KONTROL EDITION

KONTROL EDITION

KONTROL EDITION
OPERATION MANUAL

The information in this document is subject to change without notice and does not represent a commitment on the part of NATIVE INSTRUMENTS GmbH. The software described by this document is subject to a License Agreement and may not be copied to other media. No part of this publication may be copied, reproduced or otherwise transmitted or recorded, for any purpose, without prior written permission by NATIVE INSTRUMENTS GmbH, hereinafter referred to as NATIVE INSTRUMENTS. All product and company names are ™ or ® trademarks of their respective owners. Furthermore, the fact that you are reading this text means you are the owner of legal version rather than an illegal, pirated copy. It is only through the loyalty and honesty of people like yourself that NATIVE INSTRUMENTS GmbH can continue to develop and create innovative audio software. On behalf of the entire company, thank you very much. Users Guide written by Marc Schonbrun Editors: Jonathan DeRouchie, André Estermann Special thanks to the Beta Test Team, who were invaluable not just in tracking down bugs, but in making this a better product.

Germany
NATIVE INSTRUMENTS GmbH Schlesische Str. 28 D-10997 Berlin Germany info@native-instruments.de www.native-instruments.de

USA
NATIVE INSTRUMENTS North America, Inc. 5631 Hollywood Boulevard Los Angeles, CA 90028 USA sales@native-instruments.com www.native-instruments.com

© Native Instruments GmbH, 2007. All rights reserved.

1. Introduction
1.1 Welcome
GUITAR RIG 3 will change the way you play and think about music. Say goodbye to complex, noisy, unreliable guitar pedal setups with cables that crackle and batteries that die in the middle of solos. GUITAR RIG 3 puts the world’s most sophisticated, flexible, and wonderful-sounding guitar setups into any modern laptop or desktop computer (Mac OS X or Windows XP). Take it to the studio, to the gig, or practice in your hotel room…the possibilities are limitless. And thanks to the included RIG KONTROL 3 foot controller/DI box/USB 2 sound card/preamp, you can take your guitar, bass, or other stringed instrument sound to the next level with only a few guitar chords, and some way to hear what you’re doing. Of course, none of this would be possible without the visionaries, inventors, and artisans whose dedication and hard work on guitar amps and effects over the decades have defined the sound of the electric guitar as we know it. All of the NATIVE INSTRUMENTS team would like to acknowledge their creations as an integral source of inspiration in the design of this software. They have both our respect and gratitude, as without them, this software would not be possible. We are more than happy to state that imitation is indeed the sincerest form of flattery.

GUITAR RIG 3 – 

A love of the guitar and its seemingly infinite potential has driven our quest for the ultimate guitar rig. We thank you for your support, and hope that whether you’re looking for vintage blues timbres, modern rock grunge, or synthetic sounds for dance music, GUITAR RIG 3 will deliver the tone, punch, and crunch you crave. – The NATIVE INSTRUMENTS GUITAR RIG 3 Team

1.2 How to use this manual
This manual has been designed to be as clear and concise as possible. While GUITAR RIG has been designed to be as intuitive as any of the hardware rigs you may be used to, its true power lies in its great flexibility – GUITAR RIG is much more diverse and flexible than the hardware rigs you’re used to. In order to make the most of your GUITAR RIG experience, we recommend that you keep this manual handy, as it will shed light on all the cool things GUITAR RIG can do, and with any luck, inspire you to try things you never thought about. The manual is divided into two main sections. The first gives you a broad overview of the software and hardware to get you up and running as quickly as possible. The remainder of the manual is devoted to referencing every Button, Knob and switch on the interface. If you want to get deep into GUITAR RIG, and its sound design possibilities, you’ll want to know everything you can about it.

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1.3 Software installation
If you are looking for more information about the GUITAR RIG software installation, please consult the NATIVE INSTRUMENTS Setup Guide, included with this package.

!

When you install GUITAR RIG 3 for the first time,

please make sure that you also choose to install the RIG KONTROL driver (KONTROL EDITION). This option has to be initiated during the last step of the installation process. (In this step, you should also install the Service Center if it is not already installed.)

1.4 Hardware setup
If you are looking for more information about the RIG KONTROL hardware installation, please consult the NATIVE INSTRUMENTS RIG CONTROL Operation Manual, included with this package.

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2. Getting started
It’s time! You got the software and, you got the hardware (That new RIG KONTROL is crying "Step on me!"), now you want to start rocking out! Let’s get you started with an overview of GUITAR RIG 3.

2.1 What is Guitar Rig
GUITAR RIG is the future of guitar tone. Imagine having a room filled with every boutique amplifier ever crafted, endless arrays of cabinets (each with different microphones), any effect you desire, loop machines, and other amazing tools for crafting sounds at your immediate disposal. GUITAR RIG takes this idea (which would cost you many hundreds of thousands of dollars) and puts them into a single program which can run as a standalone application, or a plug-in, on Mac OSX, or Windows XP in any DAW that you prefer to work in. Not only can GUITAR RIG craft your favorite sounds, you can also create new sounds you’d never even dreamed of thanks to our unique modulation framework. GUITAR RIG is simply the best thing to happen to your guitar playing and production since the key of E minor!

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2.2 New in Version 3
GUITAR RIG 3 adds to the award winning GUITAR RIG 2 design, and implements a multitude of improvements to the software. Here’s what you can expect to find in GUITAR RIG 3: ► A new, more polished, easier to navigate user interface. ► The powerful Live view for easy access to your parameters for live, onstage performance. ► Four brand-new, sought-after amplifier models. ► Six brand-new, sound shaping effects. ► “Snapshots”, which allow for quick and fluid changes of sounds during a song. ► “Matched Cabinets” feature that makes combining amp models and cabinets easier than ever. ► A newly designed RIG KONTROL (GUITAR RIG 3 KONTROL EDITION), featuring a new A/D D/A section from the acclaimed Audio Kontrol 1, eight freely assignable foot-switches, and one continuous controller pedal with on/off switch. ► An updated Preset browser with improved Bank and sound functionality which makes organizing your sounds easier than ever. ► Tempo, such as synced delays can now be stored within the Preset and can be set to sync to host clock or ignore host clock when needed. ► Assigning controllers has never been easier. Third party controllers can share the common virtuaL rig KontroL graphic for a simplified interface.

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2.3 Standalone and Plug-in Mode
You can use GUITAR RIG 3 in two different ways: run it as a standalone application or plug it into your favourite sequencer. This section will introduce you to both modes.

2.3.1 About “Standalone” Mode
GUITAR RIG 3 can function as a guitar processing setup all by itself, without needing anything other than a computer and audio in and out. Only a few steps are neccessary to get you started: ► Turn off Direct Monitoring (please refer to Appendix A) ► Open the GUITAR RIG 3 program, and select the computer’s audio input as GUITAR RIG 3’s audio input. ► Plug your guitar (using RIG KONTROL, as described later, or a preamp) into the computer’s audio input. ► Select the computer audio output as GUITAR RIG 3’s output. ► Patch the computer’s audio output into your amplification system (guitar amp, mixing console, PA system, etc.). However, the built-in audio in most Windows machines is not studio quality, and there will be audible latency (time delay) between the time you play a note and when you hear it come out of the computer. Latency is frustrating, because we’re used to hearing a sound immediately when we pluck a string.

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Modern Macintosh computers running OS X are better, but there may still be sound quality issues with built-in audio. If you are not using the RIG KONTROL 3 audio inter face, NATIVE INSTRUMENTS advises you to use an audio interface or sound card designed specifically for audio applications. These are higher quality, and include drivers (software that transfers data from the audio interface to the computer) optimized for minimum delay. This will ensure that you have a much more pleasurable musical experience.

The Audio/MIDI Setup Window

In standalone mode, simply choose the appropriate inputs and outputs by visiting the preferences screen to bring up your audio setup.

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2.3.2 About “Plug-in” Mode
In this mode, GUITAR RIG 3 works in conjunction with a host program, like GarageBand, Cubase, Apple Logic, Pro Tools, Live, Sonar, Digital Performer, Tracktion, and so on. It inserts into the program’s mixer, like a “virtual effect”. Audio passes through the computer’s sound card into the host program, which feeds it into GUITAR RIG 3. The host’s output then proceeds to a hardware output, which goes to your amplification system. As with standalone mode, an audio-oriented sound card is highly recommended to avoid the latency involved in going through the host program and computer.

GUITAR RIG 3 is inserted in Apple Logic to process a guitar track while being automated under host automation.

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2.4 The RIG KONTROL foot controller
The RIG KONTROL 3 hardware which is included in the GUITAR RIG 3 KONTROL EDITION has an expression pedal, nine footswitches, guitar preamp/impedance converter, and USB 2 computer audio interface. The preamp is important as it conditions the guitar signal properly for the best tone and lowest noise when interfaced with other electronic devices, or your computer. The footswitches and pedal are assignable to various functions within GUITAR RIG 3 for “hands-off”, real-time control.

2.5 Caution
Guitar pickups are very susceptible to hum, light dimmer “hash”, and the interference generated by computers and monitors. LCD monitors create less interference than CRT types, and humbuckers are less likely to pick up interference than single coil pickups. Piezo pickups, like those used in the Line 6 Variax, do not pick up this interference. As you play with GUITAR RIG 3, always position your guitar so it picks up the least amount of interference. GUITAR RIG 3’s Noise Reduction can help get rid of some interference, but it is not a substitute for orienting your guitar away from sources of interference. Also, as amazing as GUITAR RIG 3 is, it cannot compensate for problems at the guitar. For example, if you have dead strings, the Compressor will not magically make them sustain.

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2.6 Get creative!
Once GUITAR RIG 3 is open and communicating with the audio interface and/or host, the real fun begins. Unlike a hardware rack, you aren’t limited by a fixed number of effects in particular positions. You can place the various GUITAR RIG 3 Components in any order – even create parallel processing paths – and then save your favorite configurations for later recall. You can create multiple rigs for blues, hard rock, and a few more for bass. You can even create a rig for rehearsing…there are no limits, other than your computer’s processor speed (and your imagination). There is one caution: The huge variety of options means it’s possible to set up some combinations of effects and settings that don’t sound all that great. If you’re working with a sound and aren’t satisfied with it, try different cabinets, mic positions, and the like until you hit the “sweet spot”. Also, save frequently – not necessarily because your computer might crash, but because it’s easy to “overtweak” a sound and you’ll wish you’d kept an earlier version. GUITAR RIG 3 makes it easy to save multiple variations on a sound; you can then decide which one you like best, and delete the rest. GUITAR RIG 3 also includes two hard disk recording Components called Tapedecks. One is optimized to load audio files to serve as backing tracks, or you can study solos by loading them into the Tapedeck, and using the tempo control to slow them down for easy analysis. The second Tapedeck is optimized for recording what you’re playing, or overdubbing new parts overtop of parts you’ve already played. A tuner and metronome keep you in tune and on time. GUITAR RIG 3 is more than just a signal shaper – it’s a complete system for processing, and enjoying, your guitar.

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3. Using Guitar Rig
GUITAR RIG was designed to be as easy to use as possible. It was also designed to be very powerful. We have done so by designing a sleek interface that combines all of the Knobs and controls you’re used to seeing in real life, alongside the power and organization of a powerful piece of software. This section is the broad overview of how to use GUITAR RIG. For a more detailed look at the software in every minute detail, please consult the reference section later in this manual.

3.1 Interface navigation
In order to get around GUITAR RIG with ease, you’ll want to know everything you can about the visual interface to the software. The interface is broken into five main parts and we will detail them for you in the next sections.

3.1.1 Global Header
The gLobaL Header is a collection of the most important controls of GUITAR RIG 3. It contains your input and output settings, as well as controls for the audio engine and CPU controls. It’s unique in that no matter what mode you’re in (rig view or live view) the global Header is always visible.

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The Global Header

The Live view button switches the interface to the new “Live Mode”, which is detailed in section 3.1..

3.1.2 Toolbar
The tooLbar in GUITAR RIG 3 is your one-stop-shop for controlling the most frequently used parts of GUITAR RIG. In the tooLbar, you can view and change Presets, Save them, as well as CoMpare various Presets while editing and even clear your whole rack with a single click. It’s the TOOLBAR that you will also access the newly enhanced SynC settings.

The Toolbar

3.1.3 SideKick
The SideKiCK includes the remainder of GUITAR RIG’s viewing options. Here, you can access the Sound browSer /Manager, which is where you’ll find, store, create, search and filter all of your sounds and Banks. The CoMponentS pooL contains all of the individual rack modules in GUITAR RIG 3. The optionS SCreen controls all of the RIG KONTROL, and external assignments for automation, and preferenCeS for setting up GUITAR RIG, such as window height, the location of its Bank storage and other program details.

The SideKick

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3.1.4 Hiding/Showing The SideKick
From the main GUITAR RIG screen, you can hide or show the SideKick by clicking on the following Button:

Follow the white circle to hide/show the SideKick

Alternately, you can use the keyboard shortcut F2 to hide and show it.

3.1.5 The Rack
The rack is where you will build your custom rigs. Using your mouse, it’s easy work to drag and drop Components from the Components pool into the rack to make your ultimate sound. The rack also houses the four

Nice Rack!

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fixed Components: tuner, MetronoMe, tapedeCK i and tapedeCK I|. You can remove CoMponentS from the rack by clicking the particular CoMponentS X button. Rearrange the rack by dragging selected CoMponentS into any order you choose.

3.1.6 Live View
The new Live view is perfect for taking your GUITAR RIG onstage with your laptop computer. This view consolidates and magnifies the following elements for easy viewing across a stage: ► Toolbar (Input/Output and CPU meters) ► Sound List ► Preset Name and Number ► Metronome, Tuner, and Loop Machine Access ► Large RIG KONTROL Display with Enlarged Assignment Text You can toggle in and out of the live mode by clicking on the Live Mode button, on the toolbar or with the key command F1.

3.2 Finding the right sound
GUITAR RIG would be useless without a sophisticated Preset manager to help you find, and organize all of your sounds. Intelligent categories, Banks, and search options help you manage the hundreds of sounds that come with GUITAR RIG.

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3.2.1 Categories, Banks and Sounds
The first organization of any sound in GUITAR RIG is a Preset. A sound contains all the Components in your rig as well as any necessary controller assignments, and the sync settings.

The

SoundS pane

GUITAR RIG 3 organizes these Presets together into Banks. Think of a Bank as a collection of Presets that you can create to keep your sounds ‘in line’. GUITAR RIG 3 ships with a generous amount of factory Presets and Banks, and you can easily create more as you see fit. Use Banks to save your edited sounds together or to create set-lists for your on-stage rigs.

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The Bank Pane

Bank categories are new in GUITAR RIG 3 and allow you to filter the Sound Banks based on categories. For example, rather than having to look at dozens of Banks, you can choose a filter to display your custom created Banks inside the My Sounds category. You can tag Banks with specific keywords (Guitar Amps, Bass Amps, Live, FX, etc…) and filter your view on to the main Bank list. This helps to organize your sounds and avoid the congestive difficulties related to navigating a large Bank collection.

Bank Categories

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3.2.2 Search and find
Since GUITAR RIG 3 ships with hundreds of sounds to explore and make music with, we felt it was key to provide a tool for you to discover this diverse sound. A library this extensive would be useless without a search engine. Behind the SearCH tab you will discover a couple of handy tools to search for sounds based on name, author, attributes or their Bank category.

The Search Pane

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3.2.3 Manage your sounds
Managing your sounds is easier than ever in GUITAR RIG 3. You can classify your Presets with attributes like style, tone and instrument types to make searching more efficient. Bank categories allow you to filter large collections of Banks by intelligent tagging. For example, you might want to put all of your live Banks into the “Live” category, and then filter them using the new Bank categories.

3.3 Building your own Rack
Forget about the days of floor to ceiling rack systems, sophisticated MIDI switching systems and miles of patch cables, GUITAR RIG lets you create your custom rig by simply dragging and dropping Components into a virtual “rig” to make your custom sound. Crafting your rig has never been easier.

The Attributes Pane

3.3.1 The Components pool
The CoMponentS pooL is where you’ll find all the sound-shaping elements in GUITAR RIG. The C oMponentS themselves are divided into eight categories: 1. Amps: The heart of guitar rig – the modeled amplifiers, and cabinets. 2. Dist: Classic, stomp-box style distortion effects. 3. Mod: Modulation effects such as Tremolo, Chorus, Flange, Octave shifters and much more.

The Components Pool

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4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

EQ: Parametric EQ, Synth-style filters and Wah pedals. Vol: Volume, Compression, Limiting, Gates and Noise Suppression. Rev: Reverberant effects and Delays. Tools: Loop Machines, Splits and Crossover Mixes. MDF: A unique, synthesizer-style modulation framework; completely unique to guitar rig. Complete, detailed explanations about each of the Components in GUITAR RIG 3 can be found in sections 7 – 15.

3.2.1 Drop it
To add any of the CoMponentS from the CoMponent pooL into your rig, you just drag the CoMponent from the pooL and drop it in the raCK area. Use your mouse to reorder your Components for a completely flexible signal routing.

3.2.2 In Sync
Guitar Rig 3 now provides much greater flexibility in its synchronization options. You can now choose to sync to the host clock/external clock, store per-sound tempo settings, or have no sync at all.

3.3 The Virtual RIG KONTROL
Virtual instruments are one thing, but hands on (or, in this case, your feet) controls are a must. Whether you’re using one of the RIG KONTROLS (RK1, RK2, or RK3) or using your own external MIDI control surface, the

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virtuaL rig KontroL is your dashboard for interfacing real world controls with your virtual rig. The virtuaL rig KontroL is a unifying theme throughout GUITAR RIG 3. No matter what controller you use, you can map it to the virtuaL rig KontroL interface. To make your life that much easier, the Templates and Snapshots will change the way you interface with your rig.

The virtuaL

rig KontroL in all its glory!

3.3.1 In control of the Rig
You want total control of your rig? Whether you use the RIG KONTROL or a 3rd party MIDI controller, GUITAR RIG 3 allows you new ways to manage all of your controller assignments. If you use a RIG KONTROL, you’ll find that it’s completely “plug-and-play” in GUITAR RIG 3. Just plug it in and all of the controls are pre-defined and hardwired in – no need to configure anything! You can even hot swap between RIG KONTROL 2 and RIG KONTROL 3 without having to change a single setting!

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3.3.2 Making assignments
Making assignments to your RIG KONTROL or external MIDI device is accomplished in a few ways. You can assign controllers through simple MIDI learn, using the virtuaL rig KontroL or through the controller assignments window. Assignments for the RK can be on a per-sound, or global basis. Global assignments speed up the assignment task (providing you want to commit a Button to a certain action, every time you use the RK.)
Global Assignment

Per Sound Assignment

Example Controller Assignments

To make an assignment to the RIG KONTROL, the quickest way is to right click on the Components knob, button, or switch that you wish to map, right click (ctrl click on Mac), select Learn and then click the Button on the virtuaL rig KontroL and your control is now mapped!

3.3.3 The snapshot concept
Have you ever wished that you could change the status of multiple Components with a single click, all within the same sound/Preset? You can with Snapshots! All you have to do is setup your rig the way you want
Right-Click Component Learn

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to look/sound, and map one of the buttons on the virtual RK to Snapshot for instant recall with a single Preset. You can setup multiple Snapshots within the same sound, making it easy to setup Snapshots for the verse, bridge, chorus, and solo of your song, all without changing Presets.

The Virtual RIG KONTROL with Snapshots Assignments

3.3.4 Linking external controllers
You will appreciate the new virtuaL rig KontroL, as it allows you to seamlessly integrate and link external controllers with the virtuaL rig KontroL. All you have to do is map your external device to the virtuaL rig KontroL through the Options > Controller > Assignment Page once, and you’ll have permanent integration with all of the GUITAR RIG 3 sounds. From this point on, your external controller will act just like a RIG KONTROL. In order to “learn” MIDI assignments, you just choose the appropriate RIG KONTROL assignment, which is already mapped to your external device. Set it, and forget it!

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Snapshots are not Preset changes – they allow you

to alter the state of the multiple components within your currently selected rig with a single click.

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Linked Controller Assignments

3.4 The Live View
The new Live view is perfect for taking your GUITAR RIG on stage with a laptop computer. Live view consolidates and “supersizes” the most essential elements of the GUITAR RIG interface for easy viewing across a stage.

3.5 Interfacing Guitar Rig with other gear
The RIG KONTROL 3 is a multi-purpose device that provides: ► Input impedance buffering to preserve the guitar’s sound quality ► Gain control to match the instrument level to Guitar Rig or other host software ► Analog to Digital converter to convert the guitar’s analog signal to a digital signal compatible with computers

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► USB 2 interface to shuttle digital audio to and from the computer and associated software running on it ► Digital to Analog converter to convert digital data coming from the computer into audio ► Standard 1/” (6.3mm) phone jacks for input and output connections ► MIDI In and Out connectors ► Volume pedal controller and footswitches In terms of audio, RIG KONTROL 3 is compatible with a large number of amplification scenarios. Here are some typical options. Powered Monitor Speakers The RIG KONTROL 3's outputs can drive powered monitor signals directly. In order to prevent damage to the speakers, turn down the monitor volume controls before connecting any cables, and turn up the volume slowly to avoid excessively loud sounds as you optimize volume levels. Project Studio Mixer The RIG KONTROL 3's outputs should feed the mixer’s line, not mic, inputs. If only mic inputs are available, you may need to switch the mixer’s –20db pad into position. It may also be necessary to switch the RIG KONTROL output high/low switch to –1db.

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Pro Studio Mixer Same as above, except the high/low switch must be set to the high (0) position for the best signal-to-noise ratio. Standard Guitar Amp With a standard guitar amp, the GUITAR RIG 3 system can be used as a highly sophisticated pedal board. First, make sure that the rear panel high/low switch is set to –1dB. You may also need to lower the RIG KONTROL 3's output LeveL ControL to avoid excessive overloading of the amp… then again, using a higher level to overload the amp may provide that extra degree of overload you are looking for. As the amp already has a cabinet, you will probably want to choose to omit a cabinet. A power amp may also be redundant, unless you want to use it as an added effect. Standard Guitar Amp With Effects Loop The effects loop for most amps is designed to accommodate line-level (as opposed to guitar-level) signals. In this case, connect the loop send jacks to the RIG KONTROL 3's inputs, and send the RIG KONTROL outputs to the loop return (receive) jacks. As the signal coming into GUITAR RIG 3 will be fairly strong, the input gain control(s) will most likely need a minimal amount of gain. Adjust GUITAR RIG 3’s output so that the power amp that follows the loop return jacks is not overloaded. You may need to set the rear panel high/low switch to low (-1dB).

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Keyboard Amp These are actually ideal for use with GUITAR RIG 3, as they are designed to give an uncolored, high-fidelity sound. Thus, you can use GUITAR RIG 3 to add different cabinets, power amps, and effects, and the keyboard amp will reproduce these sounds faithfully. Keyboard amps are designed to accept fairly high-level signals, so you will probably need to set the output level fairly high, and the high/low switch to high (0). Headphones Simply plug headphones into the RIG KONTROL 3 headphone jack. Home Stereo System Home stereo speakers are generally not designed to handle sustained high-level sounds, so if you do want to plug into a stereo system, keep the volume at conservative levels. Plug the RIG KONTROL outputs into line level inputs like those for a CD or DVD player, tuner, tape deck, etc. (not the phono input, if present). You may need special cables or adaptors which provide a 1/” plug on one end and RCA phono plug on the other.

3.5.1 Using GUITAR RIG with a Host Program
You can use GUITAR RIG within a host program, like Logic, Cubase, or Live. To do so, set up an audio track and insert GUITAR RIG as an effect. “Record enable” the track GUITAR RIG is inserted on, and your sound will be routed through GUITAR RIG, and out to the selected audio interface. You can use your RIG KONTROL to control GUITAR RIG even if you haven’t previously selected it as your audio interface.

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3.5.2 Installing GUITAR RIG as an Effect
Although some programs will allow you to install GUITAR RIG 3 as an instrument (this is because your program works with both audio and MIDI) you will definitely want to install it as a signal processing plug-in. Insert GUITAR RIG 3 on audio tracks using VST, AU or RTAS plug-ins.

!

The latency in a host program is designated by

the host program, so make sure to access the audio settings in your host of choice to control your latency/buffer size.

3.5.3 Avoid Zero-Latency Options!
As mentioned earlier, remember to avoid zero-latency (“direct monitoring”) options, or you won’t hear your guitar being processed by GUITAR RIG 3.

3.5.4 Total Recall
When using GUITAR RIG 3 within a host program, it is important to keep in mind that when you save a host’s project, it will capture whatever is in GUITAR RIG 3’s buffer. So, if you have modified a Preset as compared to how it is stored in the Bank, don’t worry – when you recall the project, the Preset will be recalled exactly as you left it.

3.6 Controlling Multiple Plug-ins with a RIG KONTROL
When you use multiple instances of the GUITAR RIG plug-in within your host sequencer, the RIG KONTROL only “binds” to the first instance of GUITAR RIG. It has no way of automatically switching its control from one plug-in instance to another automatically. To switch RIG KONTROL‘s focus to another instance of GUITAR RIG, bring up its plug-in interface

Rig Kontrol Active Status

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and make sure that the virtuaL rig KontroL is shown. On the virtuaL rig KontroL, there is a small LED with the text aCtive next to it. You must click on the LED, (this makes it glow red) and enables the RIG KONTROL to control the desired plug-in.

3.7 Automating Plug-In Parameters
Automating plug-in parameters is super easy in GUITAR RIG! Each Component has been previously configured to the same automation ID. This means that, for example, in your host, you will see the complete range of modules available to GUITAR RIG as choices, whether they are in your current Preset or not. This makes it much simpler to automate parameters as they will never change their plug-in automation ID. A good example of this is that Parameter one will always be the virtuaL rig KontroL pedaL. The main benefit of this is most obvious when you change Presets containing the same Component, even though you can keep automating the Component throughout the Preset change, there will never be glitches or hiccups in the automation stream. Here is an example of how to automate parameters in Apple Logic Pro. In the view menu, turn on track automation for the selected track. Apple Logic will change the view of the track from this:

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Apple Logic’s Default Track View

To this:

Apple Logic Displaying Track Automation

To add automation, select where it says volume and navigate to the Guitar Rig menu. You will see the full list of CoMponentS – find and select the parameter you want to automate from the list. Use the pencil tool to draw automation by hand, or change the track to latch or touch mode and move

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the control with either your RIG KONTROL 3 or your mouse. Automation will be recorded automatically as you play the track back. To add multiple automation tracks, select the arrow at the bottom left corner of the track (small black triangle) to add another track. Adjust its parameter to the control you’d like to automate and keep going. You can automate, as many things as you wish. After some automation, your tracks will resemble the following:

Multiple Automated Controls in Apple Logic Pro

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Even though this example illustrates Apple Logic Pro, all other DAW software operates in a similar fashion. Please refer to the documentation for your software for more information on the specifics of your host automation.

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software.

You can now even automate the action of the

eight RIG KONTROL buttons (they show up as automation parameters), so you can do snapshot, sound and bank changes easily within your

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4. Reference
Now comes the fun part! This part of the manual is devoted to the fine detail of GUITAR RIG. If you want to know the function and assignment of every single knob, switch and button on the GUITAR RIG 3 user interface and Components list, this is the section for you.

4.1 User interface layout
The user interface is divided into four main areas:
Global Header ToolBar

SideKick

Rack

The Interface Exposed!

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Each area is responsible for a specific task in guitar rig. Some areas, like the SideKiCK can change between views based on what tab the user selects. The only interface that never changes is the gLobaL Header. This is the best place to really dive in and discover GUITAR RIG 3.

4.1.1 Global Header
The gLobaL Header is a global list of the most important features of GUITAR RIG 3. It’s unique in that no matter what mode you’re in (rig view or Live view) the Header is always visible.
Live Mode Output Section NI Logo

Input Section

CPU Control

The Live Mode Button switches the interface to the new Live view mode, which is detailed in section . The input SeCtion allows global control of all audio inputs coming into GUITAR RIG and provides accurate visual metering of your input signals. The output SeCtion allows global control of all signals coming out of GUITAR RIG and proves visual metering of all output levels. The Cpu ControL merges several individual controls into a single, easy-touse CPU dashboard. The Cpu ControL displays the amount of CPU utlization (from 0 to 100 percent) in a dynamic window that changes according to current CPU use. To the left of the CPU utilization display is a convenient power button, which disables GUITAR RIG's audio engine. Finally, a toggle for High Quality Mode can be found to the right of the CPU utilization display. HigH

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QuaLity mode allows GUITAR RIG 3 to process its internal audio at twice the normal rate, which leads to a more detailed sound. The only downside is that it uses twice the CPU power; so watch the CPU meter when in High Quality Mode. The ni C oMpany L ogo not only signifies GUITAR RIG as a NATIVE INSTRUMENTS product, but also provides a portal to the About Guitar Rig menu selection. In the resulting dialogue box, you will find information about your currently installed version of GUITAR RIG and other details about your system and installation. To dismiss the About Window, click anywhere in the GUITAR RIG interface to return to GUITAR RIG.

4.1.2 Toolbar
The tooLbar in GUITAR RIG 3 is your one-stop-shop for controlling the most frequently used parts of GUITAR RIG.

The preSet diSpLay provides a quick look at the number and name of the currently selected sound. The previouS/next arrows let you switch back and forth between Presets in the Bank you’ve currently loaded. The Save button allows you to save a Preset once it’s been modified from its original state. Once you engage this Button, it will write over the Preset at the current location.

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The Save aS button allows you to save a Preset to a new location and change the name of the Preset at the same time. This is useful when you want to modify a pre-existing sound without losing the original sound permanently. The new sound will automatically be saved at the end of the currently selected Bank. The CoMpare button allows you to compare your changes to the currently edited Preset with the original, saved Preset. This allows quick A/B style comparisons without the need to save your edits. The CoMpare button will continue to toggle back and forth between edited and saved Presets as long as changes have been made to the currently used Preset. Once you Save or Save aS, you will not be able to compare Presets until you make changes to the Preset. The CLear button quickly removes all Components (except the fixed Components) from your rack. Use this to start a rig from scratch and build it with your own Components. The SynC section controls all levels of synchronization within GUITAR RIG 3. Since synchronization can come from external sources, DAW host clock, or internal GUITAR RIG Components, this flexible section allows you to select how GUITAR RIG synchronizes with the outside (or inside) world. The three available sync settings are as follows: ► free: This effectively turns your sync off and does not allow sync setting from a host, external clock or Preset in the currently selected sound. The metronome can run freely at whichever tempo you set. ► Sound: The sync information is contained within the Preset itself. There is no longer any need to manually change the metronome tempo between songs. Synced delays and modulations are reloaded as you saved them.

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► SynC: The sync comes from the host (in plug-in) mode or external MIDI-clock (in standalone mode). The tap ControL allows you to set the current tempo by tapping the Button with successive mouse presses. It is also possible to dial in your exact BPM with the Up And Down Arrows, or clicking in the numerical field and adding your own value. When you are in sync mode, these buttons are disabled. The rig KontroL button toggles the expanded RIG KONTROL View at the bottom of the guitar rig screen. Showing the rig KontroL SCreen will allow you to view the currently configured state of the rig KontroL buttons, and change/assign controls to any of the RIG KONTROL switches or expression pedals for the currently active Preset. The next four buttons will show/hide the following four fixed Components: ► tape deCK one (Pre-Processing) ► tape deCK two (Post-Processing) ► tuner ► MetronoMe Lastly, MiniMize /MaxiMize buttons allow you to globally expand (to show more detail) or contract (show less detail) all of the Components in your rack with a single click.

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4.1.3 SideKick
The SideKiCK includes the rest of GUITAR RIGS viewing options. The tooLbar and raCK take up the right side of the guitar rig interface, while the SideKiCK (when shown) takes up the left side of your screen. The SideKiCK can be hidden or shown at any time by pressing the Button on the GUITAR RIG interface.

Banish your SideKick…

The SideKiCK includes access to the following screens and options within GUITAR RIG: The browSer is a collection of four sub-screens that provide you access and control over your sounds.

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The SoundS pane provides access to your sounds and Banks of sounds. The window is split vertically with the Banks appearing on top and the sounds contained within the Bank on the bottom. The attributeS pane allows you to specify different searchable attributes about your sounds, such as: Sound Name, Author, Info, and tags based on Style, Tone and Instrument to make locating sounds easier. The SearCH pane allows you to easily search your Presets based on the criteria entered in the attributes page. You can even search for sounds based on Bank category. The reSuLtS pane is where you’ll head after you’ve made your search. Here you will find listed any and all matching sounds based on your search criteria. The CoMponentS pooL houses all of the CoMponentS you can drop into your virtual raCK. The CoMponentS pooL has the following sub-categories: aMpS, diSt, Mod, eQ, voL, rev, tooLS and Mdf. The optionS tab houses the various options and settings within GUITAR RIG, and is separated into two sub-views: The C ontroLLer aSSignMentS pane is where you can setup and manage assignments to your RIG KONTROL and external MIDI devices, set parameters as global or per-Preset, save controller Templates and import and export saved controller assignments. The preferenCeS window is where you can set some global preferences for the GUITAR RIG application and plug-in. Elements like window height adjustment, Preset Banks directory and RIG KONTROL calibration can be found here.

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Since sound management is such an important fea-

tures in GUITAR RIG 3, we have devoted a more detailed section to it: section .2 in this reference. Section .5 will detail all of the choices in the COMPONENTS tab along with detailed descriptions of the individual COMPONENT modules.

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4.1.4 The Rack
The rack houses all of the Components for GUITAR RIG. It’s your “drop and rock” section of the GUITAR RIG interface. The rack, at its minimum will house the input and output fixed Components. These modules cannot be removed from the rack. To add items to the rack, use your mouse to click and grab a Component from the Component pool and just drop it onto the rack. The location of your drop will influence the signal flow of your rack. When you drag an amplifier Component into the rack, GUITAR RIG will create the MatCHing Cabinet for the amplifier automatically. You can always remove the cabinet, or change it to the Cabinet & MiCS by dragging that Component after the amplifier. raCK CoMponentS have the following controls for altering their appearance when inside the rack: ► x: This button will remove the Component from the rack permanently. ► -: This button will minimize the Component controls, only showing its name. ► +: This button will expose the expert controls for the Component if available. To reorder items in your rack, simply click and drag the Component to the desired location. If your rack becomes too long to view in one window, use the scrollbars on the right side of the rack to scroll through your rig. There is no limitation on how many Components can reside in your rack; the only limitation is the power of your CPU.

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Section .3 provides a fully detailed look at all

the functions of the controller assignments and preferences tab.

The Rack

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4.2 Sound Management
The SideKiCK browser pane is where you’ll find GUITAR RIG’s collection of tools for managing your sounds. The browser is split into four panes: SoundS, attributeS, SearCH and reSuLtS.

4.2.1 Bank Operations
In the SoundS pane, the top part of the interface is devoted to Banks. Banks are collections of sounds that can contain up to 128 different Presets. There is no limit to how many Banks you can have within GUITAR RIG. The Bank section has three main elements: ► banK Category SeLeCtor ► banK Menu ► tHe banK LiSt The banK Category SeLeCtor allows you to filter your Banks based on the following Bank categories: ► All ► Guitar Amps ► Bass Amps ► Artist Sounds ► Signature Sounds ► Styles ► FX ► Live ► My Sounds

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All factory Banks come pre-tagged with one of the seven Bank categories. Newly created Banks will, by default, have the tag “my sounds”, when they are created without a set filter. If a Bank is created with a filter engaged, then it will automatically be tagged with the current filter. You can always re-tag banK CategorieS using the context menu or the banK drop down Menu. The banK drop down Menu gives you access to the following commands: ► New: Create a new, empty Bank ► Save As: Save the currently selected Bank with a new name and location. This duplicates the currently selected Bank with a new name. ► Import: Import a saved Bank into GUITAR RIG. ► Export: Export the currently selected Bank to disk. ► Rename: Rename the currently selected Bank ► Protect: Protect the currently selected Bank from being edited or accidental deletion. ► Category: Tag the currently selected category with a Bank category based on the seven available Bank category choices. ► Remove Bank: This removes the Bank permanently from your hard disk. ► Refresh Bank List: This refreshes the Bank list. From within the Bank window you can perform the following operations: ► Double click the name of any Bank to rename it. ► Click and drag the Bank to reorder the Bank list.

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The following contextual menu is available to any Bank using a right-click or (command-click on Mac):

The Bank Contextual Menu

4.2.2 Sound Operations
The SoundS pane is the lower half of the sounds window. It contains all of the sounds within the currently selected Bank. The sounds window has three main sections: ► banK naMe diSpLay ► edit preSet Menu ► preSet LiSt The banK naMe diSpLay will always show the name of the Bank for the currently selected sound. The edit Sound Menu is comprised of the following commands: ► New: Creates a new, empty Preset at the end of the list. ► Save: Saves the currently selected sound

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► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ►

Save As: Saves the currently selected sound to the end of the list. Cut: Cut the currently selected Preset or Preset text. Copy: Copy the currently selected Preset or Preset text. Paste: Paste the currently copied or cut Preset to the current location. Select All: Select all the Presets in the currently selected Bank. Rename: Rename the currently selected Preset. Undo: Undo the last action. Redo: Redo the last action. Remove Preset: Permanently delete the Preset from your hard disk. Clean Up: Remove the free space from the currently selected Bank. It will make your Preset list a single, contiguous entry.

The following contextual menu is available to any sound using a right click or (command click on Mac):

The Sound Contextual Menu

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4.2.3 Useful Tips for Sounds
Here are a few useful tips for managing your sounds: ► You can drag and drop a Preset from the sounds menu to any Bank in the banK LiSt by simply dragging and dropping! The sound will automatically move to the Bank you select at the end of the list of sounds in that Bank. ► You can Save As and direct that sound to save to a different Bank. The minute you’ve changed a sound in any way, the Save button will become illuminated, this way you know it’s different than the original. You can now select a new Bank before pressing Save aS. This will switch the Bank, but the sound will remain. Now when you press Save as..., it will save into the new Bank.

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Owners of previous versions: This is a new op-

eration in GUITAR RIG 3.

4.2.4 Sound Attributes
Any sound can be further categorized for easier searching by using the attributes pane. The attributeS window let’s you set the following information for each sound: ► Sound Name: The name of the currently selected sound. ► autHor: The special person who made the sound in the first place ► Modified: The date the Preset was last modified and saved. ► Favorite: You can check off your favorite sounds with a check mark for easier retrieval ► Info: You can add additional information into your Preset, which can be displayed when in Live Mode.

Clean…Country…Single Coils??? Never!

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► Style, Tone and Instrument: Classify your sounds according to the style, tone and instrument the Preset is intended for.

4.2.5 Search and Results
The SearCH and reSuLtS are two separate panes that react to one another. The SearCH window allows you to search for Presets and sounds based on the following criteria: ► Quicksearch (A search based on any search criteria or keyword) ► Name ► Author ► Category ► Date Modified ► Style ► Tone ► Instrument ► Favorite Once you’ve entered the elements you want to search, press the find button and you’ll be taken directly to the reSuLtS page. You will see any and all matching sounds based on your search criteria. The reSuLtS page contains the results Sound LiSt and the list of preSetS of the currently selected Bank. You can return to the SearCH page for further searches. To speed your ability to search for new sounds, use the reSet button. This restores the SearCH page back to the default, blank page.

Search. Find. Finders Keepers, Losers Weepers.

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4.2.6 Resizing the Bank and sound lists
You can resize the Bank, sound, and search results list by using the moveable reSize HandLe between the Bank and sound list. To change the window size, hover your mouse over the handle until the cursor changes its shape from the arrow cursor to the resize handle. Then, click and drag to the appropriate height. You can also use the reSize HandLe to completely maximize either the Preset List or SearCH reSuLtS LiSt by clicking once on the handle to maximize its view and clicking again to restore split-window functionality.

4.3 Options
The optionS tab provides access to two screens: controller assignments and general preferences for the plug-in/application.

The Options Tab

4.3.1 Controller assignments
By clicking on the controller assignments tab, you are brought to the following screen: From this screen, you can manage all of your assignments to your RIG KONTROL and even map your external controllers to the hard wired RIG KONTROL.

Under Your Total Control!

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Each assignment has the same strip which can be configured several ways:

The Simple Assignment Strip

Let’s look at what each section of the above graphic corresponds to: ► rK3 pedaL: This indicates that all of the options in the strip will refer to the rK3 pedaL ► Sound: This can be toggled by clicking on the Sound button to switch between Sound which are per-sound assignments and Global which are global controller assignments. ► Learn: This allows you to “learn” an external hardware control to this function. This Button links external controllers to the virtuaL rig KontroL. Press Learn, and then press the appropriate button on your external device. (Careful: your controller has now been assimilated!) ► voLuMe pedaL /pedaL: This shows what the current control is actually mapped to. In this case, the RK pedal is mapped to the volume pedal Component. ► To change the currently mapped parameter, click and hold down on the drop down text menu to select from all of the available Components for mapping. If you are in Sound Mode, you will see the Components in your current rig. If you are in Global Mode, you will see a fixed menu of global functions. From this menu, or the menu you see when selecting per-sound assignments, you always have the option to Clear the assignment and start over.

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► range: Use this to set the distance of control you would like to be available when using a pedal, or other continuous controller with GUITAR RIG 3. For example, you may not want to sweep through the entire wet/dry mix of a reverb, perhaps you prefer to sweep through 20-50%. By adjusting the right to left handles, you can limit the range of any control.

4.3.2 Special Operations
In the C ontroLLer a SSignMentS window, you can set up a few special assignments that will make your life easier. We think you will find the new snapshot feature is especially useful. When a controller is set to Sound, you then have the option to set a snapshot to that controller in the drop down menu. Simply configure your rig as you want it and select Set Snapshot to configure that controller to a snapshot recall. You can either name the snapshot from the virtuaL rig KontroL or the ControLLer optionS page. Additionally, when assigning controllers in Global mode, you may also choose Sound Jump, this allows you to jump to a specific Preset at any point. To configure this, set your assignment to Global and choose Jump To in the Sound SeLeCtion Menu.
Per-Sound Parameters!

Sound Jump Parameter

From this screen, you can specify which sound ID you’re going to jump to in the currently selected Bank. This is great when your sounds aren’t always in a line!

Global Parameters!

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You can also choose Jump To in the Bank Selection section and choose to jump to a particular Bank with the RIG KONTROL switches.

4.3.3 Virtual RIG KONTROL Operations
On the virtuaL rig KontroL, you can easily map per-sound operations by simply right clicking (or Ctrl-clicking on Mac) to bring up the same parameter list, as you will find in the full controllers window. This function allows you to set Snapshots and other assignments without even leaving the rack. Any switch that is configured for a Global operation must be controlled through the ControLLer aSSignMentS pane.

Map parameters to the Virtual Rig Kontrol

4.3.4 RIG KONTROL Templates
A rig KontroL teMpLate is a predefined Template for how the RIG KONTROL will act within the program. This is an advanced feature that not everyone will require or use, but it is powerful if you decide to switch the RIG KONTROL quickly to a specific task (such as extended Loop MaCHine controls, or tapedeCK controls, without changing Presets). The default Template is initially activated but can be changed easily with the following drop down menu: Clicking on it will bring up a list of Templates that you can then select. Next in the teMpLate ControL is the Setup Menu which when depressed brings up the following menu: This menu allows you to set the following controls: ► new: Allows you to set up a new RIG KONTROL Template. ► Save: Save the currently edited Template. ► Save aS: Save the currently edited Template with a new name.
Rig Kontrol Template Selection Menu

Template Setup Menu

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► iMport: Import a saved RIG KONTROL Template to disk. ► export: Export the currently selected Template to disk. ► deLete: Delete the currently selected Template.

4.3.5 Mapping External Controllers
The lower half of the ControLLer aSSignMentS pane deals with mapping your external MIDI controllers into guitar rig. The concept to understand is that the RIG KONTROL is now hard-wired into the application and its entire range of Presets. The purpose of mapping external controls is not explicitly to ‘learn’ new controls in an individual Preset as this would require a great deal of time. Instead, the goal is to map your external MIDI controllers to the RIG KONTROL functions. You only need to do this once and afterwards your controller will mimic the RIG KONTROL mappings. Linking an external controller to the eight buttons on the RIG KONTROL 3 is done through the Learn process as described in section .3.1. The externaL ControLLer aSSignMentS window is for adding any controllers in excess of the eight main controllers and single pedal on the virtuaL rig KontroL. Simply put, this section is for users who have a lot of buttons, switches and knobs they’d like to configure! To start assigning, you just click the add aSSignMent button, which produces the following entry:

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External Control in Action!

Simply press the L earn button on each assignment and learn your additional external MIDI controllers. You can assign similar types of commands this way as you have done before with the virtuaL rig KontroL. The main difference is that these external controllers will have no graphical representation on the virtuaL rig KontroL – these devices will fully map to GUITAR RIG and work perfectly, but they will not mimic the virtuaL rig KontroL. Everything you can map to the RIG KONTROL, as stated in section .3.1, can be mapped to your external devices; this includes Preset jump(s), Snapshots, and more.

4.3.6 Preferences
The preferenCeS window allows you to set a limited number of controls that affect the operation of GUITAR RIG as either a standalone application, or as a plug in. Here is the window:

GUITAR RIG 3 – 5

Choices, Choices, and more choices…

This window gives you access to the following controls: ► window HeigHt: This control allows you to set the size of the guitar rig window. It can either be small, medium or large. The medium and large sizes are dependent on the physical display resolution of your monitor. ► Midi Learn popup window: Toggles whether or not the MIDI learn window will pop-up after you successfully make an assignment. ► SHow HeLp HintS: Allow or disallow mouse-over hints. ► rig KontroL 1: To use GUITAR RIG 3 with a RIG KONTROL 1, select On from this drop-down list. ► rig KontroL pedaL CaLibration: If your RIG KONTROL pedal is acting funny, press this to recalibrate the movement of the pedal. ► CHooSe Sound Banks Directory: You can select (if needed) a new directory to save and access your Banks and sounds.

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4.3.7 Calibrating the RIG KONTROL
If you find that the RIG KONTROLS expression pedal is no longer calibrated properly, click the reSet button, on the Options – Preferences screen.

Calibration of the RIG KONTROLs Pedal

Doing so will prompt you to move the expression pedal on your RIG KONTROL through its full range of motion. This will internally recalibrate the range of the expression pedal back to normal.

4.4 Live View
Live view is a new addition to GUITAR RIG 3. Pressing on the Live view button in the gLobaL Header takes you to the Live view screen:

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The Live View

The interface has three main Components: 1. A listing of the currently selected Bank and its available SoundS (upper left). 2. The multi-function display shows you the currently selected Sound. It also displays any additional information about the active Sound, or one of the following three screens (MetronoMe, tuner or Loop MaCHine): 3. The supersized virtuaL rig KontroL and it's mapped parameters.

GUITAR RIG 3 – 57

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Showing the Metronome

If you set the window size to a larger view, you can

also display the info text about the Preset along with the metronome, tuner or loop machine views. At the smallest view, you will only see either the additionaL the tuner,

preSet info, MetronoMe or Loop

MaCHine.
Showing the Tuner

Showing the Loop Machine

You can change the view between MetronoMe, tuner and Loop MaCHine simply by clicking on the buttons in the interface. Bring the sound info back by pressing its supersized name in the sounds window. When your trigger functions from the RIG KONTROL (like the tuner, MetronoMe or Loop MaCHine functions) the display will automatically switch to the correct window. If you have multiple Loop MaCHineS in your rig, then

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The

Loop MaCHine is

only available if it has

been inserted into your currently selected rig.

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you can select between them using the right and left arrows in tHe Loop MaCHine view. The final section is the full sized virtuaL rig KontroL, This is where you can view your assignments: The beauty of Live view is that it provides you quick access to the most commonly used features of GUITAR RIG and does so in a “supersized” view for easy viewing from the stage. Even the RIG KONTROL buttons and assignments are clearly visible.

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To toggle in and out of

Live Mode, press F1.

4.5 Components and Parameters
To customize GUITAR RIG 3 for your own unique sound, you need to understand how the available effects parameters influence what you hear. Here’s the easy way: Drag in an effect, select a parameter, change it, and listen to what happens. After a bit of listening, you will understand each parameter's function. However, as fun as it is, trial-and-error can take some time, so this section describes each effect, its parameters, and where appropriate, tips on getting the most out of the particular effect.

4.5.1 Mono, Stereo, and Signal Flow
Unlike most guitar rigs that use only mono connections, GUITAR RIG 3 lives in a stereo world where all connections potentially carry separate left and right channel signals. This is important, because although almost all guitars are mono, many of GUITAR RIG 3’s Components add stereo

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imaging, or preserve existing stereo imaging, to create a bigger soundstage. These effects add stereo to a mono input: ► Cabinets (when using Pan and Air) ► Tremolo (in Stereo Pan mode) ► Stoned Phaser (with Rotate turned up) ► Chorus/ Flanger (in Stereo mode) ► Ensemble ► Rotator ► Quad Delay ► Psychedelay ► Spring Reverb ► Studio Reverb However, some Components have inherently mono operation. So, if any of these Components process a stereo input, it will first be converted to mono. ► Cabinets ► All amp head Components ► All distortion Components ► Ensemble ► WahWah Pedal ► TalkWah ► Chorus/ Flanger Note that some effects are in both lists because they may convert stereo to mono, then create a stereo field at the output. Other Components

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simply leave the signal alone – mono in gives mono out, stereo in gives stereo out. Most of the stereo Components include the types of effects (reverb, delay, etc.) that would normally go after an amplifier (see Appendix C for information on effects placement). Therefore, you’ll end up with a stereo signal if you place a stereo Component after a mono one. However, be aware that if you follow stereo effects with a mono one, the sound will no longer be stereo. Furthermore, when Chorus/ Flanger is in stereo mode, or Tremolo is in stereo pan mode, the effect will disappear when played through a mono device, or played back over a mono system.

4.5.2 Display Controls
Each Component has one or more buttons in the upper right corner. These are: X: Removes Component from the rack -: Minimizes the module to a single rack space panel (don’t you wish hardware rack gear could do this?) +: Expands the Component to a larger size, and reveals more parameters (expert or extended mode).

4.5.3 Power On/Off
All Components also have an on/off switch in the upper left corner. When turned off, the Component is completely taken out of the processing chain (true bypass), just as if it was deleted. With power turned off, Components do not use any CPU power.

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4.5.4 Saving and Loading Templates
All Components also have a common way of saving, selecting, and renaming Templates (control settings for the Component) that can be saved separate from a Preset. For example, if you come up with a great Quad Delay effect and whish to use it in other Presets, save it as a Component Template, then load it into the same Component in different Presets. This is described fully at the beginning of Chapter 7; the following is a recap. ► To select a Template, click on the drop-down menu to the right of the name field, and select the Template. ► To save a Template, first name it by dragging over the existing name in the name field (or double-clicking on it). Type in the new name. Next, click on the drop-down menu to the right of the name field and select Save. ► To overwrite a Template, rename the Template if necessary, then click on the drop-down menu to the right of the name field and select Overwrite. ► To delete a Template entirely, select the Template to be deleted, then click on the drop-down menu and select Delete.

4.6 Fixed Rack Components
There are six fixed rack Components: ► Input ► Tapedeck One ► Tapedeck Two

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► Tuner ► Metronome ► Output These can be minimized or hidden (except the input and output Components) to save space, but cannot be deleted. All signal processing Components insert between the Input and Output.

4.6.1 Input Component with RIG KONTROL 2 or 3

This matches your instrument’s levels to GUITAR RIG 3. Hint: Always feed in the highest possible levels (short of distortion) as indicated by the signal level meters getting as close as possible to the ‘red’ (overload) without actually hitting it. voLuMe sets the incoming level. Turn it up (clockwise) as high as possible, short of the meter glowing red, (red indicates an overload). Then, turn the control counterclockwise a bit to allow some headroom (clipping the sound card input is a major sonic disaster). If the red “LedS” still glow, reduce the volume further. If the accompanying Learn button is activated (button “pushed in”), GUITAR RIG 3 will set the optimum level automatically. After enabling Learn, play your guitar really hard so it generates the maximum possible level. GUITAR RIG 3 will analyze this level, and adjust the voLuMe automatically. After analysis is complete, the Learn button “pops out” automatically.

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The CHanneL buttonS control how GUITAR RIG 3 reacts in single and dual guitar modes: ► 1: GUITAR RIG 3 processes only the signal at RIG KONTROL 2 or 3 Input 1, and mutes Input 2. ► 2: GUITAR RIG 3 processes only the signal at RIG KONTROL 2 or 3 Input 2, and mutes Input 1. ► botH: Sends both Inputs into GUITAR RIG 3. The nr button toggles noise reduction on (button “pushed in”) or off (button “out”). The tHreSHoLd control sets a level; signals above this level will pass through the gate (the gate Led is off). If the signal dips below the threshold, then the gate closes (the gate Led glows red). This is helpful if your pickups are picking up any kind of low-level hum or buzz; set the gate Threshold just above this noise, and when you aren’t playing, the gate will not let the hum or buzz through. As soon as you start playing and the signal exceeds the threshold, the gate will open; hopefully the signal will be loud enough to “mask” the buzz. The Gate’s Learn function automatically sets an optimum threshold. Without playing your guitar, click on Learn. GUITAR RIG 3 analyzes your signal, and sets the threshold just above any residual noise. Now when you play, the Gate should open.

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4.6.2 Input Component with RIG KONTROL 1

This works the same way as if you’re using RIG KONTROL 2 or 3, with the exception of the following additional functions. The CHanneL buttonS control how GUITAR RIG 3 reacts in “single” and “dual” guitar modes, a feature associated with RIG KONTROL 1 (refer to the original GUITAR RIG manual for information on RIG KONTROL 1). ► 1: GUITAR RIG 3 processes only the signal at RIG KONTROL Input 1, and mutes Input 2. ► 2: GUITAR RIG 3 processes only the signal at RIG KONTROL Input 2, and mutes Input 1. ► botH: Sends both Inputs into GUITAR RIG 3. Do not use this mode when using the RIG KONTROL 1, as you’ll also hear the control signals coming out of the footswitches and pedal. ► on: Turns the RIG KONTROL Detection on/off (button pressed is on). ► auto: Recommended when using RIG KONTROL 1, as GUITAR RIG 3 will automatically recognize the instrument plugged into Input 1, as well as the RIG KONTROL control signals that appear in the other channel.

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Note that mono modules will mix these two signals

together.

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4.6.3 Output Component

This matches GUITAR RIG 3’s levels to the next stage (mixer, amplifier, PA system, etc.), and also lets you compensate for level variations among different Presets. preSet voLuMe is saved with a Preset. Thus, if a Preset is louder than most, you can trim down its volume or if it’s softer, then you can turn it up to match the other Presets. NATIVE INSTRUMENTS recommends you leave this at the mid-position unless you need to compensate for Preset level variations. To set the Preset volume automatically, turn on the accompanying Learn button (button “pushed in”). Play your guitar really hard (without waking button utton up your neighbors!); GUITAR RIG 3 will analyze this level, and adjust the Preset level automatically. When analysis is complete, the Learn button “pops out”. MaSter voLuMe sets the rig’s overall level. Generally, this will be adjusted to provide the desired amount of signal to the next stage, and not changed unless GUITAR RIG 3 feeds something else. The Meter shows the output level. If the meter’s LEDs glow red, this indicates an overload condition. Turn down the MaSter voLuMe slightly (or preSet voLuMe in the case of an unusually loud Preset). If they still glow red, reduce the volume further. The LiMiter SwitCH chooses how GUITAR RIG 3 will handle an overload condition, as indicated by the red output light glowing red. Without limiting

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selected, overloads will exceed GUITAR RIG 3’s headroom, resulting in distortion. With LiMiter selected, if an overload condition occurs, the limiter turns the volume down automatically to prevent distortion. When the light goes out, the volume returns to normal. If limiting occurs often, turn down the MaSter voLuMe or, with an excessively loud Preset, the preSet voLuMe.

4.6.4 Tuner

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chain.

This limiter acts more like a “fail safe”, but it’s

sonic effects may not be desirable to you. If you want to use limiting as an ef fect, inser t the Limiter

For quick, accurate tuning, this is the module for you. You know what a tuner is; here’s how this one works. The inStruMent drop-down Menu defaults to Guitar, but you can also choose Chromatic, Bass, four open tunings (D, E, G, A), and DADGAD tuning. Mute Sound turns off the audio output, so you can tune without the audience listening in. In the standard RIG KONTROL Template, the Mute Sound button is automatically mapped to an RIG KONTROL button. This is done globally, but you can, of course, change this! There are two tuning modes, as selected by the Cent button and Strobe button located toward the right of the display: ► In Cent mode, a small indicator shows whether the pitch is sharp (the indicator floats to the right of the meter’s center “0” point) or flat (indicator floats to the left of the meter’s center “0” point). The number toward the left of the display indicates the number of the string

Component into the rigs signal

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being tuned. When a string is at proper pitch, the indicator should sit in the middle of the meter at the “0” point. ► In Strobe mode, a series of lights moves to the right when the string is sharp, and moves to the left when the string is flat. The faster they move, the more out of tune the string. When the lights stop moving, the string is in tune. To access the Extended View functions, click on the (+) SyMboL to “fold down” the bottom of the tuner. ► referenCe pitCH adjusts the tuning reference, from A=25Hz to A=55Hz. The hint text for this control shows the exact pitch. ► CentS shows the deviation from ideal tuning in cents. ► drop tune transposes the tuning range. Example: If you tune all your strings a semitone lower, set drop tune to -1. ► tune forK produces a reference tone. To select the pitch, click on the note field to the right of the tune forK button, and drag up to raise pitch and down to lower pitch. You can also use the arrow buttonS above and below the display to change the “virtual tuning fork” pitch in semitone increments.

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4.6.5 Metronome

The MetronoMe helps you keep time. It may not be the most exciting Component within GUITAR RIG, but it is one of the most important as its tempo affects every module within GUITAR RIG that has the ability to sync (example: delays and modifiers). The MetronoMe automatically receives its tempo information from the sync section of the main toolbar. However, you can adjust the tempo and tap from its interface. power turns the audible metronome on. The voLuMe SLider sets the loudness of the metronome. Mute temporarily stops the sound of the metronome. Signat. sets the time signature that the metronome pulses in. The MetronoMe Meter Menu offers a ton of options for meters that you can select. BPM is the readout of whatever the current sync tempo is. #1 is the sound of the accented click, which appears on downbeats and strong beat divisions. You can change the .wav file that is played by clicking the arrow and selecting a different file. #2 is the unaccented click, which sounds on weak/off beats. You can change its .wav sound by clicking the arrow and selecting a different sound.

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tap allows you to tap tempo either with your foot or with an assigned external controller (like the RIG KONTROL 3) to set your tempo. This control is also found on the toolbar sync menu. Since the Metronome is one of the fixed Components, you can only hide it with the x button or minimize it with the – button; it cannot be deleted.

4.6.6 Tapedeck One
Okay, it doesn’t use actual tape, but it’s much cooler than a conventional tape deck in a digital way. To start, this handy module will play your audio files as well as record while play. It’s also capable of changing your tempo during playback without changing pitch, changing the pitch without changing the tempo, or even change both. This is great for learning licks by slowing them down, or changing the tempo on backing drum loops and similar parts.

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Transpose (semitones) Play/Record Mode Play Start Tempo (percent) Tune (cents) Hide

Load New Save

Play Loop Loop in Stop Record Loop out

Level Meter Minimize Volume Control

Instead of describing each control of Tapedeck One individually, we’ll cover the function you want to accomplish with the Tapedeck, and describe how to go about doing it.

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Tapedeck One will only record the clean (unaf-

fected) guitar tone coming into guitar rig. If you want to use the Tapedeck as a recording device (like a mini DAW) for your processed, ultra-cool guitar rig creation, you’ll need to use Tapedeck two!

4.6.7 Standard playback
To play back a file, like a backing track or drum loop: ► Click on the Load button, navigate to the file you want to load, and click on Open. Tapedeck accepts WAV, AIF, AIFF, and MP3 format files but will not accept bit resolutions greater than 16 bits. ► With the pLay Mode button, select either pLay at input (any processing affects playback) or pLay at output (applies no processing).

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► Click on the Transport pLay button to start playback. Click on the Stop button to stop. To loop the selection so that it plays repeatedly, click on the Loop button (the Button to the right of the Stop button). To start at a specific point in the file, drag the pLay Start SLider to the desired start point. ► Adjust voLuMe to set the desired level. If the output Meter’s red (distortion) “LEDs” light up, reduce the Volume to prevent overload conditions.

4.6.8 Looped playback
You can create a loop from your recording so that a certain portion of the recording repeats over and over. This is great for practicing, or creating a rhythm track. The two basic ways to set up a loop are: ► Click on the L oop button (located between the Stop and reCord buttons); this can be done while the Tapedeck is playing back or stopped. Two “handles” appear above the playback indicator. If desired, drag these to fine-tune the loop starting and ending points. ► While the Tapedeck is playing, click on the Loop in button when you want the loop to start, and click on the Loop out button when you want the loop to end. Handles will appear at these points, which again, you can drag around as desired.

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► The diagram shows Tapedeck One set up to loop. Note the “pushed in” Loop button, and the two handles that show the Loop In and Loop Out points.

4.6.9 Changing playback pitch and/or tempo
tranSpoSe transposes pitch –12 semitones to +12 semitones. tune provides fine tuning over the range of –50 cents to +50 cents. teMpo will change the playback speed from by as much as 50% of the original tempo to as much as 150% of the original tempo.

4.6.10 Recording
To record your playing: ► Click on the new button in the lower left. This will automatically enable record which you will recognize as the reCord button is now pressed in. If you have already created a new file, you can just click on the reCord button. ► The pLay Mode button will change to a reCord Mode button; select either reCord at input (records the input signal that feeds the RIG KONTROL) or reCord at output (the recorded signal includes any processing that’s set up in the rig).

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► Record mode is already enabled, so click on the pLay button to initiate recording. ► After recording, click on the Save button, navigate to the folder where you want to save the file. Name the file, and click on Save.

4.6.11 Tapedeck Two

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Note that loop mode is not available while re-

cording.

Tapedeck Two is optimized for overdubbing and creating backing tracks or riffs over which you can play. It’s located just before the Output Component, and therefore records whatever you’re hearing from the rig. It’s also very handy if you just want to create a simple guitar track to share with others, and you don’t want to load a full DAW program to do so. Controls are similar to Tapedeck One, except that it has no tranSpoSe, tune, or teMpo controls, nor can you choose between recording At Input or At Output. However, it can transfer recordings to Tapedeck One. This is useful not just for overdubs, but you can (for example) record a rhythm guitar part in Tapedeck Two, transfer it to Tapedeck One, practice a lead part against it, and record the rhythm and lead part playing together in Tapedeck Two. To simplify this type of recording, setting the SynC switch to On syncs the two tapedecks.

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Loop functions are the same as for tapedeCK one. Like tapedeCK one, only 16-bit files can be used, and looping does not work while recording. To record an overdub: ► Click on the tapedeCK one and two buttonS in the Kontrol Center if needed so that both Tapedecks are visible. ► Load a file in Tapedeck One over which you want to overdub, and select Play at Output if you don’t want to process this file through the rig. ► To sync the recording of Tapedeck Two to Tapedeck One, turn on SynC on Tapedeck Two. ► Go to Tapedeck Two and click on its new button (lower left). This automatically enables record by pushing in the reCord button. If you have already created a new file, just click on the reCord button. ► As Record Mode is already enabled, click the pLay button to initiate recording. ► After recording, click on the Save button, navigate to the folder where you want to save the file, name it, and click on Save. ► If you want to overdub this file again, click on Transfer File to Tapedeck One and repeat the recording procedure.

4.7 Amps
The virtual amps behave so much like real tube amps that the cabinet and the amp’s power output stage interact in a complex way. As a result, the amps’ tone and distortion characteristics change subtly depending on which cabinet you connect. When more than one cabinet connects to an

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amp, the cabinet at the top of the list determines the amp’s behavior, even if this cabinet is not turned on. Also, amps should be followed by the cabinet(s) of your choice. An amp’s straight output is buzzy and can be shrill; with all guitar amps (even virtual ones!), the cabinet is a vitally important sound-shaping element. Each amplifier has the following expert controls: Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. power SuppLy chooses between 50 and 60Hz. This represents the frequency of the virtual mains AC voltage going into the virtual amp power supply. The DC power voltage inside the modeled amp has a ripple at this frequency, which imparts a very subtle modulation on the sound. variaC emulates the effect of inserting a Variac in the AC line, thus reducing the supply voltage (“brown sound”) or increasing it above normal (“bold”). Sag simulates what happens to the power supply when you hit it with a loud signal, and the supply voltage sags for a fraction of a second because it can’t deliver the necessary power. Increasing Sag results in the power supply becoming more “spongy”, as would occur in a tube-based rectifier circuit. Tuning down Sag makes the power supply harder, like a silicon diode-based rectifier circuit. reSponSe changes the power storing capacity of the power supply capacitors. Turning down reSponSe increases their capacity, so that the supply voltage reacts more slowly to playing dynamics. Turning up the reSponSe will result in the amp’s power supply reacting more rapidly.

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biaS adjusts the virtual tube’s grid bias which, in turn, influences crossover distortion. Although it’s possible with some tube amps to adjust the bias in order to alter the tone, bias also changes naturally as the result of a tube aging, and this control can simulate that effect as well. You may wish to adjust biaS after changing the variaC and Sag settings.

4.7.1 Tweedman

Back in the 60s the “Tweedman” was a classic bass amp. Nowadays, it’s highly coveted as a great guitar amp, but of course, it still works equally as well in its originally intended role for bass. When compared to the Bass PRO amp, the sound of the Tweedman is a bit smoother and more “well-behaved”. Parameters voLuMe brigHt sets the overall level for the bright channel. voLuMe norMaL adjusts the level for the normal, “warmer” channel. Both the Volume Bright and Volume Normal controls can be used simultaneous to blend the two sounds.

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Turning baSS clockwise from the center boosts the low frequency response; counterclockwise reduces low frequency response. Turning Mid clockwise from the center boosts the midrange frequencies; counterclockwise reduces midrange frequencies. Turning trebLe clockwise from the center boosts the high frequency response; counterclockwise reduces high frequency response. The preSenCe control adds a frequency response “lift” in the upper midrange.

4.7.2 AC Box

The AC Box models that famous circa nineteen eighty one ‘ultra-electric’ amp sound (it rhymes with “box”) that powered the British Invasion of pop music. There were many versions of this original amp made, yet, each was created with a slightly different flavor. We chose a particular model that stands out and not only because of its unique flavor but add to that some circuit wizardry, perhaps a little bit Top Boost modification! The basic Normal channel has no tonal control aside from Top Cut. The Top Boost adds the Brilliant channel, which offers Treble and Bass controls.

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Parameters norMaL voLuMe sets the Normal channel’s overall level. The Treble and Bass controls have no effect in the Normal channel. briLLiant voLuMe sets the Brilliant channel’s overall level. The Treble and Bass controls have no effect when Brilliant Volume is turned down. Turning trebLe clockwise boosts the high frequency response in the Brilliant channel; counterclockwise reduces high frequency response. Turning baSS clockwise boosts the low frequency response in the Brilliant channel; counterclockwise reduces low frequency response. tone-Cut is a control unique to this type of amp. Basically, it reduces the output’s high frequency response. treMoLo Speed controls the rate of periodic volume modulation. treMoLo deptH controls the extent which tremolo modulates the sound from off, through subtle, to obvious.

4.7.3 Twang Reverb

The Twang Reverb simulates the rich tube sound of the classic amps from decades ago. It is ideal for screaming blues leads, crunchy rhythm guitar, even your clean sounds, rich in personality.

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Parameters voLuMe sets the amp’s overall level. Turning trebLe clockwise from the center boosts the high frequency response; counterclockwise reduces high frequency response. Turning Mid clockwise from the center boosts the midrange frequencies; counterclockwise reduces midrange frequencies. Turning baSS clockwise from the center boosts the low frequency response; counterclockwise reduces low frequency response. The brigHt switch is another tonal option that accentuates the high frequencies. reverb adds an emulated spring reverb effect. This is an extraordinarily realistic effect, unfortunately, if you tap on the side of your monitor, it will not go “boing”. The reverb on switch allows turning off the reverb. Like all good software reverbs, the spring reverb uses a fair amount of processing power; turn it off if you’re not using it. Speed controls the tremolo speed (but it’s labeled vibrato, just as it was on vintage amps of days long gone). intenSity controls the extent to which the tremolo modulates the sound – from a mild pulsing to a deep throbbing. Oh baby, baby… vibrato on allows for the deactivation of the tremolo effect off when not in use. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters (along with the other common controls for all amplifiers). reverb tiMe allows you to set the duration of the reverb decay tail.

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full).

Note that this is like a master volume control; if

you want to overdrive this amp, precede it with a module that provides gain (e.g., volume pedal turned up

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reverb Size changes the apparent size of the “room” being emulated by the reverb. While this interacts with Reverb Time to some extent in that a larger size leads to a longer decay, Size has more to do with the sound’s character.

4.7.4 Plex

The classic Plex sound probably needs no introduction – it’s the vintage amp sound that has powered too many hit records to mention. Parameters voLuMe i sets the preamp gain for the bright channel. voLuMe ii sets the preamp gain for the warm channel. By combining Volume I and Volume II you can set the mix between bright and warm tone. Turning trebLe clockwise from the center boosts the high frequency response; counterclockwise reduces high frequency response. Turning Mid clockwise from the center boosts the midrange frequencies; counterclockwise reduces midrange frequencies.

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Turning baSS clockwise from the center boosts the low frequency response; counterclockwise reduces low frequency response. The preSenCe control adds a frequency response “lift” in the upper midrange.

4.7.5 Jazz Amp

Modeled after an amp produced by a highly-respected synthesizer manufacturer, the Jazz Amp produces a warm, clean tone. An essential part of its sound is the Ensemble effect, which adds chorusing or vibrato. As a result, the Ensemble is built into the Jazz Amp. If you want to hear the Vibrato/Chorus effect in true stereo, then it’s best to turn off the effect built into the Jazz Amp and instead insert the Ensemble Component (which provides true stereo) after any Cabinets&Mics Component. Parameters voLuMe sets the amp’s overall level. Turning baSS clockwise boosts the low frequency response for a bassier sound; counterclockwise reduces low frequency response for a “thinner” sound.

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There are no expert mode settings for this amp.

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Turning Mid clockwise from the center boosts the midrange frequencies; counterclockwise reduces midrange frequencies. Turning trebLe clockwise boosts the high frequency response, while turning counterclockwise reduces high frequency response. The brigHt switch is another tonal option that, when On, accentuates the high frequencies. The vibrato/off/CHoruS switch selects Vibrato, Chorus, or effect off. rate controls the speed of the Vibrato effect. deptH controls the intensity of the Vibrato and Chorus effects.

4.7.6 Lead 800

This smooth, intense lead sound cuts like a knife and offers plenty of flexibility. While the Plex works very well for both chunky rhythm sounds and leads, the Lead 800 gives a brighter, more edgy sound.

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Parameters MaSter adjusts the amp’s overall volume. pre-aMp sets the preamp gain. Turning it more clockwise adds drive, distortion, and an “edge” to the sound. Turning baSS clockwise from the center boosts the low frequency response; counterclockwise reduces low frequency response. Turning Mid clockwise from the center boosts the midrange frequencies; counterclockwise reduces midrange frequencies. Turning trebLe clockwise from the center boosts the high frequency response; counterclockwise reduces high frequency response. The preSenCe control adds a frequency response “lift” in the upper midrange.

4.7.7 Instant Gratifier Solo Head

Of course you need an amp to put before your cabinet, and the Gratifier emulates a smokin’ solo head sound with a tube power amp. Its tonal spectrum spans the range from clean to over-the-top distortion. Think of it as a four-channel amp (click on the associated “channel” to select it):

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► ► ► ►

Clean Raw Vintage Modern

Parameters MaSter sets the overall output level. Setting this to a high level overdrives the virtual tube power amp. gain determines the amount of preamp overdrive. Use this to dial in the desired crunch and timbre, but use the Master to regulate the overall output. Turning baSS clockwise from the center boosts the low frequency response; counterclockwise reduces low frequency response. Turning Mid clockwise from the center boosts the midrange frequencies; counterclockwise reduces midrange frequencies. Turning trebLe clockwise from the center boosts the high frequency response; counterclockwise reduces high frequency response. Turning preSenCe clockwise from the center boosts the upper midrange frequencies; counterclockwise reduces the upper midrange frequencies.

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4.7.8 Bass PRO

This bass amp can deliver that gritty, growling sound that really makes a bass stand out in a mix. In addition to the unique tonal qualities, there’s also a graphic equalizer to allow tailoring the sound more precisely. Parameters voLuMe sets the amp’s overall level. The gain control increases the amount of distortion as you turn it more clockwise. drive “pushes” gain in the midrange region; it’s sort of like a gain control, but affects the sound’s overall “character”. Turning baSS clockwise from the center boosts the low frequency response; counterclockwise reduces low frequency response. Turning Mid clockwise from the center boosts the midrange frequencies; counterclockwise reduces midrange frequencies. The Mid -freQ control adjusts the center of the frequency band boosted or cut by the Mid control. This mid frequency is sweepable from 200Hz to 3200Hz.

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Turning trebLe clockwise from the center boosts the high frequency response; counterclockwise reduces high frequency response. Turning the brigHt switch on accentuates the very high frequencies. When activated, the uLtra Lo switch will scoop out some of the midrange while increasing the lower frequency response. By turning the uLtra Hi switch on, boosts the highs, but over a much wider frequency range than the Bright switch. It therefore, has a more obvious effect. The grapHiC eQ switch enables or disables the graphic EQ processor, which is visible only in Expert mode. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, which shows the graphic equalizer controls. grapHiC eQ voLuMe adjusts the overall level of the graphic EQ processor. When centered, there’s unity gain through the EQ. Pushing the slider up from the center increases gain (which will likely be necessary if you cut the response at various frequencies using the band level sliders), while moving the slider downward decreases gain. You will probably need to decrease the gain if you boost several frequency bands. The grapHiC eQ band LeveL controls boost or cut response at nine specific frequency bands: 40Hz, 90Hz, 180Hz, 300Hz, 500Hz, 1kHz, 2kHz, 4kHz, and 10kHz. When a slider is centered, there is neither a boost nor cut at that slider’s frequency band. Moving the slider up increases gain up to +12dB, while moving the slider down decreases gain by as much as -12dB.

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4.7.9 Citrus

If you’re yearning for that 70’s British sound with a bunch of flavor, the CitruS amp is for you! Its tones can range from the edge of clean to a gritty distortion when the master and gain are cranked. Parameters The MaSter Knob sets the overall volume of the amp The gain Knob sets how much saturation/distortion is added to the preamp section. Turn clockwise to add more distortion to your signal. The Lo Cut Knob is a bass roll off control. The lower (counterclockwise) you set the Knob, the more bass will be present in your sound. Setting the Knob more clockwise will allow less bass into your sound and allow more of the highs to pass. The b aSS K nob adjusts the low frequency response. Adjust it counterclockwise to attenuate bass response and clockwise to boost bass response in your signal.

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The trebLe K nob adjusts the high frequency response. Adjust it counterclockwise to attenuate treble response and clockwise to boost treble response in your signal. The preSenCe Knob adjusts the upper midrange frequencies. Turning clockwise from the center boosts the upper midrange frequencies; counterclockwise reduces the upper midrange frequencies.

4.7.10 Ultrasonic

You asked for an ultra-modern, ultra-high-gain, über-cool amp? We present the uLtraSoniC! A two-channel amp with all the modern tones you could even want. Parameters An override /CLean toggle switches the amp between the clean and overdrive channels. MaSter sets the overall output level. This control sets the master output on both channels. voLuMe sets the overall volume level of the currently selected channel.

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gain determines the amount of preamp overdrive. Use this to dial in the desired crunch and timbre, but use the Master to regulate the overall output. Each channel has a separate gain response depending on which channel is currently engaged via the overdrive /CLean toggle. Turning baSS clockwise from the center boosts the low frequency response; counterclockwise reduces low frequency response. Turning Mid clockwise from the center boosts the midrange frequencies; counterclockwise reduces midrange frequencies. Turning trebLe clockwise from the center boosts the high frequency response; counterclockwise reduces high frequency response. Turning preSenCe clockwise from the center boosts the upper midrange frequencies; counterclockwise reduces the upper midrange frequencies.

4.7.11 High White

Are you seeking the signature British sound of David Gilmour and Pete Townsend? If so, then we think you’ll want to spend some time with the HigH wHite model – we’re talking 100 virtual watts of pure tone! This amp features two different input paths, a normal input and a brilliant

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input, which you can use together with respective volume controls for each channel. Parameters The MaSter Knob sets the overall volume of the amp. The norMaL Knob sets the volume for the normal channel. The normal channel has a smoother clean sound. The briL Knob sets the volume for the brilliant channel. The brilliant has a slightly more “edgy” and aggressive tone. The b aSS K nob adjusts the low frequency response. Adjust it counterclockwise to attenuate bass response and clockwise to boost bass response in your signal. The MiddLe K nob adjusts the mid frequency response. Adjust it counterclockwise to attenuate mid response and clockwise to boost mid response in your signal. The trebLe K nob adjusts the high frequency response. Adjust it counterclockwise to attenuate treble response and clockwise to boost treble response in your signal. The preSenCe Knob adjusts the upper midrange and high frequencies. Turning clockwise from the center boosts the upper midrange frequencies; counterclockwise reduces the upper midrange frequencies.

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4.7.12 Tweed Delight

There’s nothing like the spank of an amp covered in tweed! This amp, based on an American legend, has greatly simplified controls and is designed to go from glassy clean, to bluesy squawk – with only three control knobs! Both channels can be used together to overdrive the amp even further. Parameters The voLuMe brigHt Knob sets the volume of the bright channel of the amp. The bright channel is deigned for slightly edgy, distorted sounds when the gain is raised. The voLuMe norMaL Knob sets the volume for the normal channel on the amp. The normal channel is designed for smoother sounds that will still distort when pushed into higher volume settings. The tone Knob is your only Knob for shaping the EQ on the amp. With the Knob fully counterclockwise, the highs will be attenuated leaving you will a warm, but muddy sound. As you raise the control clockwise, more highs start to join the signal and add high end boost and an even more defined distorted sound.

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4.8 Cabinets
What amp would be complete without a matching cabinet? Here we give you two choices. The first is the Matched Cabinet, where we provide you with what we feel, is the best choice for the amp you choose. This cabinet choice should work well for most applications. For those who really want to tweak, we have the Cabinets & Mics, which will allow you to pair any cabinet, with any microphone and tweak EQ, mic position and “air” to your hearts content. Oh, did we mention that you can have as many cabinets as you want?

4.8.1 Matched Cabinet

When you add any amplifier Component into your rack, you will see that a Matched Cabinet will also be added to your rig. This is different than in previous versions of GUITAR RIG.

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The Matched Cabinet is a module that contains the two closest Matched Cabinets for the amp you are using. Parameters ► Cabinet SeLeCtor: The Cabinet SeLeCtor allows you to choose a cabinet for your amp. ► MiC 1/MiC 2 Mix: This slider will blend between the two hidden microphones inside of the matched cabinet. One has a sharp tone, while the other has a mellow tone. You can mix between the two to achieve your desired blend. ► voLuMe: Set the volume of the matched cabinets output. ► voLuMe Learn: Automatically learn the best output volume by depressing the button and playing as loud as you can; GUITAR RIG will automatically select the best volume to avoid clipping. Once the volume has been learned, the button will “pop out”. ► dry/air: controls the level of early reflections in the room response. This simulates the distance of the microphone to the farthest wall.

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4.8.2 Cabinets & Mics

This Component models the standard guitar and bass amp recording chain: Cabinet, mic, and mic position. But it doesn’t end there, click on the small add button, and you can add another recording chain with the same set of options and controls (as shown above). Why settle for miking one or two cabinets when you can have a roomful… The 28 cabinet choices are (18 through 23 are bass cabinets):
Nr. Name Nr. Name

1 2

1 x 12 Tweed Alnico 1 x 12 Custom

11 12 

x 12 UK 60s Tall  x 12 UK 60s

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3  5 6 7 8 9 10 21 22 23 2

2 x 12 Tweed Blue 2 x 12 Tweed Green 2 x 12 Tweed Ceram 2 x 12 Brit 60s 2 x 12 Chief V-30 2 x 12 Custom 2 x 12 Jazz  x 10 Tweed Alnico  x 10 Bass-WR 8 x 10 Bass-PRO 8 x 10 Bass-WR Rotator Horn Closed

13 1 15 16 17 18 19 20 25 26 27 28 

x12 UK 80’s  x 12 UK 70s  x 12 High White 4x12 Gratifier x12 Ultrasonic 1 x 15 Bass-PRO 1 x 15 Bass-WR  x 10 Bass-PRO Rotator Horn Open Rotator Bass Close Rotator Bass Open DI Box

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Cabs 1-7, 9, 10, and 22-25: ► 1/5 On Axis ► 2/5 Off Axis ► 3/5 Edge ► /5 Far ► 5/5 Back (This applies to open back cabs only, i.e. it’s not available on the x12s or the Bass cabinets, which are all closed-back. However, many of the Bass cabinets have a Horn Tweeter, so they include the 5/5 Horn Microphone Position.) Cabs 8, 11-15, 16, and 20: ► 1/5 On Axis ► 2/5 Off Axis ► 3/5 Edge ► /5 Far Cabs 17, 18, 19, 21: ► 1/5 On Axis ► 2/5 Off Axis ► 3/5 Edge ► /5 Far ► 5/5 Horn Guitar Cabs 1-17: ► 1/5 Dynamic 57 ► 2/5 Dynamic 21

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2 & 26 use a closed cabinet, with sound re-

corded through slots. 25 & 27 use an open cabinet, with sound recorded direct. Mic positions and the position names depend on the selected cabinet (of course, the Direct Box doesn’t offer a mic option).

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► 3/5 Dynamic 609 ► /5 Condenser 87 ► 5/5 Tube Condenser Bass cabs 18-23: ► 1/5 Dynamic 7 ► 2/5 Dynamic 21 ► 3/5 Dynamic 609 ► /5 Dynamic 20 ► 5/5 Condenser 7 Cabs 24, 25: ► 1/1 Condenser 60 Cabs 26, 27: ► 1/1 Condenser 87 In MicPos 5/5 (Back or Horn), only one Mic is available: Cabs 1-7, 9, 10 (Back) – Condenser 87 Cabs 17, 18, 19, 21 (Horn) – Condenser 60 Parameters Size (the slider below the cabinet graphic) provides the equivalent of “growing” or “shrinking” the cabinet and speaker. For example, with a 1x12 cabinet, set Size to -20% and it becomes a 1x10. Increasing Size to +25% turns it into a 1x15, and +3% creates a 1x17 speaker/cabinet. voLuMe sets the microphone’s output level.

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pan places the microphone signal anywhere in the stereo panorama, from far left to far right. air controls the level of early reflections in the room response. diStanCe appears if more than one SubCabinet/Mic is active. This feature controls the delay due to the distance between the microphone and cabinet. Mixing together the signals from multiple microphones can result in cancellations and emphasis of certain frequencies, depending on the relative distances. baSS boosts or cuts the level of the lower frequencies. trebLe boosts or cuts the level of the higher frequencies. pHaSe flips the microphone polarity. MaSter voLuMe sets the entire Component’s level. This is necessary because if you have used the add button to create multiple cabinets, they may use different output levels. The Master Volume control allows bringing the levels of all the cabinets up or down as a group. Set this control carefully – if previous stages have added a lot of gain, it will be necessary to lower this control if you want to avoid triggering the output limiter or clipping (depending on the setting of the Output Component’s Clipping/Limiter switch). Learn is a Button that optimizes the Master Volume setting automatically. As with the other Learn buttonS, push it in, then play at the loudest level you’ll be using. GUITAR RIG 3 will analyze your playing, and adjust the Master volume for the optimum level. After analysis is complete, the Learn button “pops out” again.

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4.9 Distortion
The distortion and overdrive Components are accurate reproductions of classic hardware devices. Therefore, just like the transistorized originals, these effects can sound somewhat thin and artificial by themselves – especially when driven hard. For the best tone, feed them into an amp/ cabinet combination to create a beefier, more realistic sound. Distortion tips Here are some hints on how to achieve a special distortion tonality. These apply to the various distortion Components. ► Smooth sound: Use the bass pickup with the tone control set for minimum treble. ► Raunchier sound: Use the treble pickup. ► Using optional guitar switches: If your guitar has a series/parallel pickup switch, the series position will give the thickest fuzz sound. If your guitar has an in phase/out of phase switch, the out of phase position will provide the thinnest sound. ► Brighter sound: Some guitars (particularly Fender solid body types) have a feature where turning down the volume control attenuates the low frequencies at a faster rate than the high frequencies. Thus, if you turn the control down about 3/ of the way, the upper strings will distort more than the lower ones. This gives a bright, lively type of distortion. ► Balancing the sound: With guitar, pickup height adjustments are crucial to getting a consistent distortion sound. If the sound is too boomy,

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angle the pickups slightly so that the bottom three strings are further away from the pickup than the top three strings. Also, note that newer strings will sustain longer than older strings.

4.9.1 Fuzz

Looking for that special 60’s fuzz sound? The Fuzz’s rather thin and sharp tone will make your leads cut through a mix like a chain saw. As a bonus, you can create buzzing vintage rhythm guitar sounds, too. Parameters voLuMe sets the Fuzz’s output level. It acts like a master volume control. Turn the fuzz control clockwise to increase the distortion’s “fuzzy” quality. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. baSS provides control over the lower frequency tone. Turning trebLe clockwise accents the high frequencies.

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4.9.2 Big Fuzz

Stretch sustain to the max, like a 1970s guitar hero…or add some serious grunge to your tone. This is the distortion of choice for some serious rock and roll sounds. Parameters voLuMe sets the Big Fuzz’s output level. It acts like a master volume control. SuStain affects the sound’s sustain by increasing the amount of gain going to the distortion circuitry as you turn it further clockwise. Turn tone clockwise to emphasize low frequencies and reduce higher frequencies, or counter-clockwise to dampen the bass range and enhance the high frequency tone. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, which offers the following parameters. baSS provides control over the lower frequency tone. Turning trebLe clockwise accents the high frequencies.

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4.9.3 Cat

If you want a responsive overdrive for blues and rock (rhythm or lead), the Cat is the one to use. But beware: Kick the Cat hard, and its inner angry punk appears! Parameters voLuMe sets the Cat’s output level. It acts like a master volume control. fiLter affects the sound’s color, For a darker sound, turn clockwise to enhance the low frequency range; turn counter-clockwise to for a brighter, sharper sound. Turn diStortion clockwise for a more distorted sound. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, which offers the following parameters. Turn the baLLS control clockwise to add low-end punch. Turning it counterclockwise delivers a flatter, more biting sound. baSS provides control over the lower frequency tone. Turning trebLe clockwise accents the high frequencies, while moving in the counter-clockwise end of the range (say, from 0.00 to 3.00) can add an almost wah-wah like effect. tone adjusts the frequency range influenced by the built-in pre-distortion midrange booster.

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4.9.4 Skreamer

This warm, smooth-sounding overdrive works great for rhythm guitar and smooth leads. Parameters voLuMe sets the Skreamer’s output level. It acts like a master volume control. Turning tone clockwise gives bright, screaming leads and biting rhythms. Counterclockwise gives a mellower, darker sound. drive determines the “crunch factor”. Turn clockwise for more distortion. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. baSS provides control over the lower frequency tone. brigHt determines the high frequency response. CLean adds some of the unprocessed sound in with the distortion, from none to maximum.

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4.9.5 Distortion

When you want distortion that will scare small animals or clear a room of unwanted house guests, insert this baby and turn it up to 11. Parameters voLuMe sets the Distortion’s output level. It acts like a master volume control. Turning tone clockwise accents the midrange while dropping the bass. Counterclockwise takes off the highs and boosts the bass for a warmer sound. diStortion is the main grunge control. Turn it clockwise to dirty up the sound. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. baSS provides control over the lower frequency tone. Mid affects the level of the midrange frequencies. trebLe determines the high frequency response.

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4.9.6 Mezone

When you want metal…here you go. Pre- and post-distortion tone controls let you tailor the sound just about any way you want. Parameters voLuMe sets the Mezone’s output level. It acts like a master volume control. baSS provides control over the lower frequency tone. Warning to Californians: Turn up Bass all the way, and there may be enough low frequencies to trigger an earthquake. Mid sets the amount of midrange frequency boost; turn clockwise for more boost. Mid freQ adjusts the frequency where the Mid control’s boosting occurs. Turning trebLe clockwise accents the high frequencies. Turn diStortion clockwise for a more distorted sound. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, which offers the following parameters. Note that all these filters are before the distortion, and are therefore designed to affect the distortion’s character more than its tonality.

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baSS adjusts how much bass is allowed to be distorted. Turn clockwise for more bass. Mid -Q sets the amount of midrange boost that makes its way to the distortion section; turn clockwise for more boost. Mid freQ adjusts the frequency where the Mid-Q control’s boosting occurs. Turning trebLe clockwise lets through high frequencies to the distortion section.

4.9.7 Demon Distortion

Definitely a piece of hard rocker’s gear, the Demon Distortion provides you with razor-sharp, long-sustaining leads and speaker-blasting rhythm sounds. Parameters voLuMe sets the Demon Distortion’s output level. It acts like a master volume control. baSS provides control over the lower frequency tone. Mid enhances or attenuates the midrange frequencies. Turning trebLe clockwise accents the high frequencies.

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The gain control lets you adjust the input sensitivity. The more you turn the gain control clockwise, the more the incoming signal will be distorted. The SCoop SwitCH drastically attenuates the midrange frequencies, which produces a typical modern metal sound. With Scoop on, the Mid control has no effect. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. The bottoM control sets how much bass passes through to the distortion section. If the sound “rumbles” or sounds “blurry”, turn this control counter-clockwise to tighten the sound. booSt sets the frequency range influenced by the built-in pre-distortion midrange booster. baSS determines the center frequency of the equalizer’s baSS control. Mid determines the center frequency of the equalizer’s Mid control. trebLe determines the center frequency of the equalizer’s Treble control. brigHt fine-tunes the signal’s presence by attenuating or enhancing the highest frequencies.

4.9.8 TransAmp

This versatile, analog distortion box set the stage for the later generation of digital wonderboxes. When you need a “one-size-fits-all” fuzz, TransAmp

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delivers a wide variety of tones – from cool, “on the verge” distortion to biting, raging heat. Parameters voLuMe sets the TransAmp’s output level. It acts like a master volume control. baSS provides control over the lower frequency tone. Turning trebLe clockwise accents the high frequencies. The drive control has a wide range, from just a hint of crunch (counterclockwise) to hardcore (clockwise). The aMp ControL “morphs” among three different amp characters: Tweed, British, and California. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. Click on CLean to produce a cleaner, less distorted sound. The Cab&MiC switch, when pushed in, simulates the effect of adding a speaker cabinet and miking it. MiCpoS has an effect only if the Cab&MiC function is enabled. This control places the mic at various degrees of off-axis position, or at a distance from the speaker. Hot has an effect only if the Cab&MiC function is enabled. Turning the control more clockwise produces a brighter, hotter sound.

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4.9.9 Treble Booster

Treble boosters were used by Brian May of the group Queen, as well as Eric Clapton on the “Beano” album (when he was with John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers) to push their tube amps into crispy, creamy distortion. Tony Iommi, Rory Gallagher, Ritchie Blackmore, and David Gilmour are other guitarists who used this technique. Also, many Fender Telecaster players would turn down the volume control slightly, which reduced the bass and created a similar effect when feeding high-gain amps. Parameters brigHt, when turned down, reduces the boosting somewhat at the highest frequencies. booSt sets the degree of boost.

4.9.10 Gain Booster

If you’ve ever seen the movie “This is Spinal Tap”, you know that amps that go up to 11 are much better than ones that go up to 10. Well, this Component can add gain where you need it – for insane amounts of

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overdrive, to compensate for settings that reduce level, or simply to see if you really can get your amp to go up to 11 instead of 10. Parameters It doesn’t get much simpler than this: turn booSt clockwise to boost the signal level.

4.9.11 Sledgehammer

If you want your guitar to clear it’s way through a mix like a sledgehammer, than you’ll appropriately want to make use of the new Sledgehammer module. This effect is downright brutal and will make walls come down. Parameters voLuMe controls the overall volume coming out of the Component. baSS controls the low frequency response. Turn it counterclockwise to attenuate bass, and clockwise to increase bass and low frequency response in your sound. trebLe controls the treble response. Turn it counterclockwise to attenuate treble and clockwise to increase treble and high frequency response in your sound. The C ontour Knob scoops out certain frequencies from your sound depending on the freQ settings. Turning the control clockwise will scoop

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through the frequencies selected by the freQ Knob. Fully clockwise is full scoop, and fully counterclockwise applies no Countour on the sound. The freQ Knob sets which frequencies are affected when using the Contour Knob. Counterclockwise rotation will affect the midrange, while turning the control clockwise will begin to affect the upper mids and treble frequencies. gain adjusts the amount over saturation fed into the distortion circuit The diStortion/drive switch changes the Component from softer overdrivetype sounds into harder, more edgy distortion tones.

4.10 Modulation
A modulator introduces motion into formerly static sounds. Common modulation devices in your hardware rigs are: Chorus, Tremolo and Flange. GUITAR RIG provides you with a vast list of modulators than can be inserted anywhere in your rig! The majority of modulation Components have the ability to sync. With the new sync possibilities in GUITAR RIG 3, you can now sync to either host clock, metronome clock, or per-Preset clock (free sync)

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4.10.1 Tremolo

This Component provides a periodic amplitude change so that the sound seems to “pulsate”. A modulation source controls the rate of these amplitude changes. Parameters intenSity controls the tremolo effect depth by adding in some dry signal to the processed signal. r ate sets the modulation frequency. Faster settings add a type of “shimmering” effect to the sound. teMpo SynC will synchronize the tremolo rate to the host tempo so that it follows the song’s rhythm. In standalone mode, the tremolo rate syncs to the Metronome tempo. Stereo pan, when enabled, provides a stereo tremolo effect: When the level increases in one channel, it decreases in the opposite channel, and vice-versa. Note that the effect pretty much disappears when Tremolo is followed by a mono Component like an Amp. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters.

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widtH, in mono mode, controls the ratio between when the LFO cycle is positive (higher volume) and negative (lower volume). In stereo mode, this control sets the ratio between the time spent to the right or to the left side of the stereo field. down requires some explanation. Think of the tremolo modulation not as a waveform, but rather an attack and decay from an envelope. Down changes the decay time. up changes the apparent “attack time” in a similar manner. Turning both down and up to minimum creates more of a hard gate effect.

4.10.2 Ensemble

This unique effect is based on a popular vintage processor that is similar to chorusing, in the sense that it creates “bigger” sounds; but also provides vibrato (pitch modulation) effects. Parameters voLuMe sets the overall output level. CHoruS intenSity is active only in Chorus mode. It sets the depth of the chorusing effect.

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Mode chooses between the chorus and vibrato functions. d eptH is active only in Vibrato mode and sets the amount of pitch deviation. rate is active only in Vibrato mode and sets the vibrato speed. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. teMp SynC synchronizes the LFO speed to the metronome tempo, which is derived from the SYNC setting in the Toolbar. d ry/wet sets the ratio of dry to processed sound, from dry only (counterclockwise) to 50-50 (mid position) to processed sound only (fully clockwise). baSS provides control over the lower frequency tone (turn clockwise to boost, counterclockwise to cut). Mid similarly affects the level of the midrange frequencies. trebLe similarly determines the high frequency response. deLay sets the chorus circuit’s delay time (the time around which modulation occurs). Stereo changes the imaging from mono (fully counterclockwise) to stereo (fully clockwise).

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4.10.3 Chorus/ Flanger

This delay-based unit can create chorusing, flanging, and pitch modulation effects. ► CHoruSing essentially turns one guitar into a chorus of guitars, providing a more diffused and complex sound. ► fLanging produces a whooshing sound, similar to the effect you hear from a jet airplane when it passes overhead but more intense and metallic. ► pitCH ModuLation is the same thing as vibrato – a cyclic pitch change. Parameters Speed varies the modulation rate. With Chorus, faster speeds provide a more shimmering sound, while slower speeds create more of a rolling, much smoother chorus effect. With Flanger, Speed determines how long it takes to complete one “cycle” of flanging (i.e., minimum delay to maximum delay, or the “high” and “low” timbres). With Pitch Modulation, this control sets the vibrato rate. intenSity, in Chorus mode, adds in more of the delayed, processed sound. When flanging, it increases the flanger resonance to create a sharper, more

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intense effect. With Pitch Modulation, the vibrato is more pronounced and less like chorusing as you turn Intensity clockwise. widtH determines the range of the flanging effects (i.e., the difference between the highest and lowest points); with Chorus, the amount of “animation;” and with Pitch Modulation, the amount of pitch deviation. Mode chooses among the Chorus, Flanger, and Pitch Modulation modes. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. SynC synchronizes the LFO speed to the metronome tempo, which is derived from the SYNC setting in the Toolbar. Stereo creates a super-wide stereo effect, but is recommended only for live use – playing the signal back in mono causes the effect to disappear, leaving only the straight sound.

4.10.4 Stoned Phaser

The Stoned Phraser adds a swirling, animated effect to the sound. This model is modeled after a popular phaser from the 1970s. Parameters rate controls the speed of the phaser effect.

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SynC synchronizes the phaser rate to the host tempo so that it follows the song’s rhythm. In standalone mode, the phaser rate syncs to the Metronome tempo. CoLor creates a timbral change that’s a variation on the standard phaser sound. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. invert changes the phase of the shifted signal, producing a different timbre. notCHeS determines the number of stages in the phase shifter. Click on the associated numerical and drag to select from 1 to 5 notches. C oLor StrengtH sets how much the Color on /o ff button affects the sound. Sweep Min sets the sweep’s lower frequency limit. Sweep Max sets the sweep’s upper frequency limit. rotate alters the phase difference between the LFOs feeding the left and right channels for a stereo effect. dry wet adjusts the mix of the dry and processed (phase shifted) sound.

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4.10.5 Rotator

This effect, the same one used in NATIVE INSTRUMENTS’ acclaimed B “virtual organ”, simulates the effect of miking a rotating speaker. A true rotating speaker has two separate elements – the lower rotor and upper rotor – and this module faithfully emulates both elements, as well as provides separate controls for each one Parameters rotator switches the speed of the rotating speaker – slow or fast. baLanCe sets the ratio of the sound produced by the rotating speaker’s high frequency horn compared to the low frequency woofer. Turning clockwise gives more highs, while turning counterclockwise gives a bassier sound. pan changes the treble and bass rotors’ location in the stereo field. Turning clockwise moves treble right while bass moves left. diStanCe edits the distance between the virtual microphones and the rotating speaker. dry/wet controls the effect’s strength; turn fully clockwise to hear the rotating speakers only. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode. Each rotor (treble and bass) has a set of identical controls.

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Cab tone activates the Rotator’s own cabinet simulation effect. You can turn this off if you want to use the Cabinets & Mics Component instead. For example, you could set up the Rotator Bass Cabinet and pan it fully left, then add the Rotator Horn Cabinet and pan it fully right. Connect the Rotator after Cabinets & Mics, and switch Cab Tone off. The Cabinets’ left and right channels will now feed the Rotator’s Bass and Horn rotors. SLow sets the rotor speed in slow mode. When set to minimum, the rotor comes to a stop. faSt sets the rotor speed in fast mode.

4.10.6 Oktaver

This generates two signals – one octave below, and another signal two octaves below, the original pitch. There are two important cautions: ► Oktaver works only with single notes, not chords. ► Place Oktaver toward the beginning of the chain. Do not add reverb, delay, or other modulation effects before it, as that will confuse the pitch tracking circuitry. However, you can usually put the Tube Compressor, Stomp Compressor, and sometimes EQ, before it with no problems.

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Parameters direCt sets the dry signal level. oCt 1 determines the level of the octave below signal. o Ct 2 changes the level of the signal two octaves below the original pitch. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode. Each octave (1 and 2) has a set of identical controls. Cutoff changes the timbre of the octave sound. Turn clockwise to increase brightness. reSo sets the filter resonance. aCCeL sets how long it takes for the speed to change when you change the rotator Speed SwitCH. When counterclockwise, it accelerates or decelerates over time; clockwise produces a near instantaneous change. Spread widens the stereo image when turned clockwise, and narrows the image when turned counterclockwise. It controls the distance between the left and right virtual microphones.

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4.10.7 Pitch Pedal

GUITAR RIG fans from around the world begged us to include a “pedalcontrolled vibrato tailpiece” effect, so how could we resist? So, instead of a standard vibrato tailpiece, we created a unit where all the strings stay in tune as you bend up and down. Controlling the drag (pitch shift) parameter from the RIG KONTROL pedal is highly recommended, as this gives hands-free control over pitch changes. The expert mode parameters are crucial in creating useable bending. Those who don’t want to get involved with programming can simply choose some of the Presets for common string-bending effects. Parameters drag changes pitch, based on limits set by the expert mode knobs. Generally you drag the slider to the right to bend pitch up, and to the left to bend pitch down; but the reverse is also possible – as is having one extreme with no pitch change, and the other with an upward or downward pitch slide. d ry / we t adjusts the proportion of dry and processed sounds. Counterclockwise is fully dry, clockwise is processed (wet) sound only.

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Note that unlike the Oktaver, the pitch shift-

ing works polyphonically; furthermore, with small shift amounts, the Pitch Pedal can provide some superb chorus and ensemble effects.

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Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. Min SHift sets the pitch shift amount when the pedal is at minimum (up position). The range is ±2 semitones. Min detune sets “fine tuning” for the amount of detuning when the pedal is at minimum (up position). The range is ±100 cents. Max SHift sets the pitch shift amount when the pedal is at maximum (down position). The range is ±2 semitones. Max detune sets “fine tuning” for the amount of detuning when the pedal is at maximum (down position). The range is ±100 cents. feedbaCK determines how much of the output signal returns to the input. For example, if you have set the pitch to transpose up 1 semitone, that signal will return to the input and be transposed up another semitone, then that signal will return to the input and be transposed up another semitone, and so on. This produces an ascending series of notes. deLay affects the smoothness of the pitch shifted sound. It also introduces a delay in the feedback path, from 10 to 50 ms. The longer the delay, the greater the sense of a series of notes; with shorter delays, you’ll hear more of a texture.

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4.10.8 Electric Lady

The Electric Lady adds a very versatile stereo Flanger to your effects rack. Modeled after an all-time classic, the Electric Lady produces sounds that range from subtle flanging and chorusing to weird metallic timbres and extreme flanger swooshes. The static mode adds to this wide palette of sounds. It switches the unit into filter mode acting as a Bank of notch filters. Parameters rate controls the speed of the Flanger effect. For a slow effect, turn the Knob counter-clockwise. For a fast effect turn it clockwise. StatiC toggles the effect into static filter-Bank mode and disables the modulating LFO. deptH controls the intensity of the modulation. With higher values a broader frequency range is affected. CoLor varies the general timbre of the effect. In static mode (see above) this Knob controls the frequency of the filters. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters.

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SynC synchronizes the LFO speed to the metronome tempo, which is derived from the SYNC setting in the Toolbar. invert shifts the phase of the effect signal leading to a different timbre. rotate alters the phase difference between the LFOs feeding the left and right channels for a stereo effect. dry wet adjusts the mix of the dry and processed (flanged) sound.

4.10.9 Phaser Nine

This Phaser is based on another well-known effect design, it is a sure-fire way to add all kinds of animated shimmering to your guitar sounds. Parameters rate controls the speed of the Phaser modulation. Turn the rotary Knob counter-clockwise for slow and clockwise for fast swirls. deptH sets the intensity of the phasing. CoLor controls the basic timbre of the phasing by changing the feedback of the effect. Higher values lead to greater emphasis on the frequency peaks in the signal. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters.

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SynC synchronizes the LFO speed to the metronome tempo, which is derived from the SynC setting in the Toolbar. invert shifts the phase of the effect signal leading to a different timbre. freQuenCy controls the center frequency around which the LFO modulation will take place. notCHeS dials in the number of notches the effect introduces into the frequency range. rotate alters the phase difference between the LFOs feeding the left and right channels for a stereo effect. dry wet adjusts the mix of the dry and processed (phased) sound.

4.10.10 Harmonic Synthesizer

The Harmonic Synthesizer opens up a whole world of synthesizer sounds simply by playing your guitar. It can produce faithful re-creations of classic sounds but is also well-suited for generating wild effects never heard before. Additionally, you can switch it to bass-mode for use with your bass guitar. The effect contains four voices – sub-octave, dry, octave and square wave – that can be freely mixed for envelope shaping as well as for coloring using a flexible filter.

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Parameters guitar/baSS is used for switching the filter sweep range to be fed by a guitar or a bass, respectively. tHreSHoLd acts as a noise gate for the input signal. Only signals above the threshold will get through and trigger the volume envelope and the filter sweep. Dial in a setting that cleanly triggers the effect. trigger controls the signal volume needed to activate the filter. If you set this too high it may result in a stuttering filter due to multiple triggering. Experiment a bit to find the exact setting you need for your style of playing. Sub controls the volume of the sub-octave. Be aware that only single-notes are tracked. dry dials in the volume of the dry, unprocessed guitar signal. oCt is for mixing the signal shifted up one octave from the original and only tracks single notes. SQr mixes in a square wave signal that can be controlled by dynamic playing. att has a similar effect to the Attack controls of a synthesizer envelope. The higher the value the slower the signal will be faded in. High settings can completely remove the initial attack sound of the instrument. reS controls resonance and width of the filter. With higher values you get a broader frequency range and a more pronounced peak around the cutoff frequency. Strt sets the frequency at which the filter sweep starts.

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Stop determines the end-frequency of the filter sweep. If Start and Stop are set to the same value, the filter will emphasize that particular frequency without sweeping. rate determines the speed of the filter sweep from the start frequency to the end frequency.

4.10.11 Ring Modulator

Ring modulation is an unusual effect, one that you don’t hear everyday. If you like Black Sabbath’s “Paranoid” solo, then you’ve heard one in action. A ring modulator takes two signals, and mixes the sum and difference between the two, resulting in some very unique sounds. It’s a throwback to the glory days of analog noisemaking. The Component has two sections: Mod and LFO. The Mod section comprises of the following controls: The ring control acts as a balance between the dry and the ring-modulated sound. The fM ControL is an additional FM modulator. The Hi/Lo switch selects the frequency range of the oscillator used by the ring and FM modulation.

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The freQ Knob sets the frequency of the oscillator. Start with the control fully counterclockwise for low frequencies, and turning the control clockwise selects higher frequencies. The Lfo SeCtion (Low Frequency Oscillator Section) consists of the following controls: The aMount Knob controls the modulation strength of the LFO on the oscillator. Clockwise rotation of this Knob will add more movement to the sound. The Sine /SQuare switch selects between a sine wave, or square wave shaped LFO signal. The rate Knob controls the rate of periodic modulation through the LFO. The glowing Led to the right of the rate Knob shows the visual rate of the LFO applied to the signal. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. SynC synchronizes the LFO speed to the metronome tempo, which is derived from the SynC setting in the Toolbar. edge modifies the waveform of the oscillator. You can add overtones to the oscillator resulting in a more aggressive sound.

4.11 Filter
Filtering (e.g. equalizing) is the process of boosting or cutting frequencies present in any sound. Filtering is one of the most common ways to shape your sound, and GUITAR RIG gives you several ways to affect your sound

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through filtering. Filtering also includes Wah pedals, and custom filters borrowed from other NATIVE INSTRUMENTS products.

4.11.1 EQ Shelving

A shelving equalizer is a type of tone control that boosts or cuts starting at a specific frequency. Upon attaining the specified amount of boost or cut, the response turns into a “shelf” and provides a constant amount of boost or cut from that point on. This type of EQ provides general tone shaping to correct broad issues, like lack of high frequency “sparkle” or excessive “boominess” in the bass end. The graph in EQ Shelving illustrates the response created by the controls, while the Tooltips for each dot show the exact frequency in Hz and amount of boost/cut in dB. Parameters There are two ways to adjust parameters: ► Click on the graphic display’s dots and drag (up to increase gain, down to decrease gain, sideways to change frequency)

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► Adjust these same parameters by clicking on the (+) sign to reveal expert mode. These parameters are: freQ1 sets the frequency for the low shelf where boosting or cutting begins. In gain1’s center position, there is no boosting or cutting. Turning it clockwise boosts the response, while turning it counterclockwise cuts the response. freQ2 sets the frequency for the high shelf where boosting or cutting begins. In gain2’s center position, there is no boosting or cutting. Turning it clockwise boosts the response, while turning it counterclockwise cuts the response.

4.11.2 EQ Parametric

A parametric equalizer is a highly sophisticated form of tone control. Unlike the graphic equalizer (described next) which can boost/cut only at specific fixed frequencies, a parametric can boost or cut over a continuously variable range of frequencies. In addition, the bandwidth (the range of

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frequencies affected by the boosting or cutting) is variable, from broad to sharp. The graph in EQ Parametric illustrates the response created by the controls, while the Tooltips for each dot show the exact frequency in Hz and amount of boost/cut in dB. EQ Parametric includes two complete parametric EQ stages. For example, the first stage could boost the bass frequencies around 100 Hz, while the second stage adds a midrange notch. Parameters As with EQ Shelving, there are two ways to adjust parameters: Either click on the graphic display’s dots (up to increase gain, down to decrease gain, sideways to change frequency), or adjust these same parameters by clicking on the (+) sign to reveal expert mode. These parameters are: freQ1 and freQ2 set the specific part of the audio spectrum where the boosting or cutting occurs. gain1 and gain2 determine whether the frequency dialed in by freQ1 and freQ2 respectively will be boosted (emphasized) or cut (de-emphasized). Q1 and Q2 edit the sharpness of the boosting or cutting action at frequencies freQ1 and freQ2 respectively. Narrow bandwidth settings (turning clockwise from the centre position) affect a very small part of the audio spectrum, while broad bandwidth settings (turning counterclockwise from the center position) affect a broader range.

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4.11.3 EQ Graphic

This module uses multiple bandpass filters to split the audio spectrum up into eight bands, with an individual boost/cut control for each band. The term graphic equalizer refers to the fact that hardware graphic EQs use linear slide pots for the boost/cut controls, so looking at the position of the knobs gives a “graphic” indication of frequency response. With EQ Graphic, the display shows the response curve. Parameters grapHiC interfaCe dotS (HandLeS) set gain. Drag the dot up to increase gain, down to decrease gain. Double-clicking on a handle restores it to zero gain. The Tooltip for a handle shows the amount of boost or cut as an amount from 0 to 10. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. range sets the maximum amount of boost and cut, from ±1dB (very fine adjustment) to ±30dB (very wide-range adjustment). Min sets the lowest band’s frequency. Max sets the highest band’s frequency.

%
3200 Hz.

Note that all bands are equally spaced (using

logarithmic ratios) between the highest and lowest bands. Example: If Min is set to 50 Hz and Max to 600 Hz, the other bands are at 100, 200, 00, 800, 1600, and

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4.11.4 Custom EQ

The Custom EQ is modeled after the “boutique” highly colored EQ’s that are all the rage in the studio these days. This particular EQ has a warm “synth” style EQ sound. Parameters The tone Knob controls the balance between treble and bass sound. At fully counterclockwise position, the low frequencies are boosted and the high frequencies are suppressed. As you rotate the knob clockwise, the treble comes up and the bass is suppressed. The freQ Knob selects the mid frequency, between bass and treble, where the scoop happens. The SCoop Knob controls the depth of the dip in the EQ response in the midrange. Turn clockwise to increase the amount of scoop. The voLuMe Knob sets the overall gain of the CuStoM eQ.

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4.11.5 Pro-Filter

The Pro-Filter is a synthesizer-type filter based on the filter included in NATIVE INSTRUMENTS’ popular Pro-53 virtual instrument. The Pro-Filter has a fat, rich sound that works very well as a tone control, but tying the Cutoff control to the RIG KONTROL pedal also produces a great wah-wah sound. But why stop there? The various Modifiers are perfect for modulating cutoff. In particular, the Step Sequencer can give novel filtered effects that sync to the music. This is ideal for hip hop, dance, techno, and other forms of highly rhythmic music. Parameters Cutoff sets the frequency at which any filtering occurs. reSo edits the sharpness (“Q”) of the filter response. SLope morphs between two rates at which frequencies are attenuated past the cutoff frequency. When fully counter-clockwise, frequencies are attenuated at a rate of 12dB per octave. This produces a “softer” filtering sound. When fully clockwise, frequencies are attenuated at a rate of 24dB per octave. This produces a fatter, more intense filtering sound. In between settings include elements of both responses. Lfp/bpf/Hpf morphs among three filter responses:

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► Lowpass (Lfp) – the filter passes low frequencies and attenuates high frequencies ► Bandpass (bpf) – the filter passes a band of frequencies, and attenuates frequencies that fall higher or lower outside that band ► Highpass (Hpf) – the filter passes high frequencies and attenuates low frequencies

4.11.6 AutoFilter

%

Please note that there is no expert mode for this

module.

The AutoFilter is basically a wahwah that responds to the dynamics of your playing. The AutoFilter sound is very popular in funk music, particularly from the 1970s. Parameters SenS matches your guitar’s level to the AutoFilter. If the filter doesn’t sweep over a wide enough range (and the range control, described later, is set properly), increase the Sensitivity. If on the other hand you hardly have to touch the strings to kick the filter wide open, then turn the SenS control down. With the up/down switch set to the Down mode, playing harder drives the filter down to a lower frequency; as the string decays, the filter returns to

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a higher frequency. With the Up mode, playing harder drives the filter up to a higher frequency. As the string decays, the filter returns to a lower frequency. range sets the width of the filter sweep. Turn it clockwise to sweep over a wider range. reSo edits the sharpness (“Q”) of the filter response. Lfp/bpf/Hpf morphs among three filter responses: ► Lowpass (LFP) – the filter passes low frequencies and attenuates high frequencies ► Bandpass (BPF) – the filter passes a band of frequencies, and attenuates frequencies that fall higher or lower outside that band ► Highpass (HPF) – the filter passes high frequencies and attenuates low frequencies Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. attaCK adds a “glide” time (from 5 to 80ms) between when the filter senses an input change, and when the filter reaches its highest frequency (in Up mode) or lowest frequency (in Down mode). reLeaSe causes the filter to take anywhere from 50 to 800ms to decay back to its initial setting in the absence of an input signal. With short release times, the AutoFilter tracks even slight level changes. This can produce a “choppy” sound; turn up the release for a smoother decay. offSet adjusts the filter’s center frequency. In other words, the frequency goes up or down from this frequency. The wet control sets the balance of dry to filtered signal as you turn the control from fully counter-clockwise to fully clockwise. This is particularly

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useful with bass, as the filter might otherwise “thin out” the sound. By adding more dry signal, you’ll hear the full bass sound along with the filtered sound.

4.11.7 Wah-Wah Pedal

The Wah-Wah Pedal is a filter that sweeps a response peak over a frequency range; the wah-wah in GUITAR RIG 3 is perhaps Earth’s most versatile Independent settings for filter frequency, resonance, and level at the high, mid, and low points of the pedal travel allow for serious customization of the response for any type of wah-wah application or desired pedal “feel”. Parameters The SLider controls the wahwah frequency. Moving the slider toward the left lowers the frequency, and moving it toward the right raises the frequency. The RIG KONTROL expression pedal is ideal for controlling this. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. LP-BP-HP controls the mix of filter characteristics (lowpass, bandpass, and highpass). Lowpass has the response of a typical synthesizer filter,

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Bandpass is more like a traditional wahwah, and Highpass attenuates low frequencies as you move the pedal toward the down position. freQ Min sets the filter frequency with the pedal all the way up (back). freQ Mid sets the filter frequency with the pedal at its mid-position. freQ Max adjusts the filter frequency with the pedal all the way down (forward). reS Min determines the amount of filter resonance with the pedal all the way up (back). reS Mid sets the amount of filter resonance with the pedal at its midposition. reS Max edits the amount of filter resonance with the pedal all the way down (forward). voLuMe Min alters the filter level with the pedal all the way up (back). voLuMe Mid sets the filter level at the pedal midpoint. voLuMe Max tweaks the filter level with the pedal all the way down (forward).

%

Examples: A low mid setting gives little change

when moving the pedal from its minimum position to the middle, and a much greater change when progressing to the maximum position. When

Mid

is set high, the

pedal’s mid-position sounds much like the maximum position.

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4.11.8 Talkwah

This is similar to a wah-wah, but utilizes a different filter type. The Talkwah’s filter emulates the sound shaping that your mouth creates when enunciating vowels. The result is similar to the “talk box” effect that was very popular in the 70s (Joe Walsh, Peter Frampton, Joe Perry amd Ritchie Sambora). Parameters The SLider controls the Talkwah frequency. Moving the slider toward the left gives an “oooo” sound; moving it toward center morphs into more of an “aah” sound, while going further to the right morphs into more of an “eee” sound. Control this from the NATIVE INSTRUMENTS RIG KONTROL’s footpedal and you’ll be amazed at the sounds you’ll be able to coax out of your guitar. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. brigHt is a switch that makes the overall sound more trebly. voLuMe adjusts the overall level.

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Size adjusts the size of the “virtual mouth”. When counterclockwise, the mouth is small, like that of a midget. When clockwise, it’s like a giant’s mouth.

4.11.9 Cry Wah

The Cry Wah is a faithful recreation of the wah-wah that we’ve all been stepping on for years. This pedal has been modeled faithfully and provides no expert controls; it’s a one trick pony, and oh what a trick it is! Parameters The SLider is used to control the wah-wah frequency. Moving the slider toward the left lowers the frequency, and moving it toward the right raises the frequency. The RIG KONTROL expression pedal is ideal for controlling this.

4.11.10 Real Wah

The Real Wah is the answer to those hip custom wah pedals that started to appear in the mid-90’s. These wahs simply had “that sound”…

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Parameters The SLider is used to control the wah-wah frequency. Moving the slider toward the left lowers the frequency, and moving it toward the right raises the frequency. The RIG KONTROL expression pedal is ideal for controlling this.

4.11.11 Equalizer Tips
Most of these tips apply to the shelving, parameteric, and graphic EQ types; however, they also work with some of the more esoteric EQ types as well. Experiment to see what produces the results you want. Note that unlike hardware, the EQs and most other Components in GUITAR RIG 3 will never overload internally and cause distortion. Because of floating-point signal processing, the headroom is well over 700dB – so, feel free to boost away! Of course, GUITAR RIG 3 can overload in subsequent stages. Creating new sonic personalities. EQ can change a sound’s character – for example, it can turn a brash guitar sound into something significantly more even or mellow. This type of application requires relatively gentle EQ, possibly at several different frequencies; a graphic equalizer works well. Making comparisons. Use the bypaSS SwitCH to constantly compare the equalized and nonequalized sounds. You don’t want to get into a situation where you boost the treble a lot, which makes the bass seem thin so you boost that, which then makes the midrange seem weak so you boost that, and so on until

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everything is turned up to 11 (good for Spinal Tap; bad for more successful musicians). Always use the minimum amount of equalization necessary. Just a few dB of change can make a big difference to the sound. Better lead guitar tone for a better mix. Adding a bit of a peak around 3 to  kHz using EQ Parametric or EQ Graphic has the ability to really make a guitar solo stand out. Since that’s above the range of the toms, bass, and most rhythm-oriented keyboard parts, there’s little interference with these instruments. So, the guitar comes through loud and clear, but doesn’t step on anything else. Equalizing rhythm guitar for better vocal support. Suppose you’re playing a rhythmic guitar part behind a vocalist, but as the guitar and voice occupy a similar frequency range, they conflict. The solution: Pull back on the guitar’s midrange somewhat to make room for the vocal frequencies. You can then mix the guitar higher in level, while not getting in the way of the vocals. Eliminating hum. A parametric equalizer is an excellent way to reduce hum. Simply set the equalizer for maximum cut and narrowest bandwidth, then dial in 60Hz (50Hz in Europe; you’ll know you’re at the right frequency because the hum will disappear). However, if the hum generates harmonics, you’ll need additional stages to notch those out as well.

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Making distortion more responsive. Putting EQ before distortion can make an instrument seem more “touchsensitive”. This is because distortion usually affects all frequencies more or less equally. By gently boosting the midrange over a fairly broad range (e.g., 200Hz to 1kHz) prior to distortion, the notes you play in this range will distort at lower levels, which makes the distortion seem more responsive. Fixing dead spots on bass. Basses (and guitars) sometimes have “dead spots” on the neck that don’t quite seem to have the same power as the other notes; this is a job for parametric equalization. Turn the volume down on your amp, turn the boost and bandwidth controls up full, and play the dead note repeatedly while sweeping the parametric’s frequency control. When the parametric hits the right frequency, the note will jump out (usually in an obnoxious fashion, which is why you should turn down the amp first). Once the frequency control is set properly, reduce the amount of boost until the dead note is the same level as the other notes. If the note sounds too “peaky”, reduce the bandwidth control as well. Emphasizing and/or differentiating instruments. Finding and cutting specific frequencies can eliminate “fighting” between competing instruments. For example: suppose you’re mixing two rhythm guitar parts with resonant peaks around the same frequency. When playing together they really emphasize that part of the frequency spectrum, which makes them difficult to differentiate. Here’s a way to work around this:

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► Find, then reduce, the peak on one of the instruments. To do this, set a parametric EQ for lots of boost (10-12 dB) and fairly narrow bandwidth (around a quarter-octave or so). As the instrument plays, slowly sweep the frequency control. Any peaks will jump out due to the boosting and narrow bandwidth; some peaks may even distort. Find the loudest peak, and cut at that frequency until the peak falls into balance with the rest of the instrument sound. You may need to widen the bandwidth a bit if the peak is broad. ► Note the amount of cut and bandwidth that was applied to reduce the peak. ► Using the second stage of EQ Parametric, apply a roughly equal and opposite boost at either a slightly higher or slightly lower frequency than the natural peak. Both instruments will now sound more articulated, and because each peaks in a different part of the spectrum, they will tend not to interfere with each other.

4.12 Volume
Sure, it goes up (to eleven?)... and it goes down... but volume effects are capable of so much more than just simple loudness control! In Guitar Rig 3, you’ll find a range of tools to dynamically or interactively adjust levels to create an incredible range of sounds with really cool practical, musical, and even psychoacoustic properties.

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4.12.1 Volume Pedal

This simple volume control can cut or boost level going into, or coming out of, a Component. Parameters The SLider changes volume from all the way down (extreme left) to all the way up (extreme right). This is an ideal Component for the RIG KONTROL footpedal, or other MIDI controllers. voLuMe acts as a master volume control. It sets the maximum attainable level when the slider is full up. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. Min voLuMe sets the lowest volume when the slider is full left, as you may not want the volume to be all the way down but at a soft level. HaLf voLuMe sets the volume at the slider’s halfway point. Editing this can help give pedals a more comfortable “feel”.

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4.12.2 Limiter

A limiter is similar to a compressor, as it changes dynamic range. However, while a compressor makes soft parts louder and loud parts softer to even out the dynamics, a limiter acts like a governor on a motor: It won’t let audio exceed a certain limit, but also doesn’t affect signals below that limit. A limiter is ideal for cutting down on peaks to create a “hotter” sound, but without losing softer dynamics. Parameters voLuMe sets the output level. LiMit sets the level input signals cannot exceed. Counterclockwise lowers this level. HoLd sets a minimum time that limiting will be applied when the signal exceeds the LiMit threshold. reLeaSe determines how long it takes for the limiter to return to its normal state after the signal is no longer being limited. Longer release times usually sound somewhat smoother, but if there are noticeable volume fluctuations, try shortening it (lower release value). Limiter Tips ► Taming filters. If a filter setting is very resonant and produces peaks that distort subsequent stages, tame those peaks with limiting. This

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also works with modulation effects that use high amounts of feedback. ► Increasing average level. Add this at the very beginning of the chain, right after the input, and clamp strong peaks with the limiter. This will let you send more signal through the various Components and obtain a higher average level. ► Using with vocals. Limiters are used a lot with vocals to prevent overloading if the singer gets too close to the mic.

4.12.3 Noise Gate

A noise gate helps remove noise and hiss, but can also be used as a special effect. Although there is a simple gate built into the Input module, the Noise Gate Component is more sophisticated and offers more parameters. To understand the principle of operation, suppose your guitar is picking up an electrical buzz. As long as you’re playing, the signal will generally be higher than the buzz and “mask” it. However, when the audio goes away, the noise is no longer masked and can be audible. A noise gate does the equivalent of turning down the volume when there’s only noise present, then turning the volume back up when you’re playing. Its Threshold control sets the “dividing line” between what’s considered noise and what is considered signal. Setting the threshold just above the noise level insures that the noise will be muted when no signal is present.

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Parameters tHreSHoLd determines the reference level above which the gate opens, and below which the gate closes. Setting Threshold very low (counterclockwise) accommodates signals with little noise; higher threshold levels are useful for special effects, such as removing substantial amounts of a string’s decay to make a more percussive or gated sound. HoLd sets a minimum amount of time that the gate stays open. With high threshold, this prevents the gating effect from being too percussive. attaCK works in reverse. When a signal exceeds the threshold, the noise gate fades in over a specified period of time. With long attack times, it’s possible to simulate “backwards tape” effects. reLeaSe prevents the gate from closing down abruptly. Instead, when the signal goes under the threshold, the noise gate fades out according to the release time. Learn automatically sets an optimum threshold. Without playing your guitar, click on Learn. GUITAR RIG 3 analyzes your signal, and sets the threshold just above any residual noise. Now when you play, the Gate should open.

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4.12.4 Noise Reduction

The Noise Reduction Component affects the signal similarly to a noise gate, but has a less abrupt action because it filters out noise below a certain threshold rather than relying solely on amplitude. It is very simple to adjust. Parameters Start with tHreSHoLd fully counter-clockwise (no reduction). Turn it clockwise until when the input signal has faded out, any noise fades out as well. For automated threshold settings, without playing your guitar, click on Learn. The Noise Reduction Component analyzes your signal, and sets the threshold just above any residual noise. Now when you play, the noise reduction filter will open up and allow you to hear your playing. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. reLeaSe determines how long it takes for the filter to close down after the input signal goes away. de-HiSS, when turned clockwise, accentuates the effect of the filtering to reduce more treble frequencies.

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4.12.5 Stomp Compressor

The Stomp Compressor provides a different type of compression action compared to the Tube Compressor, but follows the same basic principle of operation: It evens out dynamic range variations by amplifying soft signals to make them louder, and attenuating loud signals to make them softer. Most would characterize the sound as being “tighter” and perhaps somewhat cleaner than the Tube Compressor. Parameters The Stomp Compressor has several parameters that interact (i.e., after adjusting one parameter you may need to go back and tweak a different parameter). voLuMe sets the overall output level. Think of it as a master volume control. SuStain determines how much the compressor level will be boosted as the string decays. Turning the sustain clockwise will increase the apparent sustain, but note that this can also amplify other low-level signals, like noise and hum coming into the pickups. The Meter between the two controls mentioned above shows how much the gain is being reduced by the compression action.

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Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. attaCK sets the time it takes for the compressor to react to input level changes. A longer attack time “lets through” more of a signal’s original dynamics before the compression begins. For example, to retain the pick noise in a compressed guitar sound, add a bit of attack time. reLeaSe determines how long it takes for the compressor to return to its normal state after the input goes under the threshold. With short release times, the compressor tracks even very slight level changes. This can produce a “choppy” sound; turn up the release time to smooth things out. tHreSHoLd sets the level above which signals will be compressed. A lower threshold = more compression = greater sustain. If the signal drops below the threshold, the compressor leaves the signal alone until it exceeds the threshold again.

4.12.6 Tube Compressor

A compressor evens out dynamic range variations by amplifying soft signals to make them louder, and attenuating loud signals to make them softer. It’s as if an invisible hand was turning up the volume during soft passages,

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then turning it down during the peaks. This gives a more controlled sound with narrower dynamic range, a higher average level, and more sustain. Parameters The Tube Compressor has several parameters that interact (i.e., after adjusting one parameter you may need to go back and tweak a different parameter). input sets the level going to the compressor. Increasing the input causes a signal to be more likely to exceed the threshold, and therefore be compressed. However, turning this up too high can lead to distortion. tHreSHoLd sets the level above which signals will be compressed. A lower threshold = more compression = greater sustain. If the signal drops below the threshold, the compressor leaves the signal alone until it exceeds the threshold again. ratio selects how the output signal changes in relation to the input signal once the input signal exceeds the threshold. The higher the ratio, the greater the amount of compression, and the more “squeezed” the sound. attaCK sets the time it takes for the compressor to react to input level changes. A longer attack time “lets through” more of a signal’s original dynamics before the compression begins. For example, to retain the pick noise in a compressed guitar sound, add a bit of attack time. reLeaSe determines how long it takes for the compressor to return to its normal state after the input goes under the threshold. With short release times, the compressor tracks even very slight level changes. This can produce a “choppy” sound; turn up the release time to smooth things out.

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g ain allows compensating for output level changes caused by the compression process. Set this so that the peaks of your playing are the same when the compressor is bypassed or active. Note that the compressed sound will appear louder, even if the peaks are the same – that’s what compression is all about, bringing up the signal’s average level. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. Saturation adds an element of distortion to the tube characteristics. Knee changes the compressor response from soft knee (gentler compression effect) to hard knee (more squeezed, harder-sounding compression) d ynaMiC determines the dynamic response of the “tube”. Turning this clockwise flattens dynamics a bit. Compressor Tips ► Minimizing noise. Do not overcompress, as this makes for a thin, unnatural sound. Use the bypass switch to compare the compressed and non-compressed sounds; you may find that even a little bit of compression gives the desired effect. ► Optimum signal chain placement. Place the compressor toward the beginning so that it doesn’t bring up the noise from previous stages. Although the effects in GUITAR RIG 3 don’t create noise themselves, ones with high gain (such as distortion) can amplify noise already present in your guitar. ► Using compression to increase sustain. Remember that compressors are not miracle workers. They cannot make your guitar’s strings vibrate any longer, but can only increase the apparent sustain. A compressor

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cannot compensate for dead strings or for guitars with poor sustain characteristics. ► Smoother distortion sound. Add compression before distortion for a smoother sound with more sustain. ► “Mystery” compression increases. If it seems like there’s been a sudden increase in compression but you didn’t increase the compression amount, then the input signal going to the compressor may have increased. ► Compressing lead guitar but not compressing rhythm. You can take advantage of the fact that increasing the input level increases compression when you want a sustaining lead but an uncompressed rhythm sound. Turn up your guitar’s volume control for leads, and turn back down for rhythm. As the guitar signal drops below the threshold, the compression will either go away, or have much less of an effect.

4.13 Reverbs and Delays
Time-based effects such as reverb and delay are staples in the guitar community. Whether you’re trying to warm up your sound with some spring reverb, or use complex tempo-synced delays for that “Edge” sound, you’ll find your sounds in the Reverb and Delay Bank.

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4.13.1 Spring Reverb

This is the classic reverb effect found in older amps, before the advent of solid-state reverb units. But this time, there’s no noise or hum. Parameters reverb adds the reverb effect into the mix, from full dry (counterclockwise) to 50-50 (middle) to all reverb (clockwise). tiMe determines the reverb decay time. Turn clockwise to increase decay. baSS sets the low-frequency response characteristics. Turn clockwise for a bassier sound, counterclockwise for less bass. input Mute shuts off the signal going to the Spring Reverb’s reverb section, but lets any dry signal pass through. This is great for creating reverb “splash”: Control input mute with a footswitch, and leave the input muted. When you want to splash a note with reverb, disable the input mute while you play the note, then mute the input again. The note you played while input mute was disabled will continue to reverberate – but no subsequent notes you play will be reverberated. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters.

%
(“wet”).

Note that because no signal is allowed into the

reverb section when Input Mute is on, you will hear nothing if the Reverb control is set fully clockwise

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Spring LengtH adjusts the length of the virtual spring. Spring reverbs varied in length, with the shorter versions producing a tighter, more metallic effect, and longer springs giving a more diffused sound with a longer decay. HigH daMp, when turned clockwise, reduces highs as the reverb decays. Turning it counterclockwise leaves the highs intact during the decay. Low daMp, when turned clockwise, reduces lows as the reverb decays. A counterclockwise setting leaves the lows intact during the decay.

4.13.2 Studio Reverb

The Studio Reverb provides a natural-sounding emulation of halls and rooms. Parameters Mix determines the balance of dry and reverberated sound, from full dry (counterclockwise) to 50-50 (middle) to all reverb (clockwise). tiMe sets the reverb decay time. Turn clockwise to increase decay. rooM Size determines the cubic volume of the virtual room. Turn clockwise for a large concert hall, counterclockwise for a small auditorium or room. input Mute shuts off the signal going to the Studio Reverb’s reverb section, but lets any dry signal pass through. This is great for creating reverb “splash”: Control input mute with a footswitch, and leave the input muted.

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When you want to splash a note with reverb, disable the input mute while you play the note, then mute the input again. The note you played while input mute was disabled will continue to reverberate – but no subsequent notes you play will be reverberated. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. Stereo adjusts the stereo width of the reverberated signal. trebLe, when turned counterclockwise, reduces highs as the reverb decays. Turning trebLe clockwise leaves the highs untouched. pre deLay determines the delay time before the reverberated signal becomes audible.

!
(“wet”).

Note that because no signal is allowed into the

reverb section when Input Mute is on, you will hear nothing if the Mix control is set fully clockwise

4.13.3 Quad Delay

The Delay module takes the input signal and plays it back through four taps, each delayed by a certain amount of time. The output can be fed back to the input, thus producing a series of echoes, and mixed with the straight signal

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Parameters dry/wet determines the balance of the delayed (wet) and straight (dry) signals; you rarely want to hear the sound of the delayed signal by itself. With longer echoes, the amount of delayed sound will depend on how “murky” a sound you want: increasing the amount of delayed sound gives a swimming-in-echo effect, while adding in only a little delayed sound provides more of an ambience effect. tiMe sets the amount of delay time (i.e., the time interval between the straight sound and the appearance of the echo). feedbaCK determines how much of the output feeds back into the input. Minimum feedback gives a single echo; increasing this makes the echoes repeat. rate sets the modulation frequency. A slower rate produces a slow, gradual detuning that gives a majestic, rolling chorusing or pseudo-flanging sound. Faster rates produce a more “bubbly” effect. deptH determines how much the modulation section varies the delay time. With longer delays, adding a little bit of modulation can give chorus-like sounds, but too much modulation will cause detuning effects. Note that the rate parameter interacts with the depth parameter because the total amount of pitch change depends not just on the amount of pitch change, but also on the rate. For example, combining full depth with a fast rate setting can sound out of tune, whereas the same amount of depth coupled with a slow rate sounds just fine. tap tiMe allows setting the delay rhythm by clicking on the tap tiMe button. The Quad Delay measures the time between clicks, and uses this to derive the tempo; it will also average the time between multiple “taps”.

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input Mute shuts off the signal going to the Quad Delay’s delay section, but lets any dry signal pass through. One application would be to control this function with a footswitch; when you hit the footswitch, any existing echoes would continue until they faded out, but no new signals would be fed into the Psychedelay, so there would be no new echoes. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. SynC synchronizes the LFO speed to the metronome tempo, which is derived from the SynC setting in the Toolbar. invert changes the phase of the delayed signal, so that different frequencies cancel when mixing the delayed signal in with the dry signal. The result is particularly noticeable in Flanger-like effects involving short delays. SynC deLayS when on, insures that the delay tap times have a regular pattern (for rhythmic delays), and the modulation LFOs are in phase for a “hard” sound. When off, the delay tap times are irregular (for reverb-like delay) and the LFOs are free-running, which produces a “lusher” sound. diffuSion spreads out the delay tap times for the four delay lines that make up the effect. baSS adjusts a high pass filter; turn coungterclockwise to reduce low frequencies. trebLe adjusts a low pass filter; Turn counterclockwise to reduce high frequencies.

%
(“wet”).

Note that because no signal is allowed into the

delay section when Input Mute is on, you will hear nothing if the Dry/ Wet control is set fully clockwise

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4.13.4 Psychedelay

This true stereo delay (both ins and outs are stereo) creates sounds that range from standard echo/ambient sounds, to reverse-based effects that recall the “backwards tape” sounds of the 1960s. Parameters dry/wet sets the balance of straight and delay sounds. Counterclockwise is dry sound only; turning clockwise adds more delay effect. tiMe adjust the initial delay time, from 10 ms to 2000 ms. This parameter is also influenced by the Stereo: tiMe control in expert mode. Note that very short delay times give complex, ring modulation-type tones. reverSe plays back subsequent echoes in reverse, like the reverse tape sounds commonly heard on many albums from 60s (especially Jimi Hendrix). detune detunes echoes up to ±50 cents. Combining this with feedback causes successive echoes to have ever-increasing amounts of detuning. feedbaCK determines how much of the output feeds back into the input. Minimum feedback gives a single echo; increasing this parameter produces repeating echoes. As noted above under “Detune”, Feedback interacts with the Detune parameter.

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tap sets the delay rhythm as you click on the tap tiMe button. This function measures the time between clicks, and uses this value to derive the tempo; it will also average the time between multiple “taps”. input Mute shuts off the signal going to the Psychedelay’s delay section, but lets any dry signal pass through. One application would be to control this function with a footswitch; when you hit the footswitch, any existing echoes would continue until they faded out, but no new signals would be fed into the Psychedelay, so there would be no new echoes. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, which has parameters that turn the Psychedelay into a stereo effects box. You’ll find the following options. pitCH adds a more extreme amount of detuning by transposing the echo in semitones, from –12 to +12. It interacts with the feedback control in the same way as detune (i.e, each successive echo will be transposed an additional amount upward or downward, as set by the Pitch value). Stereo: Time, when turned clockwise, creates stereo echo effects. At 1.00, the delay time is set solely by the main Time parameter. Settings of less than 1.00 place echoes in the stereo field, with the number indicating division (e.g., a setting of 0.50 means that the extra echoes will happen at half the time of the main delay setting). reverSe causes these additional delays to play back in reverse, like the main delays when the Main reverSe button is enabled. detune allows the main Detune parameter to affect the added stereo echoes as well.

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(“wet”).

Note that because no signal is allowed into the

delay section when Input Mute is on, you will hear nothing if the Dry/ Wet control is set fully clockwise

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CroSS creates feedback paths that cross between the two channels – right feeds back into the left channel, and left feeds back into the right channel. This creates a more complex, polyrhythmic type of echo effect. SynC synchronizes the LFO speed to the metronome tempo, which is derived from the SynC setting in the Toolbar. For some amazing effects, on the main panel set a fairly short Delay Time (e.g., 200 ms), Detune to +50 cents, and Feedback to maximum. In the expert section, set Stereo Time fully clockwise (0.50), detune to On, and Cross up full. Hit a note, and it will stretch upward and then decay…very cool.

4.13.5 Delay Man

The Delay Man is an extremely warm and flexible delay unit with built-in chorus and vibrato. It faithfully recreates the sound of the esteemed classic hardware modules everyone had in their rigs. Parameters The Mute button shuts off the signal going to the Delay Man’s delay section, but lets any dry signal pass through. One application would be to control this function with a footswitch; when you hit the footswitch, any

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existing echoes would continue until they faded out, but no new signals would be fed into the Delay Man, so there would be no new echoes. The input Knob sets the level of the incoming audio into the delay module. Set this so that the loudest peaks do not engage the overload LED next to the Knob. The dry/wet Knob controls the balance between the dry (unaffected) signal and the wet (delayed) signal. The 12 o’clock position is an equal 50/50 blend of wet and dry signals. The tiMe Knob sets the length of the delay. Counterclockwise begins with short delays, while turning the control clockwise increases the length of the delay. The feedbaCK Knob brings in repeats of the delayed signal. Turning the knob fully clockwise will overload the delay and produce an interesting, distorted, oscillated sound. The CHor /vib switch switches the Component from having an additional chorus modulator, to having a vibrato modulation. The deptH Knob increases the intensity of either the chorus or vibrato (depending on which module is turned on) into the delay mix. The tap button allows you to tap with your mouse or external controller the delay time. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. The SynC deLayS button syncs the internal delay time to reflect the current state of the sync module. The SynC Mod button syncs the internal modulation (chorus or vibrato) to reflect the current state of the sync module.

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The CHoruS rate Knob varies the frequency of modulation applied to the chorus module (when engaged.) The vibrato rate Knob varies the frequency of modulation applied to the vibrato module (when engaged.) The aCCeLeration Knob controls how fast the delay algorithm reacts to changes made to the tiMe parameter. baSS when adjusted counterclockwise attenuates bass frequencies. Turn the control clockwise to boost the bass frequencies. This control acts as a low shelf. trebLe when adjusted counterclockwise attenuates treble frequencies. Turn the control clockwise to boost the treble frequencies. This control acts as a high shelf.

4.13.6 Tape Echo

The Tape Echo module recreates the sought-after sound of tape based delay modules. This module has two tape heads and also includes a spring

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reverb module. We are proud to say this is one of the coolest sound shaping modules with GUITAR RIG 3. Parameters The input Mute button will mute the incoming audio, effectively bypassing the module. If the level is too great, the peaK LED will light up. The dry Mute button will completely mute the dry sound, leaving only the effected sound. The Tap Button allows you to tap your own tempo. The Head a Knob has five selections for delay time. Position 0 has no delay. The subsequent head positions (one through four) are each as many times longer than position one as their value states. The exact amount of delay depends on the tempo (either taped or set with the Speed ControL. The Head b Knob has five selections for delay time. Position 0 has no delay. The subsequent head positions (one through four) are each as many times longer than position one as their value states. The exact amount of delay depends on the tempo (either taped or set with the Speed ControL. The baSS Knob when adjusted counterclockwise attenuates bass frequencies of the delay. Turn the control clockwise to boost the bass frequencies. The trebLe Knob when adjusted counterclockwise attenuates treble frequencies of the delay. Turn the control clockwise to boost the treble frequencies. The Speed Knob varies the speed of the virtual tape loop and changes the delay times of Head b and Head b.

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The feedb Knob controls the amount of feedback regeneration in the delay. The higher the level of feedback, the more cross modulation and possible distortion you can impart to the signal. The rev voL Knob controls the amount of reverb added to the dry signal in parallel to any delay effects. The eCHo Vol controls the volume of the delay output. When rotated fully counterclockwise, the delay will have no audible effect. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. The SynC button syncs the internal delay(s) time(s) to reflect the current state of the sync module. The tape baSS Knob controls the amount of bass response on the virtual tape. The tape trebLe Knob controls the amount of treble on the virtual tape. The dropoutS Knob simulates dropouts in the tape from long periods of use. The noiSe Knob adds that familiar “tape” noise to the delayed signal. The warbLe Knob simulates how mechanical problems caused delay tapes to slip and start, causing causing variations in pitch also known as “flutter” The HeadrooM Knob increased the amount of saturation the tape can take before distorting. The Head Mix Knob controls the balance of the outputs of tape playback heads A and B, allowing for interesting variations of sound where one or the other is louder by comparison. The revtiMe Knob adjusts the decay time of the reverb heard on the dry signal.

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The Motor aCCeL Knob recreates slight acceleration of the tape motor over time. The Spring LengtH controls the length of the spring reverb element. A shorter spring produces a more “metallic” sound, while a longer spring produces a more traditional reverb sound.

4.14 Tools
The Tools Components are at the heart of GUITAR RIGS extreme flexibility. From split modules that allow parallel signal processing with different effect chains, to the ultra-hip loop machine. The tools are the key to create fresh extraordinary sounds.

4.14.1 Loop Machine

The Loop Machine allows recording, playing back, and overdubbing multiple layers of sound. The loops can be synchronized with the host, or to the metronome tempo in stand-alone mode. Furthermore, individual layers, or the mix of all layers, can be exported as WAV files.

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As a practical example, you could record four measures of rhythm guitar, then overdub a lead, then a harmony, some rhythmic slides, etc. Parameters When nothing has been recorded into the Loop Machine, the pLay button (arrow symbol) has a red outline. Pressing the pLay button has different functions depending on the Loop Machine status. ► Press once to start the recording. The Button glows red. ► Press again to stop recording and begin loop playback. The Button glows green. ► Press again to enter overdub mode (the Button glows yellow). Existing material plays back, but you can record over this. When the loop repeats, you can continue overdubbing. From this point on, pressing the pLay button toggles between Play and Overdub modes. Each time you do this creates another layer (the Layers indicator shows how many layers have been recorded). It’s convenient to be able to go into Play mode to practice your part for the next loop, then return to Overdub mode. Press the S top b ut ton (X symbol) once to stop the loop from playing. The Button will have a red outline for a few seconds; if you click again while the red is showing, all layers will be erased. The beat button enables a flashing indicator on the beat. The progreSS Meter shows the current time within the loop. Loop tiMe shows the total loop time, while reC tiMe shows the current time within the loop.

%

While the Loop Machine is stopped, you can dou-

ble-click on the Stop

button

to

erase the various layers.

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reC voL adjusts the level feeding the Loop Machine. pLay voL adjusts the Loop Machine playback level. undo deletes the current layer. You can press undo repeatedly to delete layers, starting from the most recent. redo restores the most recently-deleted layer. The Load button (folder icon) calls up Loop Machine files, which have a .ls suffix. These consist of the audio files and all settings for a particular loop. The Save button (floppy disk icon) saves Loop Machine files, which have a .ls suffix and consist of the audio files and all settings for a particular loop. exp Mix exports the entire collection of loops as a single mixed WAV file. exp L ay exports the current loop as a WAV file. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. autoStart causes recording to begin when the Loop Machine detects that you have started playing. overdub MuLtipLy allows recording a longer loop over a shorter loop. reverSe plays back the layers in reverse mode, like 60s-type “backwards tape” effects. reC pan places the recorded signal in the stereo field. Thus, one overdub could go in the right channel, and another overdub in the left channel. SynC synchronizes the LFO speed to the metronome tempo, which is derived from the SynC setting in the Toolbar. SynCHing to HoSt: The Loop Machine transport starts, stops, and rewinds, in synchronization with the host.

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Although you can Undo multiple layers, you can

Redo only to the most recently undone layer.

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SynCHing to MetronoMe: This quantizes the loop length to the beat, even if you stop recording slightly before or after the beat. Loop a/b toggles between two loops recorded previously.

4.14.2 Split

This device splits the signal path in two directions, thus allowing parallel effects. For more information on series and parallel effects (as well as optimal placement of effects), see Appendix C, “Tips on Creating Your Own Rig”. Creating a Split To create one split (Split A), drag the desired Component(s) in between the Split A and Split b sections. To create the second split (Split B), drag the desired Component(s) in between the Split B and Split Mix sections.

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Here’s what a particular split looks like in GUITAR RIG 3. Split A feeds the Skreamer, Equalizer Shelving, and Ensemble Components. Split B feeds the Distortion and Wahwah Components.

This diagram shows the split’s actual signal flow.

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Parameters CroSSfade determines the mix between the A and B split. When fully left, you’ll hear only the A split. When fully right, you’ll hear only the B split. pan is separate for each split, and determines where the split will appear in the stereo field. Example: If A is panned left, B is panned right, and CroSSfade is set to the center, you’ll hear only the A split from the left channel and only the B split from the right channel. If you now pan A to the right, you’ll hear both splits out of the right channel, and nothing from the left channel. Stereo input L/r SpLit allows processing each stereo channel separately. This is particularly useful if you play with two guitars through GUITAR RIG 3 and want two different sounds. Using this option with a Chapman Stick can be interesting as well, as it enables you to process the high and low strings with different effects. The +/- SwitCH varies the polarity (also called “phase”) of the B split. Split Tips The Split module is extremely powerful: ► Because you can drag multiple Components into a split, it’s possible to have parallel strings of series effects. ► You can use more than one Split Component in a rig, and place Components inbetween them. Therefore, you can split a signal into two paths and use the CroSSfader to adjust the balance of the two splits. This total sound can then be processed by additional effects, before going to another split.

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► You can even put a split inside another split to get more than two parallel signal chains.

4.14.3 Crossover Mix

This device is similar to the Split Mix, in that it splits the signal path in two directions, thus allowing parallel effects. However, in this case, you can set a dividing line (“crossover point”) in the frequency response, and send lower frequencies to one split and higher frequencies to the other split. (For more information on series and parallel effects, see Appendix C, “Tips on Creating Your Own Rig”.) Creating the Low and High Frequency Splits Drag Components that will process the low frequencies between the Low and High sections, and drag Components that will process the high frequencies between the High and Crossover Mix sections. Note that you can even put a Crossover Mix inside another Crossover Mix. Thus, you can split the signal into two frequency bands, then split those frequency bands into two more frequency bands (e.g., split the low ito low and lower mid, and the high into upper mid and highs).

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The following example shows a setup that splits the guitar’s low frequencies into an equalizer, and the highs through the Ensemble and Quad Delay effects. This gives a shimmering, echoey effect on higher notes, but the lower notes have a more solid, direct sound.

The following diagram shows the equivalent signal flow.

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Parameters freQuenCy sets the crossover point frequency, where signals are divided between the Low and High splits. CroSSfade determines the mix between the Low and High splits. When fully left, you’ll hear only the Low split. When fully right, you’ll hear only the High split. pan is separate for each split, and determines where the split will appear in the stereo field. Example: If Low is panned left, High is panned right, and Crossfade is set to the center, you’ll hear only the Low split from the left channel and only the High split from the right channel. If you now pan the Low split to the right, you’ll hear both splits out of the right channel, and nothing from the left channel. The +/- SwitCH varies the polarity (also called phase) of the High split.

4.15 Modifiers
Modifiers aren’t something you typically find in a guitar setup. If you’ve ever programmed a synthesizer (virtual or real), you’ve used modifiers like LFO’s and step sequencers, as these elements are typical for synthetic sound design. Place these same modifiers in the hands of a guitarist, and the doors to creativity fly wide open. If you’re into cutting-edge sound design, this is the section for you.

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4.15.1 About Modifiers
You already know about the concept of a modifier (also called a modulator); for example, you can modify a Component’s parameter with the GUITAR RIG foot pedal, or modify amplitude with the tremolo’s periodic waveform. In both cases, there is a modulation source that generates a control signal; this affects a particular parameter, called the modulation target. The modifier modules included with GUITAR RIG take the concept of realtime parameter value modification to another level, as they can modify multiple parameters simultaneously, and tailor the amount of modulation to each parameter. Once you insert a Modifier into the rack, you can assign its control signal to almost any Component parameter to it. There are two ways to do this. The simplest is to simply click on the Modifier’s aSSign button and drag it on top of the parameter you want to modify. A hand cursor will confirm the parameter is eligible for modifier control. The second method is ideal if you have a lot of Components inserted in the rack, and the parameter you want to control is located far from the Modifier Component. 1. Right-click on the parameter you want to assign. 2. Place the cursor over Modifiers. 3. Move the desired Modifier slider to either add the modulation signal to the parameter value (positive percentage) or subtract the modulation from the parameter value (negative percentage). Several modulation sources are available even with no Modifier modules inserted into the rack. These are:

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► Input Trigger: This generates a constant-level modulation signal based on a note’s initial input transient. When you play a note, the level goes to full on. Stop the note, and the level returns to full off. ► RIG KONTROL Pedal: The pedal generates a signal whose level depends on the pedal position. ► RIG KONTROL Switches (1-): Each of these produces a signal that alternates between full off an full on. In the following screen shot, the Wah-Wah pedal parameter has been right-clicked to reveal the available modifiers. The amount of Amp Follower modulation is being adjusted to 38.8%. An additional consideration is that each Modifier lists the targets that the Modifier signal feeds (the drop-down “targets” menu). These also have level controls that duplicate the level controls at the parameters themselves. If you change the parameter slider value, the level shown in the modifier’s target list will reflect those changes, and vice-versa. In this example, the LFO signal is being sent to the Parametric EQ: voLuMe, Distortion: tone, and Wahwah Pedal: pedaL parameters. Why is it necessary to adjust the amount of modulation in two separate places? It actually isn’t necessary, but it can be convenient. Sometimes you want to check out the parameters in a Component to see how they’re assigned; sometimes it’s more convenient to see all the targets being fed from a particular modifier. Finally, note the blue meter above the Targets drop-down menu. This gives a visual representation of the modulation signal.

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4.15.2 LFO

LFO stands for Low Frequency Oscillator – a periodic waveform that occurs at a subsonic rate. An LFO is at the heart of tremolo circuits; the low frequency varies amplitude to create a pulsing effect. Parameters rate sets the LFO frequency, from 0.01Hz to 10.24Hz. The frequency can also sync to tempo, as described next. teMpo SynC, when enabled (“pushed in”), synchronizes the LFO rate to a rhythmic value. Moving the rate ControL displays the rhythm. The slowest rhythm is 8 beats per cycle (32 dotted measures), while the fastest is a dotted 32nd note. This is chosen by the two arrows to the right of the main display. waveforM provides a graphic display of the LFO’s shape. Options are Sine, Triangle, Square, Sawtooth, and Random. poLarity inverts the waveform’s polarity. pLay restarts the LFO from a specific point, as determined by the Start Phase control (described next). To “auto trigger” the LFO so that it restarts when you hit a note, click on the small auto button above the Play button so that it turns blue. This enables auto-trigger.

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Start pHaSe sets the restart point. At 0 degrees (center position), clicking on Trigger causes the LFO waveform to start from a 0 (neither positive nor negative) value and go positive. Turning clockwise to 90 degrees causes the waveform to start from its peak (full positive value) and go negative. With the control set to 180 degrees (fully clockwise), the waveform starts at 0 and goes negative. Turning counterclockwise to –90 degrees causes the waveform to start from the full negative value and go positive, while turning counterclockwise all the way to –180 degrees causes the waveform to start from 0 and go negative. LFO Tips ► Input Trigger is a useful modulation source for the Trigger parameter; or use one of the RIG KONTROL footswitches. ► A Random LFO waveform, applied to a Speed or Rate control (e.g., Chorus/Flanger Speed, Stoned Phaser Rate) can add a more humanized, less periodic effect. ► If you want to modulate two targets in opposite directions, using the same waveform at the same rate, you don’t need to use two LFOs. Just set a positive modulation amount on one target and a negative amount on the other target.

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4.15.3 Envelope

The envelope generates an arbitrary control shape over time. This is a Rate/Level type of envelope, where you specify levels, and the times that it takes to get from one level to the next. Levels are specified by inserting breakpoints [also called nodes] along a line, then moving the breakpoints up or down to change levels, and left or right to change times. This Component has an extremely useful graphic display, where you make most of the envelope adjustments. Editing the Envelope Shape A default envelope includes four breakpoints. To add a breakpoint, rightclick (Mac: ctrl-click) anywhere along the envelope curve where you want a breakpoint to appear. To remove a breakpoint, right-click (Mac: ctrl-click) on it. Note that the first and last breakpoints move up and down together, because the envelope always starts from where it ended. Again referring to the default envelope, the left-most breakpoint is where the envelope starts. The next two breakpoints fall on two vertical lines. These indicate the segment where the envelope reaches the “sustain” level, marked by the horizontal blue line; however, note that if the Loop

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option is enabled, this segment will repeat for as long as a Trigger signal is present. If there are three or more breakpoints (other than the start and end), the sustain/loop segment can be shifted by clicking on a vertical blue line and dragging it to the next breakpoint. When the trigger returns to zero, the envelope continues with the segment after the second vertical line. Dragging the small circle between breakpoints can change the line’s shape between the breakpoints from concave, to straight, to convex. The Envelope Parameter Strip The envelope parameter strip above the envelope provides a variety of useful data. Except as noted, clicking on a numerical and dragging up or down edits the value; the numericals also update automatically if you move the breakpoint. At the left of the strip, # shows two numbers. The first field is the index number of the breakpoint or stage being edited. You can change this by clicking on the numerical and dragging. The second field is the total number of envelope breakpoints. This is for display only and cannot be edited. Mode has two options, SLIDE and FIXED. In Slide Mode, if you move a breakpoint left or right, the envelope to the right of the breakpoint moves as well to maintain the same times and levels past the breakpoint being edited. In Fixed Mode, the total envelope time doesn’t change. Moving a breakpoint to the right not only lengthens its distance compared to the

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breakpoint to its left, but shortens the distance compared to the breakpoint at its right. abS. tiMe shows the amount of time in seconds from the start of the envelope to the breakpoint being edited. deLta tiMe shows the amount of time in seconds from the breakpoint being edited to the breakpoint at its immediate left. LeveL shows the breakpoint level referenced to the center line. SLope shows the state of the line between breakpoints. 0.5 indicates a straight line. 0.999 indicates a maximally convex curve. 0.001 indicates a maximally concave curve. The numericals for Delta time, Level and Slope can be edited by using the mouse (click and move up or down). Envelope Ruler and Zoom The ruler below the envelope is calibrated in seconds. If the envelope extends past the envelope’s visible range, click on the ruler and drag to the left or right to see a different range of the ruler. Double-click on the ruler to fit the envelope exactly within the visible part of the ruler. To change the ruler range and zoom in on the envelope for more precise adjustments, click on the (+) SyMboL in the lower right. To zoom out, click on the (-) SyMboL. This not only changes the display, but also sets the quantization time for the Tempo Sync function (described later). Other Envelope Parameters pLay starts the envelope from its beginning. To “auto trigger” the envelope so that it starts when you hit a note, click on the small auto button above the pLay button so that it turns blue. This enables auto-trigger.

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With reLeaSe disabled, a trigger of any duration causes the envelope to play through all the way to the end. When it’s enabled, the envelope will proceed through its stages as long as a trigger signal is present (e.g., by clicking on and holding the trigger button). If the trigger goes away, the envelope jumps immediately to the third node from the left and continues from there. Loop, when enabled (“pushed in”), repeats the curve between the two loop points. If reLeaSe is off, the looping continues until another trigger occurs, which then restarts the envelope. If reLeaSe is on, looping continues for as long as the trigger signal is present. When the trigger signal goes away, the envelope jumps immediately to the third node from the left and continues from there. Enabling SynC superimposes a grid on the envelope display that corresponds to rhythmic values, such as quarter notes, eighth notes, 16th notes, etc. Breakpoints can be snapped to these points. The quantization value depends on the current zoom factor; when SynC is enabled, the ruler markings will be calibrated in rhythmic values instead of seconds. If the incoming tempo information changes, the envelope times are recomputed to match the current song tempo. Example: If the envelope loop is set to a 1 beat duration, it will remain 1 beat long even if the tempo changes. Enabling teMpo SynC does not change breakpoint positions in existing envelopes. However, you can edit an existing envelope by moving the breakpoints so that they snap to the nearest quantization value.

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4.15.4 Step Sequencer

The Step Sequencer generates up to 16 sequential trigger signals, which can have rhythmic values of quarter notes to 1/32nd notes. Note that you cannot vary the level of these steps; they are triggers that are intended to create chopping/rhythmic effects that sync to the rhythm. Activating a Step To turn on a step so that it provides a trigger, click on the desired step (116). It turns from gray to blue to indicate that it’s producing a trigger. Assigning the Step Sequencer to a Parameter 1. Click on the aSSign button, and drag it to the target parameter (e.g., Pro Filter cutoff). 2. Click on the Targets downward-pointing arrow to reveal a drop-down menu.A slider will appear for the Step Sequencer and for the target parameter. 3. Adjust the Step Sequencer slider for the desired step level. 4. Adjust the target parameter slider for the desired effect on the target.

!

Not all VST host software supplies tempo informa-

tion to plug-in instruments, so this feature may not work with your host software. In standalone mode, GUITAR RIG 3 does respond to MIDI clock signals.

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It may seem that having two sliders is redundant. However, if you are feeding multiple parameters from the step sequencer, you will almost certainly want to be able to adjust each target parameter independently. Furthermore, the Step Sequencer provides a sort of “master control” if you want to vary the step level going to all targets simultaneously. Parameters reSoLution sets the rhythmic value of each of the 16 steps. Available options are 1/, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 notes. Enable Legato to tie adjacent steps to each other, thus creating longer steps. Click on the (+) SyMboL to reveal expert mode, with the following parameters. widtH sets the amount of time the step reaches its assigned value. When fully clockwise, the width equals the resolution (e.g., if reSoLution is set to 1/8, then the step stays at its assigned value for an eighth note). When set to its midpoint (50%), the width equals half the resolution (e.g., if reSoLution is set to 1/8, then the step stays at its assigned value for a sixteenth note). attaCK adds a “glide” time (from  to 1233ms) from the start of a step up to the step’s maximum value. See the diagram below. deCay causes the control signal to fade out after the step ends over a range of  to 2197ms. See the diagram below.

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Without attack and decay

With attack and decay

offSet increases all control signal values as the control is turned more clockwise.

4.15.5 Analog Sequencer

The Analog Sequencer generates 16 sequential control signals, which can have rhythmic values of quarter notes to 1/32nd notes. You can change the value of each “step” to create a complex, rhythmically-related control signal. Setting Step Levels To set a step’s level: 1. Move one of the 16 faders up- or downwards from its initial position.

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2. A step is turned on if its position differs from the initial zero position in the middle. 3. A fader turned upwards will apply a positive value to the assigned target. 4. A fader turned downwards will apply a negative value to the assigned target. Parameters reSoLution sets the rhythmic value of each of the 16 steps. Available options are 1/, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 notes. With the SLide parameter you adjust the Glissando, the continuous sliding from one value of a step to the next.

4.15.6 Input Level Modifier

The Input Level Modifier generates a control signal based on the input level at GUITAR RIG 3. This is commonly called an “envelope follower” as the signal tracks changes in the guitar or bass amplitude envelope. Parameters voLuMe adjusts the overall control signal output. This affects the level of the signal feeding all assigned parameters.

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offSet varies the control signal’s “baseline”. For example, normally the control signal covers a range from –1 to +1, with 0 as the midpoint. When offSet is at minimum, the baseline is -1. When offSet is at maximum, the baseline is 0. No higher baseline than 0 is possible. attaCK adds a “glide” time (from 1 to 978ms) between when the control signal receives an input change, and when the control signal reaches that actual value. Sometimes, too abrupt an attack can create a “pop” when the control signal first kicks in; increasing attaCK can soften this effect. deCay causes the control signal to take anywhere from 10 to 9863ms to fall back to its initial setting in the absence of an input signal. Input Level Tips The most common application for envelope control is filters; this is already built in to the AutoFilter Component. However, envelope control has many other uses. ► Set some attack and decay time to create a “spongier” response, and control chorus or ensemble Speed or Rate. This varies the rate so it doesn’t sound quite so regular. ► Use the Input Level modifier to control panning, so that the position of the signal in the stereo field changes depending on the signal level. ► Note that you can apply the Modifier’s signal to the Modifier’s parameters, or parameters in other Modifiers. For example, you can assign input LeveL to the input LeveL attaCK control. With a positive modulation amount, stronger input signals increase the attack time. With a nega-

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tive modulation amount, stronger input signals decrease the attack time. ► If you really want to drive your audience crazy, apply the Input Level signal to the Pitch Pedal’s Pedal parameter.

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5. Appendix A: Optimizing system response
Your guitar will be playing through a computer, and any computer-based audio system has some delay between the audio input and output. Even the most powerful computer can only do a certain number of calculations per second; signal processing demands a lot from a processor, so it’s important to minimize any computer-based delays. Fortunately, three main factors make delays virtually insignificant, assuming you have a suitable computer setup (see System Requirements). ► Today’s multi-GigaHertz, multi-core computers are so fast they dramatically reduce latency. ► Many sound cards and audio interfaces include drivers optimized for low latency. ► GUITAR RIG 3’s software, despite its superb sound quality, is written very efficiently.

5.1 Use low-latency drivers
Drivers are pieces of code that handle communication between your computer and audio interface. The audio interface is either built into a

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computer or attached via USB or FireWire. The more efficiently data is transferred between audio interface and computer, the lower the latency. GUITAR RIG 3 works with two low-latency driver types: ► ASIO (Audio Streaming Input Output). This cross-platform protocol was originally developed by Steinberg. ► Core Audio (Mac only). This low-latency protocol was created by Apple for the Macintosh, starting with OS X. If your audio interface does not support one of these protocols, you will likely hear an audible delay if you play through GUITAR RIG 3. Although GUITAR RIG 3 can work with the DirectSound and MME drivers used with Windows machines, it will not make for a satisfying playing experience.

5.2 What about Direct Monitoring?
You may have heard about a sound card feature called “direct monitoring”, which reduces latency by sending the sound card’s audio input signal directly to its audio output. However, this bypasses the computer, which means it also bypasses GUITAR RIG 3’s processing. Make sure direct monitoring is turned off in your sound card’s control panel software.

5.3 How low can you go?
1.5 ms of latency approaches the theoretical minimum, because it will always take some time to convert analog to digital, then back to analog

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again at the output. However, note that ultra-low latency settings (or higher sampling rates) make your computer work harder, which may limit the number of Components you can add to GUITAR RIG 3 and still obtain audio that’s free of clicks, pops, or dropouts. So, here are some tips on living with latency.

5.4 About samples and buffers
Audio cannot be handled continuously by a computer, but has to wait its turn while other operations are being carried out. As a result, sound cards create a “buffer”, which can hold a certain number of samples, where data can be stored and released as needed to create a smooth flow of data. If there’s an interruption in the data flow for a little bit, no problem: There’s some reserve in the buffer. An analogy would be if you had a hose that didn’t deliver water continuously, but in bursts. So, you use a bucket to store the water from the hose, and release the water from the bucket as a smooth, continuous flow. If the bucket (buffer) is large, then you can store more water in case the hose goes dry for a bit. But it will take longer to fill the bucket, which is equivalent to latency. A smaller bucket takes less time to fill, but the hose had better deliver water on a pretty continuous basis. All ASIO audio interfaces and sound cards include a control panel where you can adjust latency. This may be given as the number of samples per buffer, or simply as different latency Presets.

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Some ASIO control panels let you choose a particular number of samples/ buffer. The display then shows the resulting latency. A 256 samples/buffer is giving a latency of just under 6 ms at .1kHz. Setting this to 128 samples/buffer will reduce the latency, but may stress out your computer more. Some control panels simply show the latency that results from choosing a particular setting in milliseconds rather than showing samples/buffer as shown in the Audio Kontrol 1 panel.

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5.5 Tips on minimizing latency
► Set latency to the highest comfortable value. 256 samples/buffer is very responsive yet gives your computer some “breathing room”. However, 512 samples may also be acceptable. Anything more will create a very noticable delay. If you can’t get reliable audio with 512 samples, then it might be time for a better computer! ► If your ASIO Control Panel shows latency in milliseconds, you’ll find that anything over 10 ms or so gives an audible delay. 5 ms is a good compromise between speed and minimum stress to your computer. ► Download your sound card’s latest drivers from the manufacturer’s web site. This can make a huge difference in performance. ► If you are recording in a host application and using software synthesizers, use your program’s “freeze” function (if available) to disconnect some synths from the CPU. Or, render a soft synth’s output as a hard disk audio track (then remove the soft synth), as audio tracks are less taxing on the computer. ► Sometimes there are two latency adjustments: A Control Panel for the sound card sets a minimum amount of latency, and the host can increase from this value if needed. Or, the host may “lock” to the control panel setting.

%

If you retain the MIDI track driving the soft

synth, which places virtually no stress on your CPU, you can always edit the part later by re-inserting the soft synth.

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5.6 Using Built-In Mac Audio
In OSX 10., Apple changed the way that you access its built-in audio settings. If you plan to use GUITAR RIG 3 without an external soundcard or the RIG KONTROL, you may need to set up an aggregate device. Here is how to do it: 1. From the Utilities Folder, launch the Audio MIDI Setup. 2. From the drop-down list labeled audio, choose Create Aggregate Device 3. Press + in the dialog that comes up to create a new entry. 4. Rename the new entry to Guitar Rig by double clicking in the text field for Aggregate Device 5. In the uSe column, check Built in Inputs and Built in Outputs. The panel should look like this:

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6. When done, press the done button and quit Audio MIDI Setup. 7. Launch GUITAR RIG and open the Audio and MIDI Settings. Select the aggregated device Guitar Rig you have just created.

%
torted.

You can’t simply plug a guitar directly into a line

in on any computer. The output impedance of a normal electric guitar does not match these inputs, thus the sound will be thin and/or dis-

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6. Appendix B: About MIDI
Many musicians think that MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) is just for keyboard players; but guitarists can use MIDI to control multieffects, and in the process, sculpt a unique and fresh sound. The complete MIDI spec is fairly “deep” and complex. Fortunately for MIDIphobes, there are only a few parts of the spec that relate to multieffects control, so there’s not really that much to learn. Let’s start with MIDI basics.

6.1 MIDI Basics
A MIDI system requires something that sends MIDI messages (such as a footpedal or footswitch that says “make the instrument louder”, “select this effect”, “add more echo”, etc.) and something that receives these messages and acts on them, like GUITAR RIG 3. Of course, this assumes your computer has a MIDI input so that GUITAR RIG 3 can receive MIDI messages. Stripped to its basics, you can think of MIDI as a catch-all name for the process of sending control messages from one device (e.g., a footswitch) to another device (e.g., GUITAR RIG 3) over a MIDI cable. Host sequencers also use MIDI data to provide automation for GUITAR RIG 3 when it’s serving as a plug-in.

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There are many different kinds of MIDI messages, most of which relate to keyboards, sequencers, drum machines, lighting controllers, tape recorders, and other gear we can ignore. With GUITAR RIG 3, 99% of the time you need to know about only two kinds of MIDI messages: program changes (which call up different Presets) and continuous controller messages (which alter effects parameters in real time). Note that RIG KONTROL 1 does not use MIDI messages to trigger changes or control parameters, but rather a unique audio control method as described earlier. MIDI is applicable only if you want to use MIDI controllers made by other companies.

6.2 MIDI Connections
Your computer’s sound card probably has a MIDI in jack (receives MIDI message) and MIDI out jack that transmits MIDI messages. There may also be a MIDI thru jack, which provides a duplicate of the signal at the MIDI in jack.

6.3 About Program Changes and Bank Select
To understand program changes, take a trip with me down memory lane to the mid-70s, when disco ruled, synthesizers were not yet programmable, and guitar effects were starting to progress beyond funny little boxes that ate batteries and burped noise. Guitarists discovered early on that the

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hippest control on any signal processor was the in/out footswitch because it allowed you to bring an effect in as needed (distortion is wonderful, but not all the time). As more boxes were introduced – compressors, phase shifters, echo units, wah-wahs, etc. – musicians started connecting all these boxes together with patch cords. And that’s where the trouble began: if you wanted to bring in multiple effects simultaneously, you had to hit a bunch of footswitches at once. Fancy tap dancing became the order of the day. When the MIDI spec was drawn up, provisions were made for 128 MIDI program change messages. This is why many signal processors offer 128 programs, and why each GUITAR RIG 3 Bank can store up to 128 Presets. As usual, people wanted more – so an addition to the MIDI spec, Bank Select messages, can select up to 16,38 GUITAR RIG 3 Banks of 128 programs for a grand total of over 2.000.000 programs (that should hold you for a while).

6.4 About Continuous Controllers
Changing from one program to another is a good start, but sometimes you’d like to vary a particular parameter within an individual program (delay feedback, filter frequency, distortion drive, etc.). A wah-wah sound is a good example of changing a particular parameter (filter frequency) in real time. When you call up a program’s parameter, you usually change its value by turning a Knob. The idea of continuous controllers came about because

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synthesizers and effects have pedals, Knobs, levers, and other physical “controllers” that alter some aspect of the sound over a continuous range of values (this is why they’re called continuous controllers, as opposed to a controller such as an on-off switch, which only selects between two possible values). Unlike a program change, which is a single event, continuous controllers generate a series of events, such as a volume fade-in (each event raises the volume a bit more than the previous event), or change in some other parameter (e.g., increasing chorus depth, or altering the wah-wah filter frequency). Like program changes, continuous controller messages are transmitted over a MIDI output and received by a MIDI input. The transmitter usually digitizes the physical controller motion into 128 discrete values (0-127). For example, pulling the controller’s pedal all the way back generates a value of 0. Pushing down on the pedal increases the value until at midpoint, the pedal generates a value of 6. Continuing to push on the pedal until it’s all the way down generates a value of 127. Continous Controller Numbers MIDI “tags” each continuous controller message with an ID from 0 to 127. Therefore, you can control up to 127 GUITAR RIG 3 parameters, although in practice, it’s unlikely you could keep track of that many parameter assignments, let alone use them constructively. When controlling a signal processor via continuous controllers, the basic idea is to assign a particular signal processor parameter (delay, modulation

%

Note that continuous controller transmitters

only send messages reflecting a change; for example, leaving a pedal in one position doesn’t transmit any messages until you change the pedal’s physical position.

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rate, distortion drive, etc.) to a particular continuous controller number. With GUITAR RIG 3, this is particularly easy thanks to the Learn function. At the receiving end, the parameter being controlled changes in response to incoming message values. For example, if you’re controlling Delay Feedback and it receives a value of 0, feedback is at minimum. When it receives a value of 6, the feedback is halfway up and upon receiving a value of 127, the feedback is up all the way.

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7. Appendix C: Tips on creating your own RIG
One of the best aspects of GUITAR RIG 3 is you have the freedom to rearrange the various Components in any way you like. This section gives some guidelines on which effects should follow or precede other effects in the signal chain.

7.1 Series and Parallel Effects
There are two main ways of hooking effects together. With a series connection of effects, the effects string together serially, one after another. Effect 1’s output plugs into effect 2’s input, effect 2’s output plugs into effect 3’s input, and so on. A parallel effects combination uses the Split Component to split the signal into the inputs of effects 1 and 2. Mixing the outputs of the two effects gives the combined (paralleled) sound of these effects; the Split Component’s Cross-fade parameter adjusts the proportion of the two splits. Another variation is the series/parallel effects combination, where you include multiple Components connected in series within a parallel Split. The example given earlier in the section on the Split Component illustrates this well.

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7.2 Placing Components in the right order
Series, parallel, and series/parallel configurations represent an almost unlimited way of connecting effects together for a customized sound. In fact, maybe the possibilities are just too great, because people are often confused about topics such as whether compression should go before or after distortion, which effects work best in parallel, whether a noise gate should go earlier or later in the signal chain, and so on. Actually, there is no one “right” routing, although there are certainly common ones. Different combinations of different effects make different sounds, so experiment! That’s why GUITAR RIG 3 gives you all these cool toys. Nonetheless, it’s a good idea to at least establish a recommended point of departure. We’ll start off with some general rules, then discuss series combinations of effects, and finally investigate parallel effects combinations.

7.3 The all-important first effect
For many instruments, compression or distortion are generally good choices for the first effect. A compressor increases sustain, which gives a “punchier” signal for subsequent stages. Also, a compressor is a unique kind of effect since if it’s not over compressed, the effect is fairly subtle and can be left in the signal chain at all times.

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However, note that if you’re using Oktaver, it wants to be the first effect. This is because it needs a clean, single-note line, and adding effects prior to Oktaver can work against this.

7.4 Series Effects Combinations
When determining an order for effects, start off by considering a series effects chain as consisting of three subsections that occur in this order: ► Modules that alter dynamic range (compression, limiting) and/or synthesize frequencies (e.g., distortion, Oktaver). ► Equalization (tone controls) to further shape the sound. This will usually include speaker cabinets. ► Time-altering devices (delay, chorus, reverb, etc.) to add ambience and animation In addition, you may want to close out the chain with additional equalization to give an overall tonal tweaking, a noise gate to cut out noise, a speaker cabinet if one was not already included in the chain, and/or a limiter to reduce peaks. The order in which effects occur can make a huge difference to the overall sound. For example, distortion before equalization sounds very different compared to equalization before distortion. Here are some specific examples of what to expect when you connect two effects in series. ► Compressor before distortion. With guitar, this increases sustain and gives a more consistent distortion timbre.

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► Distortion before compressor tends to be a bit noisy but provides a somewhat “gentler” sound compared to compressor before distortion. ► Equalization before distortion. This can make distortion seem more “touch-sensitive” by causing boosted frequencies to distort more readily than non-boosted ones. Also, as distortion synthesizes harmonics, the overall sound may be too bright. Pulling back on the highs before feeding the distortion can help control this. ► Distortion before equalization. In this combination, the equalization tailors the timbre of the distorted sound. In general, placing equalization both before and after distortion gives the most flexibility. ► Distortion before delay gives a clear echo sound. ► Delay before distortion gives a dirty echo sound since the echoes “melt” together when distorted. ► Echo before noise gate. The noise-gating action will also cut out some of the low-level echoes, which may not be desirable. Patching the noise gate before echo gives a more natural echo sound. ► Distortion before flanger or chorus. Flangers and choruses give the most intense effect when they’re fed a signal with lots of harmonics (overtones). Distortion delivers a harmonically rich sound that accents the flanging or chorusing effect. ► Flanger or chorus before distortion. Lots of distortion may mask the subtlety of the flanger or chorus effect. In fact, with extreme amounts of distortion, it may seem as if there is little, if any, flanger or chorus effect.

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► Reverb before equalization. Boosting lower frequencies gives a larger, more “distant” reverb sound. Boosting higher frequencies gives more presence, resulting in a subjectively closer reverb sound. ► Reverb before chorus unit. Following reverb with light chorusing can impart a shimmering, full sound. As an example of how to apply this, suppose you want a flexible, general purpose effects algorithm for power-chord rhythm guitar. Here’s one possibility: Tube Compressor » EQ Parametric » Plex » Cabinet & Mic » Chorus/ Flanger » Noise Gate » Studio Reverb The compressor adds sustain, and the EQ/distortion/amp+cabinet combination allows for a very precise tailoring of the distorted sound. The chorus helps diffuse the overall sound somewhat; the noise gate cuts out any low level noise, and the reverb “smoothes over” choppiness contributed by the noise gate as well as provides ambience.

7.5 Parallel Effects
Parallel effects combinations can provide a greater degree of subtlety than series combinations. As one example, putting bass through a chorus and then a wahwah will give a thin sound because the wahwah removes the bass “bottom”. Placing the wahwah in parallel with the chorused signal adds the filtered effect to the chorused bass sound (which doesn’t remove the low end).

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Parallel effects chains are also a good way to create a stereo image, as one leg of the chain can provide one channel and the other leg, the other channel. For example, suppose you feed a guitar into two graphic equalizer Components connected in parallel. If you set bands 1, 3, 5, and 7 to maximum and bands 2, , 6, and 8 to minimum in one channel, and do the reverse for the other channel (bands 1, 3, 5, and 7 to minimum with bands 2, , 6, and 8 to maximum), you’ll create an interesting type of stereo spread.

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8. Appendix D: About ground loops
What was that buzz? That strange hum? What is that digital hash from your computer that’s showing up in your guitar pickup? You may be a victim of ground loops, which can occur easily when using multiple AC-powered devices. But before we can solve the problem, we need to understand what causes it. A ground loop means there is more than one ground path available to a device. For example one path goes from device A to ground via the AC power cord’s ground terminal, but A also sees a path to ground through the shielded cable and AC ground of device B which is connected to A. Because ground wires have some resistance (the electronic equivalent of friction), there can be a voltage difference between the two ground lines, thus causing small amounts of current to flow through ground. This signal may get induced into the hot conductor. The loop can also act like an antenna for hum and radio frequencies. Furthermore, many Components in a circuit connect to ground. If that ground is “dirty”, this noise might get picked up by the circuit. Ground loops cause the most problems with highgain devices, since massive amplification of even a couple millivolts of noise (as often happens when using high-gain distortion) can be objectionable. There are two main fixes: break the loop by interrupting the audio ground, or break the loop by interrupting the AC ground line. The preferred method depends on the nature of the problem, so let’s look at various options.

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8.1 A non-solution: ground lifters
Some musicians who are unconcerned about leading a long and productive life simply “lift” the AC ground by plugging a 3-wire cord into a 3-to-2 adapter. However, this is definitely not recommended since it eliminates the safety protection afforded by a grounded chassis. Rather then spend time explaining why you shouldn’t do this, just don’t do it, okay?

8.2 Solution #1: The single plug theory
Many ground loop problems can be solved by plugging all equipment into the same grounded AC source, which attaches all ground leads to a single ground point (for example, a barrier strip that feeds an AC outlet through a short cord). However, it is important to make sure that the AC source is not overloaded and is properly rated to handle the gear plugged into it.

8.3 Solution #2: The broken shield effect
A solution for some stubborn ground loop problems is to isolate the piece of gear causing the problem, and disconnect the ground lead (shield) at one end only of one or more of the audio patch cords between it and other devices. The inner conductor is still protected from hum by a shield connected to ground, yet there’s no completed ground path between the two devices except for AC ground.

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If you make your own cables, it’s worth wiring up a few special ground loopbuster cords with a disconnected shield at one end. Mark them plainly; if used as conventional cords, you’ll encounter hum, loss of level, and other problems.

8.4 Solution #3: Audio isolation transformer
Using a 1:1 audio isolation transformer is much more elegant than simply breaking the shield, but accomplishes the same thing: interrupt the ground connection while carrying the signal. Although a cord with a broken shield is less expensive, the transformer offers some advantages. If needed, you can change impedance or levels simultaneously by choosing a transformer with different impedances for the primary and secondary windings (e.g., use the transformer to boost the level of a device with a fairly low output; this gives less noise than turning up the mixer’s preamp gain).

8.5 Solution #4: AC isolation transformer
Many times, you can also break a loop by removing the direct connection from a piece of gear to AC ground. This doesn’t always work because the ground loop may not involve the AC line but various ground-to-ground connections; however, loops involving the AC line generally seem to be more problematic and common. Breaking audio is a simpler, lower power solution (that can also minimize computer-generated “hash”), but an AC

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isolation transformer provides ancillary benefits. In short, an AC isolation transformer can clean up the AC line, reduce spikes and transients, and provide performance almost equal to that of a separate AC line. So which is better, breaking the audio connection or the AC connection? It depends. If you have a lot of microprocessor-controlled gear and less than ideal AC, adding isolation transformers can solve various AC-related problems and get rid of ground loops. If you just have a simple ground loop problem, then patching in audio isolation transformers may be all you need.

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9. Appendix E: Keyboard Shortcuts
Type File File File File Edit Edit Edit Edit Edit Edit Edit View Command New Preset Save Preset + Bank Save Preset + Bank As Quit Undo Redo Cut Copy Paste Delete Select All Hide Hints Windows Ctrl+N Ctrl+S Ctrl+Shift+S Alt+F Ctrl+Z Ctrl+Y Ctrl+X Ctrl+C Ctrl+V Del Ctrl+A Ctrl+I Mac Cmd+N Cmd+S Cmd+Shift+S Cmd+Q Cmd+Z Cmd+Y Cmd+X Cmd+C Cmd+V Delete Cmd+A Cmd+I

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View View View View

Full Screen Hide/Show RigKontrol Hide/Show SideKick Hide/Show Live View

F F3 F2 F1

F F3 F2 F1

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10. Index
A
Activating a Step.............................. 185 Amp ............................................... 109 Assign ............................................ 185 Assigning the Step Sequencer to a Parameter ................ 185 Attack ..............137, 19, 152, 186, 189 Cross .............................................. 163 Cutoff ............................................. 135

D

B

Balls ............................................... 103 Bass ..... 78, 80, 82, 8, 85, 86, 90, 101, ...................... 102, 103, 10, 105, 106, ....................... 107, 108, 109, 115, 165 Bias ................................................. 77 Boost ......................................108, 111 Bottom ........................................... 108 Bright ............ 80, 83, 87, 10, 108, 10

De-Hiss .......................................... 150 Decay ..................................... 186, 189 Delay .............................................. 115 Depth ....................................... 83, 115 Detune ........................................... 162 Distortion ................. 100, 103, 105, 106 Down .............................................. 11 Drive ................................ 86, 10, 109 Dry/Wet .......................................... 115

E F

Ensemble ........................................ 11 Filter .............................................. 103 Flanger ........................................... 116 FP/BPF/HPF .................................... 137 Freq Max ........................................ 139 GUITAR RIG 3 – 215

C

Cab&Mic ......................................... 109 Chorus Intensity ............................... 11 Clean...................................... 10, 109 Continuous Controllers ...................... 201

Freq Mid ......................................... 139 Freq Min ......................................... 139 Fuzz ............................................... 101

LP-BP-HP ....................................... 138

M

G

Gain ......................................... 86, 108 Graphic EQ........................................ 87 Graphic EQ Band Level ....................... 87 Graphic EQ Volume ............................ 87

H

Half Volume .................................... 16 Hold ........................................ 17, 19 Hot ................................................ 109 Hum ................................................. 12

I

Master .............................................. 8 Max ................................................ 133 Metronome ........................................ 13 MicPos ........................................... 109 Mid ......................... 78, 80, 83, 8, 85, ......................... 86, 90, 105, 106, 107, .............................................. 108, 115 Mid-Freq ........................................... 86 Mid-Q ............................................. 107 Mid Freq ................................. 106, 107 MIDI ............................................... 198 Min Volume ..................................... 16 Mode .............................................. 115

Input .............................................. 153 Input Level Tips ............................... 189 Intensity ................................... 80, 113 Interference ...................................... 12

O

Offset .............................. 137, 187, 189 overdrive ......................................... 100

L

P

Learn.......................................19, 150 Legato ............................................ 186 LFP/BPF/HPF .................................. 135 Limit .............................................. 17

Parameters.............................. 186, 188 pickups ............................................. 12 Pitch .............................................. 162 Play Button ..................................... 169 Plug-in.............................................. 11 GUITAR RIG 3 – 216

Power ............................................... 61 Power Supply .................................... 76 Pre-Amp ........................................... 8 Presence ......................... 78, 8, 85, 90

R

Range ............................................. 136 Rate ..................................83, 113, 115 Release............. 137, 17, 19, 150, 152 Res Max ......................................... 139 Res Mid .......................................... 139 Res Min .......................................... 139 Reso ....................................... 135, 137 Resolution ............................... 186, 188 Response .......................................... 76 Reverb .............................................. 80 Reverb On ......................................... 80 Reverb Time ...................................... 80 Reverse........................................... 162

Slider .............................. 138, 11, 12 Slope .............................................. 135 Speed ............................................... 80 Standalone .......................................... 9 Step Sequencer ............................... 185 Stereo............................................. 115 Stereo\ Time ........................................... 162 Stereo Pan ...................................... 113 Sustain ....................................102, 151 Sync ............................................... 163

T

S

Sag .................................................. 76 Scoop ............................................. 108 Sens ............................................... 136 Signal Flow ....................................... 59 Size ................................................ 11 Slide............................................... 188

Tapedeck .......................................... 13 Tempo Sync .................................... 113 Temp Sync ........................115, 117, 163 Threshold ................. 19, 150, 152, 153 Tone ........................ 102, 103, 10, 105 Treble ...................... 78, 80, 83, 8, 85, ................... 87, 90, 101, 102, 103, 105, ............... 106, 107, 108, 109, 115, 165 Tremolo .......................................... 113 Tuner ................................................ 13

U

Ultra Hi ............................................ 87 Ultra Lo ............................................ 87 GUITAR RIG 3 – 217

Up ................................................. 11 Up/Down......................................... 136

V

Variac ............................................... 76 Vibrato/Off/Chorus .............................. 83 Vibrato On ......................................... 80 Volume ........... 77, 80, 82, 86, 101, 102, 103, 10, 105, 106, 107, 109, 11, 16, 17, 151, 188 Volume Max .................................... 139 Volume Mid ..................................... 139 Volume Min ..................................... 139

W

Wahwah .......................................... 10 Wet ................................................ 137 Width ......................................11, 186

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