won’t work. To ensure healthy composting, go
with red wigglers (eisenia fetida).
> 5. Feed them yummy scraps, but avoid meat, fish, dairy and citrus.
> 6. In three to six months, your wiggly helpers can be moved to one side of the bin and what
is left on the other is gooey, great compost!
Source: worms.ncsu.edu
“Success with
composting, whether
indoor or outdoor,
requires making a com-
mitment to the process
and finding a method
that fits the needs of
the household…”
—Cindy Salter, expert and coordinator,
https://ask.extension.org/
“Red wigglers”
making in-roads
in some rich soil.
Vermicomposting at its best.

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ASG_1310_COMPOST.CX 9/24/13 11:07 PM Page 91
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these holes can tear, causing the debris
to fall out when you are adding to the
trash bag or moving it about. To prevent
this, tape the areas of the trash bag
where you will be cutting the holes to
reinforce them and pre-
vent tearing. A good,
industrial-strength tape
about three inches
wide will work well.
Start filling your
compost bag by layering
in brown debris such as
dead leaves and straw.
Next, add green mater-
ial such as grass, and
kitchen refuse such as
banana peels, eggshells,
and coffee grounds. Fin-
ish by adding a little blood meal, lime, a
few shovels of dirt, and about one-half gal-
lon of water from a garden hose. Securely
tie the bag shut. Once a week, shake the
bag to mix the contents.
WORM’S THE WORD
“Worm composting is more practical
for indoor composting, and definitely
more common,” Salter maintains.
“Vermicomposting is relatively easy
and requires little to get started. For
worm composting, you’ll need to find a
good container of the right size for your
household, enough worms to get the
process started, and a source of bedding
materials, such as newspaper strips
mixed with water with soil on top.”
A portable bin to house your worms
in is ideal, especially for the disaster-con-
scious composter. Having a home for
your urban resource and being able to
move it in an emergency can be beneficial.
Take into consideration this location
advice from Salter: “Find the right spot
for the container—utility room, laundry
room, or garage are good choices, but
not too far from the kitchen where the
food scraps are generated.”
Last, when you put your vermicom-
post together, make sure you mix up a
thoughtful combination of bedding,
worms, and food. Worms.ncsu.edu rec-
ommends a mixture of moistened leaves
and discarded paper products with a little
dirt. When it comes to feeding your
worms with waste, Salter reminds new
composters, “Most worm composting
experts advise against dairy, meat, fish,
bones, and large amounts of citrus waste
in a warm bin.”
MIXING IT UP
Another popular way to compost in
the city is bag composting. While vermi-
composting utilizes worms to do the
work of mixing the scraps up and break-
ing down the waste
materials, bag compost-
ing relies on manpower
to mix up the scraps.
A watertight bag is
best to start with rec-
ommends the Home
and Environment sup-
plement from
www.extension.pur-
due.edu.
After adding green
materials like paper,
soil, and water, the Pur-
due pamphlet continues, “The bag should
be strong enough to hold all the ingredi-
ents without breaking. Squeeze the bag
daily to mix the compost and open the
bag every other day to check the mois-
ture. If it is too wet, leave the bag open
until it dries to the right level. If it is too
dry, add water.”
KEEPING IT CLEAN
Rodents and pets will be attracted to
the scent of your composting, so keep it
safe and sanitary.
Salter reminds the urban composter,
“the presence of rodents and other pests
in living quarters can be the result of
EARTH
“Composting should be
managed in a way that
does not attract pests,
whether it is indoors,
on a porch, or in the
back yard…”
-—Cindy Salter, expert and coordinator,
https://ask.extension.org/
From the cutting
board to the
compost bin.
We need to change our habits before it’s too late.
WORM COMPOSTING
• Find a good container of the right
size for your household.
• Get worms to start the process.
• Find bedding materials.
• Determine location: utility room,
laundry room, garage.
• Provide food for worms (fruit and
veggie scraps, peels or rinds,
brown and green leaves).
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many factors. If they are present in your
building or neighborhood, it is reasonable
to be wary. Pests are attracted to food
sources, so the best way to prevent them
from becoming a problem is good house-
keeping.”
The survival expert will recognize the
need to keep your compost safe from
creatures to avoid contamination from
disease and dander.
Salter explains why this is essential,
“composting should be managed in a way
that does not attract pests, whether it is
indoors, on a porch, or in the backyard.
10:55 AM Page 1
FOR MORE INFO
If you want to know more, contact
Ask An Expert at ask.extension.org.
eXtension is an interactive learning
environment.
SET UP A
WORM BED
Start the worm-bed by shredding one-
inch strips of newspaper, enough to fill
the container.
Soak the shredded strips of newspa-
pers with water. Squeeze out the excess
water and fluff-up the wet newspaper.
Place the fluffed-up wet newspaper into
the container. The container should be
one-half to three-fourths full.
In a well-lit area or outside on a sunny
day, empty the worms on top of the
shredded newspaper (making sure the
light or sun is shining down on the box).
The worms will quickly go down into the
bedding material because they don’t like
the light. (If the area isn’t well-lit, the
worms won’t go down into the bedding
and they might crawl out.) Once they go
into the bedding, they will start making
their new home in the bedding. Keep the
bedding moist but not wet.
Then, add a little soil over the bedding
material. Worms need soil or sand to
digest their food. Wait for about seven
days before adding other food to the
worm bed. The worms need to become
acclimated to their new environment for
the first week.
This means selecting the right system to
minimize odors and access.”
If you are worried about the load of
garbage you are dragging to the curb or
dumpster, you should be. The earth is
overburdened with waste, and disaster is
around the bend. Now is the time to
reduce your dependence on our cities’
waste management systems and learn to
start managing your own.
Kristin Webb-Hollering is a freelance writer
working out of North Carolina. This busy mother
of four and former teacher enjoys gardening, writ-
ing, reading and walking for fun.
From the kitchen to the landfill. We consume, but
we also throw away, and a crisis is ensuing.
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THE
LONG
ASG_1310_GETHOME 9/23/13 2:24 AM Page 94
95

WAY
HOME
By Abe Elias
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make sure you have a get-home plan
—and a plan for once you get there
LL OF YOUR PREPPING HAS FINALLY PAID OFF.
Disaster hit and you bugged out successfully and managed to survive.
Now the big question is, how do you get home? And what do you need to
know once you get there? You’d be surprised.
It’s imperative to not only plan for the disaster but for the aftermath as well.
And part of the aftermath is returning home, whether it’s to gather more things to take
with you or to settle back into your residence post-disaster. If disaster strikes and you’re
away from home, you need to know how to return.
Once you get home, there are safety precautions you should take to ensure no one
gets hurt, especially if the disaster affected your area.
It’s never to early to start shaping your get-home strategy, so read on and find out
good ways to do just that as well as how to deal with the actual homecoming.
A
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A PLAN
The very first part of forming a get-home plan is to be edu-
cated enough to decide if you should stay or go.
Sometimes it’s more dangerous to move in an emergency
than to stay put. Let’s say, for example, you’re at work and com-
plete chaos ensues. It’s likely better for you to just stay there
and hunker down until the worst of the situation is over. In the
event of a power outage or something
along those lines, you’ll probably want to
get home. In that event, make sure you are
familiar with all the safe exits at your
workplace so you can get out quickly and
efficiently. In addition, you might want to
contact someone near your place of work
and arrange to seek safety there until you
can get home. Whatever you choose, you
should always keep your family and loved
ones apprised of the plan so their worry is
kept to a minimum.
If the chaos is happening en route to
your home, it’s always better to take an
indirect route, so make sure you familiarize
yourself with back roads and off-the-
beaten path ways to get there. Sometimes
you actually need to head in the other
direction away from home until you have cleared the area of
chaos. Once you’ve gotten past the gridlocked area, it will be
easier to find transportation. Study local maps and make sure
you come up with more than one route you can take.
THE SAFE HOUSE
Each member of the family should have a designated place
they can “escape” to in the event that they can’t return to the
house. Think about a scenario in which there’s a fire in your area
and you can’t get in any way. You’re stuck with nothing: no food,
no clothes, no place to stay. If you arrange with friends or family
HOME
MAP SAVVY
Read local maps and make sure you have a few different get-home
routes you can use should an emergency arise while you’re at work.
OVERVIEW
Part I
• Determine if you
should stay or go.
Part II
• Designate a safe
house.
Part III
• Make sure you have
the right tools.
Part IV
• Carefully check to
make sure it’s all
right to stay home.
“It’s imperative to not only
plan for the disaster but
for the aftermath as well.”
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97
GET-HOME
BAG CONTENTS
It’s important to have
the following items avail-
able at work, just like you
do in your car or at your
home:
• Comfortable walking
shoes
• Blanket
• Flashlight or head lamp
• Rain coat
• Something to read (to
pass the time)
• Money (in an emergency,
cash is king)
• 1 Gerber multi-tool
• 8 extra batteries
• 1 fixed blade knife
• 2 boxes waterproof
matches
• 1 fire steel & striker
• 2 sticks Coleman fire
starter tinder
• 2 mini Bic lighters
• 2 emergency candles
• 4 light sticks
• Nalgene water bottle
with built-in filter (imme-
diate water needs—fill
bottle and drink through
the straw filter built-in
while continuing to
move)
• Water purification tablets
(enough to make three
days’ water)
• MREs (stripped of exter-
nal packaging to fit bet-
ter in pack)
• 1 battery booster for cell
phone
• 2 pairs of socks
• 1 first aid kit
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to evacuate to their house, you’ll at least have shelter until you
can get back into your house.
It’s key that each family member knows where he or she
would go in the case of an emergency, and of course make sure
everyone is aware of each others’ plans. Have a plan A and at
least a good idea of what plan B and C are. Because in an emer-
gency, nothing will ever go as planned.
NUTS AND BOLTS
Part of any strategy is making sure you have the right tools
and know how to utilize them. You should always keep a get-
home bag in your car. Make sure you keep the kit up-to-date,
too. Keep your car in tiptop shape with a full tank of gas. Should
disaster strike and you’re able to bug out quickly enough by car,
you certainly don’t want it breaking down or running out of gas.
ONCE YOU GET THERE
Once you get home, make sure you check out things prop-
erly to see if everything is ok to stay put.
Check the outside of your home before you enter. Look for
loose power lines, broken or damaged gas lines, foundation
cracks, missing support beams or other damage. Damage on the
outside can indicate a serious problem inside. Ask a building
inspector or contractor to check the structure before you enter.
If the door is jammed, don’t force it open—it may be pro-
viding support to the rest of your home. Find another way to
get inside.
Sniff for gas. If you detect natural or propane gas, or hear a
hissing noise, leave the property immediately and get far away
from it. Call the fire department after you reach safety. If you
have a propane tank system, turn off all valves and contact a
propane supplier to check the system out before you use it again.
Beware of animals, such as rodents, snakes, spiders and
insects that may have entered your home. As you inspect your
home, tap loudly and often on the floor with a stick to give
notice that you are there.
Damaged objects, such as furniture or stairs, may be unsta-
ble. Be very cautious when moving near them. Avoid holding,
pushing or leaning against damaged building parts.
Is your ceiling sagging? That means it got wet, which makes it
heavy and dangerous. It will have to be replaced, so you can try
to knock it down. Be careful: wear eye protection and a hard
hat, use a long stick, and stand away from the damaged area.
Poke holes in the ceiling starting from the outside of the bulge to
let any water drain out slowly. Striking the center of the dam-
aged area may cause the whole ceiling to collapse.
HOME
P
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COMMUNICATE
It’s key that each member of your family knows what the
emergency plan is. That includes a plan involving where each
person will go in the case of disaster, where the family will
meet up again, and making sure everyone knows alternate
routes back to your house.
ASG_1310_GETHOME 9/23/13 2:25 AM Page 98
S
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ASG_1310_99 9/20/13 4:06 AM Page 99
100
HOME
PHOTO BY THINKSTOCK
YOU’VE ARRIVED
Once you actually get home, make sure it’s safe to
be in there.
• If you smell gas, don’t go in; call the fire department.
• Turn off all vales for propane gas systems.
• Beware of animals that may have entered.
• Don’t lean on damaged building parts.
• Don’t force the door open if it’s jammed.
• If the ceiling is sagging, carefully poke holes in it.
• Don’t walk on sagging floors.
• If it’s dry weather, open windows for ventilation.
• Do not use any open flame to check for damage;
choose a flashlight.
“The very first part of forming a get-
home plan is to be educated enough to
decide if you should stay or go.”
Is the floor sagging? It could collapse under your weight, so
don’t walk there! Small sections that are sagging can be bridged
by thick plywood panels or thick, strong boards that extend at
least 8–12 inches on each side of the sagging area.
If the weather is dry, open windows and doors to ventilate
and/or dry your home.
If the power is out, use a flashlight. Do not use any open
flame, including candles, to inspect for damage or serve as alter-
nate lighting.
Make temporary repairs such as covering holes, bracing walls,
and removing debris.
THE TAKEAWAY
Emergencies come in a number of different shapes and forms.
Since you never know quite what to expect, taking the time to
prepare for just about anything increases your odds of survival.
Stop. Look around you. Examine the potential threats and make
a plan about how to deal with them. Take the time, be prepared
and be a survivor.
ASG_1310_GETHOME 9/23/13 2:25 AM Page 100
102
B
A
G
S
Survival on the Go
MOST SURVIVAL ENTHUSIASTS are no stranger to bug-out bags, a supply kit
containing goods that can help you survive for about 72 hours in situations where
there is no guarantee of food or shelter.
The bags contain needed supplies if you are forced to evacuate either home
or work due to a natural or manmade disaster such as a hurricane or wildfire.
Many people keep fully stocked bug-out bags by their front doors, in their
vehicles or even in their offices, because you never know when or where disaster
may strike.
Read on to learn more about some great available bags.
Bug-out bags and get-home kits enable you to
make a quick getaway in an emergency situation
BY ERIN HATFIELD
“This stealthy,
covert kit was
designed to make
the difference
between life and
death when all
heck breaks loose.”
1
$279
NITRO-PAK
ASG_1310_BG_BAGS.CX 9/24/13 11:08 PM Page 102
103
buyer’s
Guide BUG-OUT BAGS
NITRO-PAK
Model: Urban Survival-Pak
www.nitro-pak.com
MSRP: $279
Key Features: Lightweight, concealed
weapon compartment, Coby AM/FM Radio
Description: The Urban Survival Pak com-
bines tactical survival, evasion and escape
gear in one compact and lightweight unit.
Designed to get you safely home to your
loved ones, the kit contains items selected
to give you the tools you’ll need to stay safe
and survive any emergency situation. Devel-
oped by survival experts with military and
security hands-on experience, the kit’s com-
pact size and light weight easily accommo-
date the possibility of traveling many miles
by foot to reach a safe spot. In addition to 72
essential survival items, the Urban Survival
Pak contains a Gerber suspension multi-tool,
Aquamira water filter bottle and a Coby
AM/FM radio. The kit comes in a cover tacti-
cal messenger bag with built-in hidden
weapon zippered compartment.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “With more than
12 months of R&D and testing that went into
this kit, don’t confuse this for a standard ‘72
hour or Bug-out Kit.’ Far from it! This stealthy,
covert kit was designed to make the differ-
ence between life and death when all heck
breaks loose, Zombie Apocalypse or not!”
SURVIVAL BAGS, INC.
Model: Elite Emergency Building
Escape Survival Bag
www.survivalbagsinc.com
MSRP: $375
Key Features: FOX Tactical Duty Pack;
Leatherman multi-tool; Headlamp
Description: The Elite Building Escape Sur-
vival Bag provides emergency tools, gear
and first aid to assist in escaping a building,
apartment, or other area in which you may
have to escape in an emergency. Two differ-
ent bags are available, the FOX Tactical Duty
Pack (in high-visibility safety orange) or FOX
Tactical Cobra Gold Reconnaissance Pack (in
black). The survival bag contains a two-day
food and water supply, a firefighter rescue
survival axe from Ontario Knife, a Leather-
man multi-tool, a Pico LED mini lantern and
an eGear headlamp. Also included are an
Ultimate Survival Technologies BASE Kit, an
emergency blanket and poncho, and other
shelter, safety and hygiene items.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “This is a great
bag to have at the ready in case you need to
escape in an emergency.”
1 2
2
$375
SURVIVAL BAGS, INC.
ASG_1310_BG_BAGS 9/23/13 2:44 AM Page 103
104
buyer’s
Guide BUG-OUT BAGS
ECHO-SIGMA
Model: Get-Home Bag
www.echo-sigma.com
MSRP: $249
Key Features: Condor hydration system,
compact size, thermal sleeping bag
Description: The Echo-Sigma Emergency
Get-Home Bag is designed to provide provi-
sions and tools appropriate to help you get
home (or other suitable shelter) should an
emergency emerge while you are going
about everyday life. The Echo-Sigma Get-
Home Bag is a mid-sized disaster prepared-
ness kit that is perfectly suited to keep on-
hand in the office, vehicle or dorm room. In
addition to food and water rations, the kit
also contains a Condor Outdoor Compact
Assault Pack, a disposable lighter, tinder kit,
emergency whistle, thermal sleeping bag
and an emergency tube tent.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “Disaster sel-
dom strikes at the time and place of your
choosing. Echo-Sigma designed the Emer-
gency Get-Home Bag to help you get home or
to your safe place, wherever disaster may
strike. All items included in this bag are pre-
configured and ready to use right out of the
box.”—BILL KIRK, ECHO-SIGMA MARKETING
4
REDEPACK
Model: 1-Person Emergency Pack
www.redepack.com
MSRP: $169.95
Key Features: Three-day pack; LED crank
light; food and water; work gloves
Description: The RedePack 1-Person Emer-
gency Pack contains enough supplies to
sustain one person for three full days,
including food and water. The safety and
hygiene items in the pack include a folding
multi-tool, an LED crank light, a first-aid kit,
emergency shelter, duct tape, a compass,
lightsticks and candles. All items are packed
within a high-quality large, multi-compart-
ment backpack. Backpack features angled,
adjustable compression straps, padded
shoulder straps, zippered accessory pock-
ets, padded back panel and hook for attach-
ing extra gear. Loaded with survival gear
and supplies for any emergency situation,
the bug-out bag adheres to Ready.gov
emergency prepared guidelines and stan-
dards. The compact size makes it ideal for
easy storage in a vehicle, home or office.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “The RedePack
1-Person Emergency Pack is filled with
expert-recommended products for virtually
any emergency or survival situation.”—NICOLE
OLSON, REDEPAK MARKETING
3
3
$169.95
REDEPACK
“Echo-Sigma
designed the
Emergency
Get-Home Bag
to help you
get home or
to your safe
place, wher-
ever disaster
may strike.”
ASG_1310_BG_BAGS 9/23/13 2:44 AM Page 104
buyer’s
Guide BUG-OUT BAGS

4
$249
ECHO-SIGMA
ASG_1310_BG_BAGS 9/23/13 2:44 AM Page 105
106
buyer’s
Guide BUG-OUT BAGS
6
$109.95
SURVIVAL KIT
5
$104.32
DAN’S DEPOT
“We highly recommend that you add
climate-dependent clothing (like gloves
and hat in a cold climate) and a local map
of your city/region to your survival kit.”
ASG_1310_BG_BAGS 9/23/13 2:44 AM Page 106
107
buyer’s
Guide BUG-OUT BAGS
DAN’S DEPOT
Model: The Ozark EDC Survival Kit
(DD-OZA-KIT)
www.dansdpot.com
MSRP: $104.32
Key Features: Mora Allround knife, high-quality
compass, survival blanket
Description: Dan Bacon, cofounder of Dan’s Depot,
conducted years of research to assemble the Ozark
Every Day Carry (EDC) Survival Kit. The kit contains
a number of emergency and survival items, includ-
ing a Mora Allround knife, a Firesteel fire starter, a
Silva Polaris Baseplate compass, an Aquamira
water filtration system, a survival blanket, para-
cord, a stainless steel water bottle, duct tape, and a
lighter. In addition to survival items, the kit also
features food rations in case of emergency, power
outage, flooding, or other natural disaster. The
Ozark Kit is ideal for the workplace and/or in vehi-
cle to help you survive an emergency situation and
get home or to your safe place.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “We highly recommend
that you add climate-dependent clothing (like gloves
and hat in a cold climate) and a local map of your
city/region to your survival kit. You can usually pick
up maps at your local Chamber of Commerce.”
–DAN BACON, CO-FOUNDER OF DAN’S DEPOT
SURVIVALKIT.COM
Model: Ultimate Bug-Out Kit (#SK-G-SKHK)
www.survivalkit.com
MSRP: $109.95
Key Features: Food and water, 4-in-1 flashlight,
20-hour body warmer
Description: The Ultimate Bug-Out Kit is loaded
with all the best urban survival tools and essentials
to give you the peace of mind knowing that if a dis-
aster were to happen, you would be prepared. The
kit comes in a secure camouflage bug-out back-
pack that also has enough extra space for your per-
sonal items. It contains a bright orange pull-out flag
that can be used as an alert when necessary, as
well as gun straps to free your hands when you are
on the move. The Ultimate Bug-Out Kit also con-
tains an emergency survival sleeping bag; a
Dynamo 4-in-1 flashlight with a flashlight, radio,
siren and charger; water purification tablets; and a
multi-function shovel.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “The Ultimate Bug-Out
Kit was designed for individuals who are not sure
what they need to start their own survival kit.
While this is not a replacement for a good home
survival kit, it comes in very handy when you find
yourself outdoors in the wild and realize that you have
one in the car.”
5
6

DON’T
FORGET
In addition to the basic survival
gear included in these bug-out
bags, be sure to add irreplaceable
items such as digital backups of
important documents, cash and
any prescription medication.
“The Ultimate Bug-Out Kit was designed for
individuals who are not sure what they
need to start their own survival kit.”
Les Stroud knows a good knife can save
your life. Rugged, versatile and ergonomic
– these signature knives are true survival
tools, approved by the master. Go with
Les Stroud and survive.
www.camillusknives.com
shop.lesstroud.ca
Camillus Brand

ASG_1310_BG_BAGS.CX 9/24/13 11:05 PM Page 107
buyer’s
Guide BUG-OUT BAGS
NITRO-PAK
Model: 72 Hour Tote-N’-Go Kit (#5113)
www.nitro-pak.com
MSRP: $45
Key Features: 72-hour kit, compact, five-year
food and water shelf life
Description: The Tote-N’-Go Kit is perfect for
those who are looking for excellent protection
in a single-person, 72-hour compact kit. The kit
contains an emergency blanket, a poncho, LED
flashlight with batteries, emergency food and
water rations, a survival whistle and multi-
function knife. The bag easily fits into any vehi-
cle, providing easy access to practical and use-
ful survival products that will come in handy
when a crisis strikes. The Tote-N-Go Kit comes
assembled in a heavy-duty cordura nylon bag
that’s made to survive years of abuse.
Manufacturer’s Comment:“72-hour kits can
make a difference in being able to survive an
emergency situation. With the Tote-N’-Go Kit, you
will be able to meet all of your essential needs in
an emergency.”
8
7
$189
QUAKEKARE INC.
ASG_1310_BG_BAGS 9/23/13 2:45 AM Page 108
109
buyer’s
Guide BUG-OUT BAGS
QUAKEKARE INC.
Model: 4-Person Ultimate Deluxe Backpack Survival Kit
www.quakekare.com
MSRP: $189
Key Features: Battery-free USB charger, weather band radio, solar/hand-crank flashlight
Description: This four-person, 72-hour survival kit comes in a durable nylon backpack
and contains most effective and reliable emergency preparedness supplies to prepare for
any disaster. The kit includes food, water purification tablets, light sticks, blankets, pon-
chos, a tent, a first-aid kit, a multi-function knife, a survival guide and more. A USB device
charger never needs batteries and charges smartphones and other devices so you can
stay in touch with family.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “Prepare now to be able to survive for a minimum of three days
following an emergency situation. Protect your family! Give yourself peace of mind! By having
this recommended survival kit, you will be able to meet all of your essential needs in an
emergency.”—SHERRY HEITZ, CEO/PRESIDENT
7
8
$45
NITRO-PAK
“Prepare now
to be able to
survive for a
minimum of
three days
following an
emergency
situation.”
“With the
Tote-N’-Go Kit,
you will be
able to meet
all of your
essential
needs in an
emergency.”
ASG_1310_BG_BAGS 9/23/13 2:45 AM Page 109
110 110
ACCORDING TO THE DICTIONARY, one meaning of
homesteading is simply “any dwelling with its land and build-
ings where a family makes its home.” More and more families
are heading out to parts unknown these days to stake their
claims and get away from it all. In this issue, we bring you a
slew of interesting articles on homesteading, from raising
goats to maintaining a root cellar. It’s time to make your own
homesteading definition and decide if this lifestyle could be
for you.
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American Survival Guide

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ASG_1310_111 9/20/13 4:49 AM Page 111
112
GOT
YOUR
GOAT?
THESE ANIMALS ARE A GREAT FOOD
SOURCE FOR LONG-TERM SURVIVAL
BY KRISTIN WEBB-HOLLERING
ASG_1310_GOATS 9/23/13 2:59 AM Page 112
113
O YOU’VE DECIDED TO TAKE MATTERS INTO
YOUR OWN HANDS AND BECOME AS SELF-
SUFFICIENT AS YOU CAN BE.
You’re ready for any kind of disaster the world can
throw at you and you’ve prepped for the worst. And
now…you’re even starting to grow your own food!
Growing a garden is a necessity, of course, but what about a
good protein source? Don’t forget that’s necessary for your
long-term survival. Think goat!
The benefits of goat rearing are profound, which is why they
are perennially the most popular animals to farm worldwide.
Like all major enterprises, goat farming should not be
entered into lightly. Goats are amazing creatures who need top-
quality care and time, but they are a great food source for those
willing to invest in their long-term sustainability.
BENEFITS OF GOATS
OVER LARGER ANIMALS
Goats are easier to raise than other livestock, and what they
offer is exceptional compared to other animals. They grow to
maturity more quickly, are lighter to handle in size and girth, and
their meat is healthier. Milk, cheese, and cream can also be pro-
duced from their milk, which is an added bonus in raising them.
“Goats have grown in popularity, showing up in commercials,
movies, and many have made them pets,” says Derek Beane,
owner and operator of D and J Goat Farms, “they are easier to
handle versus larger livestock like cattle and swine.”
They mate more quickly than larger animals, and because
they are smaller in size and strength, they are easier to slaughter
when fully grown.
S
“Goat meat is the most consumed meat worldwide,
and with our nation’s growing ethnic population,
goats have increased in demand,” Derek Beane, owner
and operator D and J Goat Farms LLC.
PHOTO BY THINKSTOCK
ASG_1310_GOATS 9/23/13 2:59 AM Page 113
114
“They have shorter gestation time than cattle,
which would yield more offspring more quickly than a
cow and would be important in a survival-ready environ-
ment,” maintains Beane.
“It would be easier to butcher, process, and package the
meat versus a cow or swine which is the difference between
working with a 40- to 80-pound animal at wean-
ing and a 300-pound cow.”
Not only are cows and pigs harder to main-
tain due to their size and needs, many studies
show them to be unhealthy for long-term
human consumption. Since you may be investing
in goat raising as a future food source and may
be dependent on their yields for your survival,
that is something to consider.
“Goat meat is the most popular consumed
meat worldwide, and with our nation’s growing
ethnic population, goats have increased in
demand. It is a very healthy meat, lean and low
in cholesterol and pretty tasty,” says Beane.
TEMPERAMENT
Be it fiction, film or fodder, goats have got-
ten a bad rap as being gruff and immovable.
Sometimes the personality is dependent on the
breed, but usually the sex of the beast deter-
mines their individuality. As a primary food
source, learning the differences between male
and female temperament will be an important
factor in successful goat rearing to ensure your
preparedness food plan prospers.
“Goats can be ill-mannered at feeding time keeping the peck-
ing order in line. They have different temperaments depending
on the individual. By far, they have a lov-
ing, easy, almost affectionate attitude with
the exception of the bucks or males,”
states Beane.
LAND, SHELTER, CLIMATE
The size of your property and where
you plan to raise goats will determine how
many you raise and mate. In addition, dif-
ferent breeds of goat prosper in different
climates, and what you plan to use your
goat for, be it food or fiber, will also fac-
tor into the survival equation.
“Folks normally overcrowd their herd,
increasing parasite issues, which are the
biggest problem with goats,” says Beane.
For example, he has 50 acres of land and
raises approximately 175 head. He recom-
mends a lot of land due to issues with
overcrowding and disease. This way, the
pastures can be rotated to allow the
grazing fields to be treated.
According to the University of
Illinois, “Poor ground may support
two to four goats per acre, while
better pasture may be able to sup-
port six to eight goats per acre.”
Beane also warns would-be farm-
ers that they multiply quickly, so it
is advisable to start small.
“A small, rustic environment herd
can be fairly easy to raise.” A small herd
of goats would range from five to ten and
would be manageable, he maintains, as long as
“the browsing and grazing were of good quality to maintain
proper health.”
North Carolina State University’s Department of Agriculture
and Life Science recommends a “combination of treatment and
management,” which includes both veterinary intervention with
antibiotics and diet as well as pasture management.
Pasture management might include moving your goats from a
parasite-infected pasture to an uninfected area and keeping your
herd off that patch for an entire grazing season. In addition, vac-
cinating your goats like any other animal helps to curb the
spread of disease.
Keeping goats healthy also includes sheltering them from the
elements and making sure their bedding is dry. Beane suggests
shavings over straw, due to the kids’ attraction to “nibbling” on
things, and straying away from inexpensive building materials that
they will just chew and break apart.  
“A fully enclosed shelter is preferred to keep out blowing
snow and rain,” says Beane.
Climate is another factor that enters into raising goats.
“Goats are raised over all climates, but drier climates are
probably better. The Southeastern part of the United States is
harder to raise goats in due to the parasite problem being
harder to control.”
These are important things to consider with the rise in
extreme temperatures and disasters.
Beane recommends that the breed should fit the climate and
the need as well.         
GOATS
Here’s a goat
donating milk
to make
cheese…
and to drink.
WHAT DO
GOATS EAT?
Almost anything! They mostly graze
on plants, vines, weeds, and the tips of
wood shrubs and trees. Don’t have that
type of environment for them? Don’t worry,
you can sub in hay and alfalfa and grain
in the form of whole, pelleted, rolled
or texturized, all available at feed
stores.
GOAT
GOODS
• Goat meat is deli-
cious and healthier
than both beef and
pork.
• Goat’s milk can be
used to make
many different
foods including
yogurt, cream, but-
ter, ice cream, and
of course milk to
drink.
• Goat fur can be
used for fiber and
made into goat’s
wool for clothing,
blankets, and other
fiber products.
ASG_1310_GOATS 9/23/13 2:59 AM Page 114
“Angora goats are woolen bred and
fair better in cooler areas while some
breeds are more durable, such as the
Spanish Kiko.”
On his farm, in the Southeast, Beane
raises Boer goats, which are the most
popular meat-bred goat type.
READY-TO-GO GOAT
Raising any kind of animal is a big
commitment and can be expensive with
veterinary costs, feeding, breeding, and
housing.
If your plan is to prepare for the
future and raise a viable and fruitful food
source, goat rearing might be right for
you. In these troubled times, investigating
options for the future is important.
Going goat might be the thing you’ve
been looking for!
Kristin Webb-Hollering is a freelance writer based in
North Carolina.  
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“Thinking from a survival angle, it would be easier to
butcher, process, and package goat meat versus cow or
swine meat, which is the difference between working
with a 40- to 80-pound animal versus a 300-pound cow.”
BREEDS BY REGION
Boer is the most popular type of
meat goat and does best in a hot, dry
climate like the Southeastern parts of
the United States. The Spanish and
Kiko, which are also meat breeds, are
hardy and durable and do well in warmer
states as well. The Myotonic (fainting
goat) is found most often in Texas and
Tennessee. Dairy goats such as the
Nubian and Alpine are found in every
state in the United States. While the
Angora goat, a woolen bred type, prefer a
cooler climate and would be happier in
northern parts of the U.S.
CLIMATE, LAND AND
NEEDS DETERMINE
BREEDS
• There are over 300 breeds of goats
that prosper or decline depending on
climate and pasture size and quality.
• Some breeds are best for food con-
sumption while others are better for
fiber production. Investigate the differ-
ences before you start raising goats.
• Make your land goat ready with appro-
priate enhancements like enclosures,
shelters and proper grazing areas.
Goat meat is
lean and tasty,
and so easy to
cook outdoors.
FOR MORE INFORMATION
To learn more about sustainability with goat farming, visit Derek Beane’s website, www.dandjgoatfarms.com.
Goat cheese is nutritious and delicious!
ASG_1310_GOATS 9/23/13 2:59 AM Page 115
116
“There are many little tricks to
making the most of whatever root
cellar situation a person has.”
—Steve Maxwell,
co-author of The Complete Root Cellar Book
ASG_1310_ROOT 9/23/13 3:05 AM Page 116
117
OBWEBS. DARKNESS. RICKETY, SQUEAKY
STAIRS …. IF YOUR VISION OF A ROOT CELLAR
INVOLVES YOUR GRANDMOTHER’S SPOOKY
OLD BASEMENT, THEN THINK AGAIN.
A root cellar is a useful way to ensure that your
produce stays fresh and survives throughout the season to keep
your family full and your pantry diverse. Creating a root cellar
may not be as difficult as you expect, if you know where to start
and how to store your vegetables.
URBAN SETTING? NO WORRIES
Even if you don’t have a proper basement, you can still create
your own version of a root cellar, says Steve Maxwell, co-author
of The Complete Root Cellar Book.
“Urban or rural, root cellars make sense,” Maxwell says. “As
long as a person has access to some kind of soil, you can create
a root cellar from nothing more than a hole in the ground.”
In fact, Maxwell says, some people even create above-ground
root cellars.
Get
to the
Root
of It!
enhance your homegrown
produce storage with a
root cellar
By Torrey Kim
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118
“A little bit of insulation and a little
bit of electricity allows anyone to have a
root cellar, even if they don’t have access
to a basement or backyard,” he advises.
“I’ve designed and created plans for root
cellars for all applications, including con-
ventional basements, urban backyards,
stand-alone root cellars, and even a root
cellar for a condo.”
HIGH MOISTURE IS
ESSENTIAL
Some people believe that their base-
ments aren’t amenable to root cellars
because they struggle with dampness—
but that’s exactly the environment your
root cellar will need to thrive.
“A high moisture content is actually
required for effective root cellaring in
most cases,” Maxwell says.
“Many root crops, for instance, keep
best at a temperature just above freezing,
and with a relative humidity of 90 to 95
percent. Different types of produce
require different conditions, and there
are ways to achieve this all in the same
cellar.”
For example, you can place shelving in
your root cellar to separate your produce.
“I have a shelf very low to the ground
for my vegetables that like it cooler and
more moist (like potatoes), and then I put
items like hot peppers on the high shelves
because it’s warmer and more dry there,”
says Andrea Bergen, who created a root
cellar in her North Carolina home.
In addition to ensuring that the tem-
perature and moisture content is accept-
able in your root cellar, you’ll also want
to make sure it’s well ventilated.
DON’T DUMP VEGGIES
TOGETHER
Once you’ve carved out some space
for a root cellar and you’ve controlled
the temperature and moisture content,
don’t simply pile your vegetables
together and expect them to stay fresh.
ROOT
GREAT
ROOT
CELLAR
VEGGIES
AND
FRUITS
You’ll want to
classify your root
cellar storage
spaces based on
moisture and
temperature, so
you’ll need a way
to determine
which types of
produce require
each setting. Cor-
nell University’s
“Storage Guide-
lines for Fruits
and Vegetables”
offers the follow-
ing tips, among
others.
Ideal storage is
cold and moist:
• Asparagus
• Apples
• Broccoli
• Cabbage
• Carrots
• Celery
• Sweet corn
• Kale
• Lettuce
• Pears
• Potatoes
• Rhubarb
Ideal storage is
cool and dry:
• Garlic
• Onions
Ideal storage is
warm and dry:
• Hot peppers
• Pumpkins
• Winter squash
• Sweet potatoes
Source: Cornell Univer-
sity’s “Storage Guidelines
for Fruits and Vegetables,”
available at www.garden-
ing.cornell.edu/fact-
sheets/vegetables/stor-
age.pdf
After you gather
your potatoes, store
them in a dark
place so they’ll
keep longer.
All root vegetables will thrive in a root
cellar, but you should separate each type
before storing because not all vegetables
succeed when stacked together.
AVOID
FREEZING
TEMPS
Ideal tempera-
tures for a root cellar
can vary based on
location and season,
Maxwell says.
He also told us
that, generally speak-
ing, a temperature
just above freezing is
ideal; you can go
warmer than that,
and it only shortens
keeping times. What
you should avoid,
however, is a temper-
ature below freezing.
If any kind of produce
freezes, it will rot in a
short time. The ideal
way to avoid freezing
is a cellar below
ground level, or one
in an insulated area
above ground.
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ASG_1310_ROOT 9/23/13 3:05 AM Page 118
119
Instead, you must find out what helps
each type of produce thrive and store it
accordingly.
“There are many little tricks to mak-
ing the most of whatever root cellar situ-
ation a person has,” Maxwell says.
“Apples, for instance, give off ethylene
gas, and this promotes the premature
ripening of other produce. That’s why it’s
always good to keep apples separated
from the rest of the produce.”
Likewise, Maxwell advises, potatoes
require dark conditions or they will turn
green. “Rhubarb roots can be dug up in
fall, brought into the cellar, then allowed
to sprout when winter is still around,” he
adds.
“You get fresh rhubarb long before it
would ordinarily be ready.”
When it comes to cabbages, instead
of cutting them off at ground level, har-
vest them roots and all, then plant them
in tubs of soil in the cellar, Maxwell
advises.
“They’ll keep much longer because
they’re actually growing a little.”
GIVE IT A TRY!
Urban dwellers take note: if you think you don’t have
room to have a root cellar, get creative! You can use
anything from a closet to a space under a stairwell to
start your cellar. It’s an easy way to ensure your veggies
stay fresh and is the perfect solution to keeping your
meals healthy and interesting!
FOR MORE
INFORMATION
To find more ideas
for proper root cellar
management, along
with many unique
recipes for your home-
grown produce, check
out Maxwell’s book,
The Complete Root
Cellar Book.
P
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O

C
O
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S
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O
B
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R
T

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E

P
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I
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H
I
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G
NO BASEMENT?
No worries! You can even create
a root “cellar” in a condo. If you
have a cool, dark spot (even an
unused closet in a guest room), you
can create a makeshift root cellar.
Key things to consider:
• Cool, even temperature
• A dark area
• Space to store things with room
for air circulation
You can even adapt a space
below a stairwell or use a small,
secondary fridge, because root veg-
gies can be refrigerated. Note: Pur-
chasing fresh, good quality produce
is important for long-term storage.
“Urban or rural, root cellars make sense.”
—Steve Maxwell, co-author of The Complete Root Cellar Book.
As long as you
have access to
soil, then you
can create a root
cellar.
THREE ESSENTIAL TIPS
You can be on your way to root cellar success if you avoid
these three mistakes that Andrea Bergen made when she built
her first North Carolina root cellar:
Don’t build near trees. Bergen dug her root cellar and then
planted several trees around it, which was great for the first few
years, and then the tree roots made their way into the cellar and
damaged the walls, so avoid building near trees.
Use non-metal storage materials. Bergen had wooden
shelves but a metal bin for potatoes. In the summer, the metal
conducted heat, and the potatoes went bad very quickly.
Place a screen in your ventilation area. “Bergen installed a
ventilation hose from our root cellar to the outdoors but didn’t
put a screen in it. Bugs ended up coming into the root cellar
through the ventilation tube and damaging some of our food.”
Although you might gather apples with
the rest of your fruits and vegetables,
they can promote premature ripening
of other produce. Therefore, you
should separate apples from your
other foods during storage.
P
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ASG_1310_ROOT 9/23/13 3:05 AM Page 119
WHEN CREATING A SURVIVAL TOOLKIT, many don’t look past food,
water and medical supplies. A trustworthy weapon, however, can also be a
key component of your survival arsenal.
Firearms can provide both personal protection and hunting functions,
ensuring that you’re well prepared for any situation.
Various firearms fill different roles. Handguns can be used for hunting
small game. Shotguns are a great match for flying prey such as ducks or
geese. And a rifle is ideal for hunting large game at long distances.
Whether you are adding to an established firearms collection or seeking
out your first weapon, here are a few of the latest guns to consider.
From handguns to shotguns, firearms are
essential tools IN THE WILDERNESS
BY ERIN HATFIELD
G
U
N
S
1
$329
STURM, RUGER & CO.
Gunning for Survival
ASG_1310_BG_GUNS 9/23/13 3:17 AM Page 120
121
buyer’s
Guide GUNS
STURM, RUGER & CO.
Model: American Rimfire Bolt-action Rifle
www.ruger.com
MSRP: $329
Key Features: Bolt-action, interchangeable stock mod-
ules, durable composite stock
Description: The Ruger American Rimfire bolt-action
rifle contains many of the standard Ruger American Rifle
features, and this new line also combines several design
innovations from the popular 10/22 rimfire rifle. This
combination, along with the rifle’s adaptability, appeals
to all bolt-action enthusiasts. The new line consists of
four models—full-sized (22-inch barrel/13.75-inch
length of pull) and compact (18-inch/12.5-inch length of
pull), both of which are available in either .22 LR or .22
Magnum. Each model in the line includes two inter-
changeable stock modules that provide comb height
options for scope or iron sight use. Ruger American Rim-
fire rifles feature a durable composite stock with front
and rear swivel studs.
Manufacturer’s Comments: “The new American Rimfire
series really ups the ante for performance in rimfire rifles,”
remarked Mike Fifer, President and CEO. “With proven
technologies and features from the centerfire Ruger Ameri-
can Rifle, the bolt-action rimfire models are sure to deliver
accuracy, durability and value to consumers.”
1
REMINGTON
Model: 870 EXPRESS COMPACT JR.
www.remington.com
MSRP: $349-$383 (online sellers)
Key Features: Adjustable length of pull, light weight
Description: The Remington Model 870 Express Com-
pact Jr. is the slightly smaller version of the standard
for pump shotguns around the world. It also features
the Adjustable Length of Pull System and Rem Choke
barrels. This 20-gauge gun features an 18.75-inch bar-
rel and weighs 5.75 pounds with a six-round capacity.
Manufacturer’s Comment: “The perfect gun for
youngsters to learn on and for adults who need a shorter
length of pull.”
2
2
$349-$383
REMINGTON
“The new American Rimfire
series really ups the ante for
performance in rimfire rifles…”
“A trustworthy
weapon can be a
key component of
your survival
arsenal.”
ASG_1310_BG_GUNS 9/23/13 3:17 AM Page 121
122
buyer’s
Guide GUNS
BENELLI
Model: Vinci Shotgun
www.benelliusa.com
MSRP: $1359
Key Features: Semi-automatic, three-piece
modular design
Description: The three-inch, 12-gauge Vinci
shotgun is a reliable, fast-performing, semi-
automatic shotgun. Its innovative design
features the In-Line Inertia Driven operating
system, which delivers reduced recoil and
shotgun modularity. The ComforTech Plus
recoil reduction system delivers better
results than any other recoil reduction prod-
uct available, without adding weight. The
unique modular design makes Vinci the eas-
iest shotgun to assemble and disassemble
for cleaning, maintenance, storage and
transportation. The Vinci reliably shoots car-
tridges up to three-inch magnum loads.
Manufacturer’s Comments: “The Benelli
Vinci is like nothing you’ve ever seen before,”
said Stephen McKelvain, Benelli’s VP of Mar-
keting & Communications.
3
SAVAGE ARMS
Model: Savage B.MAG rifle
www.savagearms.com
MSRP: $349
Key Features: Rimfire action, center-feed
rotary magazine
Description: The new Savage B.MAG con-
tains a completely new compact rimfire
action with rear locking lugs and cock-on-
close bolt. It features a center-feed rotary
magazine, as well as a soft rubber buttpad
and hidden action-screws. Savage designed
the B.MAG rimfire rifle specifically to handle
the high velocities of the 17 Winchester
Super Magnum with design features typi-
cally reserved for its centerfire rifles. In
order to maximize accuracy in this long-
range shooter, the B.MAG utilizes Savage’s
thread-in barrel headspacing system, rear-
locking lugs and a cock-on-close bolt
capped off with the light, crisp AccuTrigger
that is user-adjustable without special tools.
Manufacturer’s Comments: “If you are a
new gun owner and you bought a pistol or an
AR first, this would be your ideal second gun
that you will never outgrow and that you will
still enjoy shooting in 30 years with your
grandchildren.”
4
“The Benelli Vinci is like nothing
you’ve ever seen before…”
“Firearms can
provide both
personal
protection
and hunting
functions…”






ASG_1310_BG_GUNS 9/23/13 3:18 AM Page 122
buyer’s
Guide GUNS
3
$1359
BENELLI
4
$349
SAVAGE ARMS
“this would be your ideal second gun
that you will never outgrow…”
Front
back
BUY THEM ONLINE AT ENGAGEDMEDIAMAGS.COM
OR CALL US AT 800-764-6278
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ASG_1310_BG_GUNS 9/23/13 3:18 AM Page 123
124
buyer’s
Guide GUNS
6
$500 and up
SPRINGFIELD ARMORY
HI-POINT FIREARMS
Model: 916
www.hi-pointfirearms.com
MSRP: $179
Key Features: Affordable, semi-automatic
Description: The Hi-Point 916 is an affordable, American-
made semiautomatic pistol. The polymer frame and han-
dles have matching black powder-coated slides, which
lock open after the last shot. The three-dot sight systems
feature fully-adjustable rear sights. It has 8+1 capacity
and includes a holster. It’s available in 9mm, .380 ACP, .40
S&W and .45 ACP calibers and weighs only 29 ounces.
Manufacturer’s Comments: “Simply put, you can’t get a
better-quality gun for the price.”
SPRINGFIELD ARMORY
Model: XDS 3.3-inch Single Stack 9mm handgun
www.springfield-armory.com
MSRP: Starting at $500, price varies by dealer
Key Features: Ultra-slim profile, fiber-optic front sight,
USA Action Trigger System
Description: The XD-S offers a unique combination of an
ultra-slim profile paired with enhanced performance point-
and-shoot features, allowing you to shoot accurately with-
out having to adjust your wrist. The pistol boasts a number
of safety features, including the Ultra Safety Assurance
(USA) Action Trigger System, loaded chamber indicator
and grip safety. In addition, the XD-S offers a top-of-the-
line, enhanced secure grip texture for greater control and
usability. The XD-S also features a fail-safe disassembly to
protect users from disassembling the pistol while a maga-
zine is in place, or from inserting a magazine when the
gun is being disassembled.
Manufacturer’s Comments: “The comfortable design of
the all new XD-S feels so natural, it’s like an extension of
your own body” —DEB WILLIAMS, ADVERTISING ASSISTANT WITH SPRING-
FIELD ARMORY
5
6
“The comfortable
design of the all
new XD-S feels
so natural…”
5
$179
HI-POINT FIREARMS
“Simply put, you can’t
get a better-quality gun
for the price.”
ASG_1310_BG_GUNS 9/23/13 3:18 AM Page 124
Front
back
BUY THEM ONLINE AT ENGAGEDMEDIAMAGS.COM OR CALL US AT 800-764-6278
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Get Your official american survival guide T-Shirt Today!
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SURVI VE
THE UNDEAD APOCALYPSE
ASG_1310_125 9/22/13 11:38 PM Page 125
buyer’s
Guide GUNS
Front
back
BUY THEM ONLINE AT ENGAGEDMEDIAMAGS.COM
OR CALL US AT 800-764-6278
100% Pre-Shrunk Cotton with Gold, Black and White Screen Print
Get Your official american
survival guide T-Shirt Today!
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BROWNING
Model: A-Bolt III AB3 Bolt Action Rifle
www.browning.com
MSRP: $599.99
Key Features: Matte blued barrel and action,
detachable double-stack magazine
Description: Browning introduced the AB3 bolt-
action rifle in 2013. Built to be an accurate and
value-priced rifle, the AB3 features a bolt lock
override button that allows shooters to unload the
firearm while leaving the top-tang safety in the on
safe position. A premium Inflex Technology recoil
pad reduces felt recoil by absorbing recoil and
using directional deflection to pull the comb down
and away from your face when shooting. The steel
receiver has a matte blue finish and is drilled and
tapped for scope mounts. The AB3 also has a
removable box magazine. The AB3 Composite
Stalker model is chambered in .30-06 Springfield,
270 Win, 300 Win Mag, and 7mm Rem Mag.
Manufacturer’s Comments: “The firearms market
has many different offerings in bolt action rifles, and
making a decision can be daunting. But it need not
be. With the AB3 you can have the accuracy and per-
formance you demand in a hunting rifle with more
money leftover for ammunition.” —PAUL THOMPSON, MEDIA
RELATIONS MANAGER WITH BROWNING/WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS
KEL-TEC CNC
Model: KSG Shotgun
www.keltecweapons.com
MSRP: $1197
Key Features: Pump-action, compact size
Description: The KSG is Kel-Tec CNC’s first entry
into the shotgun market. The size, shape, and
design are similar to those currently available Kel-
Tec RFB rifle, but the KSG ejects downward,
instead of forward. The pump-action KSG is as
compact as legally possible, with a 26.1-inch over-
all length and an 18.5-inch cylinder bore barrel.
Even with this compact size, the internal dual tube
magazines hold an impressive 12 rounds of 12-
gauge, three-inch rounds in total (six per tube). It
can also reliably shoot shells as short as 1 3/4-inch
up to three-inch. The pump includes an under
Picatinny rail for the mounting of a forward grip, a
light, or a laser. The included top Picatinny sight
rail will accept many types of optics or iron sights.
Manufacturer’s Comments: “The KSG is Kel-
Tec’s first pump shotgun and large amounts of
resources were put towards its development and
production.”
7
8
“With the AB3 you can have the
accuracy and performance you
demand in a hunting rifle with more
money leftover for ammunition.”
7
$599.99
BROWNING
8
$1197
KEL-TEC
ASG_1310_BG_GUNS 9/23/13 3:18 AM Page 126
127
AS ANYONE WHO IS TRAINED TO
survive in a harsh winter environment
will tell you, the cold can be a killer if you
are not prepared.
While the days of having to trek
through snow dunes on foot are long
gone (unless you are going on a trekking
expedition), having a vehicle doesn’t
mean you will be immune to the dangers
of extreme weather conditions.
Winter storms are considered decep-
tive killers … as most of the deaths
caused by them are indirect. Everyone is
potentially at risk during winter storms,
yet the actual threat to you depends on
your specific situation. In recent years,
winter deaths or injuries were found to
be related to ice and snow, with about
75 percent occurring in automobiles,
while the other 25 percent were those
of people actually being caught outside
during the storm. With such a high per-
centage occurring in automobiles, every-
one should carry a winter survival kit in
his/her car.
Although some of the gear you need
may be common sense, being as prepared
as you can for any eventuality or emer-
gency could mean the difference between
life and death.
P
H
O
T
O

C
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Y

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F

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A
L
S
T
O
N
ULTIMATE KIT
“Prepare for the worst, hope for the best.”
—Tim Ralston, Founder, Gear Up Center
PREPPINGWITHRALSTON
BY TIM RALSTON
KIT BASICS
• Topography map of area
• Shovel (Recommend Crovel Extreme or Shovel Multi-tool)
• Windshield scraper and small broom
• Flashlight with extra batteries
• Battery powered radio
• Water
• Snack food, including energy bars
• Matches and small candles, magnesium fire rods and lighter
• Extra hats, socks and mittens (recommend wool)
• First aid kit
• Pocket knife (Multi-tool or Mora knife recommended)
• Necessary medications
• Blankets or sleeping bag (wool blanket, Mylar survival sleeping
bag recommended)
• Tow chain or rope
• Road salt, sand, or cat litter for traction
• Booster cables
• Emergency flares and reflectors
• Fluorescent distress flag and whistle to attract attention
• Cell phone adapter to plug into lighter
• Tin cup/metal pot (vessel you can heat to melt snow)
• Goggles
• Small notebook and pen
• Snow boots
• Neon florescent marker tape
• 1 small pup tent (Adventure Pod recommended)
• Jump cables, snow/tire chains (these may or may not
need to be attached prior to departing)
• Additional medication if anyone in group requires it
Timothy Bryan Ralston is an American inventor, veteran, adventurer, author and movie consultant for his expertise in the field of survival and preparedness
education. He is best known for his appearance in the powerful motivational film, The Compass, and for being the international spokesperson in the launch
of NatGeo’s #1-rated program, Doomsday Preppers. 
THE
NUMBERS
About
75%
of winter deaths
occur in automobiles,
while the other
25%
is made up of people
caught during the
storm.
What You Need To Survive Winter
PHOTOS BY THINKSTOCK
ASG_1310_RALSTON 9/23/13 3:08 AM Page 127
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Midwest Native Skills Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
MIL-TAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Nitro-Pak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3, 39
Ontario Knife Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Paracord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Savage Arms, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
SCCY Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Sturm, Ruger & Company, Inc. . . . . . . . . . 62-63
Survival Bags Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Tormach LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
W.R. Case & Sons Cutlery Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
WILSON COMBAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Zombie Survival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
The Advertiser Index is provided as a service to American Survival
Guide readers. American Survival Guide is not responsible for
omissions or typographical errors on names or page numbers.
128
Know Your Environment
Before you put your survival kit
together, it is important to do some pre-
liminary research regarding the climate
and major dangers of the area you are
located in, or traveling to. If traveling,
make sure you are aware of possible
weather fronts that could hit and how
these conditions will affect the conditions
of the road, as well as how you will navi-
gate through it. Generally, avoid driving
through snow or ice unless absolutely
necessary, as your chances of breakdown
and getting stranded increase when you
do. Making sure you are as aware as pos-
sible about weather conditions, general
areas of danger when traveling, and who
to call in an emergency, are all very cru-
cial no matter where you are going.
PREPPINGWITHRALSTON
ENJOY WINTER!
Once you have these basics in your kit, you can add more supplies as needed should you be
planning longer or more extended trips. Having such a kit on hand, whether you are skiing at a
resort or trekking in the woods, is always a good idea. Accidents can happen anytime, from
avalanches, snow storms and other forms of extreme weather that can quickly leave you
stranded. Without a winter survival kit, you could be in real trouble. That said, while winter
can be dangerous, by respecting it, having a little knowledge of your environment and being
prepared, you can really enjoy the winter season.
CAUGHT IN A
WINTER STORM?
Try to find shelter and
stay dry. Cover all exposed
parts of the body. If you can-
not find shelter:
• Prepare a lean-to, wind-
break, or snow cave for
protection from the wind.
• Build a fire for heat and to
attract attention.
• Place rocks around the fire
to absorb and reflect heat.
• Do not eat snow: It will
lower your body tempera-
ture. Melt it first.
VEHICLE SENSE
Stay in your car or truck.
Disorientation occurs quickly in
wind-driven snow and cold. Run
the motor about ten minutes each
hour for heat. Open the window a
little for fresh air to avoid carbon
monoxide poisoning and make sure the
exhaust pipe is not blocked.
TIPS – If possible, make yourself visible to rescuers:
• Tie a colored cloth (preferably red) to your
antenna or door.
• Turn on the dome light at night when running your
engine.
• Raise the hood indicating trouble after the snow
stops falling.
• Exercise by moving your extremities from time to
time to keep your blood circulating and to keep
warm. Don’t forget your toes!
• Eat and drink. Food provides the body with energy
for producing its own heat. Keep the body replen-
ished with fluids to prevent dehydration.
P
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B
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T
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T
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KIT TIPS
• Reverse batteries in flash-
light to avoid accidental
switching and burnout.
• Store items in the passenger
compartment in case the
trunk is jammed or
frozen shut.
ASG_1310_RALSTON 9/23/13 3:08 AM Page 128
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ASG_1310_129 9/22/13 11:33 PM Page 129
130
P
H
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B
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T
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S
T
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“We could do it, you know.”
“What?”
“Leave the district. Run off.
Live in the woods. You and I,
we could make it.”
—Suzanne Collins, The Hunger Games
CLOSING WORDS
ASG_1310_CLOSING 9/20/13 6:20 AM Page 130
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