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UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION SCIENCES & DISORDERS

COURSE NAME: Summer Autism Institute

COURSE NUMBER: CSD 295

SEMESTER: Summer Term YEAR: 2014

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course is offered as a one-week intensive session featuring international, national,
and regional experts in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). It is open to community teams and the
families they serve in Vermont and interdisciplinary teams across the New England area,
nationwide and abroad. Participants represent several disciplines, including speech-language
pathologists, special educators, general educators, medical professionals, family members,
administrators, early interventionists, paraprofessionals, occupational therapists, physical
therapists, psychologists, child care service providers, and community resource parents. The
content emphasizes best practices in providing home and community-based services for infants
and toddlers with ASD and their families, using peers to foster social engagement in preschool
settings, understanding the personal accounts of those with ASD and ways to improve their
educational outcomes, describing the impact of theory of mind on the social communication of
individuals with ASD, and providing quality services with limited resources.

CLASS MEETING TIMES:

DATES: June 16-July 11, 2014
TIME: 8:15 am - 5:30 pm
LOCATION: Double Tree Hotel, South Burlington, VT

COURSE FACULTY:

COURSE COORDINATOR: Patricia A. Prelock, Ph.D., CCC-SLP
College of Nursing and Health Sciences
OFFICE: 105 Rowell Building, 106 Carrigan Drive
Burlington, VT 05405
PHONE: (802) 656-2529 (voice mail); (802) 656-2191(fax)
E-MAIL: patricia.prelock@uvm.edu
OFFICE HOURS: By appointment

GUEST INSTRUCTORS: Phillip S. Strain, Ph.D.,
Professor of Educational Psychology & Psychiatry
University of Colorado-Denver
Director, Positive Early Learning Experiences
Center
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John Robison, Neurodiversity Scholar in Resident
The College of William and Mary

Carol E. Westby, Ph.D.
Consultant, Bilingual Multicultural Services,
Albuquerque, NM,
Affiliate Faculty,
Brigham Young University, Provo, UT

Sherry Sancibrian, M.S., CCC-SLP
Professor & Program Director, Department of
Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

Jennifer I. Stapel Wax, Psy.D.
Associate Professor, Division of Autism and
Related Disorders
Department of Pediatrics
Emory University School of Medicine

TEACHING-LEARNING METHODS:

A variety of teaching tools including group and individual classroom and Blackboard
activities will be used to facilitate students‘ learning. This is a writing-intensive course with
active verbal engagement during face-to-face sessions. Student learning is evaluated through the
completion of several writing assignments for which grading rubrics are provided. During face-
to-face sessions, students will be asked to participate in class discussions that are facilitated
through key questions related to the content as well as a simulated learning experience. Targeted
discussion regarding a case-based scenario will occur using Blackboard technology. The
simulated experience and case-based scenario have been added in response to student requests
for more active and dynamic learning opportunities requiring analysis and synthesis of new
knowledge which can be applied to practice.

TEXTBOOKS & REQUIRED READINGS:

There are several required readings listed for each day of our face-to-face discussions.
These readings can be found on the UVM blackboard site under CMSI 295 Summer Autism
Institute and are listed under the course outline for each of the five days we will be meeting as a
group. There is one required book that should be read for Tuesday‘s session, as it is a personal
account. The book is entitled Look me in the eye, my life with Asperger’s by John Robison.

COURSE GOALS & OBJECTIVES:

The primary goals of the course will be to: 1) present and explain outcomes research for
infants, toddlers and preschoolers with ASD who receive evidence-based interventions; 2)
3
describe the impact of theory of mind deficits on social communication in children with ASD; 3)
discuss the need for improved educational and vocational outcomes for adolescents and young
adults with ASD; and, 4) identify those services that can be implemented with the greatest
efficiency and effectiveness. The specific content focus and educational objectives for each face-
to-face content day of the course are listed in the course outline.

The following is a list of the expected knowledge and skills for students at the end of the
CSD program as outlined by the Commission on Academic Accreditation (CAA) in
Standard 3.1B. Those outcomes that are supported through work in this course are
identified (see checked boxes).
Knowledge of the nature of speech, language,
hearing, and communication disorders and
differences, as well as swallowing disorders,
including etiologies, characteristics, and
anatomical/physiological, acoustic,
psychological, developmental, linguistic, and
cultural correlates.
Taught Practiced Evaluated
Articulation
Fluency
voice and resonance, including respiration and
phonation

receptive and expressive language
(phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics,
and pragmatics) in speaking, listening,
reading, writing, and manual modalities
X X
hearing, including the impact on speech and
language

swallowing (oral, pharyngeal, esophageal, and
related functions, including oral function for
feeding; orofacial myofunction)

cognitive aspects of communication (e.g.,
attention, memory, sequencing, problem
solving, executive functioning)
X X
social aspects of communication (e.g.,
behavioral and social skills affecting
communication)
X X
communication modalities (e.g., oral, manual,
and augmentative and alternative
communication techniques and assistive
technologies)
X X
Knowledge of the principles and methods of
prevention, assessment, and intervention for
people with communication and swallowing
disorders across the life span, including
consideration of anatomical/physiological,
psychological, developmental, linguistic, and
Taught Practiced Evaluated
4
cultural correlates of the disorders
standards of ethical conduct
interaction and interdependence of speech,
language, and hearing in the discipline of
human communication sciences and disorders

processes used in research and the integration
of research principles into evidence-based
clinical practice
X X
contemporary professional issues
certification, specialty recognition, licensure,
and other relevant professional credentials

Skills in the following areas: Taught Practiced Evaluated
oral and written or other forms of
communication
X (written) X
(written)
prevention, evaluation, and intervention of
communication disorders and swallowing
disorders

interaction and personal qualities, including
counseling, collaboration, ethical practice, and
professional behavior

effective interaction with patients, families,
professionals, and other individuals, as
appropriate

delivery of services to culturally and
linguistically diverse populations

application of the principles of evidence-based
practice

self-evaluation of effectiveness of practice

CLASS SCHEDULE:

MONDAY, JUNE 23
TITLE: 34 Years of Outcome Research on LEAP Preschool

SUMMARY:
This presentation documents outcomes for typically developing children and peers with
autism in LEAP Preschool. Research and clinical data provide guidance for child ratios,
intervention intensity, assessment strategies, adult roles, and organization of teaching contexts in
inclusion settings.

Educational Objectives:
As a result of this session, participants will be able to:
1. Describe the range of outcomes achieved by participants in LEAP Preschool.
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2. Identify lessons learned in LEAP Preschool specific to child ratios, adult roles and
responsibilities, assessment procedures, intervention intensity and the organization of
large group teaching contexts.
3. Apply lessons learned to their own inclusion efforts.

Instructor: Phillip S. Strain, Ph.D.,
Professor of Educational Psychology & Psychiatry
University of Colorado-Denver
Director, Positive Early Learning Experiences Center

Required Readings:

Strain, P.S., & Bovey, E. H. (2011). Randomized, controlled trial of the LEAP model of early
intervention for young children with ASD. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 31,
133-154.

Strain, P.S., & Bovey, E. H. (2008). LEAP: Learning experiences, an alternative program for
preschoolers and parents. In S. Harris, & J. Handleman, (Eds.), Preschool education programs
for children with autism (pp. 249-280) Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.

Strain, P.S., Bovey, E. H., Wilson, K., & Roybal, R. (2009). LEAP Preschool: Lessons learned
over 28 years of inclusive services for young children with autism. Young Exceptional Children,
11, 49-68.

Questions to consider during facilitated discussion for MONDAY (3:30 - 5:00)

1. What were the most powerful outcomes realized as a result of LEAP?
2. What lessons did you learn from LEAP that you could apply to your own program fro
children with ASD?
3. What LEAP strategies are likely to be most effective in an inclusive classroom?

DUE: Facilitate Group Reflections
Pre-assessment & Goal Setting

TUESDAY, JUNE 24
TITLE: Growing up Different: Living with Autism

SUMMARY:

This presentation describes how John Robison grew up with Asperger‘s at a time when
differences like his were unrecognized. After finding success as an adult he began helping others
see strengths where others see disability. John‘s wife Maripat will join him to talk about family
and romantic issues.

Educational Objectives:
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As a result of this session, participants will be able to:
1. Identify the strengths of individuals with ASD and capitalize on those to support their
quality of life.
2. Explain those characteristics, which interfere with an individual‘s ability to be socially
engaged.
3. Describe the family and romantic issues facing individuals with ASD.

Instructor: John Robison, Neurodiversity Scholar in Resident
The College of William and Mary
Required Readings:

BOOK TITLE: Look me in the Eye: My life with Asperger’s disorder
AUTHOR: John Robison

Questions to consider during facilitated discussion on TUESDAY (3:30 - 5:30):
1. How might you use the strengths of an individual with ASD to support their quality of
life?
2. Describe those characteristics mostly to interfere with an individual with ASD‘s ability to
be socially engaged?
3. Explain some of the relationship issues that face individuals with ASD.

DUE: Facilitated Group Reflections


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25
TITLE: Theory of Mind: Going to the Heart of Autism

SUMMARY:

This presentation describes the developmental stages of theory of mind (ToM), reviews
research documenting neural bases for emotional understanding, explains environmental factors
that influence ToM, presents protocols for assessing ToM, and demonstrates strategies that foster
social interaction.

Educational Objectives:
As a result of this session, participants will be able to:
1. Describe the developmental stages of theory of mind from infancy through adolescence
2. Relate current research documenting neural bases for emotional understanding and theory
of mind
3. Design a protocol for assessing development of ToM
4. Implement ToM intervention strategies based on developmental levels

Instructor: Carol E. Westby, Ph.D.
Consultant, Bilingual Multicultural Services, Albuquerque, NM,
Affiliate Faculty, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT

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Required Readings:
Korkmaz, B. (2011). Theory of mind and neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood. Pediatric
Research, 69(5), 101R-108R.

Westby, C. E. (2014). A language perspective on executive functioning, metacognition, and self-
regulation in reading, pp. 339-358.

Westby, C. E. (submitted). Social neuroscience and theory of mind. Folia Phoniatrica (under
review)

Questions to consider during facilitated discussion for WEDNESDAY (3:30 - 5:00)

1. Explain the stages of theory of mind progression important to understanding the behavior
of children and adolescents with ASD.
2. Describe the neural bases for theory of mind.
3. What strategies would you use to both assess and treat theory of mind in children with
ASD?

DUE: Facilitated Group Reflections

THURSDAY, JUNE 26
TITLE: Providing Quality Services on a Shoestring

SUMMARY:
This presentation describes three strategies for doing better with less: using
a continuum of service delivery models; engaging and supporting families; and creating
collaborative community relationships. Practical guidance is provided for achieving quality
services for individuals with ASD.

Educational Objectives:
As a result of this session, participants will be able to:
1. List the benefits and limitations of at least three service delivery models
2. Match the features of a service delivery model to the current needs of an individual
3. Identify strategies for developing services that honor family preferences and values
4. Develop a community profile that includes new ways to connect existing resources
5. Identify ways to enhance access to community life for individuals with ASD and their
families

Instructor: Sherry Sancibrian, M.S., CCC-SLP
Professor & Program Director, Department of Speech, Language & Hearing
Sciences
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center



8
Required Readings:
Diehl, S. F. (2003). The SLP‘s role in collaborative assessment and intervention for children with
ASD. Topics in Language Disorders, 23 (2), 95-115.

Woods, J.J., Wilcox, M.J., Friedman, M., & Murch, T. (2011). Collaborative consultation in
natural environments: Strategies to enhance family-centered supports and services. Language,
Speech and Hearing Services in Schools, 42, 379-392.

Questions to consider during facilitated discussion on THURSDAY (3:30 - 5:00):
1. Consider a child with ASD and describe the most appropriate service delivery model to
meet the child‘s needs.
2. How would you go about developing services that honor the values and preferences of
families?
3. What might a community profile look like for a child with ASD with whom you are
working and how much you increase community access for the child and family?

DUE: Team Reflections
Reflection on Simulated Experience


FRIDAY, JUNE 27
TITLE: ASD: On the Frontiers of Research, Practice & Viability

SUMMARY:
This presentation describes research at the Marcus Autism Center focusing on early
screening and detection. It explains the impact of ASD on development, scientific tools for
screening in the community, risk and resilience factors impacting prognosis, and interventions
targeting ASD characteristics.

Educational Objectives:
As a result of this session, participants will be able to:
1. List factors contributing to autism etiology and the social neuroscience of early childhood
development
2. Describe new technologies and science in early screening and detection
3. Explain assessment of ASD in very young children and promising early intervention methods
4. Identify intervention models that are community viable and sustainable
5. Describe community and public policy implications of current science and clinical practice

Instructor: Jennifer I. Stapel Wax, Psy.D.
Associate Professor, Division of Autism and Related Disorders
Department of Pediatrics
Emory University School of Medicine




9
Required Readings:

Adams, R.C., Tapia, C., & The Council on Children with Disabilities. (2013). Early intervention,
IDEA Part C services, and the medical home: Collaboration for best practice and best outcomes.
Pediatrics, 132, e1073-e1088.

Jones, W., & Klin, Ami (2013). Attention to eyes is present but in decline in 2-6-month old
infants later diagnosed with autism. Nature.

Wetherby, A. M., & Woods, J.J. (2006). Early social interaction project for children with ASD
beginning in the second year of life: A preliminary study, TECSE 26 (2), 67-82.

Wetherby, A.M., Woods, J., Allen, L., Cleary, J., Dickinson, H., & Lord, C. (2004). Early
indicators of autism spectrum disorders in the second year of life. JADD, 34(5), 473-493.

Questions to consider during facilitated discussion for FRIDAY (3:30 - 5:00)
1. Describe the new technologies for early detection of children with ASD.
2. Explain an early intervention model that is community viable and sustainable.
3. What are some of the policy implications for practice based on the current science in
ASD.

DUE: Team Reflections
Post Assessment

CRITICAL ARTICLE REVIEW DUE: June 30, 2014

DISCUSSION BOARD CASE-BASED SCENARIO DUE: July 1-July 8, 2014

BOOK REVIEW DUE: July 11, 2014

FINAL ASSIGNMENT DUE: July 14, 2014

COURSE POLICIES:

Attendance Policy
Students are expected to attend all regularly scheduled classes. It is the responsibility of the
student to inform the instructor regarding the reason for absence or tardiness from class, and to
discuss these with the instructor in advance whenever possible. Circumstances that require the
student to be absent for any length of time should be discussed with the faculty member so that a
plan can be made for make-up work or extensions of due dates. Details of the UVM attendance
policy are outlined on the website.

Classroom Code of Conduct
Faculty and students will at all times conduct themselves in a manner that serves to maintain,
promote, and enhance the high quality academic environment befitting the University of
Vermont. Details of the code of conduct are outlined on the UVM website.
10

Religious Holidays
Students have the right to practice the religion of their choice. Each semester students should
submit in writing to their instructors by the end of the second full week of classes their
documented religious holiday schedule for the semester. Faculty will permit students who miss
class for the purpose of religious observance to make up this work.

Academic Honesty
The principal objective of the policy on academic honesty is to promote an intellectual climate
and support the academic integrity of the University of Vermont. Each student is responsible for
knowing and observing this policy. For the purposes of this course each assignment contains
information about the expectations for individual or collaborative work.

ADA Student Accommodations
Reasonable accommodations are provided for students with appropriate documentation from the
ACCESS Office. ACCESS coordinates reasonable accommodations for students with
documented disabilities. They are located at A170 Living/Learning Center, and can be reached
by phone 802-656-7753, or by e-mail access@uvm.edu. Visit their website
http://www.uvm.edu/access. To receive accommodations in this course, please bring the primary
instructor a copy of the letter provided by the ACCESS Office and speak to the instructor about a
plan to implement the recommendations. Contact with the course instructor should occur no
later than the second week of classes so we can discuss accommodations necessary to ensure full
participation and facilitate your educational opportunity.

Student Course Evaluation
As a matter of professional responsibility, all students are expected to complete a course and
instructor evaluation at the end of the semester. Evaluations will be anonymous and confidential.
I reserve the right to withhold the final grade for any student who has not completed the
evaluation.

EVALUATION METHODS/GRADING (see description of each assignment below; grading
rubrics are attached):

ASSIGNMENT/EXAM % OF
GRADE
TYPE OF
EVALUATION
ACADEMIC
HONESTY
DATE
Attendance & Facilitated
Discussions
20 pts.
UG: 18%
GR: 14%
Formative Collaborative
June
23,24,25,26,27,
Critical Article Review 30 pts.
UG: 27%
GR: 23%
Summative Individual
June 30
Simulated Experience 6 pts.
UG: 1%
GR:1 %
Formative &
Summative
Collaborative &
Individual June 25
Book Review: Personal 24 pts Summative Individual July 11
11
Account UG: 22%
GR: 18%
On-Line Discussion: Case-
base Scenario
10 pts
UG: 9%
GR: 8%
Formative &
Summative
Collaborative &
Individual July 1-8
Applied Assignment

40 pts. (GR)
20 pts. (UG)
UG: 23%
GR: 31%
Summative Individual or
Collaborative
July 14
TOTAL UG: 110 pts.
GR: 130 pts.
NA NA



1. There will be a 10% reduction in grade for each assignment turned in late except under
extraordinary circumstances communicated in advance to the instructor.

2. As instructor feedback is critical to your ongoing learning and evolution in thinking
critically, writing and integrating information, late assignments must be turned in prior to
the due date of the next assignment unless there are extraordinary circumstances as
determined by the instructor. An assignment not turned in prior to the next assignment
due date cannot be accepted for credit and will be given a zero.

REMEDIATION METHODS:

Students in Communication Sciences & Disorders not achieving the ‗indicator of achievement‘
set for any of the assignments listed are expected to meet with the instructor to review the
assignment and make a plan to achieve the expected competency for the individual assignment
by redoing the assignment. Grades will not be changed following the completion of an
assignment as part of the remediation plan.

DESCRIPTION OF COURSE ASSIGNMENTS & REQUIREMENTS:

1. Attendance and Facilitated Discussions. Attendance for the five days of the face-
to-face course and participation in the facilitated discussions is required of all students. At the
end of the presentations by the featured speakers time has been set aside for participants to
engage in discussions facilitated by the course instructor in response to targeted questions posed
on the course outline. Each group member is expected to offer their reflections to the questions
or the simulated experience for the day. Attendance and participation in the discussion for each
day are worth 4 points (x5 days) for a total of 20 points.

2. Critical Article Review. Because of the intensive nature of the course, required
readings will be assigned for each day. Students are expected to read all of the assigned readings.
In addition, each student is expected to select the readings from one of the 5 days and will
critically review these readings and respond to the questions listed below. These readings or
links to them can be found on Blackboard.
12

To facilitate your critical reflection on what has been read, your assignment should
include the following content:
a) A brief description of the articles you read (<300 words; Total=>6 points)
b) Answer to the 3 questions listed below. For each question, explicitly address at least 3
of the following terms: (1) receptive & expressive language, (2) cognitive
communication, (3) social aspects of communication, and (4) communication
modalities. If the article does not directly discuss 3 terms, you can extrapolate from
the article using what you have learned in class. Refer to the document entitled
‗Critical Article Review Terms‘ for definitions of these terms that is attached at the
end of this syllabus.

Question 1. In what way does the information in this article expand your knowledge
regarding the assessment &/OR intervention for children or adolescents with ASD and
their families (3pts per term; Total=>9 points)

Question 2. Based on your current knowledge of and/or experience with children and
adolescents with ASD, describe how the information you read in the article supports or
refutes your beliefs and practices (3pts per term; Total=>9 points)

Questions 3. Explain how you will apply the knowledge you gained from reading the
article as you collaborate with team members including families to support the needs of
children and adolescents with ASD. You may relate your application to a specific child or
adolescent with a diagnosis of ASD. (2pts per term; Total=>6 points)

This critical article review should be typed and be no more than 3 pages in length. It is
worth a total of 30 points and is due on or before Monday, June 30. See the explanation of
receptive & expressive language, cognitive communication, social aspects of communication and
communication modalities attached at the end of the syllabus.
Learning Goals:
1) Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the etiologies and characteristics of
receptive/expressive language, cognitive communication, social aspects of
communication & communication modalities in individuals with autism spectrum
disorders (ASD) (ASHA Standard III-C).
2) Students will possess knowledge of methods of prevention, assessment, &
intervention for communication disorders in individuals with ASD (ASHA Standard
III-D).
3) Students will demonstrate an ability to analyze, synthesize & evaluate information
regarding methods of prevention, assessment, & intervention for communication
disorders in individuals with ASD (ASHA Standard III-D).
4) Students will demonstrate knowledge of research & integration into evidence-based
clinical practice for individuals with ASD (ASHA Standard III-F).

Indicator of Achievement: Students will achieve the learning goals above & obtain at
least 26 of the total 30 points for these assignments.

13
3. Simulated Experience. This year, I have added an opportunity to learn through a
simulated experience. On Wednesday, June 25, the class will participate in a simulated
experience. You will learn what simulation is, how it supports learning, and how to debrief
following the simulation. Different members of the class will be asked to take on and will
prepare for their various roles (e.g., teacher, special educator, SLP, school nurse, parent,
adolescent child, typical peer, psychologist, debriefer, etc.) in the simulated experience.
Following the simulation, the class will use a debriefing framework to talk about what was
learned and how this might be applied to real experiences. Students will be asked to reflect on
this simulated experience and turn in their 1-page reflection on Thursday, June 26. This
reflection will require students to answer 3 questions:
a) What did learn about yourself during the simulation?
b) What did you learn about the importance of teamwork in supporting children affected
by ASD and their families?
c) Based on your simulation experience, what will you apply to your practice?
This assignment is worth 6 points.

4. On-Line Discussion: Case-based Scenario. This course is a hybrid instructional
model, which combines face-to-face didactic lecture, with active learning through discussion
both in class and via a blackboard discussion board. To facilitate your learning and integration of
the complex and research-based but interesting material you will be learning and reading, this
course is designed to help facilitate your ability to problem solve around a case study
emphasizing the challenges of ASD. You will be participating in a discussion forum to support
your learning during the two weeks following the in class lectures. You are expected to provide
at least one original post and respond to at least 2 posts of your classmates regarding the case
study presented through Blackboard. Deadlines for participation in the Discussion Group is
highlighted below. The probing questions for your case-based scenario will be posted at the end
of the first week of face to face learning and responses expected within the following two-weeks:

Instructor posts Case Scenario and questions by Monday, June 30
Students provide original response by July 3
Students provide responses to the comments of at least 2 peers by July 8

Responsibility for Student Participation in Case-Based Discussion:
 You are expected to provide an original post to the case scenario to demonstrate your
ability to initiate self reflection and achieve a learning goal for effective analysis and
synthesis of information
 It is expected that your postings are of sufficient length to demonstrate your
understanding of the material & your ability to reconcile the complex issues facing our
students with ASD. The average number of words for your original posting should be
approximately 200-250 words.
 You will be required to post at least 2 comments to the postings of your classmates to
contribute to a collegial learning community. These responses should average
approximately 100 words.
 The research you are reading should provide the foundational skills you will need to
answer the questions posed. Please cite the literature, as appropriate in your postings—
14
following APA standards-5
th
edition for citations. You are encouraged to draw from the
literature to support the reflections you post.
 All postings should be characterized by complete thoughts with correct grammar and
spelling.

Responsibility of the Instructor to Facilitate Student Learning via Discussion
Forums
 You can expect that I will post the discussion questions at least one week prior to when
the discussion is to begin.
 During each week in which a forum is posted, I will provide at least one summary of the
themes that emerge from the student discussion or ask students to consider an expansion
of the discussion based on the evolution of the postings
 I will respond to questions posed to the instructor within 48 hours of the posting

Evaluation of your Participation in the Discussion Forum.

To evaluate students‘ participation in the discussion forums, I will use the rubric
presented below. This will be completed by the July 11
th
for each student. Your participation in
the Discussion Forum is worth 10 pts.

Assessment Area Performance
Requires
Improvement
(.5 pt.)
Performance
Meets
Expectation
(1 pt.)
Performance
Exceeds
Expectation
(2 pts.)
Provides comments that are
relevant to the discussion

Takes initiative to address
questions posed & responds
meaningfully to peers‘
comments

Exhibits appropriate
expression & delivery using
correct grammar & spelling
& exhibiting a respectful
tone

Comprehends the material
being read & discussed in
class

Demonstrates an ability to
both analyze & synthesize
material being learned and
discussed

TOTAL _____

Date: ______


15

5. Book Review (24 points). To increase students‘ awareness and understanding of the
specific challenges and joy experienced by individuals with autism and their families, each
student is to read ―Look me in the Eye‖ by John Robison, our speaker for Tuesday, June 24, an
individual with autism. Students are to prepare a book review of no more than 4-6 pages, which
includes the following:
a. Description of the characteristics, including physiological, psychological,
developmental, linguistic & cultural correlates (4 pts.) as well as receptive
language, expressive language, cognitive communication, social aspects of
communication & communication modalities (4 pts.) of the individual with autism
who either writes the story or whom the story is written about (Total=>8 points)
b. Explanation of the services and models of intervention the individual with autism
and their family received (4 pts.) and how effective these services were perceived
(4 pts.) (Total=>8 points)
c. Reflection on the most important thing you learned while reading the
book, which is likely to change your practice for children or adolescents with
ASD & their families (4 pts.) and how you will implement this new insight into
your practice (4 pts.)(Total=>8 points)

The grading rubric that will be used to evaluate the book review is provided at the end of the
syllabus. Please follow this rubric as it ensures you have addressed the expected questions in
your book review. This assignment is worth a total of 24 points and is due on or before July
11
th
.

Learning Goals:
 Students will demonstrate knowledge of the nature of receptive and expressive language (i.e.,
semantic & pragmatic difficulties); cognitive communication (i.e., attention, memory,
sequencing, problem solving, executive function); social aspects of communication (i.e.,
ineffective social skills, lack of communication opportunities); and communication
modalities (i.e., oral, manual, augmentative, alternative, assistive) for individuals with autism
spectrum disorders (ASHA Standard III-C).
 Students will possess knowledge of methods of prevention, assessment, & intervention for
communication disorders in individuals with ASD (ASHA Standard III-D).
 Students will demonstrate an ability to analyze, synthesize & evaluate information regarding
methods of prevention, assessment, & intervention for communication disorders in
individuals with ASD (ASHA Standard III-D).

Indicator of Achievement: Students will achieve the learning goals above & obtain at
least 26 of the total 30 points.

6. Applied Assignment. Students may collaborate on this assignment, where
appropriate, with team members who are also taking the class. If individual students are taking
the course, they are welcome to join a team, although they can complete the applied assignment
independently. The applied assignment is designed to give students an opportunity to share the
information they have learned with their community through an inservice training so that the
knowledge base of all providers and families affected by ASD or other neurodevelopmental
16
disabilities can be expanded. An outline of the inservice training plan with relevant materials
should be submitted to the course coordinator on or before July 14. The following components
should be included:
a. A statement of purpose (2 pts.) for the inservice training with educational
objectives (2 pts.) listed. (4 points)
b. Description of the content to be covered with justification, including literature support
for the focus of the training, specifically emphasizing needs in the areas of receptive
(1.5) & expressive language (1.5) (total 3 pts.), cognitive communication (3 pts.),
social aspects of communication (3pts.) & communication modalities (3 pts.). (12
points)
c. Teaching strategies which will be used to facilitate and ensure adult
learning. (5 points)
d. Copy of the handouts (5 pts.) that will be provided, including a reference list or
relevant bibliography (4 pts.). (9 points)
e. Copy of the evaluation tool that will be used to assess the effectiveness of the
training. (5 points)
f. Follow-up plans for supporting the ongoing learning of staff in your community in
the area of ASD (5 points)

If an inservice training is not the most effective way for students who are participating in
the course to exchange information with their community, then an alternative applied assignment
can be negotiated. This could take many forms, including developing a screening protocol for all
students in your program to ensure early identification and intervention; designing a parent
training protocol to support families and children affected by ASD; identifying appropriate
strategies for children with ASD in inclusive classrooms; designing a training program for
paraprofessionals who are supporting the needs of children with ASD; etc.
The applied assignment is worth a total of 40 points. Undergraduate students who are
registered for the course should talk with the course coordinator to determine an appropriate
applied assignment. The applied assignment for undergraduate students is worth 20 points
instead of 40 points.
Learning Goals:
1) Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the nature of receptive/expressive
language, cognitive communication, social aspects of communication &
communication modalities in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD)
(ASHA Standard III-C).
2) Students will demonstrate an understanding of ways to disseminate information,
communicate effectively and collaborate around issues affecting children with ASD,
their families and the professionals who serve them (ASHA Standard IV-G).

Indicator of Achievement: Students will achieve the learning goals above & obtain at
least 34 of the total 40 points for graduate students & 17 out of 20 points for
undergraduate students.

6. Pre- and Post-Assessment. All participants taking the course are required to
complete a pre-assessment of their knowledge in the assessment and intervention of children
with ASD, and to establish individual goals for enhancing their knowledge throughout the
17
week. This pre-assessment will be completed on Monday, June 23, during the scheduled time
for facilitated discussions and should be given to the assigned facilitators. All participants are
also required to complete a post-assessment of their knowledge in the assessment and
intervention of children with ASD, and to evaluate the effectiveness with which they met their
individual goals for the week. This post-assessment will be completed on Friday, June 27,
during the scheduled time for facilitated discussions.

NOTE: Any student who has a disability that may prevent him/her from fully demonstrating
his/her abilities should contact the course instructor no later than the second day of class so
we can discuss accommodations necessary to ensure full participation and facilitate your
educational opportunity.

GRADING:
Graduate Students Undergraduate Students
(undergraduate credit)

121-130 points A 102-110 points A
118-120 points A- 99-101 points A-
115-117 points B+ 96-98points B+
110-114 points B 92-95 points B
109-104 points B- 88-91 points B-
100 – 98 points C 85-87 points C+
below 98 points F 81-84 points C
77-80 points C-
66-76 points D
65 points or below F

STUDENTS ARE REMINDED OF THE UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT’S COMMON
GROUND FOR BEHAVIOR AS A STUDENT IN A COMMUNITY OF LEARNERS
Our Common Ground
The University of Vermont is an educationally purposeful community seeking to prepare students to live in a diverse
and changing world. We who work, live, study, teach, do research, conduct business or participate in the University
of Vermont are members of this community. As members, we believe in the transforming power of education and
agree to help create and foster an environment where we can discover and reach our true potential.
We aspire to be a community that values:
 Respect: We respect each other. We listen to each other, encourage each other and care about each other.
We are strengthened by our diverse perspectives.
 Integrity: We value fairness, straightforward conduct, adherence to the facts and sincerity. We
acknowledge when things have not turned out the way we had hoped. As stewards of the University of
Vermont, we are honest and ethical in all responsibilities entrusted to us.
 Innovation: We want to be at the forefront of change and believe that the best way to lead is to learn from
our successes and mistakes and continue to grow. We are forward-looking and break new ground in
addressing important community and societal needs.
18
 Openness: We encourage the open exchange of information and ideas from all quarters of the community.
We believe that through collaboration and participation, each of us has an important role in determining the
direction and well-being of our community.
 Justice: As a just community, we unite against all forms of injustice, including, but not limited to, racism.
We reject bigotry, oppression, degradation and harassment, and we challenge injustice toward any member
of our community.
 Responsibility: We are personally and collectively responsible for our words and deeds. We stand together
to uphold our common ground.
19
As part of the Unit Faculty for the University of Vermont that prepares speech-language
pathologist, teachers, and counselors as educators in school settings, the following conceptual
framework is shared across educators at UVM to ensure quality learning and teaching:

Conceptual Framework
“The heart and mind of programs”
Unit faculty at the University of Vermont aspire to prepare a committed reflective
practitioner, instructional leader and change agent, collaborating with other
professionals to make a positive difference in schools and in the lives of all learners.

Through Reflective learning and practice, the UVM prepared educator is grounded in . . .
Constructivism
Knowledge is socially constructed through dialogue and community-based practice (constructivism).
Collaboration
Teachers and other school professionals work collaboratively to problem-solve with stakeholders
(collaboration, inter-professional practice, reflective practice, excellence).
Human development & empowerment
Education facilitates development of human potential (developmentally appropriate practice, strengths
perspective, empowerment).
Inclusion
All students can learn and have value in their communities (inclusion).
Multiculturalism/culturally responsible pedagogy
Learning communities demonstrate respect for and honor diversity; pursue knowledge and affirmation of
our diverse cultures (multiculturalism, culturally responsive pedagogy, equity).
Equity & justice
Education should advance social justice and democracy (equity).

. . . and meets these standards - KSD Standards for Beginning Teachers and Others
School Professionals in I nitial Programs

 Demonstrates content knowledge and skills
 Understands learners and differences
 Understands learning
 Translates curriculum into instruction
 Creates equitable, inclusive learning environments
 Assesses student learning
 Practices culturally responsive pedagogy
 Demonstrates collaborative and interpersonal skills
 Engages in reflective practice
 Integrates technology
 Acts consistently with the belief that all students can learn
 Engages in self-directed learning and professional development for growth
20
Faculty beliefs have shaped their professional commitments that are expressed in
Outcome Statements for Candidates.

The professional educator in initial preparation programs at The University of Vermont .
. .

1. Knows content/subject matter,
understands connectedness with
other disciplines, and translates
curriculum into materials and
instructional strategies
appropriate for subject matter
and learners. (Critical Thinker)

2. Understands all learners as
individuals, in the context of
families and social groups, and
uses standard‘s based instruction
to create equitable safe and
supportive learning environments
that promote acceptance and
belonging. (Problem Solver)

3. Understands learning and ways
of evaluating and enhancing it,
including through the application
of technology. (Instructional
Leader)

4. Knows social, cultural, historical,
legal and philosophical context
of schools in a democracy and
practices equitable and culturally
responsive pedagogy appropriate
for subject matter and learners.
(Reflective Practitioner)

5. Can create inclusive learning
environments which meet diverse
learning needs, incorporate and
reflect all learners‘ experiences,
and facilitate students‘ learning,
including about their own biases
and understandings. (Reflective
Practitioner/Change Agent)

6. Demonstrates effective
collaborative and interpersonal
skills in problem-solving with
students, families, colleagues and
related professionals. (Inter-
professional Practitioner)

7. Engages in professional
development and continually
examines own assumptions,
beliefs and values. (Reflective
Practitioner)

8. Demonstrates the belief that all
students can learn and that they
can take responsibility for their
own learning; demonstrates high
expectations for all students and
takes responsibility for helping
them aspire to high levels of
learning. (Student Advocate)
21
CRITICAL ARTICLE REVIEW FORMAT
(CMSI 295 Summer Autism Institute)

NAME: ___________________ DATE: __________


1. Brief description of the articles read (Total=>6 points)



2. Answer to the 3 questions listed below. For each question, explicitly address at least 3 of
the following terms: (1) receptive & expressive language, (2) cognitive communication, (3)
social aspects of communication, and (4) communication modalities. If the article does not
directly discuss 3 terms, you can extrapolate from the article using what you have learned in
class. Refer to the document entitled ‗Critical Article Review Terms‘ for definitions of
these terms that is attached at the end of this syllabus.

a. Question 1. In what way does the information in this article expand your knowledge
regarding the assessment &/OR intervention for children or adolescents with ASD and
their families (3pts per term; Total=>9 points)




b. Question 2. Based on your current knowledge of and/or experience with children and
adolescents with ASD, describe how the information you read in the article supports or
refutes your beliefs and practices (3pts per term; Total=>9 points)




c. Questions 3. Explain how you will apply the knowledge you gained from reading the
article as you collaborate with team members including families to support the needs of
children and adolescents with ASD. You may relate your application to a specific child
or adolescent with a diagnosis of ASD. (2pts per term; Total=>6 points)


TOTAL POINTS: ___/30 points




ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:





22
BOOK REVIEW FORMAT & RUBRIC
(CMSI 299 Seminar in Autism Spectrum Disorders)

NAME: ___________________ DATE: __________

TITLE & AUTHOR OF BOOK REVIEWED:


1. Description of the characteristics, including physiological, psychological, developmental,
linguistic & cultural correlates (4 pts.) as well as receptive & expressive language, cognitive
communication, social aspects of communication & communication modalities (4 pts.), of the
individual with autism who either writes the story or whom the story is written about
(Total=>8 points)







2. Explanation of the services and models of intervention the individual with autism and their
family received (4 pts.) and how effective these services were perceived (4 pts.) (Total=>8
points)







1. Reflection on the most important thing you learned while reading the book which is likely to
change your practice for children or adolescents with ASD & their families (4 pts.) and how
you will implement this new insight into your practice (4 pts.)
(Total=>8 points)







TOTAL POINTS: ___/24 points


ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

23
APPLIED ASSIGNMENT: INSERVICE TRAINING
(CMSI 295 Summer Autism Institute)

NAME: ___________________ DATE: __________



1) A statement of purpose (2 pts.) for the inservice training with educational objectives (2 pts.)
listed. (4 points)




2) Description of the content to be covered with justification, including literature or research
support for the focus of the training, specifically emphasizing needs in the areas of
receptive/expressive language (3 pts.), cognitive communication (3 pts.), social aspects of
communication(3pts.) & communication modalities (3 pts.). (12 points)





3) Teaching strategies, which will be used to facilitate and ensure adult learning. (5 points)




4) Copy of the handouts (5 pts.) that will be provided, including a reference list or relevant
bibliography (4 pts.). (9 points)




5) Copy of the evaluation tool that will be used to assess the effectiveness of the training. (5
points)



6) Follow-up plans for supporting the ongoing learning of staff in your community in the area of
ASD (5 points)



TOTAL POINTS: ___/40 points



ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:
24
Definitions of Terms used in Preparation for Answering the Questions in Article Review

COGNITIVE COMMUNICATION=>generally refers to attention, working memory, organizational
skills and problem-solving; overall, the thinking skills involved in communicating, learning and
interacting
Cognition comprises of thinking skills such as: attention, memory, orientation, and higher level
executive functions such as reasoning, problem solving, planning and decision making.
Characteristics associated with cognitive-communication impairments include:
 Confusion and disorientation
 Confused language
 Poor concentration
 Inability to maintain topic of conversation
 Reduced recognition of people and places
 Trouble learning new tasks or motor activities
 Inappropriate behavior
 Confabulation
 Lack of awareness of difficulties
 Lack of cohesive organization of thoughts & topics
Retrieved from: www.speechlanguagelearning.com/cog.html

SOCIAL ASPECTS OF COMMUNICATION=>includes the ability to engage in reciprocal (back-and-
forth) communication or conversation, understanding & using social conventions, turn-taking,
appropriate use of gestures, eye contact, body posture and facial expression in social situations, and
initiating, sustaining and terminating topics of conversation appropriately, etc.
Some challenges in social aspects of communication might include:
 Non-typical social behaviors which affect a person's ability to participate in a conversation
 Maintaining somebody else‘s topic of conversation
 Atypical interest in or perseveration on a chosen topic
 Limited awareness of the breakdowns in communication & the effect those breakdowns might
have on a listener

COMMUNICATION MODALITIES=>are ways in which communication is transferred from one
partner to another; verbal communication is a modality - as is gestural and written communication.
Sign language is a modality that uses gestures to communicate. Picture exchanges, used for
communicative purposes, are a modality. There are many augmentative or alternative forms of
communication, and these are all modes; "talkers" that use synthesized speech, "talking" picture
boards, etc. – are all modes of communication. So if you have a child with autism who is verbal, their
communication modality is verbal. If they use sign language or picture exchange that would be their
communication modality. Any way that a thought or idea is coded into symbols, exchanged with
another person, and de-coded so a response can be formulated is a communication modality.

RECEPTIVE LANGUAGE=>understanding spoken, written and/or gestural language use; relates to
listening and comprehending oral, written and/or gestural communication

EXPRESSIVE LANGUAGE=>using spoken, written and/or gestural language; relates to the sounds,
words, sentences and discourse involved in speaking and/or writing & other communication systems
used to communicate a message

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