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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 • Vol XIII, Edition 261
SECT-ON-SECT VIOLENCE
WORLD PAGE 8
AOTS: GOLF
AND TENNIS
SPORTS PAGE 11
COCKTAIL OF
CRAFT BEER
FOOD PAGE 17
OMINOUS SIGNS EMERGING THAT OPEN WARFARE BETWEEN THE TWO
MAIN MUSLIM GROUPS HAS RETURNED TO IRAQ
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Burlingame school officials
won’t appeal a judge’s ruling to
stop construction at Hoover
Elementary School, but they are
asking to secure and stabilize the
site before an environmental
impact report is conducted.
On Tuesday, San Mateo County
Superior Court judge Marie Weiner
made no ruling at a hearing to con-
sider the Burlingame Elementary
School District’s request to do
some additional construction
work at the site, which the district
contends is necessary to secure the
site now that overall construction
has been put on hold. She intends
to visit the school Thursday. In
May, Weiner ruled in favor of the
Alliance for Responsible
Neighborhood Planning that sued
the district stating it needs to pre-
pare a full EIR on traffic impacts
for the entire property, which
means all construction must be
stopped until this is done. At this
point, the district doesn’t plan to
appeal the final ruling,
Superintendent Maggie MacIsaac
said.
A group of Hillsborough resi-
dents filed the lawsuit in January
2013. At a July 2013 hearing, the
alliance’s attorney Kevin Haroff
said the district failed to address
traffic impacts in its December
2012 mitigated negative declara-
tion study and review. Amitigated
negative declaration is like an
environmental impact review but
less extensive. Haroff, who
attended the hearing Tuesday,
believes the judge will take the
alliance’s side in favor of not
allowing any more work to be
Hoover constructionhalt won’t be appealed
Burlingame school officials want to secure property before an EIR
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Envisioning the future of San
Mateo’s Central Park is underway
as the City Council, the Parks and
Recreation Commission and the
public discussed building a new
recreation center, relocating
amenities, constructing a plaza
and potentially expanding the
park to promote open space as
transit-oriented development con-
tinues to boom.
The proposal to update the San
Mateo Central Park Master Plan
was reviewed at a meeting Monday
night.
“The park’s been there for such a
long time, it really hasn’t been
updated or upgraded and as we
build, almost a new city, with the
TOD, transit development stuff, I
think we need to upgrade our plans
so it matches the rest of the city, ”
Mayor Robert Ross said.
Central Park is at the southern
end of downtown at El Camino
Real and Fifth Avenue and its cur-
rent Master Plan was adopted in
1982. Updating the plan is one
step in a line of many before any
price tags are attached or physical
changes are made. The city has
conducted a four-month-long
pubic participation and outreach
Feedback on
Central Park
Master Plan
San Mateo officials weigh in on update,
changes both big and small discussed
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Deciding on how much commu-
nity engagement to do before for-
mulating ideas on overcrowding
issues in the San Mateo-Foster
City Elementary School District is
a concern for its Next Steps
Advisory Committee.
The committee is looking at
hosting what could end up being
50 meetings to gather feedback on
ways of alleviating the lack of
facilities in the district, with
potential town halls, focus
District’s overcrowding committee
working on engagement options
Next Steps trying to find right balances of thoroughness, efficiency
See HOOVER, Page 20
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
When the next winter swell
picks up monstrous enough to
draw surfers from all over the world
to risk their lives and compete in
the renowned Mavericks
Invitational, international specta-
tors will be able to tune in and the
athletes could take home a hefty
prize after local organizers paired
with a Los Angeles management
company.
The invite-only event brings 24
professional big wave surfers to
the thrilling break near Pillar
Point Harbor in Half Moon Bay. It
has changed hands throughout the
years and is currently being culti-
vated by a
group of locals.
Ma v e r i c k s
pioneer Jeff
Clark, his wife
C a s s a n d r a
Clark, Rocky
Raynor and
Brian Overfelt
make up the
board of direc-
tors and have joined forces with
Cartel Management, a boutique
talent agency owned by the young
Griffin Guess.
“It’s not every day you find a
really really good fit, both from
the sense of business, also the
sense of community. And [Guess
is] really into this,” Clark said.
“He’s been watching Mavericks
for years kind of go in and out of
the highs and the lows. And we do
a lot of things really well and
some of the things that we don’t
do well, he does better. So we’re
really looking forward to this
partnership getting underway and
really carving out a stable event.”
Cartel’s star-studded portfolio
includes working with musicians
and athletes like Kanye West and
Barry Bonds, along with organiza-
tions and companies like the NFL,
Apple, Victoria’s Secret and
Harley-Davidson Motorcycles.
Guess said taking over the
Mavericks brand and elevating it
New management for Mavericks
Local surf competition organizers pair with Cartel Management
DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
A surfer catches a break during the Mavericks surf contest.A new management partnership seeks to focus more
on the surfers with an emphasis on their talent.
Griffin Guess
See MAVERICKS Page 19
See PARK, Page 20
See NEXT STEPS, Page 18
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
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information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
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Rock musician
Dizzy Reed is 51.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1964
President Lyndon B. Johnson and
Japanese Prime Minister Hayato Ikeda
spoke to each other by telephone as
they inaugurated the first trans-Pacific
cable completed by AT&T between
Japan and Hawaii, and linked to exist-
ing cables between Hawaii and
California.
“The way of a superior man is three-fold;
virtuous,he is free from anxieties; wise,he is
free from perplexities; bold,he is free from fear.”
— Confucius, Chinese philosopher (551-479 B.C.)
Rock singer Sir
Paul McCartney is
72.
Country singer
Blake Shelton is
38.
Birthdays
TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL
A Daly City police car is towed after blowing out a tire Tuesday afternoon.Police cars do not come equipped with a spare tire.
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the mid
60s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Wednesday night: Mostly clear in the
evening then becoming partly cloudy.
Lows around 50. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the
lower 60s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Thursday ni ght: Mostly cloudy.
Patchy fog after midnight. Lows around 50. West winds 5 to
15 mph.
Friday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming partly
cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs in the lower 60s.
Friday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becom-
ing cloudy. Lows around 50.
Saturday and saturday Night: Cloudy. Highs in the
lower 60s. Lows around 50.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1778, American forces entered Philadelphia as the
British withdrew during the Revolutionary War.
I n 1812, the War of 1812 began as the United States
Congress approved, and President James Madison signed, a
declaration of war against Britain.
I n 1815, Napoleon Bonaparte met his Waterloo as British
and Prussian troops defeated the French in Belgium.
I n 1873, suffragist Susan B. Anthony was found guilty by
a judge in Canandaigua, New York, of breaking the law by
casting a vote in the 1872 presidential election. (The judge
fined Anthony $100, but she never paid the penalty. )
I n 1908, William Howard Taft was nominated for president
by the Republican National Convention in Chicago.
I n 1912, the Republican National Convention, which
would nominate President William Howard Taft for another
term of office, opened in Chicago.
I n 1940, during World War II, British Prime Minister
Winston Churchill urged his countrymen to conduct them-
selves in a manner that would prompt future generations to
say, “This was their finest hour. ”
I n 1953, a U.S. Air Force Douglas C-124 Globemaster II
crashed near Tokyo, killing all 129 people on board.
Egypt’s 148-year-old Muhammad Ali Dynasty came to an
end with the overthrow of the monarchy and the proclama-
tion of a republic.
I n 1972, 118 people were killed in the crash of a Brussels-
bound British European Airways Hawker Siddeley Trident 1C
shortly after takeoff from London Heathrow Airport.
T
he minimum wage in the United
States in 1949 was 40 cents per
hour.
***
“The Hank McCune Show” debuted on
NBC in 1950 and ran for three years. It
was the first television show to use a
laugh track.
***
Power steering in cars became commer-
cially available in 1951. Francis Davis
of Massachusetts invented power steer-
ing after working for the truck division
of the Pierce Arrow Motor Car
Company.
***
On Oct. 15, 1952, General Electric cel-
ebrated its 75th anniversary by giving
five shares of stock to any employee
who had a baby on that day. The compa-
ny guessed there would be 13 births out
of the 226,000 employees. However,
none of the women on staff were under
age 17 or over age 65, and it was the
baby boom era. There were 189 G.E.
babies born that day.
***
TV Guide and Playboy Magazine both
debuted in 1953. Do you know who was
pictured on the cover of the first TV
Guide? The cover girl of the first
Playboy? See answer at end.
***
In 1954, Swanson & Sons sold 10 mil-
lion TV dinners. After Thanksgiving
1953, Swanson had 270 tons of unsold
turkey and needed to do something with
it . Thus, TVdinners were invented. The
98-cent meals had turkey, corn bread
dressing, buttered peas and sweet pota-
toes in aluminum trays.
***
Bert Parks (1914-1992) began his long
career as host of the Miss America pag-
eant in 1955. It was also the first year
the pageant theme song, “There She Is
Miss America,” was used. Lee
Meriweather (born 1935) was Miss
America 1955.
***
In January 1956, Elvis Presley’s (1935-
1977) song “Heartbreak Hotel” was
released. The song sold more than 1
million copies, making it Elvis’ first
gold record.
***
Ray Romano, Matt Lauer, Donny
Osmond, Fran Drescher and Daniel Day-
Lewis were all born in 1957.
***
The Brazilian National Soccer Team
won the 1958 World Cup for soccer.
***
In Disney’s 1959 animated movie
“Sleeping Beauty,” the girl fell into her
deep sleep when she was 16 years old.
***
“Ben-Hur” starring Charlton Heston
(born 1924) won 11 Academy Awards
in 1960, including best picture, actor
and director. The movie saved MGM
from bankruptcy.
***
Jacques Cousteau (1910-1997) began
exploring the deep of the ocean in his
personal research vessel, Calypso, in
1961. The Calypso, an old minesweep-
er, went around the world on underwater
expeditions for the television series
“The Undersea World of Jacques
Cousteau” (1968-1976).
***
John Glenn (born 1921) made history
in 1962 as the first American astronaut
to orbit the Earth. Glenn traveled at a
speed of 17,500 mph 160 miles above
earth in the ship Friendship 7.
***
Felipe (born 1935), Jesus (born 1942)
and Matty (born 1938) Alou were broth-
ers and teammates on the San Francisco
Giants in 1963. That year, on Sept. 10
at the Polo Grounds in New York, the
three brothers batted consecutively in
the same game for the same team; the
only time that has happened in profes-
sional baseball.
***
Answer: Lucille Ball’s baby Desi Arnez
Jr. was on the cover of the first issue of
TV Guide on April 3-9, 1953. Lucille
Ball was on the cover of TV Guide 34
times throughout her career, more than
any other person. Marilyn Monroe was
pictured, fully clothed, on the cover of
the first Playboy in December 1953.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email
knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or call 344-
5200 ext. 114.
(Answers tomorrow)
WEARY BUILD GENTLE ENZYME
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: They bought the discounted sunglasses after
seeing that they were — “EYE-DEAL”
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SEYZT
ATUBO
WORYDS
CLYHIR
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
C
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k

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,

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-
Ans:
Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., is 77. Baseball Hall of
Famer Lou Brock is 75. Actress Constance McCashin is 67.
Actress Linda Thorson is 67. Rock musician John Evans (The
Box Tops) is 66. Sen. Mike Johanns, R-Neb., is 64. Actress
Isabella Rossellini is 62. Actress Carol Kane is 62. Actor
Brian Benben is 58. Actress Andrea Evans is 57. Rock singer
Alison Moyet is 53. Figure skater Kurt Browning is 48.
Country singer-musician Tim Hunt is 47. Rock singer-musi-
cian Sice (The Boo Radleys) is 45. Rhythm-and-blues singer
Nathan Morris (Boyz II Men) is 43. Actress Mara Hobel is 43.
Singer-songwriter Ray LaMontagne is 41.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Big Ben,No.4,,
in first place;Lucky Star,No.2,in second place;and
Whirl Win,No.6,in third place.The race time was
clocked at 1:40.59.
1 5 3
10 14 24 47 60 3
Mega number
June 17 Mega Millions
9 33 42 45 54 30
Powerball
June 14 Powerball
1 15 26 30 38
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
0 1 8 2
Daily Four
4 7 1
Daily three evening
5 16 20 29 42 5
Mega number
June 14 Super Lotto Plus
3
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Sequoia Hospital
Foundation names new president
The Sequoia Hospital Foundation
announced Gail Rudolph, CFRE joined the
organization as its new president this week.
In addition to her role with the Sequoia
Hospital Foundation, Rudolph will also
serve in a parallel role as vice president of
Development and Community Relations for
Dignity Health’s Sequoia Hospital.
Rudolph comes to Sequoia from the
Cleveland Clinic where she served as the
Neurological Institute’s Senior Director of
Development. She previously served as the
vice president of the Foundation at Centegra
Health System near
Chicago and as the direc-
tor of development for
Northwestern University.
Rudolph holds a mas-
ter’s degree in Human
Services Administration,
is a Certified Fund
Raising Executive
(CFRE) and an active
member and frequent
speaker with the Association for Healthcare
Philanthropy.
STATE GOVERNMENT
• Legislation
authored by state Sen.
Mark Leno, D-San
Franci sco, to require
more consumer infor-
mation about furniture
containing flame retardant chemicals passed
the Assembly Environmental Safety
and Toxi c Materi al s Commi ttee
Tuesday with bipartisan support.
Senate Bi l l 1019 requires disclosure of
the use or absence of flame retardant chemi-
cals on existing furniture labels.
The bill will be heard next in the
Assembly Business and Prof es s i ons
Committee June 24.
COUNTY GOVERNMENT
• The Board of Supervisors adopted its
$2.1 billion fiscal year 2014-15 budget,
including up to $630,000 to reimburse the
Superior Court for the cost of one court
commissioner for the next three years.
CITY GOVERNMENT
• Redwood City is moving to an
appointment-only schedule for passport-
related services starting July 14. Residents
needing services can schedule between 8:30
a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday
and 9 a.m. to noon Fridays by calling 780-
7220. Passport service in Spanish and
English is at the City Clerk’s Offic e ,
City Hall, second floor, 1017 Middlefield
Road, Redwood City.
• The San Mateo County Harbor
District Board of Commissioners will
review and vote on its 2014-15 fiscal year
budget Wednesday night. The proposed
budget outlines drawing about $2 million
from its $11.5 million in reserves to cover
an estimated $10 million in expenses for
the coming year. The board made a motion
to adopt the budget at its June 5 meeting.
However, it did not adopt the budget by res-
olution therefore it was not formally
approved. The board will discuss and take
action on the proposed budget at a meeting
starting 6 p.m. June 18 at 33 Arroyo Drive,
South San Francisco.
• The San Mateo City Council unani-
mously approved its $205 million budget
for the 2014-15 fiscal year. The council also
approved its fire department’s request to
relocate Foster City’s Truck 28 to San
Mateo as part of the joint agreement to
share fire services between Belmont, Foster
City and San Mateo.
Gail Rudolph
Local brief
BELMONT
Suspicious circumstances. A group of
juveniles were reported for staging a rape
scene with a knife for a film on Village Drive
before 3:26 p.m. Wednesday, June 11.
Assaul t wi th a deadl y weapon. A
teenager was arrested for beating up his
father and threatening to kill him on
Hastings Drive before 8:22 a.m. Wednesday,
June 11.
Suspicious circumstances. A man in a
vehicle was reported for offering to sell
drugs to people at Broadway and Fifth
Avenue before 11:56 a.m. Monday, June 9.
Suspicious circumstances. Aman in an
orange shirt was reported for attempting to
pull a manhole cover off and running in and
out of traffic on El Camino Real before 3:42
p.m. Sunday, June 8.
SAN CARLOS
Petty theft. Two men and a woman were
arrested for petty theft on the 1100 block of
Old County Road before 5:50 p.m. Sunday,
June 15.
Vandalism. Police responded to a vandal-
ism incident on the first block of Chestnut
Street before 6 a.m. Friday, June 13.
DUI. A woman was cited for driving under
the influence on the 1200 block of Holly
Street before 2:25 a.m. Friday, June 13.
Burglary. Police responded to a report of a
vehicle burglary at Bing Street and Industrial
Road before 10 p.m. Thursday, June 12.
Petty theft. Police responded to a report of
a petty theft incident on the 100 block of
Industrial Road before 1 p.m. Thursday, June
12.
Arre s t. Aman was arrested for driving under
the influence on the 1000 block of Holly
Street before 12:46 a.m. Wednesday, June
11.
Police reports
It should be there
Aman reported being unable to find his
iPhone after leaving it on top of his car
and then driving off on Rollins Road in
Burlingame before 11:37 a.m.
Thursday, May 29.
4
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Asubstitute music teacher at a Daly City
fine arts school inappropriately touched the
chests of three female students while giving
them piano lessons, according to prosecu-
tors who charged him with 10 counts of
child molestation.
Brian Butts, 28, of Danville, taught gui-
tar and piano at MusicArt
Studio, School of Music
and Fine Arts on
Northgate Avenue, for
two months between
April and June of this
year while the owner was
in Spain. Upon his
return, two girls ages 13
and 15 reported that
Butts had touched their chest and breasts
over their clothing. The owner contacted
Daly City police and after Butts’ arrest
learned of a third girl who also reported he
touched her breast multiple times during
piano class, said District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe.
At his initial arraignment, Butts asked for
a court-appointed attorney and pleaded not
guilty to all 10 counts of lewd and lascivi-
ous behavior. Bail was set at $1.5 million
and he returns to court June 25 to identify
his attorney.
Butts faces life in prison if convicted
because of the multiple victims alleged.
Music Art did not return a call for com-
ment.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Music teacher charged with touching students
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
ASan Mateo man on probation for trying
to chat up a high school student on campus
and touching her leg is facing new charges
for allegedly approaching two different ado-
lescent girls near a Burlingame elementary
school.
Margarito Leon Bastidas, 21, is accused
of pulling his vehicle
near the curb of
Washington Elementary
School on Jan. 16 and
asking to walk a 13-year-
old home. She declined
and walked away. The
morning of April 17,
prosecutors say Bastidas
approached an 11-year-
old girl walking to Washington and tried
getting her to speak with him. She also
walked away.
After Burlingame police contacted
Bastidas, he told them he has “a problem
talking to young girls,” said District
Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.
Bastidas was booked into custody on two
misdemeanors but posted a $10,000 bail
bond in May. His first court appearance on
two misdemeanor counts of child annoy-
ance was Tuesday. He pleaded not guilty and
was ordered back to court Oct. 29 for a pre-
trial conference.
He remains free from custody. If convict-
ed, he faces registration as a sex offender.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Probationer charged with annoying children
Brian Butts
Margarito Bastidas
5
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The county’s adult correctional facilities
are hampered by overcrowding and a lack of
technology but the new jail currently under
construction should correct many of the
existing problems, according to the civil
grand jury.
The jury looked at management of all the
county’s adult and juvenile detention facili-
ties and concluded that neither effectively
collect data to track program success and
recidivism. Aside from the recommendation
to improve its performance documentation,
the county’s jails and juvenile hall received
a fairly positive review by the grand jury
report issued Tuesday.
The evaluation considered the Maguire
Correctional Facility, the Women’s
Correctional Facility, the men’s and
women’s transitional facilities, the site of
the new Maple Street Correctional Facility
and the Youth Services Center.
The jurors wrote they were “impressed”
by the adult facility staff but that operations
and safety are challenged by historic over-
crowding and lack of modern technology.
The jury recommends that the Sheriff’s
Office document performance results of its
programs and services and submit an annual
report to the Board of Supervisors on the
measures. The jury similarly recommended
documenting performance in juvenile pro-
grams and services with an annual report,
t oo.
Sheriff Greg Munks said he was pleased
with the grand jury report and agreed that
there isn’t currently adequate reporting on
the effectiveness of the programming but
that changes are underway. The Sheriff’s
Office just flipped the switch on a new man-
agement system that will help collect data
and Munks said another decision may help
— a decision of how to actually define
recidivism.
“It sounds like an easy task but you’d be
amazed how hard it is to get a definition of
what it means to repeat,” Munks said.
Munks, along with the District
Attorney’s Office and Probation
Department, narrowed one down which will
be up for public comment and consideration
at the next Community Corrections
Partnership meeting. CCP is a multi-depart-
ment public safety group established to
implement state prisoner realignment
locally. The definition is any new charge
filed by the District Attorney’s Office within
three years of an offender’s release, not
counting technical violations like a dirty
test or minor incidents like a drunk in pub-
lic.
The jury report also concluded that the
addition of new county jail inmates due to
state prisoner realignment in 2009 has
made management “more complex” and
required a reassessment of inmate programs
because long-term populations’ needs are
different and add to an already overcrowded
situation, according to the jury.
Maguire, the men’s jail near downtown
Redwood City, averages 878 inmates
although it is rated for 688 beds and has
minimal computerization, no security cam-
eras in inmate pods and single unarmed offi-
cers in pods with up to 64 low-risk inmates.
The women’s jail averages 124 inmates in
a facility rated for 84 and overcrowding
keeps it from providing the same level of
service and programs as Maguire does for
the men. The 1980 building is old, in need
of repair, provides inadequate baby chang-
ing and restroom options in the visiting
area and forces multiple education and reha-
bilitation groups to overlap space in the
common eating area.
The 576-bed Maple Correctional Facility
opening in Redwood City next year will
include adequate space for family visits and
child contact, a garden, a roof-top recre-
ation area and a dog run for the inmate dog
training program. Pods will have security
cameras and some manual paperwork will be
computerized.
Once the new facility opens to male and
female inmates, the women’s jail will be
closed and Maguire maintained.
The state recently awarded San Mateo
County $24 million to upgrade Maguire
including the creation of a critical treatment
center for severely mentally ill inmates,
converting an 80-bed pod into a mental
health wellness pod, building a new recre-
ation yard for realigned inmates with longer
sentences and creating a retail vocation
store to train re-entry and work furlough
inmates.
Grand jury reports carry no legal weight
but recipients are required to respond in
writing within 90 days.
The complete grand jury report is avail-
able at www.sanmateocourt.org/grandjury
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Grand jury says new jail will fix current problems
“It sounds like an easy task
but you’d be amazed how hard it is to
get a definition of what it means to repeat.”
—Sheriff Greg Munks
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — For the first time,
California forestry officials intend to
give counties and organizations money
raised through a contested assessment on
property in wildfire-prone areas to be
used for fire-prevention projects.
The funds will be awarded as part of a
one-time grant process after lawmakers
included a $10 million appropriation in
the new state budget.
The remainder of an
accumulated balance of
$48 million raised by
the assessment is being
held in savings while a
lawsuit challenges the
legality of the so-called
“fire fee.”
The Howard Jarvis
Taxpayers Association
wants the fee to be
declared unconstitutional, arguing it is
actually a tax.
Gov. Jerry Brown sought the one-time
$10 million appropriation from the State
Responsi bi l i t y Area Fire Prevention
Fund and is expected to sign the budget in
coming days.
The timing of the grants couldn’t be
better, said Department of Forestry and
Fire Protection spokeswoman Janet
Upton, noting that California is strug-
gling with an ongoing drought that is
creating dangerous fire conditions
statewide.
“It will be the highest priority,” she
said. “We need to get those projects on
the ground because conditions are only
getting worse.”
The department must solicit bids from
counties, local Fire Safe Councils and
other organizations for fire prevention
projects, she said, adding it is too soon
to say when the grants might be awarded
and what programs will be funded.
“We think it’s a good first step, espe-
cially in light of the drought,” said Karen
Keene, a lobbyist with the California
State Association of Counties.
California to award funds for wildfire prevention
Jerry Brown
6
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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IN MEMORY OF DOUGLAS WAYNE KAUL
December 22, 1952 – June 9, 2014
Douglas Wayne Kaul (formerly of San Mateo) passed away following a
brief illness on Monday, June 9th at his home in McArthur, California
with his loving wife Sandi, daughter Yvonne and his beloved
Labradors, Brawny Bear and Bailey at his side. He spent his last day
surrounded by friends and family, watching the Giants beat New York
twice and maintaining his sense of humor and spirit to the end.
Doug and Sandi moved to McArthur, California from San Mateo in 2010 to fulfill the dream
of enjoying their retirement years in the beautiful Fall River Valley of far Northeastern
California. Having retired as a Welding Inspector, Doug built his dream ranch and shop
and enjoyed every moment spent there with family and friends. Doug’s spirit will live on in
McArthur and at their ranch for years to come.
A memorial celebration of Doug’s life is planned for Saturday, August 9
th
at their home in
McArthur. Sandi is planning to establish a scholarship fund to benefit welding students in
Doug’s memory. Please email her at rockingkrch@yahoo.com if you would like further details.
Obituary
California Assembly
leader opens up on gay rights
SACRAMENTO — Assembly Speaker
Toni Atkins, the first lesbian to lead a house
of the California
Legislature, said Tuesday
that more work needs to
be done to promote toler-
ance of gays and les-
bians, especially in rural
America.
The San Diego
Democrat, a native of
Appalachia, told atten-
dees at the She Shares
women’s leadership conference in the state
capital that the “most profound” way of
advancing equality is coming out and taking
small actions that validate being gay.
As an example, she noted the kiss with
her spouse, Jennifer LeSar, when she was
sworn in as speaker of the 80-member
chamber last month. Aphoto of the kiss ran
online and in newspapers across the coun-
try, including in the newspaper of her child-
hood hometown, The Roanoke Times.
She said there was nothing courageous
about the kiss, noting that it’s easier to be
openly gay in California than in places
such as rural Virginia, where she grew up in
poverty.
“For that picture to be in the paper in
Virginia is important because it gives per-
mission for the speaker of the California
state Assembly to be a lesbian and it’s OK,”
Atkins said.
California releases
revised fracking regulations
SACRAMENTO — California oil regula-
tors have released updated rules governing
well stimulation jobs including hydraulic
fracturing.
The revisions announced Tuesday are a
continuation of the draft rules released last
year.
Operators would have to perform real-time
seismic monitoring during fracking and
other oil recovery techniques. They also
have to notify homeowners in English and
Spanish about their right to get groundwater
tested before and after a job.
Jason Marshall of the state Department of
Conservation says the rules apply to both
fracking on land and in the ocean.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Citing incidents like
the 2013 limousine fire that killed five
women on the San Mateo Bridge,
California’s state auditor said Tuesday that
the commission responsible for oversee-
ing passenger carriers has failed to ensure
consumer safety.
State Auditor Elaine M. Howle said the
main reason for the deficiencies was a lack
of effective leadership at the
Transportation Enforcement Branch of the
California Public Utilities Commission,
with current management failing to estab-
lish goals or measures to guide its over-
sight efforts.
The commission’s investigators rou-
tinely fail to collect the fees they are enti-
tled to and do not ensure complaints are
resolved in an adequate or timely manner,
Howle said. They also don’t ensure that
carriers have permits, undergo inspec-
tions, hold insurance and participate in
driver safety programs, she said.
“In May 2013 in the San Francisco Bay
Area, a fire killed five women in a limou-
sine, which was a charter carrier regulated
by the commission,” the auditor’s report
said, referring to the San Mateo Bridge
incident.
The fire trapped nine women celebrating
a friend’s recent wedding, killing five of
them. The limousine’s driver survived, but
no criminal charges were filed.
The California Highway Patrol has said
the blaze was caused by a catastrophic
failure of the rear suspension system. The
air suspension failure allowed the spin-
ning driveshaft to contact the floor pan,
causing friction that ignited carpets and
set the vehicle on fire, authorities have
said.
The San Mateo Bridge event “called into
question the state’s oversight of passen-
ger carriers,” the auditor’s report said.
“Four women who escaped the fire appar-
ently climbed through the limousine’s
divider window and out the driver’s sec-
tion of the vehicle because the rear pas-
senger doors were blocked by smoke.”
After the deaths, a law was passed in
January 2014 requiring certain modified
limousines to have additional window and
door emergency exits that passengers can
open from the inside beginning in July
2015.
Audit: California agency not ensuring limo safety
By Stephen Ohlemacher
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue
Service has lost more emails connected to
the tea party investigation, congressional
investigators said Tuesday.
The IRS said last Friday it had lost an
untold number of emails when Lois Lerner’s
computer crashed in 2011. Lerner used to
head the division that handles applications
for tax-exempt status.
On Tuesday, two key lawmakers said the
IRS has also lost emails from six additional
IRS workers whose computers crashed.
Among them was Nikole Flax, who was
chief of staff to Lerner’s boss, then-deputy
commissioner Steven Miller.
Miller later became acting IRS commis-
sioner, but was forced to resign last year
after the agency acknowledged that agents
had improperly scrutinized tea party and
other conservative groups when they
applied for tax-exempt status. Documents
have shown some liberal groups were also
flagged.
Investigators from the House Ways and
Means Committee interviewed IRS techni-
cians Monday. The technicians said they
first realized that Lerner’s emails were lost
in February or March — months before they
informed congressional investigators, said
a statement by two top Republicans on the
Ways and Means Committee, chairman
Dave Camp of Michigan and subcommittee
chairman Charles Boustany of Louisiana.
The two lawmakers called on the Justice
Department to appoint a special prosecutor
to investigate the IRS, something Attorney
General Eric Holder has declined to do in the
past.
“It looks like the American people were
lied to and the IRS tried to cover up the fact
it conveniently lost key documents in this
investigation,” said the statement by Camp
and Boustany. “The White House promised
full cooperation, the commissioner prom-
ised full access to Lois Lerner emails and
now the agency claims it cannot produce
those materials and they’ve known for
months they couldn’t do this.”
The IRS did not immediately respond to a
request for comment.
IRS Commissioner John Koskinen is
scheduled to testify before the Ways and
Means Committee next Tuesday. The House
Oversight Committee has subpoenaed
Koskinen to testify at a rare evening hear-
ing on Monday.
Lawmakers: IRS lost more
emails in tea party probe
Around the state
Toni Atkins
“It looks like the American people were lied to
and the IRS tried to cover up the fact it conveniently lost key
documents in this investigation. ...The White House promised
full cooperation, the commissioner promised full access to Lois
Lerner emails and now the agency claims it cannot produce those
materials and they’ve known for months they couldn’t do this.”
—Dave Camp and Charles Boustany, Republicans on the Ways and Means Committee
NATION 7
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REUTERS
President Barack Obama responds to questions from workers at TechShop in Pittsburgh.
By Lolita C. Baldor and Nancy Benac
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — U.S. special forces
seized a “key leader” in the deadly Benghazi,
Libya, attack and he is on his way to face trial
in the U.S. for the fiery assault that killed the
U.S. ambassador and three other Americans,
the Obama administration announced
Tuesday. It was the first breakthrough in the
sudden overseas violence in 2012 that has
become a long-festering political sore at
home.
President Barack Obama said the capture on
Sunday of Ahmed Abu Khattala sends a clear
message to the world that “when Americans
are attacked, no matter how long it takes, we
will find those responsible and we will bring
them to justice.”
“We will find you,” Obama declared.
As recently as last August, though, Abu
Khattala told the Associated Press that he was
not in hiding nor had he been questioned by
Libyan authorities about the attack at the
diplomatic compound. He denied involve-
ment and said that he had abandoned the mili-
tia. Administration officials said Tuesday that
despite his media interviews, he “evaded cap-
ture” until the weekend when military special
forces nabbed him.
Whatever the path to his capture, he was
headed for the United States to face what
Obama called “the full weight of the
American justice system.” Obama called the
Libyan an “alleged key leader” of the attacks,
and said he was being transported to the U.S.,
without saying exactly how or where.
Abu Khattala was the commander of a mili-
tant group called the Abu Obaida bin Jarrah
Brigade and is accused of being a senior
leader of the Benghazi branch of the terror
organization Ansar al-Shariah in Libya.
On Capitol Hill, Republicans urged the
administration to get as much intelligence
out of Abu Khattala as possible before any-
one reads him his rights to remain silent,
supplies him with a lawyer and prepares him
for trial in a U.S. courtroom.
U.S.seizes ‘leader’ in Benghazi
suspect in deadly Libyaattack
By Josh Lederman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Vowing to protect frag-
ile marine life, President Barack Obama
acted Tuesday to create the world’s largest
ocean preserve by expanding a national
monument his predecessor established in
waters thousands of miles from the American
mainland.
The designation for a remote stretch of the
Pacific Ocean marks a major symbolic victo-
ry for environmentalists, who have urged the
president to take action on his own to pro-
tect the planet as Congress turns its focus
elsewhere. But the initiative will have limit-
ed practical implications because little fish-
ing or drilling are taking place even without
the new protections.
Protecting the world’s oceans and the
vibrant ecosystems that thrive deep under
the surface is a task that’s bigger than any
one country but the U.S. must take the lead,
Obama said, announcing the initiative dur-
ing an ocean conservation conference.
“Let’s make sure that years from now we
can look our children in the eye and tell them
that, yes, we did our part, we took action,
and we led the way toward a safer, more stable
world,” Obama said in a video message.
Obama hasn’t settled on the final bound-
aries for the expanded Pacific Remote Islands
Marine National Monument, and will solicit
input from fishermen, scientists and conser-
vation experts. Obama’s senior counselor,
John Podesta, said that process would start
immediately and wrap up “in the very near
future.”
President George W. Bush, a Republican,
created the monument in 2009 by setting
aside waters that encircle an array of remote
islands in the south-central Pacific, between
Hawaii and American Samoa.
Bush’s protections extend about 50 miles
from the shore of the U.S.-administered
islands, but maritime law gives the U.S. con-
trol up to 200 nautical miles from the coast,
forming the outer limit of what Obama could
protect using the 1906 Antiquities Act.
Conservation groups urged Obama to be
bold. If Obama opts for the full 200 miles,
conservation groups said, he could roughly
double the amount of ocean that’s protected
worldwide.
A geographic analysis by the Pew
Charitable Trusts estimated Obama could
protect more than 780,000 square miles —
almost nine times what Bush set aside — and
far more if he included the waters around
other U.S. islands in the Pacific Ocean.
“Our oceans are feeling the strain of human
activity from increased acidification, over-
fishing, and pollution, and we need to take
bold action to protect this vital natural
resource,” said Carol Browner, the former
Environmental Protection Agency adminis-
trator.
But in practical terms, the expanded sanc-
tuary will likely have a modest impact.
Very little commercial fishing is conducted
around the islands. And Bob Fryklund, chief
upstream strategist for analytics agency IHS
Energy, said no one is currently exploring
for oil or gas in the area.
But conservation groups said it’s critical
to take proactive steps to safeguard underwa-
ter ecosystems even if direct human damage
isn’t imminent.
“These are fairly long distances from any
ports, and they’re very expensive to get to,”
said Lance Morgan of the Marine
Conservation Institute.
Obama sets aside massive
preserve in Pacific Ocean
WORLD 8
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Israel leader seeks world
pressure on Palestinians
JERUSALEM — Israel’s Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu on Tuesday urged the
international community to demand the
We s t e r n - b a c k e d
Palestinian president
break off ties with the
militant Hamas group
over the abduction of
three Israeli teens, the
latest sign that Israel’s
massive five-day-old
search in the West Bank
has broader objectives
than finding the missing.
Israel said it also wants
to destroy the Hamas infrastructure in the
West Bank and apparently hopes to reclaim
international support after the latest failure
of U.S.-led peace efforts.
Israel has launched its most significant
military ground operation in more than five
years since the three Jewish seminary stu-
dents went missing last Thursday at a West
Bank hitchhiking junction.
Activists say car bomb
in eastern Syria kills seven
BEIRUT— Acar bomb exploded in eastern
Syria near the border with Iraq on Tuesday,
killing at least seven people, including a
local rebel commander, opposition activists
said.
The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for
Human Rights said the blast struck near the
offices of the al-Qaida-linked Nusra Front
and another group, Ahrar al-Sham, in the vil-
lage of Shmeitiyeh in Deir el-Zour province.
The Observatory, which relies on a net-
work of activists on the ground, said an
Ahrar al-Sham commander in the area and an
Islamic judge affiliated with the Nusra Front
also were among those killed.
There was no immediate claim of responsi-
bility for the bombing.
By Hamza Hendawi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD — Nearly four dozen Sunni
detainees were gunned down at a jail north of
Baghdad, a car bomb struck a Shiite neigh-
borhood of the capital and four young Sunnis
were found slain, as ominous signs emerged
Tuesday that open warfare between the two
main Muslim sects has returned to Iraq.
The killings, following the capture by
Sunni insurgents of a large swath of the
country stretching to Syria, were the first
hints of the beginnings of a return to sectar-
ian bloodletting that nearly tore the country
apart in 2006 and 2007.
During the United States’ eight-year pres-
ence in Iraq, American forces acted as a buffer
between the two Islamic sects, albeit with
limited success. The U.S. military is now
being pulled back in — with a far more lim-
ited mission and far fewer troops, as
President Barack Obama nears a decision on
an array of options for combating the
Islamic militants.
In the latest sect-on-sect violence, at least
44 Sunni detainees were slaughtered by gun
shots to the head and chest by pro-govern-
ment Shiite militiamen after Sunni insur-
gents tried to storm the jail near Baqouba,
northeast of Baghdad, police said.
The Iraqi military gave a different account
and put the death toll at 52, insisting the
Sunni inmates were killed by mortar shells
in the attack late Monday on the facility.
In Baghdad, the bullet-riddled bodies of
four men in their late 20s or early 30s, pre-
sumably Sunnis, were found Tuesday at dif-
ferent locations in the Shiite neighborhood
of Benouk, according to police and morgue
officials who spoke on condition of
anonymity because they were not authorized
to talk with the media.
Also Tuesday, a car bomb in Baghdad’s
Shiite Sadr City district killed 12 people and
wounded 30 in a crowded outdoor market,
police and hospital officials said. No one
claimed responsibility for the bombing, but
attacks targeting Shiite districts are routine-
ly the work of Sunni militants.
The sectarian violence was a grim
reminder of a dark chapter in Iraq’s history
when nearly a decade ago the city woke up
virtually every morning to find dozens of
bodies dumped in the streets, trash heaps or
in the Tigris river, bullet-riddled or with tor-
ture marks.
Obama has said he would not commit the
U.S. to military action in Iraq unless the
government in Baghdad moves to “set
aside sectarian differences, to promote sta-
bility, and account for the legitimate inter-
ests of all of Iraq’s communities.” In the
absence of that type of political effort,
Obama has said any American military
action would not succeed.
In a move apparently designed to satisfy
Obama’s demand for political inclusion,
Iraq’s Shiite, Sunni and Kurdish leaders
issued a joint statement late Tuesday stress-
ing the importance of setting “national pri-
orities” that adhere to democratic mecha-
nisms in resolving divisions and condemn-
ing sectarian rhetoric.
A U.N. commission, meanwhile, warned
Tuesday that “a regional war in the Middle
East draws ever closer” as Sunni insurgents
advance across Iraq to control areas bridging
the Iraq-Syria frontier. It said Iraq’s turmoil
will have “violent repercussions,” most dan-
gerously the rise of sectarian violence as “a
direct consequence of the dominance of
extremist groups.”
Signs of reprisal killings emerge in Iraq
Around the world
Benjamin
Netanyahu
REUTERS
People gather at the site of a car bomb attack in Baghdad’s Sadr City, Iraq.
OPINION 9
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Belmont City Council’s new
ethics and conduct regulations
Editor,
At the June 10 Belmont City
Council meeting, the council dis-
cussed adoption of a code of ethics
and conduct for elected and appointed
officials.
How ironic it was that during that
discussion, Mayor Warren Lieberman
again reiterated his personal opinions
on the “offensiveness” of the previ-
ous council. Councilman Charles
Stone criticized the Planning
Commission for being what he con-
sidered out of line. Councilman Eric
Reed reiterated how badly behaved the
Planning Commission was when he
was on it. And it continues.
The council passed this resolution
telling each other and commissioners
how they must behave in certain pre-
defined ways, and that if they don’t fit
the council’s mold, they won’t be
able to serve on boards and won’t be
reappointed.
In this new world order, will there
be any room for dissent?
Mayor Lieberman also went on a
tirade at a recent neighborhood meet-
ing, denigrating the previous coun-
cilmembers (although he was one
himself).
In a newspaper article, Daily Post,
June 9 edition, both councilmembers
Lieberman and Stone again disparaged
the previous council, quoting com-
ments that were taken out of context.
Belmont, we have a problem! Your
council continually chastises others,
and now passes a resolution not to
chastise. Hypocrisy!
My advice to the council: look to
the future. Continuing to disparage
past council and planning members
who have served the community does
not reflect well on this council, and it
does it serve our community.
The saying applies: “Don’t cut
someone else’s legs off to make your-
self appear taller. ”
Coralin Feierbach
Belmont
Letter to the editor
By Seth Rosenblatt
L
ast week, in the case of Vergara
v. California, Superior Court
Judge Rolf Treu overturned five
California Education Code statutes
around firing protections, tenure and
seniority for public school teachers. As
expected, the education community is
abuzz over the decision because if sus-
tained on appeal, it may indeed be the
biggest change in California public
education in the last four decades, or
perhaps ever. There are thousands lin-
ing up both lauding and chiding the
judge’s ruling.
No doubt there is much nervousness
about this ruling, but I do believe that
regardless of the final judicial outcome
of this case, we have a historic oppor-
tunity to reimagine and recreate a sys-
tem built long ago which hardly could
be argued is well adapted for a 21st cen-
tury learning paradigm. I do not buy
into the arguments that this case is
about “reformers” versus “traditional-
ists” or that it’s about charter schools,
competition or privatization. This is
about an opportunity for all of our pub-
lic schools to bring true professional-
ism to the profession of teaching. If we
can create a new compact on how we
hire, evaluate and even fire teachers, I
believe it will not only be better for
our students, but better for our teachers
as well.
So, my plea to all sides on this issue
is to view it as an opportunity to dis-
cuss how we elevate the profession of
teaching and examine the obligations
on all sides to accomplish that. We
need more money in the system to bet-
ter pay teachers as professionals, but
we also need modern work rules, pay
schemes and evaluation processes to
better support both teachers and stu-
dents. Most local school board mem-
bers and administrators with whom I
have spoken recognize that we can’t
treat teachers exactly like we treat
employees in the private sector —
there are certain obligations required
and protections
needed as public
employees. It’s rea-
sonable for teachers
to have due process
in employment deci-
sions (much as other
government
employees do), but
clearly this process
shouldn’t be so onerous in terms of
time or money as to create a disincen-
tive for a district to make the right
decision. Most understand that using
test scores to evaluate teachers’ per-
formance is so reductive and narrow as
to be inherently meaningless, but that
does not mean that teachers shouldn’t
have frequent, rich evaluations from
qualified evaluators (including other
teachers). And such evaluations should
inform both the support that we give
our teachers as well as the employment
decisions that we make.
Although I am a staunch defender of
public education (and so many of our
hard-working teachers, administrators
and other staff who do amazing work
every day), I can also realize we have
inherited a system that no longer
applies to our current era. Twenty-first-
century education is based upon a per-
manent change in the context of teach-
ing and learning catalyzed by a flatten-
ing world with unprecedented accesses
to information and resources. If we
were to start over and design a public
school system from scratch, we would
certainly have a set of rules, regula-
tions and responsibilities appropriate
for this new context. As such, I also
implore the state Legislature to take
this opportunity to look at other areas
of California Education Code which run
counter to serving interests of our stu-
dents and schools. We should restruc-
ture Ed Code to reflect policies that:
• Allow school districts to create a
nimble, professional, 21st-century
workforce;
• Enable the adoption of smart tech-
nology solutions (as opposed to anti-
quated textbook requirements);
• Support modern facility require-
ments;
• Reexamine grade structures (includ-
ing the clear evidence to include uni-
versal preschool within our public
school system);
• Enact other policies that expand the
role and scope of public schools (in
terms of time and resources) to provide
“community” services to mitigate the
effects of poverty and allow our public
school system to become the “great
equalizer” that it is now only in theory;
and
• Notwithstanding the recent step
forward with the new state funding sys-
tem (the Local Control Funding
Formula), further shore up the financial
system to support all of these above
changes.
I recognize it’s difficult to change
something that has just been accepted
as common practice for decades.
Naturally, many may be anxious of
potential changes or suspicious of
motives, but to paraphrase FDR, it is
only the fear we need to fear. Public
school advocates can both recognize
that so many of our schools are doing
amazing things with the resources and
structure they have inherited, but also
admit that we must open everything up
to potential change to meet the modern
requirements of the institution. I hope
that last week’s ruling doesn’t pit well-
meaning advocates against each other,
but rather starts a conversation in
earnest.
Seth Rosenblatt is a member of the of
the San Carlos Elementary School
District Board of Trustees. He is also the
past president of the San Mateo County
School Boards Association and sits on
numerous committees and tasks forces
related to public education in California.
Creating a 21st-century school system
This and that
“W
ill all of those who feel powerless to
influence events please signify by main-
taining their usual silence?” — Ashleigh
Brilliant.
When I read the newspaper or watch TV, I often cut arti-
cles out of the paper or jot down something I’ve seen to
possibly use as a basis for a column. Then sometimes I’ll
forget about them until I go through the files looking for
something else. Such was
the case recently.
First, I found a very
important article about arti-
ficial colors in foods. As I
read it again, I wondered
why they haven’t been out-
lawed in the United States
as they have in Europe
where only natural colors
are allowed. “In fact,”
wrote the author: “The U.K.
branches of Wal-Mart,
Kraft, Coca-Cola and Mars
have removed artificial col-
ors, sodium benzoate and
aspartame from their product lines as a result of consumer
demand and government recommendations. In the United
States, however, the Food and Drug Administration con-
tinues to allow these toxic ingredients in countless popu-
lar foods, including those marketed directly to children.”
I had listed some of the reasons these additives should
be banned. First, they’re made from chemicals derived
from petroleum. They have also been linked to long-term
health problems, like cancer. They have been shown to
cause an increase in hyperactivity in some children as
well as a negative impact on their ability to learn. This is
a perfect example of how our FDAis largely controlled by
corporate interests. Go figure!
Next, I remembered a column I once wrote about concus-
sions suffered by football players when I saw the newspa-
per article about another good reason that, ideally, the
game should be outlawed, or at least altered considerably.
Now the NFL is being sued by many former players
because they were dangerously overdosed with potent
painkilling drugs so they could stay in the game, though
sometimes seriously injured, and are now suffering the
consequences. The suit claims: “Team doctors … are disre-
garding American Medical Association ethics standards
that require considering their patients’ welfare above their
employers’ financial interests.” Last year, the NFL settled
for $765 million for more than 4,000 former players who
complained that they weren’t adequately warned or protect-
ed against the risks of concussions and brain injuries. …
Additional claims are pending.” Let’s hope so.
I found a column by Robert Reich — “Exposing Right
Wing Lies.” He listed the four “biggest right-wing lies
about inequality.” The one that gets to me most is the one
they use to justify their refusal to support government
programs to help disadvantaged kids: “Anyone can make
it in America with enough guts, gumption and intelli-
gence.” As Reich wrote: “We’re the only rich nation to
spend less educating poor kids than we do educating kids
from wealthy families.”
Add an article about President Obama’s visit to Wal-mart
in Mountain View to bring attention to the importance of
solar energy. Of all places, he goes to Wal-Mart. It makes
you wonder if he is aware of the fact that Wal-Mart is the
epitome of greedy, acquisitive, exploitative corporations
that care about nothing but increasing profits and show no
concern for their employees or suppliers, shamelessly
using them for whatever way necessary to advance its
interests. Reminds me of what Robert Reich wrote in
another column: “America’s largest employer, with about
1.4 million workers, refuses to provide most of them with
an income they can live on. The vast majority earns under
$25,000 a year, with an average hourly wage of about
$8.80.” Shame.
On the lighter side, I came upon a note that I had written
on the back of an envelope. “What is it with most
women? Do they want to be taken seriously or not?” On
the other side I found, “Or do they want to be considered
airheads who go along with the latest fashion because
everyone else is doing it?” I recalled that what got to me
was that long straight hair that hangs all over the place
and causes girls and women to have to continuously brush
it out of their eyes. Well, even though I admire women
who pay no attention to such style trends and do their hair
in a way that best suits their lifestyle, I don’t think that
this will develop into a column. Not for a while, anyway.
Then I looked up at the TV and there was the news story
about the cat that saved the little boy from the vicious
dog. “So there is some good in this world, after all,” I
thought, “even stemming from the actions of a brave and
loyal pet.” That made my day. And it was a reminder that if
we want to change things we have to act even though
“Normal times may possibly be over forever.” — Mr.
Brilliant.
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 750
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
Guest
perspective
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 16,808.49 +27.48 10-Yr Bond 2.66 +0.06
Nasdaq 4,337.23 +16.13 Oil (per barrel) 106.23
S&P 500 1,941.99 +4.21 Gold 1,270.90
By Alex Veiga
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stocks rebounded from a downbeat
start Tuesday, building on small gains
for the third day in a row.
News that U.S. consumer prices
jumped sharply in May drove up long-
term interest rates, setting the stage
for the turnaround as investors bid up
shares in financial stocks such as E-
Trade Financial, Charles Schwab and
Goldman Sachs.
Disappointing home construction
data had weighed on the market early
on, sending homebuilder stocks
lower.
The major stock indexes recovered,
but only barely above the previous
day’s close.
“The market is just kind of drifting
along. Everybody is trying to figure
out how much of a hold this economic
expansion can get, if we can get some
self-sustaining momentum going,”
said Brad Sorensen, director of market
and sector analysis at the Schwab
Center for Financial Research.
Investors may get a better sense of
that on Wednesday afternoon, when
the Federal Reserve is scheduled to
give an update following a two-day
meeting of its policy-making com-
mittee.
Fed officials are widely expected to
keep a key short-term rate near zero.
The Fed will also update its economic
forecasts.
“We’re all waiting to see what the
Fed has to say tomorrow,” said JJ
Kinahan, chief strategist at TD
Ameritrade.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
rose 4.21 points, or 0.2 percent, to
1,941.99. The index is down less than
1 percent from its most recent all-time
high of 1,951.27 set last week.
Five of the 10 sectors in the S&P
500 rose, led by financials. Utilities
fell the most.
The Dow Jones industrial average
added 27.48 points, or 0.2 percent, to
16, 808. 49. The Nasdaq composite
gained 16.13 points, or 0.4 percent,
to 4,337.23.
The three stock indexes are all up for
the year.
Stocks were down slightly in pre-
market trading Tuesday as investors
got a look at the latest data on U.S.
home construction. The Commerce
Department reported that home-
builders broke ground on new apart-
ments and houses at an annual rate of
1.01 million homes in May. That’s
down 6.5 percent from the previous
month.
The report sent homebuilder shares
mostly lower for much of the morn-
ing. Most recovered by the afternoon.
Separately, the Labor Department
reported that U.S. consumer prices
vaulted last month by the largest
amount in more than a year, propelled
by rising costs for food, gasoline and
airline fares.
The bigger-than-expected hike in
prices helped ease demand for govern-
ment bonds, pushing down bond
prices. The yield on the 10-year
Treasury note rose to 2.65 percent
from 2.60 percent late Monday.
Higher long-term interest rates can
translate into more earnings for finan-
cial institutions that make loans.
E-Trade Financial was among the
biggest gainers, rising $1.58, or 7.7
percent, to $22. Charles Schwab added
$1.42, or 5.5 percent, to $27.30.
Banks including Goldman Sachs and
Morgan Stanley also posted gains.
Morgan Stanley rose 79 cents, or 2.5
percent, to $32.50, while Goldman
Sachs gained $2.37, or 1.4 percent, to
$168.22. Goldman rose the most of
the 30 stocks in the Dow Jones indus-
trial average.
By afternoon, stocks had climbed
into positive territory and held on to
their gains the rest of the day.
Solid quarterly growth in banking
and trading at Jefferies Corp. also
raised hopes that investment banking
could be strengthening, Kinahan
said.
Stocks higher as banks gain on rising rates
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
GameStop Corp., up $2.57 to $40.29
A report from the NPD Group revealed huge video game sales in May and
likely some bigger margins for the video game retailer.
Southwest Airlines Co., up 53 cents to $26.63
Stifel Nicolaus said it saw the stock’s price as a good entry point for
investors and upgrades the airline.
Edwards Lifesciences Corp., up $3.62 to $82.06
The Food and Drug Administration approved a second-generation,
implantable heart valve made by the medical device company.
General Motors Co., up 30 cents to $36.36
Sales of Malibus and other models do not appear to be suffering despite
the automaker’s recalls of more than 20 million vehicles worldwide.
Allergan Inc., up $1.16 to $160.53
Valeant plans to go hostile in its takeover bid for the maker of Botox after
its latest offer of $53 billion was rejected.
Nasdaq
SolarCity Corp., up $9.65 to $64.53
CEO Elon Musk says the company is buying a solar panel maker and will
build factories “an order of magnitude”bigger than current plants.
Expedia Inc., up $3.04 to $77.62
Travel websites rose sharply after analysts with UBS and Susquehanna
released separate reports, both optimistic about growth.
RF Micro Devices Inc., up 30 cents to $10.13
Federal regulators took no action to block a $1.56 billion tie-up between
the communications technology company and TriQuint.
Big movers
By Martin Crutsinger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Federal
Reserve received some further cause for
discussion at its policy meeting this
week with a report Tuesday of a surpris-
ing jump in consumer inflation.
Yet most economists aren’t altering
their view that the Fed’s first interest
rate increase is at least a year away.
Analysts cautioned that that time
frame could change if inflation were to
accelerate. The consumer price index
rose 0.4 percent in May, the govern-
ment said, and has risen 2.1 percent
over the past 12 months — roughly at
the level of the Fed’s target rate for
inflation.
It’s why the Fed might actually wel-
come the news of slightly higher infla-
tion: It will help ease long-standing
concerns that inflation might be too
low. For the past two years, inflation
by one key measure has remained under
the Fed’s 2 percent target.
“I don’t think the Fed is going to
express concern about the May price
increase,” said Joel Naroff, chief econ-
omist at Naroff Economic Advisors.
When the Fed issues a statement
Wednesday after its meeting ends and
updates its economic forecasts, and
then Chair Janet Yellen holds a news
conference, investors will be seeking
clues about when short-term rates will
finally rise. They will also be looking
for hints about how and when the Fed
will start unloading its vast invest-
ment holdings.
The answers will affect loan rates for
individuals and businesses — and per-
haps the direction of the economy. Yet
few expect to hear anything definitive.
The Fed remains in a tentative wait-
and-see stance.
Though the central bank has sig-
naled optimism, officials are unsure
how much the economy will strength-
en the rest of the year. In its updated
forecasts, the Fed may downgrade its
estimate of growth for 2014 after the
government said last month that the
economy shrank in the first quarter,
depressed by a harsh winter.
The International Monetary Fund
this week predicted that the U.S. econ-
omy will grow a modest 2 percent this
year, below the IMF’s previous esti-
mate of 2.7 percent.
Inflation data give Fed
another topic for debate
YouTube to launch music
service amid indie dispute
LOS ANGELES — YouTube will launch a new subscrip-
tion music service, the company acknowledged Tuesday
after being dragged into a public dispute over royalties
that will result in the blockade of some independent
artists’ music videos.
The Google Inc.-owned video site said in a statement
that it is “adding subscription-based features for music
on YouTube” and that “hundreds of major label and inde-
pendent artists” have signed on.
The paid service — to be launched within a few
months — will likely allow playback of videos without
ads and allow for offline playback on mobile devices.
That’s according to two people familiar with the matter.
The people weren’t authorized to speak publicly and
spoke on condition of anonymity.
The people also confirmed that a small number of
independent artists who had not agreed to new deal terms
will have their videos blocked in some countries start-
ing in a few days, even on the free version of YouTube.
Business brief
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Your money or
your life?
Sovaldi, a new pill for hepatitis C,
cures the liver-wasting disease in 9 of
10 patients, but treatment can cost
more than $90,000.
Leading medical societies recom-
mend the drug as a first-line treatment,
and patients are clamoring for it. But
insurance companies and state
Medicaid programs are gagging on the
price. In Oregon, officials propose to
limit how many low-income patients
can get Sovaldi.
Yet if Sovaldi didn’t exist, insurers
would still be paying in the mid-to-
high five figures to treat the most com-
mon kind of hepatitis C, a new pricing
survey indicates. Some of the older
alternatives involve more side effects,
and are less likely to provide cures.
$1,000-a-pill Sovaldi jolts U.S. health care system
By Jonathan Fahey
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The energy world is
not keeping up with Elon Musk, so
he’s trying to take matters into his
own hands.
Musk, chairman of the San Mateo-
based solar installer SolarCity,
announced Tuesday that the company
would acquire a solar panel maker and
build factories “an order of magnitude”
bigger than the plants that currently
churn out panels.
“If we don’t do this we felt there was
a risk of not being able to have the
solar panels we need to expand the
business in the
long term,” Musk
said Tuesday in a
conference call.
Musk is also a
founder and the CEO
of the electric vehi-
cle maker Tesla
Motors, which is
planning what it
calls a “gigafacto-
ry” to supply bat-
teries for its cars.
In both cases, Musk’s goal is to
make sure that the components critical
to his vision of the future — electric
cars and solar energy — are available
and cheap enough to beat fossil fuels.
Musk’s future customers could
ignore traditional energy companies
completely. They would have
SolarCity panels on their roof that
would generate enough power to also
charge up a Tesla in the garage. ATesla
battery could then power the home at
night with stored solar power.
It’s a far-off vision — solar power is
still much more expensive than con-
ventional power, even before the enor-
mous cost of a battery backup. And
electric cars are less than 1 percent of
the total auto market. But Musk has
made a career of thinking far into the
future.
Musk takes on carbon with solar, battery bets
Elon Musk
<<< Page 13, Mexico, Brazil
play to scoreless World Cup tie
NOT INTIMIDATED: REDWOOD SHORES’ 11-YEAR-OLD LUCY LI JUST WANTS TO HAVE FUN AT U.S. WOMEN’S OPEN >> PAGE 15
Wednesday • June 18, 2014
Best of the best
A breakout year
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Sacred Heart Prep golfer Derek Ackerman’s run to the CIF/CGA State High
School Championship was made possible by one improbable shot.
For the second straight year, the SHP junior advanced to the Central Coast
Section playoffs. After his sophomore year, in which the Gators team missed
the Northern California playoffs by one stroke, Ackerman proved a contender
to advance on an individual basis this season.
After shooting a par 71 to end regulation in a five-way tie for fifth in the CCS
finals at Monterey’s Rancho Cañada Gold Course,
Ackerman advanced to a second playoff hole against
Monte Vista Christian’s Ryan Slater. The third
stroke favored Slater, who hit the green 20 feet
out on the par-4 hole. Ackerman’s third stroke
went long, forcing him to attempt a chip
shot from 10 yards off the green.
Ackerman responded by hitting a miracu-
lous shot right on target.
See GOLF, Page 16
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Menlo tennis player David Ball had a lot on his plate his senior sea-
son. Not only did he serve as the Knights’ No. 1 singles player and team
captain, he was also student body president.
As if that weren’t enough, he had immense pressure on the tennis
courts. Not only was he trying to help continue the Knights’ dominat-
ing performance, he had the added pressure of living up to the family
name. Older brothers Jamin and Andrew also served as No. 1 singles
players, both earned college scholarships and com-
bined to help the Knights to five straight Central
Coast Section and Northern California titles.
David Ball handled it all with aplomb. He
lost only one match this season as he
helped lead Menlo to a sixth-straight
CCS and Nor Cal championship.
For his efforts, Ball is this year’s San
Mateo Daily Journal’s Boys’ Tennis
Player of the Year.
See TENNIS, Page 14
By John Jackson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — Gordon
Beckham and Dayan Viciedo hit
two-run home runs, John Danks
pitched effectively into the sev-
enth inning and the Chicago
White Sox snapped a four-game
losing streak with an 8-2 victo-
ry over the San Francisco
Giants on Tuesday night.
The slumping White Sox had
managed a total of six runs in
their previous four games.
Viciedo, who was just 2 for 23
on the homestand before
Tuesday, went 2 for 4. His fifth-
inning blast ended a stretch of
51 at-bats without an RBI.
Danks (6-5) settled down after
a somewhat slow start and gave
up two runs — one earned —
and five hits in 6 1-3 innings.
In his last five starts, the left-
hander is 3-1 with a 1.51 ERA.
Hunter Pence went 2 for 4
with a home run for the Giants,
who have dropped four straight
and seven of eight. Giants
starter Matt Cain (1-5) allowed
eight runs — seven earned —
and 10 hits in five innings.
Pence opened the scoring
with a homer in the first inning,
and the Giants made it 2-0 with
an unearned run in the third.
The White Sox tied it in the
bottom of the third as Adam
Eaton singled with two outs,
stole second and then trotted
home on Beckham’s two-run
shot.
Chicago took a 5-2 lead with
three runs in the fourth. Jose
Abreu led off with a single and
one out later Alexei Ramirez
and Viciedo both singled to
load the bases.
Alejandro De Aza popped up
in foul ground on the first pitch
for the second out, but Tyler
Flowers drew a walk to drive in
Giants’
struggles
continue
See GIANTS, Page 16
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SPORTS 12
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — The start of the San Francisco 49ers’
three-day mandatory minicamp was overshadowed more by
the players who were absent than the ones in attendance.
Two-time Pro Bowl tight end Vernon Davis and right guard
Alex Boone skipped the first day of San Francisco’s mini-
camp Tuesday. Both starters are seeking raises despite two
years left on their contracts.
Coach Jim Harbaugh also said cornerback Eric Wright was
not with the team because he’s contemplating retirement.
Wright, a seven-year veteran who played in seven games for
the 49ers last season, had participated in most of the team’s
offseason conditioning program.
Players can be fined nearly $70,000 if they miss all three
days of the minicamp, per the NFL’s collective bargaining
agreement. If Davis and Boone continue to hold out, they
set the stage for what could be major distractions leading
into training camp next month for a 49ers team that has
Super Bowl aspirations.
Harbaugh said he appreciates players who show up for the
voluntary workouts in the offseason but expects everybody
in attendance for the mandatory meet-
ings. He said he was “disappointed”
Davis and Boone are holding out.
“Not the decision that I envisioned
being the 49er way,” Harbaugh said.
“Really nothing more to be said about it.
The focus will be on what’s going on
here.”
Neither Davis nor Boone has been
present during the first eight weeks of
the team’s voluntary offseason program.
Davis sacrificed a $200,000 bonus for
missing the workouts.
And while both are seeking new deals,
Davis has been the most vocal about his
situation.
“In 2010 I signed a five-year, $37 mil-
lion contract extension with $23 million
guaranteed. It was the biggest contract
for a tight end in league history. Four
years later, and I’m playing at a higher
level than I was then, which brings me to
why I’m holding out,” Davis wrote in a
guest column for MMQB.com on Monday. “It’s all about
getting paid what you deserve. It’s not that complicated. I
want the 49ers to win the Super Bowl, and I want to be on
the field this summer working toward that goal, but I have to
worry about my future first.
“Most of my teammates and many players in the NFL
understand that. A few don’t,” Davis continued. “Behind
closed doors, they’ll say they’re all about the team and
would run through a brick wall for the organization. But
when you look closer, they’re doing things to contradict
themselves. I can’t listen to anyone but my family and my
advisors, because those are the people who are going to be
there when football inevitably dumps me.”
Davis, who initially acted coy about skipping the team’s
voluntary offseason program, began making his displeas-
ure known publicly shortly before the 49ers announced
they had given quarterback Colin Kaepernick a six-year
contract extension through the 2020 season that could be
worth up to $126 million.
Davis, who is now 30 years old, had 52 catches for 850
yards and accounted for 13 of Kaepernick’s 21 touchdown
passes last season.
The tight end has repeatedly talked about marketing his
“brand” this offseason after signing a deal with Fantex,
which sells shares of Davis’ “stock” to investors. The San
Francisco company paid Davis $4 million in return for 10
percent of his future earnings from football, commercial
endorsements and other jobs that he may get during the
remainder of his life.
The 27-year-old Boone signed a contract extension while
he was a backup offensive tackle in November 2011. He has
two years remaining on the deal, which will reportedly pay
him $2.25 million this season and $1.45 million next sea-
son.
Most of their teammates responded in similar fashion
when asked about their — that it’s a decision each player
has to make.
Second-year safety Eric Reid, whose locker is next to
Wright’s, said he it was a “little surprising” that Wright is
considering not playing anymore because he had worked
out most of the spring to compete for the job vacated by for-
mer starters Carlos Rogers and Tarell Brown, who both
signed with the Oakland Raiders in free agency.
“Maybe he’s dealing with some personal issues, so I’m
going to leave that up to him. I’m not going to invade his
space,” Reid said. If he comes back, I’ll ask him how he’s
doing. But that’s a personal decision.”
Vance McDonald and Garrett Celek are expected to receive
most of the practice repetitions behind Davis at tight end.
Joe Looney is competing at the guard spot, while tackle
Jonathan Martin is receiving some time at guard. Kilgore
also could go from center to guard.
Tramaine Brock, Chris Culliver, Perrish Cox, Chris
Cook, Darryl Morris and draft picks Dontae Johnson and
Kenneth Acker are competing at cornerback.
Davis, Boone skip 49ers’ mandatory minicamp
Vernon Davis
Alex Boone
SPORTS 13
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Mexico goalkeeper Guillermo Ochoa makes a save off a header from Brazil’s Thiago Silva,
right, in the 86th minute of a scoreless tie in World Cup action Tuesday. It was one of several
goal-saving stops by Ochoa.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FORTALEZA, Brazil — Goalkeeper
Guillermo Ochoa made a series of outstand-
ing saves to help Mexico hold Brazil to a
thrilling 0-0 draw at the World Cup on
Tuesday.
The result leaves both teams with four
points each after two games in Group A, but
Brazil is ahead on goal difference going into
their decisive final matches. Croatia and
Cameroon meet on Wednesday for their sec-
ond games after both opened with defeats.
Ochoa’s first remarkable save prevented
Neymar from scoring in the 26th minute.
The Brazil striker’s powerful header looked
set to fly just inside the post when the goal-
keeper dived to his right to push the ball
wide.
Ochoa also made three other difficult saves
to keep the hosts from breaking the dead-
lock — a shot by Paulinho in the 44th, a
second-half effort by Neymar from inside the
area and a close-range header by Thiago
Silva in the 86th minute which produced a
remarkable block by the Mexico keeper.
After that, there was still time for a
thrilling end to the game in the northeastern
city of Fortaleza.
The referee dismissed Brazilian claims for
a penalty after Marcelo seemed to have been
grabbed in the 88th minute. Mexico then
had two great chances, first with Andres
Guardado’s shot over the crossbar in the
90th and then with an effort by Raul Jimenez
that was stopped by Brazil goalkeeper Julio
Cesar in injury time.
“In the end, the 0-0 mirrors what hap-
pened, it was a very hard-fought match,”
Brazil coach Luiz Felipe Scolari said. “The
draw wasn’t a good result because a victory
would have already allowed us to advance,
but we need to be able to respect our oppo-
nent, which played very well.”
A win by either team would have guaran-
teed a spot in the next round if Cameroon and
Croatia were to draw in the jungle city of
Manaus.
Brazil had won all three previous World
Cup matches between the teams without con-
ceding a goal, but the Latin American rivals
hadn’t met in the sport’s showcase tourna-
ment since 1962.
It was an evenly balanced game at the
Arena Castelao, with Mexico not allowing
Brazil to take control. El Tri didn’t play
defensively and created chances throughout
the match, especially with long-range shots
by midfielders Hector Herrera and Jose
Vazquez.
Brazil, playing without injured strike
Hulk, turned up the pressure in the second
half, but there was no getting past Ochoa.
He denied Paulinho just before halftime,
blocking the midfielder’s shot after a loose
ball inside the area, and then got his body in
the way of Neymar’s drive from inside the
area. In the 86th, he was there on cue to
block Silva’s powerful header from point-
blank range.
Brazil, Mexico play to scoreless draw
Belgium opens with 2-1
comeback win over Algeria
BELO HORIZONTE, Brazil — Belgium
opened its World Cup Group H campaign with
a 2-1 comeback win over Algeria on Tuesday,
relying on second-half goals from two substi-
tutes.
Marouane Fellaini’s strong glancing header
in the 70th minute with his back to goal came
from a Kevin De Bruyne cross. Fellaini had
only come onto the pitch five minutes earlier
and was coach Marc Wilmots’ final substitu-
tion.
Ten minutes later, Dries Mertens’ shot beat
Algeria’s goalkeeper from close range after
Eden Hazard set him up for the decider. Mertens
came on at the start of the second half.
Algeria attacking midfielder Sofiane
Feghouli converted a penalty to give his coun-
try a surprise lead in the 25th.
Russia draws 1-1 with South Korea
CUIABA, Brazil — Alexander Kerzhakov
scored with one of his first touches after
coming on as a substitute to earn Russia a 1-
1 draw with South Korea on Tuesday in a
World Cup match marked by the first big
goalkeeping error of the tournament.
Russia goalkeeper Igor Akinfeev spilled
Lee Keun-ho’s speculative shot into his own
net to gift South Korea a 68th-minute lead at
the Arena Pantanal in Cuiaba in Group H.
But Kerzhakov bailed his teammate out,
turning in a shot from close range in the
74th — three minutes after coming on as a
substitute — to rescue a point for Russia in
a poor-quality match.
Dempsey should be able
to play with broken nose
SAO PAULO — The U.S. Soccer Federation
says captain Clint Dempsey should be able to
play in Sunday’s World Cup game against
Portugal despite a broken nose.
Dempsey scored 30 seconds into Monday’s
2-1 win over Ghana, then was bloodied by a
shin to the face from defender John Boye when
they battled for a header in the 33rd minute.
U.S. team spokesman Michael Kammarman
said Tuesday it had not been determined whether
Dempsey would need to play with a mask.
All players clean in World Cup
drug testing program —so far
RIO DE JANEIRO — FIFAsays all 800 play-
ers that have given samples in its World Cup
doping program tested clean so far.
FIFAalso says players chosen for samples
after the first nine matches— including the
Switzerland-Ecuador early kickoff on Sunday
— tested negative.
The figures include samples from 91 percent
of players included in the 30-man preliminary
squads for the 32 teams.
FIFA reported no problems getting blood
and urine samples to the World Anti-Doping
Agency laboratory in Switzerland.
WADA revoked the Rio de Janeiro lab’s
accreditation last year.
World Cup stadium
stairs wobble under fan weight
RIO DE JANEIRO — Video of a key stair-
case most people use to get to and from Rio
de Janeiro’s famed Maracana stadium shows
the structure built atop scaffolding wob-
bling under the weight of fans who attended
the World Cup game between Argentina and
Bosnia on Sunday.
The footage shot by a Brazilian journalist
shows fans packing the staircase with
wooden steps as it swayed back and forth
and grabbing hand rails to support them-
selves as they headed via their only exit to a
subway station after the game.
Some fans said Tuesday that they were
scared the staircase might fall when they
used it Sunday.
The Rio de Janeiro state government
issued a statement saying the staircase was
inspected following complaints, reinforced
and then re-inspected again Tuesday to
ensure fan safety.
World Cup roundup
SPORTS 14
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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“This year was a pretty exciting and inter-
esting season. Like always, we have a strong
team, but this was one of the few years where
we’ve had some ups and downs. We were faced
with some injuries, just some bad scheduling
where we lost some guys (to injuries),” Ball
said. “We ultimately achieved our goal of win-
ning CCS and Nor Cals for the sixth-straight
year and that made for a little more excite-
ment.”
It’s no secret the Menlo boys’ tennis team
is one of the best in the state, if not the
nation. But it’s the work and dedication the
Knights put in that allow them to continue to
play at such a high level. No matter the oppo-
nent, Menlo players take every match seri-
ously. They look at it as an opportunity to
raise the level of their game.
“They take pride in that and I think it makes
them work harder,” said Menlo coach Bill
Shine. “I think they have an advantage. The
upperclassmen have taught the younger ones
the ‘Menlo Way.’ They take pride in that.”
Ball also took pride in being the team cap-
tain and what that entails. Not only was it his
job to make sure the rest of the team was ready
to play, but also to support the team all the
way through matches.
“[Ball is] phenomenal,” Shine said. “He is
a huge motivator. He waits until the final
match is over. He’s really nice to the fresh-
men. … He’s like my right-hand man when
he’s out there. He’s like an assistant coach.”
Despite his leadership role, Ball is still one
of the guys and he credits them for lifting him
up when he was at his lowest. He lost his only
match of the year at the National Invitational
Tournament in Newport Beach, where a win
would have sent the Knights into the champi-
onship match.
Instead, his loss dropped the Knights into
a tie in their semifinal match and they were
relegated to the third-place match after los-
ing a tiebreaker. Ball credits his teammates
for lifting his spirits and getting the team
back on track.
The Knights ended up winning the third-
place match.
“Being my senior year, it would have been
easy to roll over and say we lost a really
tough match, but the guys totally bounced
back. Everyone came out (for that third-place
match) really fired up. I think we played one
of our best matches of the season. That was
kind of a defining moment about how hard we
had to work,” Ball said. “I have to give credit
to the guys for picking me up. I was able to
realize there was still work to be done. I had a
long talk with the guys, saying this is what
Menlo tennis is all about. The most impor-
tant thing was all the guys rallied around me
when I was really down.”
When the postseason rolled around, Ball
and the Knights picked up their play. In CCS,
the Knights had a tough time in the quarterfi-
nals, outlasting Palo Alto 4-3. But in the
semifinals and finals, they dropped a total of
two matches.
It was more of the same in Nor Cal play. In
three matches, they posted a pair of 7-0 wins
before handily beating Dougherty Valley-
Dublin in the finals, 5-2.
Ball, obviously, played in big role in the
Knights’ postseason success.
“He’s very poised, very businesslike.
Doesn’t get too high or too low,” Shine said.
“He’s really matured a lot and he’s grown a lot
— both physically and mentally. When he
was younger, he would let little things bother
him.”
Having followed his older brothers’ path
through Menlo, he is now following in
Jamin’s and Andrew’s footsteps in college.
Jamin Ball wrapped up a four-year career at
Stanford, while Andrew Ball just finished up
his freshman season at Harvard. David Ball
will be playing at BYU next season on a ten-
nis scholarship and his hope is to crack the
starting lineup as a freshman.
“BYU has a great team. I’m hoping to go in
there and sneak into the singles lineup and
start as a freshman,” Ball said. “There are a lot
of good players over there. I’m just hoping to
get some experience and play as a Division I
athlete.
“It’s kind of a dream come true.”
Continued from page 11
TENNIS
By Rick Eymer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Derek Norris hit a home run
and drove in five runs, Stephen Vogt was 3 for 3
and drove in two runs and the Oakland Athletics
held off the Texas Rangers for an 10-6 victory
on Tuesday night.
Tommy Milone (5-3) won his fifth consecu-
tive decision, matching his career-best, as the
A’s won their third in four games.
Milone gave up three runs and five hits over
5 2/3 innings in improving to 5-0 over his last
eight starts. He walked one and struck out three.
Yu Darvish (7-3) lost his eighth straight to
the A’s and the Rangers lost for just the second
time in six games.
Darvish allowed seven runs — four earned —
and eight hits over 5-plus innings. He walked
five and struck out eight, including Brandon
Moss in the first for career strikeout 600.
Roughned Odor hit a home run, tripled and
drove in three runs for the Rangers.
Aaron Poreda, who was recalled from Triple-
ARound Rock earlier in the game, took over for
Darvish with two runners on in the sixth and
got two outs before giving way to Shawn
Tolleson, who gave up Norris’ home run.
Adrian Beltre gave the Rangers a 1-0 lead in
the first with his two-out RBI single.
The A’s scored twice in the second. Jed
Lowrie, Vogt and Alberto Callaspo hit consecu-
tive singles to open the inning. Lowrie scored
on Beltre’s hit and Vogt came around to score
on left fielder Michael Choice’s throwing error.
Vogt added RBI singles in the third and fifth
while Coco Crisp hit a sacrifice fly in the fourth
and Norris hit the three-run home run, his fourth
career pinch-hit homer, in the sixth.
Odor hit a solo homer in the fifth and added a
two-run triple in the seventh. Alex Rios hit a
sacrifice fly in the sixth and Daniel Robertson
drove in a run in the seventh.
Norris added a two-run double in the eighth.
NOTES: The Rangers signed IF Carlos Pena
to a minor-league deal. Darvish owns a 7.59
ERAin four career starts at 0.co Coliseum.
A’s left-hander Drew Pomeranz was placed on
the disabled list with a broken right hand.
Right-hander Evan Scribner was recalled from
Triple-ASacramento.The A’s obtained left-han-
der Brad Mills in a trade with Milwaukee for
cash considerations.
Nick Tepesch (2-2, 3.94) starts for the
Rangers in Wednesday’s series finale. He’s won
three straight over ALWest opponents. Sonny
Gray (6-3, 2.93) starts for the A’s. He has lost
his last two.
A’s continue
to dominate
Rangers’ ace
Athletics 10, Rangers 6
Texas ab r h bi Oakland ab r h bi
Rrtsn cf-lf 5 1 1 1 Crisp cf 4 1 1 1
Andrus ss 4 1 2 0 Jaso c 3 1 2 0
Choo dh 4 0 0 0 Norris ph-c 2 1 2 5
Beltre 3b 3 0 2 1 Cespds lf 4 1 1 0
Rios rf 3 0 0 1 Moss 1b 5 0 0 0
Mrphy 1b 2 0 0 0 Lowrie dh 3 1 1 0
Snder ph-1b 2 0 0 0 Vogt rf 3 1 3 2
Gimenz c 4 1 0 0 Gentry ph-rf 1 0 0 0
Choice lf 2 0 0 0 Clspo 3b-2b 2 0 2 1
Martn ph-cf 2 1 1 0 Punto ss 4 1 0 0
Odor 2b 4 2 2 3 Sogard 2b 1 1 0 0
Dnldsnph-3b 2 2 1 0
Totals 35 6 8 6 Totals 3410 13 9
Texas 100 011 300 — 6 8 2
Oakland 021 113 02x — 10 13 1
E—Rios (4), Odor (3), Donaldson (15). DP—Texas 1.
LOB—Texas 4,Oakland 7.2B—Andrus (18),Jaso (9),
D.Norris(11).3B—Odor (3).HR—Odor (3),D.Norris(8).
SB—D.Robertson (1), Sogard 2 (6). SF—Rios, Crisp.
Texas IP H R ER BB SO
Darvish L,7-3 5 8 7 4 5 8
Poreda .2 0 0 0 0 0
Sh.Tolleson .1 2 1 1 0 0
Cotts 1 0 0 0 1 2
Frasor 0 3 2 2 0 0
S.Baker 1 0 0 0 0 1
Oakland IP H R ER BB SO
Milone W,5-3 5.2 5 3 3 1 3
Otero H,8 .2 3 3 2 0 0
Abad H,7 .1 0 0 0 0 1
Gregerson H,9 1.1 0 0 0 0 1
Doolittle 1 0 0 0 0 2
WP—Darvish.
Umpires—Home, Andy Fletcher; First, Chris Segal; Sec-
ond, Mike Muchlinski;Third, Mark Wegner.
T—3:28. A—21,288 (35,067).
SPORTS 15
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
650.259.9200
East Division
W L Pct GB
Toronto 41 31 .569 —
New York 36 33 .522 3 1/2
Baltimore 36 34 .514 4
Boston 33 38 .465 7 1/2
Tampa Bay 28 44 .389 13
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Kansas City 38 32 .543 —
Detroit 36 31 .537 1/2
Cleveland 36 36 .500 3
Chicago 34 37 .479 4 1/2
Minnesota 32 37 .464 5 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
A’s 43 28 .606 —
Anaheim 38 32 .543 4 1/2
Seattle 37 34 .521 6
Texas 35 36 .493 8
Houston 32 40 .444 11 1/2
Tuesday’sGames
Seattle 6, San Diego 1
Washington 6, Houston 5
L.A. Angels 9, Cleveland 3
N.Y.Yankees 3,Toronto 1
Kansas City 11, Detroit 4
Baltimore 7,Tampa Bay 5
Boston 2, Minnesota 1
Chicago White Sox 8, San Francisco 2
Oakland 10,Texas 6
Wednesday’sGames
Royals(Guthrie3-6) at Detroit (Smyly3-5),10:08a.m.
O’s (Gausman 2-1) at Tampa (Cobb 2-4), 10:10 a.m.
Twins(Gibson6-5) at Boston(Lackey8-4),10:35a.m.
Giants (Hudson 7-2) at ChiSox (Sale 5-1),11:10 a.m.
Rangers (Tepesch 2-2) at Oak.(Gray 6-3),12:35 p.m.
Astros(Feldman3-4) atWas.(Gonzalez3-4),4:05p.m.
Angels(Wilson7-6) at Cle.(Masterson4-5),4:05p.m.
Jays (Buehrle 10-3) at NYY (Whitley 2-0), 4:05 p.m.
M’s(F.Hernandez8-2) at S.D.(Cashner 2-6),7:10p.m.
Thursday’sGames
L.A. Angels at Cleveland, 9:05 a.m.
Kansas City at Detroit, 10:08 a.m.
Seattle at San Diego, 3:40 p.m.
Toronto at N.Y.Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Houston at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 4:10 p.m.
Boston at Oakland, 7:05 p.m.
AL GLANCE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 36 33 .522 —
Atlanta 36 34 .514 1/2
Miami 36 34 .514 1/2
Philadelphia 31 38 .449 5
New York 31 40 .437 6
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 43 29 .597 —
St. Louis 39 32 .549 3 1/2
Cincinnati 34 35 .493 7 1/2
Pittsburgh 34 36 .486 8
Chicago 29 40 .420 12 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Giants 43 28 .606 —
Los Angeles 39 34 .534 5
Colorado 34 37 .479 9
San Diego 29 42 .408 14
Arizona 30 44 .405 14 1/2
Tuesday’sGames
Seattle6,SanDiego1
Cincinnati 6,Pittsburgh5
Washington6,Houston5
Miami 6,ChicagoCubs 5
Philadelphia5,Atlanta2
ChicagoWhiteSox8,SanFrancisco2
St.Louis 5,N.Y.Mets 2
Milwaukee7,Arizona5
L.A.Dodgers 4,Colorado2
Wednesday’sGames
Phils(R.Hernandez2-5)atAtlanta(Harang5-5),9:10a.m.
Cubs (Arrieta2-1) at Miami (Eovaldi 4-2),9:40a.m.
Mets (Colon6-5) at St.Louis (Lynn7-4),10:45a.m.
Giants (Hudson7-2) at ChiSox(Sale5-1),11:10a.m.
Reds (Simon9-3) at Pittsburgh(Volquez4-5),4:05p.m.
Astros(Feldman3-4)atWash.(G.Gonzalez3-4),4:05p.m.
Brewers (Garza4-4) at Arizona(Miley3-6),6:40p.m.
Rox(J.DeLaRosa6-5) at L.A.(Kershaw6-2),7:10p.m.
M’s (F.Hernandez8-2) at S.D. (Cashner 2-6),7:10p.m.
Thursday’sGames
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh,9:35a.m.
Milwaukeeat Arizona,12:40a.m.
Seattleat SanDiego,3:40p.m.
AtlantaatWashington,4:05p.m.
N.Y.Mets at Miami,4:10p.m.
Philadelphiaat St.Louis,5:15p.m.
NL GLANCE
BASEBALL
American League
OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Placed LHP Drew
Pomeranz on the 15-day DL. Optioned SS Jake El-
more to Sacramento (PCL). Recalled RHP Evan
Scribner from Sacramento. Agreed to terms with
SS Trace Loehr on a minor league contract.
TEXASRANGERS—Agreed to terms with 1B Car-
losPenaandRHPAustinPettiboneonminor league
contracts. Assigned Pena to Round Rock (PCL).
National League
SANFRANCISCOGIANTS—Optioned OF Daniel
Carbonell to Salem-Keizer (NWL)
MILWAUKEEBREWERS—Traded LHP Brad Mills
to Oakland for cash considerations.
NFL
CLEVELANDBROWNS —Agreed to terms with
QB Johnny Manziel. Released WR Earl Bennett.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS —Signed DL Seali’i
Epenesa.
TRANSACTIONS
By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PINEHURST, N.C. — With pig-
tails and plenty of giggles, Lucy
Li just wants to have fun like any
11-year-old girl.
Except that she’s playing the
biggest event in women’s golf.
Li, a sixth-grader from the
Redwood Shores who doesn’t
appear to be the least bit over-
whelmed by the attention around
her, became the youngest qualifier
in U.S. Women’s Open history
when she shot 68 at Half Moon
Bay last month to win her section-
al by seven shots.
She celebrated by having dinner
at her favorite restaurant and
watching “The Amazing
Spiderman 2.”
Now it’s time for the amazing
Lucy Li show.
“She looks so darn cute,” said
Michelle Wie, who didn’t make it
to her first Women’s Open until
she was 13. “I was like, ‘I don’t
think I looked that cute when I was
11.’ But she just looks so excited,
so wide-eyed. ... And I’m just real-
ly so excited for her to be out. It’s
a memory that will last her a life-
time. What other 11-year-old can
say that they played in the U.S.
Open at Pinehurst? And she got to
see the men play, too.”
Life is moving at warp speed for
little Lucy Li.
She only became serious about
golf four years ago when she set up
shop in Miami to work with Jim
McLean. Just two months ago, the
precocious 11-year-old with a
mouth full of braces won her age
division in the inaugural Drive,
Chip and Putt Championship at
Augusta National. And now she’s
at Pinehurst No. 2, ready to take
on the course where Martin
Kaymer won the U.S. Open on
Sunday.
“It’s awesome, right?” she said.
“I mean, Pinehurst and Augusta
National in like two months. I
mean, that’s just amazing. It’s
mi nd- bl owi ng
for me. It’s been
a w e s o m e ,
because it’s
been ... I mean,
the food is great
and it’s been a
lot of fun. I’ve
made a lot of
friends.”
There’s some-
thing about U.S. Women’s Open in
the North Carolina sandhills that
attracts all the kids.
Morgan Pressel qualified when
she was 12 and had just turned 13
when the Women’s Open was down
the street at Pine Needles in 2001
(Li wasn’t even born then). Lexi
Thompson qualified and played at
12 when it returned to Pine Needles
in 2007.
Too young? Both went on to win
major championships.
“Look, if you’re good enough,
you’re old enough — or young
enough, whichever way you look
at it,” Laura Davies said. “If you
can play the golf and you can qual-
ify, then have a go. What’s the
worst that can happen? She shoots
a million this week and everyone
says, ‘Wasn’t it great she was
here?’ So I don’t think anything
bad can come out of it because
she’s too young to worry about the
pressure.
“She’s just having fun. She’s got
a week off school. It’s perfect.”
Li looked as if she was having a
blast on a broiling day of practice
Tuesday. She went nine holes with
a local caddie. Then, it was time
for a press conference, which drew
the largest crowd of the day. Her
pigtails in braids, held by clips
the shape of hearts, she twirled in
her chair waiting for it to start.
She giggled before just about
every answer, including one about
whether her father could beat her.
She laughed. She laughed again.
And then she moved closer to the
microphone and said, “No.”
But the kid made one thing clear.
She’s not out to prove anything.
She not out to make history.
“The perfect week? I just want to
go out there and have fun and play
the best I can, and I really don’t
care about the outcome,” Li said. “I
want to have fun and learn. I want
to learn a lot from these great
players.”
She is not the youngest player
in Women’s Open history. Beverly
Klass was 10 when she played in
1967, before there was qualifying.
The youngest player to make the
cut was Marlene Hagge, who was
13 in the 1947 Open at Starmount
Forest in North Carolina.
Among the favorites this week
is Lydia Ko, the youngest LPGA
Tour winner in history at 15 in the
Canadian Women’s Open two years
ago.
Age is becoming irrelevant,
though something about the num-
ber “11” grabs the attention.
“I saw her on the range this
morning for the first time and did-
n’t really watch her hit any balls
— just how little she was, and the
pigtails kind of caught me off
guard,” Stacy Lewis said. “But I’m
not a big fan of it. She qualified, so
we can’t say anything about that.
You qualify for an Open, it’s a great
thing. I just like to see kids be suc-
cessful at every level before they
come out here.
“When I found out she qualified, I
said, ‘Well, where does she go
from here? What do you next?’ I
don’t know. If it was my kid, I
wouldn’t let her play in the U.S.
Open qualifier at 11. But that’s just
me.”
Li played in the U.S. Women’s
Amateur last year at 10. She was
the youngest to qualify for match
play at the U.S. Women’s Amateur
Public Links. The idea to try to
qualify for the Women’s Open was
“mine.”
“Because I wanted to go out there
and get the experience,” she said.
“Because it’s 36 holes and I didn’t
care if I qualified or not. I didn’t
think about it. I just wanted to go
for the experience.”
11-year-old Li just wants to have fun
Lucy Li
a run and make it 3-2. Eaton followed with a
slow grounder to shortstop that Brandon
Crawford fielded cleanly but threw wide of
first base after rushing to get the speedy
Eaton.
Eaton was credited with a single and one
RBI as both Ramirez and Viciedo scored for
the three-run lead. Crawford was charged
with an error for allowing the second run to
score and both runners (Flowers and Eaton)
to advance a base.
Chicago added three runs in the fifth to
break the game open. Adam Dunn had an
RBI single and two batters later Viciedo hit
a two-run, two-out homer for an 8-2 margin.
NOTES: Giants manager Bruce Bochy was
a teammate of Tony Gwynn’s and later man-
aged the Hall of Famer, who died Monday.
“Just a huge loss for baseball and San
Diego,” Bochy said. “We all know what a
great player he was and a great hitter. But he
is getting recognized for being such a
tremendous person.” . White Sox C Tyler
Flowers entered 18 for his last 109 at-bats
with 49 Ks as his average dropped to .250. .
Giants OF Angel Pagan (lower back) was out
of the lineup for a second straight game and
is listed as day-to-day. . C Buster Posey was
used at DH after taking a foul off mask on
Sunday. ... The finale of the brief two-game
series has a marquee pitching matchup of
RHP Tim Hudson (7-2, 1.81) vs. LHP Chris
Sale (5-1. 1.97).
16
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
“I ended up hitting a good chip and luckily
enough it trickled right into the hole,”
Ackerman said.
Slater’s putt missed wide right to give
Ackerman a spot in the Nor Cal playoffs May
19 at Sierra View Country Club in Sacramento.
Ackerman rallied for a 72 there and became just
the second ever Sacred Heart Prep golfer to
advance to the State Championship.
Because his deep postseason run was
unmatched among San Mateo County prep
golfers, Ackerman has been named the San
Mateo Daily Journal Boys’ Golfer of the Year.
“I was very fortunate for both the CCS
Championship and Nor Cals to be able to make
it high up off one stroke,” Ackerman said. “So,
I felt pretty lucky to have those opportunities.”
Ayear after his SHP teammate Bradley Knox
became the school’s first golfer to advance to
the State Championship, Ackerman took to the
San Gabriel Country Club on June 4 and shot a
disappointing 4-over-par 76. Still, it capped a
remarkable season for the junior after serving
as SHP’s No. 2 golfer behind the senior Knox.
“For me, just being able to make it to State
was probably the biggest achievement out of
everything,” Ackerman said. “Just being able
to compete with the best high school golfers
in California was a really good experience.”
The postseason run was well timed for
Ackerman, as it prefaced the U.S. Open appear-
ance of friend and former club teammate
Maverick McNealy. After competing against
one another during McNealy’s high school
career at Harker, the two teamed with Menlo
Park’s Sharon Heights golf team last summer.
“Just the fact he was able to qualify for a tour-
nament like that shows the quality of your
game, just that you’re able to compete with the
best players in the U.S. and the world,”
Ackerman said. “That’s the one tournament
that, if I were to play in one, that would be the
one.”
Following last season at Sharon Heights,
Ackerman got serious about fine-tuning his
swing. So, in August of last year, he switched
private instructors to work on mechanics with
Alex Murray at the Burlingame Golf Center.
And Murray quickly retooled Ackerman’s
swing.
“That showed positive effects almost
instantly,” Ackerman said. “I was just working
on getting my swing back onto an even
plane.”
Ackerman continued to tweak his inside
route to the ball throughout his season at SHP,
which admittedly took some months to entire-
ly iron out.
With his mechanics on the right track,
Ackerman will now get serious about choosing
a college. While he said he is still weighing his
options, he has all but ruled out following in
the footsteps of McNealy and Knox, both of
whom are going the Stanford route.
“I did previously talk to Stanford a little bit,”
Ackerman said. “I got to know [Stanford head
coach Conrad Ray] pretty well. But they’re fil l-
ing up pretty quick. There’s only one spot left
and I think they have that spot almost filled.
So, I’ve been talking to a bunch of schools
besides Stanford.”
Opening up doors for college opportunities
was precisely the reason Ackerman chose golf
entering into his freshman season at SHP.
Having previously excelled at baseball and
basketball, golf seemed an out-of-the-blue
choice as he was the first person in his family
ever to officially compete in the sport.
In fact, his and Knox’s historic postseason
accomplishments at SHP are not entirely new
territory for Ackerman. As a Little League base-
ball player, Ackerman was a catcher for the first
ever Half Moon Bay All-Star team to win a
District 52 championship with the 10-11 squad
in 2008.
“If baseball weren’t the same season as golf,
I probably would have played both … through-
out high school,” Ackerman said.
After three seasons with the Sacred Heart
Prep boys’ golf team, in which he keeps get-
ting better, it would seem Ackerman chose
wisely. And still, he has one more season to
define his legacy at the Atherton private
school.
Continued from page 11
GOLF
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
White Sox 8, Giants 2
Giants ab r h bi WhiteSox ab r h bi
Blanco lf 3 1 0 0 Eaton cf 4 1 2 1
Pence rf 5 1 2 1 GBckh 2b 4 1 1 2
Posey dh 4 0 1 1 Gillaspi 3b 4 1 2 0
Sandovl 3b4 0 2 0 JAreu 1b 4 1 1 0
Morse 1b 4 0 1 0 A.Dunn dh 4 1 1 1
HSnchz c 4 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 4 1 1 0
BCrwfr ss 4 0 1 0 Viciedo rf 4 2 2 2
J.Perez cf 4 0 0 0 De Aza lf 4 0 0 0
B.Hicks 2b2 0 0 0 Flowrs c 2 0 0 1
Totals 34 2 7 2 Totals 34 8 10 7
SanFrancisco 101 000 000 — 2
Chicago 002 330 00x — 8
E—B.Crawford (9), Al.Ramirez (7). DP—Chicago 1.
LOB—San Francisco 9, Chicago 3. HR—Pence (10),
G.Beckham (5),Viciedo (6). SB—Eaton (6).
San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO
M.Cain L,1-5 5 10 8 7 1 3
Petit 3 0 0 0 0 3
Chicago IP H R ER BB SO
Joh.Danks W,6-5 6 1-35 2 1 3 4
Guerra 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Putnam 1 1 0 0 0 1
D.Webb 1 0 0 0 1 0
WP—M.Cain.
Umpires—Home, Bill Miller; First, Mike Everitt; Second,
Chad Fairchild;Third,Vic Carapazza.
T—2:42. A—25,278 (40,615).
Ole Miss wins 2-1 in 9th,
ousts Texas Tech at CWS
OMAHA, Neb. — Pinch hitter John Gatlin’s
single into short right field over a pulled-in,
five-man infield in the bottom of the ninth
inning gave Mississippi a 2-1 victory over
Texas Tech in a College World Series elimina-
tion game Tuesday.
The exciting finish came after Texas Tech had
tied it in the top of the ninth on a couple daring
steals and a sacrifice fly.
Ole Miss (47-20) plays TCU or Virginia on
Thursday in another elimination game. The Red
Raiders (45-20) went 0-2 in their first CWS.
Ole Miss won after Colby Bortles walked
with one out. Brantley Bell hit a comebacker to
Cameron Smith, who tried to force out Bortles
at second. But he threw high into center field,
allowing Bortles to go to third.
Aaron Greenwood then pinch ran for Bortles,
Dominic Moreno came on to face Gatlin and
Texas Tech shifted an extra player to the left
side of the infield and went with only two out-
fielders. Gatlin punched a 1-2 pitch over second
base, Greenwood scored, and the celebration
was on.
Scott Weathersby (4-4) got the win for an
inning of relief of left-hander Christian Trent,
who allowed six hits, walked one and struck out
six in eight innings.
Sports brief
FOOD 17
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Craft brews are mixing it
up on the cocktail scene
By Michael Felberbaum
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cocktail connoisseurs are falling for craft beers in a new
way — as a mixer.
Bars around the country are tapping into the trend of mix-
ing artisanal brews with hard liquor to create new, refreshing
cocktails. Can’t see how it works? How about a bold stout
blended with white chocolate liqueur? Or maybe a mojito
made with blonde ale and rum?
Beer as a mixer isn’t new, but it has seen an uptick in
recent years, fueled largely by the flourishing market of
excellent craft beers, according to bar consultant Jacob
Grier, who’s publishing a book on beer cocktails next year
called “Cocktails on Tap.”
Beer is a versatile ingredient that “offers tons of different
possibilities that you wouldn’t get in other mixing spirits,”
he says. For example, malty or fruity beers add a sweet ele-
ment to a cocktail, hoppy beers add bitter and floral notes
and stouts can add a chocolate or roasted flavor.
Here are a couple of craft cocktail recipes for your July
Fourth festivities. They would be a fine way to celebrate
your freedom from plain-old light beers.
RICKEY BREW
Start to finish: 5 minutes
Servings: 1
1 ounce lime juice
1 ounce gin
1/4 cup fresh raspberries
8 ounces raspberry lambic, chilled
In a pilsner glass, combine the lime juice, gin and rasp-
berries, using the back of a spoon to crush the raspberries.
Fill with raspberry lambic, then stir gently just to combine.
BLACK CREAM
Start to finish: 5 minutes
Servings: 1
1 ounce Godiva liqueur
1 ounce coffee liqueur
4 ounces cream soda, chilled
4 ounces dark stout
In a tall glass, combine the Godiva and coffee liqueur.
Slowly pour the cream soda down the side of the glass, fol-
lowed by the stout.
Malty or fruity beers add a sweet element to a cocktail,hoppy beers add bitter and floral notes and stouts can add a chocolate
or roasted flavor.
18
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Mary Clare Jalonick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Food companies and
restaurants could soon face government
pressure to make their foods less salty —
a long-awaited federal effort to try to pre-
vent thousands of deaths each year from
heart disease and stroke.
The Food and Drug Administration is
preparing voluntary guidelines asking
the food industry to lower sodium levels,
FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg
told the Associated Press. Hamburg said
in a recent interview that the sodium is
“of huge interest and concern” to the
agency.
“We believe we can make a big impact
working with the industry to bring sodi-
um levels down, because the current level
of consumption really is higher than it
should be for health,” Hamburg said.
It’s still unclear when FDA will release
the guidelines, despite its 2013 goal to
have them completed this year.
Hamburg said she hoped the agency
would be able to publicly discuss the issue
“relatively soon.” On Tuesday, FDA
spokeswoman Erica Jefferson said there is
no set timeline for their release.
The food industry has already made
some reductions, and has prepared for
government action since a 2010 Institute
of Medicine report said companies had
not made enough progress on making
foods less salty.
FDA prepping long-awaited plan to reduce salt
groups, community forums, attending pre-
existing events and other strategies.
Proposed community engagement meeting
dates are for mid-September and the month
of October. Some expressed concerns about
the engagement being too drawn out.
“We’d be looking at this stuff effectively
in early January at best,” said committee
member Mark Hudak. “November and
December are worrisome to me from a tim-
ing standpoint. We just have to be cog-
nizant of giving people the opportunity to
give input, but being over inclusive and not
staying on task has its dangers too.”
Hudak suggested holding eight to 10
focused meetings, while soliciting others
with surveys.
Conversely, Superintendent Cynthia
Simms noted the engagement process will
be very important and that the Peninsula
Conflict Resolution Center, which may
facilitate the community engagement, will
sort and compile information efficiently.
“This is an opportunity to express opin-
ions; I don’t think we want to miss those
points,” she said. “Last time we did not
actively engage the support staff.”
The last time Simms is referring to is the
$130 million bond measure, which only
received 46.6 percent approval, short of 55
percent voter approval it required in
November 2013. The district’s Board of
Trustees placed Measure P on the ballot this
summer to rebuild and expand Bowditch
Middle School to add Foster City fifth-
graders and reopen Knolls Elementary
School in San Mateo for the 2016-17
school year. It would have cost property
owners $19 per $100,000 assessed proper-
ty value.
“People have asked what is the Next
Steps’ job? External and internal group
engagement,” Simms said. “It’s a big job,
there’s no way around it. … If we say this
has to be done by the end of October, they’ll
(Peninsula Conflict Resolution Center) be
done by the end of October. It’s up to you
(the committee) on how much input you
want.”
Through the outreach work, the commit-
tee is hoping to not only find overcrowding
solutions, but to also find ways to get a
bond measure passed to finance them.
Stakeholders the committee is looking to
reach out to include PTAs, teachers, parents,
newspapers, the “No on P” campaign, city
staff, unions, environmental groups,
politicians such as state Sen. Jerry Hill, D-
San Mateo, chambers of commerce in San
Mateo and Foster City, church groups, site
councils, Realtors, senior citizens and oth-
ers. Other engagement strategies the group
is looking at are phone surveys, home vis-
its, advertising, ice cream socials, design
thinking events, creating a website for Next
Steps and other methods.
Foster City Mayor Charlie Bronitsky,
along with City Manager Jim Hardy, and
San Mateo Mayor Robert Ross, along with
City Manager Larry Patterson, took part in
a recent meeting to address school capacity
and equity issues when it comes to increas-
ing enrollment.
Overall, making sure to involve the pub-
lic in the process is very important, many
committee members agreed.
“I think the risk would be so great not to
do this,” said committee member Larry
Lowenthal.
Hudak ultimately agreed, but does think
the process should be streamlined to a cer-
tain extent, so people have an opportunity
to speak without it becoming overwhelm-
i ng.
“During my eight years on the school
board, I learned process is much more
important in the school setting than in the
other settings in which I find myself,” he
said. “Although I’m somewhat skeptical we
can be done with all this, I find myself
reaching the same conclusion as I think
everyone else does. If we don’t go through
it, the process will come back to haunt us.”
Meanwhile, Ed Coady, board trustee and
committee member, did agree the process
seems a bit ambitious, but observed commu-
nity outreach for a new calendar schedule
and noticed it was well done. Committee
member Gloria Brown noted the group is
going to need quite a few facilitators.
“I just think we’ll need the cream of the
crop — whatever that looks like,” she said.
Following the community feedback, Next
Steps’ job is to narrow it down and say these
are the best six ideas and ask the communi-
ty what it thinks about them, Simms said.
Additionally, Simms suggested the for
Next Steps members give updates to the
school board themselves.
“It humanizes our committee if the public
and board members see us,” Lowenthal said.
“We might want to rotate through so each
face gets one showing in front of the board
and those other stakeholders.”
At the next committee meeting, consult-
ants will bring a community engagement
proposal.
Continued from page 1
NEXT STEPS
FOOD 19
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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as high as the barreling waves will
involve broadcasting licenses and per-
haps, one day, inviting women to
compete on the ocean’s stage.
The new partnership will be Cartel’s
first real venture into the surfing
sphere and the Invitational directors’
chance to receive support.
Organizing the competition has
hinged on volatile factors such as a
mere 48-hour-notice before it begins,
sweating over gaining enough spon-
sors to put on the event and enticing
the athletes to risk their lives with a
meager purse prize, Overfelt said.
“Right now, the surfing industry has
no money. We’re begging to pay for
the event through our sponsors. But
they can only give us what they can
give us,” Overfelt said. “There’s
always been room for the right person
to step up and I think for the first time
… I think the proper steward for
Mavericks Invitational has showed
himself, unveiled himself.”
Emphasis on talent
Overfelt said he was introduced to
Guess a few months ago through big
wave rider, record holder and avid
Invitational competitor Shawn Dollar
from Santa Cruz.
Since then, the board and Cartel have
hit the ground sprinting.
The title of the competition may
change, a romantic story line
immersed in the local history will
evolve and driving Mavericks as year-
round brand could bring fiscal stability
and national attention to the event,
Guess said.
Guess, who lives in Santa Cruz with
his supermodel wife Marissa Miller,
said working with Dollar and getting
to know Invitational organizers
spurred his desire to spotlight the
renowned surf break.
“I think the interest that originated,
just piqued my attention, was the tal-
ent. And as a close connection with a
lot of these big wave surfers that are
local to Santa Cruz and the Bay Area
and over time, I’ve built a relationship
with those folks and hear what they’re
looking for as an artist,” Guess said.
“It started casual and I really kind of
started to understand the more granular
details of what they were doing really
well, what they were looking for,
where they wanted to take it. They real-
ly started to divulge all of it. The his-
tory of the wave, just so many ele-
ments that I saw a lot of potential in.”
Guess said there are four pillars on
which he wants to focus: the wave, the
athletes, the community and the brand.
Deriving a payoff worthy of those
who risk their lives on the perilous
waves and providing for the athletes
were primary reasons why Overfelt
said he was drawn to Guess and Cartel.
“He just wants to fix it. So he’s got
the passion for the athletes, to take
care of them. He loves the rogue-ness
and the difficulty the event has given
other people in the past, he likes the
challenge,” Overfelt said. “Get this
thing under a premium platform where
it belongs. These guys can die out
there, they have died out there, they
need to be protected, they need to get a
reward.”
Right now, a lot of the athletes are
paying their own way for hotels,
flights and other expenses, and Guess
said that’s going to change now that
he’s on board.
‘A true invitational’
“We are going to make the new
Mavericks an element for really a
story line that is really based on a true
invitational. We are inviting these tal-
ents or these athletes. They are invited
to come to our community to our event
and be part of our brand, part of that
means they are cared for,” Guess said.
“They’re not going to have to cover
their bar tabs at the end of the night.
… Because they’re performing for us
on this phenomenal stage, we want to
be able to honor them and give them
worth in a way that translates, because
of the risk that they take.”
Guess, Overfelt and Clark all said
Mavericks will stay true to its local
history and lineage.
Guess said this new partnership isn’t
a merger; it’s an acquisition of respon-
sibilities that he’ll take to heart by
keeping Mavericks authentic to Half
Moon Bay and bringing in the type of
sponsors that will respect that.
“I thrive off their energy, I thrive off
their loyalty and community and
frankly, just really respect what
they’re doing, and really just using all
of that. I’m just inspired. There you
go, I’m just really damned inspired,”
Guess said. “We’re excited to [bind]
together and hold those hands and all
collectively make this thing great,
because this is a big project. It’s kind
of funny, the wave is as big as this
project.”
Continued from page 1
MAVERICKS State lawmakers reject
sugary drink warnings
By Fenit Nirappil
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Abill that would have made California
the first state in the nation to require warning labels on sodas
and other sugary drinks was effectively killed Tuesday.
Sen. Bill Monning’s SB1000 failed on a 7-8 vote as his
fellow Democratic lawmakers doubted whether a label would
change consumer behavior. It needed 10 votes to pass.
Certain sodas, energy drinks and fruit drinks would have
included a label reading, “STATE OF CALIFORNIA SAFETY
WARNING: Drinking beverages with added sugar(s) con-
tributes to obesity, diabetes, and tooth decay.”
It was developed by public health advocates using ciga-
rette and alcohol warnings as a model. Representatives of
the beverage industry argued that the bill was unfair by not
applying to other foods and drinks, including lattes and
chocolate milk.
Monning, of Carmel, says warning labels would be the
most efficacious tool for educating people about the dangers
of sugary drinks.
“Changing behavior is the hardest challenge in the world
of medicine,” Monning told lawmakers before the vote. “But
you can’t start to even make a commitment to make behav-
ior change if you don’t have the information.”
DATEBOOK 20
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18
Computer Class: Google Drive.
10:30 a.m. Belmont Library. For more
information call 591-8286.
Free lecture: Government Benefits
and Senior Citizens. Noon. San
Mateo County Law Library, 710
Hamilton St., Redwood City. For
more information go to
www.smclawlibrary.org or email
Andre Gurthet at
agurthet@smclawlibrary.org.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
weekly networking lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Admission is
free and lunch is $17. For more infor-
mation call 430-6500 or email Mike
Foor at mike@mikefoor.com.
Meet the K-9 Unit of the San
Mateo Police. 4 p.m. San Mateo
Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San
Mateo. Free. For more information
call 522-7838.
Music in the Park 2014. 6 p.m. to 8
p.m. Stafford Park, corner of King
Street and Hopkins Ave., Redwood
City. Every Wednesday through Aug.
13. Free. For more information call
780-7311.
Lecture: Your voice, your feminine
power, your job. 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.,
KeyPoint Credit Union, 2805 Bowers
Ave., Santa Clara. For more informa-
tion email Cathy Ritter at
lynn@lynnkirkham.com.
Fox Club Blues Jam. 7 p.m.-11 p.m.,
doors open at 6:30 p.m. Club Fox,
2209 Broadway, Redwood City. The
best blues jam on the planet. $5
cover. For more information go to
rwcbluesjam.com.
Windrider Film Forum. 7 p.m.
Performing Arts Center, 555
Middlefield Road, Atherton. $15 gen-
eral and $10 for students. For more
information email
lucycalder10@gmail.com.
‘How Can We Solve California’s
Water Crisis?’ 7 p.m. Burlingame
Public Library, 480 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. Presented by the
Citizens Environmental Council of
Burlingame. For more information
contact John Piche at piche@plsin-
fo.org.
Lifetree Cafe Conversations: Does
God Play Favorites? 7 p.m. Bethany
Lutheran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. Complimentary snacks
and beverages will be served. For
more information call 854-5897.
Peninsula Quilters Guild Meeting.
7 p.m. to 9 p.m. San Mateo Garden
Center, 605 Parkside Way, San Mateo.
Patricia Belyea presents ‘Embracing
the Creative Needle’. $5. For more
information go to www.peninsu-
laquilters.org.
THURSDAY, JUNE 19
Lifetree Cafe Conversations: Does
God Play Favorites? 9:15 a.m.
Bethany Lutheran Church, 1095
Cloud Ave., Menlo Park.
Complimentary snacks and bever-
ages will be served. For more infor-
mation call 854-5897.
‘Living Well with Chronic
Conditions.’ 9:30 a.m. to noon. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. Six week
program. Free. For more information
call 616-7150.
AARP Meeting. 11 a.m. Beresford
Recreation Center, 2729 Alameda de
las Plugas, San Mateo. The meeting,
held by San Mateo Chapter 139, will
be followed by Hawaiian music sung
by Paul Aea. For more information
call 345-5001.
Creative writing workshops:
‘Write your life — memoir writ-
ing.’ 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Little
House, 800 Middle Ave., Menlo Park.
$15. For more information email but-
ler-phyllis@att.net.
Peopleologie: Making coiled clay
pots. 2 p.m. San Mateo Main Public
Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo.
Part of the Paws to Read summer
program for children. Free. For more
information call 522-7818.
Movies on the Square 2014. 8:45
p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free.
Catching Fire will be showing. For
more information call 780-7311.
FRIDAY, JUNE 20
San Mateo Sunrise Rotary Club
meeting featuring guest speaker
Michelle Bologna. 7:30 a.m. Crystal
Springs Golf Course, 6650 Golf
Course Drive, Burlingame. Bologna
will give a presentation entitled
‘Natural & Environmental Property
Hazards.’ Fee of attending is $15 and
includes breakfast. For more infor-
mation and to RSVP call Jake at 515-
5891.
Discover Nature at Filoli. 10 a.m. to
3 p.m. 86 Cañada Road, Woodside.
For more information go to
www.filoli.org.
Music Performance. 11 a.m. to
noon. San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno.
Free. For more information call 616-
7150.
Food Truck Friday. 11:30 a.m. to 8
p.m. Devil’s Canyon Brewery, 935
Washington St., San Carlos. For more
information email Daniel Curran at
Dan@DevilsCanyon.com.
Twentieth Century History and
Music Class. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. $2 drop-in
fee. For more information call 616-
7150.
Artists talk and gallery opening
and the Studio Shop. 5 p.m. The
Studio Shop, 244 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. Features Linda
Christensen, Katy Kuhn, Nick
Paciorek and Lawrence Morrell. For
more information go to www.thes-
tudioshop.com.
Music on the Square: Mustache
Harbor. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Courthouse
Square, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. Free. For more information call
780-7311.
Fifth Annual St. Peter Rummage
Sale. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. St. Peter
Church, 700 Oddstad Blvd., Pacifica.
$5 for this early bird time. Continues
on Saturday, June 21 from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. and Sunday, June 22 from 9 a.m.
to 2:30 p.m. Admission is free on
Saturday and Sunday. For more
information email Charleene Smith
at cjsmith26@att.net.
Stanford Jazz Festival. 6 p.m.
Stanford Shopping Center, 660
Stanford Shopping Center, Palo Alto.
Festival continues through Aug. 9.
For more information go to stan-
fordjazzfestival.org or call 725-2787.
Teen Night: Potluck and Games.
6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Menlo Park
Library, 800 Alma St., Menlo Park. The
library will provide sandwiches and
light refreshments. Bring a dish to
share with others. Registration
required. Free. For more information
go to
http://menlopark.org/DocumentCe
nter/View/404.
Windrider Film Forum. 7 p.m.
Performing Arts Center, 555
Middlefield Road, Atherton. $15 gen-
eral and $10 for students. For more
information email
lucycalder10@gmail.com.
Foster City Monthly Social Dance.
7:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Foster City
Recreation Center, 650 Shell Blvd.,
Foster City. Waltz lessons from 7:30
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Ballroom dance
party 8:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Snacks
included. Couples and singles wel-
come. $12 from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30
p.m., which includes dance lesson.
$10 after 8:30 p.m. For more infor-
mation contact Cheryl Steeper at
571-0836.
Summer movie night: ‘Monsters
University.’ 8:30 p.m. Burton Park,
San Carlos. Free. For more informa-
tion call 802-4382. Free.
SATURDAY, JUNE 21
Half Moon Bay Shakespeare
Announce Auditions. Auditioners
will need to prepare a three-minute
monologue from one of
Shakespeare’s Comedies and may
also be asked to sing a capella. Email
a head shot and resume to half-
moonbayshakes@gmail.com or mail
to HMB Shakespeare, P.O. Box 112,
HMB, CA 94019. For more informa-
tion email
halfmoonbayshakes@gmail.com.
Family Feud, Earthquake Edition. 9
a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Burlingame Public
Library, Lane Room, 480 Primrose
Road, Burlingame. RSVP by June 14.
Free. For more information email
info@theneighborhoodnetwork.org.
Fifth Annual St. Peter Rummage
Sale. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. St. Peter Church,
700 Oddstad Blvd., Pacifica.
Continues on Sunday, June 22 from
9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Admission is free.
For more information email
Charleene Smith at
cjsmith26@att.net.
Walk with a Doc in Downtown San
Mateo. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Central
Park, 50 E. Fifth Ave., San Mateo.
Enjoy a stroll with physician volun-
teers who can answer your health-
related questions along the way.
Free. For more information contact
smcma@smcma.org.
Discover Nature at Filoli. 10 a.m. to
3 p.m. 86 Cañada Road, Woodside.
For more information go to
www.filoli.org.
Wags and Whiskers Festival. 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. Cañada College, 4200
Farm Hill Blvd., Redwood City. There
will be music, animals up for adop-
tion, prizes, food trucks and much
more. $10 for adults, $5 for children
under 13. For more information call
367-1405.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
session that garnered lots of interest.
“[Central Park] is the most historic
park the city has and … it’s adjacent to
downtown, so those for us really stand
out as the two features about Central
Park that really can’t be replicated
anywhere else,” said Parks and
Recreation Director Sheila Canzian.
The park will retain its historical
attributes like the Kohl Pumphouse
and Japanese Tea Garden, but the city
may consider removing its children’s
train.
Vice Mayor Maureen Freschet, how-
ever, said she’d like to keep the train
she remembers riding as a child.
“I think a lot of people bring their
children to the park for the train,”
Freschet said. “There aren’t any amuse-
ment parks around here and short of
kids going to the carnival and the fair,
it’s sort of a unique thing.”
Sporting ideas for the park include
rotating the baseball field, reducing
the size of the current 2,000-seat
bleachers, relocating the tennis courts
and building a skate park.
Enhancements could include creating a
focal point like a fountain, construct-
ing a performance area or stage to host
events and adding a dog park. The city
will consider altering the parking lay-
out wants to create more inviting
entrances, particularly along Fifth
Avenue and into downtown.
“I don’t know many cities that have
16 acres of park right in their town’s
center. We really have a special ameni-
ty here and we really want to do the
right thing. And I agree, we’re way
overdue for this,” said Councilman
Jack Matthews.
Many ideas were discussed yet no
decisions have been made. The council
did agree updating the recreation center
would be a priority. However, whether
to relocate it elsewhere in the park,
build it multiple stories tall and large
enough to allow for a variety of activi-
ties, is still up for debate.
Central Park’s current recreation
center is managed by Self Help for the
Elderly, which draws hundreds of
members from San Francisco to Santa
Clara. The council remained thankful
for the work and resources the pro-
gram offers to seniors in the area and
wants to continue its relationship
with the organization, but the city
will consider either offering it anoth-
er location or space in a new recre-
ation center.
Unlike Central Park’s recreation
center, modern ones are used different-
l y, Canzian said.
“In today’s world of community cen-
ters, they are much larger, they have
many more amenities that can work
together so a whole family can come
down,” Canzian said. “Many of these
larger facilities that have a variety of
facilities, a gymnasium and a pool and
those kinds of things, many around
the country are really operating at 95
percent recovery [of expenses].”
However, city officials said Central
Park might not be large enough to
accommodate a recreation center of
that size while still retaining a lot of
open space.
Freschet asked staff to look into
where it could build a large recreation
center and whether locations like the
park at Bay Meadows would be viable
alternatives.
Running and staffing a large-scale
recreation center is an undertaking and
Ross said it might need to be a few sto-
ries tall with potentially relocating
the tennis courts on top.
Ross said he wants to make sure
focusing on Central Park won’t detract
from other parks that also need
healthy recreation centers.
“Build it to enable families to get
full usage. So mom could be doing
Pilates while one of the kids is [baby-
sat] or in another class. The real chal-
lenge is how do we make it a center
that allows so many uses that it does
help pay for itself,” Ross said. “I think
it’s really important that we don’t lose
any of these other parks, especially on
our east side of town, because the
socioeconomics are a little less there
and some of the children are a little
less privileged and really need these
rec centers.”
With the population booming
alongside the growth of transit-orient-
ed developments along the Peninsula,
the council and public stressed the
need to maintain open spaces.
“As the density of housing is bound
to increase in San Mateo and therefore
the population grows, it’s going to be
all the more important to have more
open space to sort of counterbalance
some of that,” said John Hershberger,
a resident at the Gramercy on the Park
apartments next to Central Park.
Councilman Joe Goethals said the
park is an asset and although it may be
difficult, if at all feasible, he’d like to
look at expanding the park.
Freschet said crafting Central Park’s
Master Plan is an exciting venture that
is critical for the city’s future.
“As we’re getting more and more
dense in population and doing more
transit-oriented development, more
and more people are going to start to
look at our parks as an oasis to go to
relax and enjoy nature. So we want to
maintain it,” Freschet said. “We want
to keep as much open space as we can,
but be very deliberate in how we design
these things, so there’s something for
everybody. ”
City staff will continue to prepare
ideas for the Central Park Master Plan
and present it to council near the year’s
end. For more information visit
www.cityofsanmateo.org.
Continued from page 1
PARK
done on the site.
“We had agreed already to have cer-
tain housekeeping manners taken care
of, but objected to anything that
looked like it was a continuation of
construction,” the alliance’s attorney
Kevin Haroff said Tuesday. “She
(Weiner) expressed a lot of skepticism
on the structural work on the two build-
ings. … We would have liked to have
gotten it all wrapped up today, but the
judge seemed in favor of our position.”
Weiner also seemed apt to appoint an
independent consultant to see what’s
necessary to ensure the buildings are
safe, Haroff said.
With a full EIR, the school would
likely open in 2018, board Vice
President Mark Intrieri said. Growing
enrollment in the district resulted in
the purchase of the previously-closed
Hoover Elementary School in 2010.
The district is projected to grow to
3,500 students by 2018 from its cur-
rent size of 3,234 students, MacIsaac
said. Since the purchase, the district
worked to renovate the building to
meet current standards. The plan for the
school called for two 8-foot-wide curb-
side bays to be created for pickup and
dropoff along the west side of Summit
Drive adjacent to the school providing
enough curb space for 15 cars. The
existing school site curb would be
shifted west to provide for the bays and
two 10-foot-wide vehicle travel lanes,
which will increase the width of
Summit Drive to 17 feet in some areas.
“It’s a good thing she (Weiner) wants
to go and tour the site,” MacIsaac said.
“I’m hopeful she will allow us to make
sure the site is safe and safe for the
community around it. We’re trying to
make sure it is stable.”
Alot of work was put into the foun-
dation, but the structure on top is not as
solid, she said.
“We’re trying to secure it so we can
move forward with an EIR,” she said.
Hoover was founded in 1931, closed
in 1979 and repurchased by the district
for $4.8 million in 2010. Measure D, a
$56 million bond measure passed by
voters in November 2012, was used to
cover most of the costs. The overall
budget for Hoover was $23 million and
the district has not gone over that
budget, MacIsaac said.
Another hearing date has not been
set.
Continued from page 1
HOOVER
COMICS/GAMES
6-18-14
TUESDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Young screecher
6 Jostles
12 — over (fainted)
14 Cafe — —
15 Relaxed
16 Like sandpaper
17 Teachers’ org.
18 Guitarist — Paul
19 Family member
21 Ernesto Guevara
23 Sault — Marie
26 Pound sound
27 Mother rabbit
28 Props
30 Mr. Brynner
31 German conjunction
32 Take over
33 Polygraph flunkers
35 Guy’s date
37 Felt boot
38 Own up
39 Nonflying bird
40 Clean air org.
41 Just a —!
42 Avail oneself of
43 Dallas hrs.
44 Oola’s Alley —
46 Phooey!
48 Free
51 Cover stories
55 Spice grinder
56 Digestive fluid
57 Stunned
58 Add lanes
DOWN
1 Approves
2 Small
3 Guided
4 Large antelope
5 Monsieur’s pate
6 Aerie builder
7 Entice
8 — out (is ecstatic)
9 Feedbag tidbit
10 Humor
11 Hog’s spot
13 Minor cleric
19 Stonehenge frequenters
20 Ignited
22 Won’t commit
24 Pantyhose shades
25 Spellbound
26 Jean Auel heroine
27 Check for fingerprints
28 Dilly
29 Pet adoption org.
34 Cannoli filling
36 They have pseudopods
42 In a foul mood
43 — con carne
45 Fixes a squeak
47 — — unto itself
48 College stat
49 Avg. size
50 Cigar residue
52 Make an offer
53 — had it!
54 — Andreas Fault
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18, 2014
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Don’t become lazy in
your work habits. Your peers depend on you to do your
best. There are skilled people willing to jump in and
take your place. Protect your reputation.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — You should
concentrate on romantic and sentimental issues.
It’s likely someone you love feels the same way,
so make plans to do something special. Self-
improvement projects will pay off.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Consider remodeling or
redesigning your home. Check out real estate in
your region to get a host of good ideas that will help
improve your domestic scene.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Don’t make any spur-
of-the-moment decisions. Question the motives of
someone who is trying to talk you into a controversial
or unproven investment. Protect your assets.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Let everyone know about
your innovative ideas. Applying your creative talents to
your work will help you outmaneuver any competition
you encounter. Put your best foot forward.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Invest in you. Don’t
hesitate to seize an opportunity. Get the ball rolling
and turn your dreams into reality. It’s up to you to
make things happen.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Don’t wait until
it’s too late. If something isn’t going your way, deal
with it head-on. You’ll feel much better once you know
you have nothing to worry about.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Listen to the
voice of experience. Your friends and relatives want
to help. They have faith in your talents and will do
the best they can on your behalf.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — You will gain a lot of
meaningful insight and information if you listen to an
older or more experienced friend or relative. Free your
head of distractions and offer your undivided attention.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — You may feel let down
if someone decides to do things without you. Let him
or her have some space, and look for an activity you
can pursue on your own.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — A little exploring could
lead you to discover what is going on behind the
scenes. Someone will try to withhold vital information
regarding a decision you need to make.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Don’t let restlessness
lead to trouble. A good cure for boredom is doing yard
work or home repairs. You can avoid complaints if you
take care of responsibilities without being asked.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
BUS DRIVER JOBS
AVAILABLE TODAY
AT MV TRANSPORTATION
Join us in providing safe, reliable and professional community
transportation in San Mateo County.
Please call:
Redwood City 934 Brewster Ave (650) 482-9370
CDLDrivers
needed immediately for Passenger Vehicle and
Small Bus routes.
Paid classroom and behind-the-wheel training from exception-
al instructors and trainers. The future is bright for Bus Drivers
with an expected 12.5% growth in positions over the next ten
years!
MV Transportation, Inc. provides equal employment and affir-
mative action opportunities to minorities, females, veterans,
and disabled individuals, as well as other protected groups.
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
HOME CARE AIDES
IMMEDIATE POSITIONS
Live-ins
Part Time and Full Time
Accepting applications only through June 24.
CNAs skills and CDL a must.
Call 650.343.1945
and/or send resume to kris@huddlestoncare.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
Limo Driver, Wanted, full time, paid
weekly, between $500 and $700,
(650)921-2071
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
DELIVERY / SET UP
Party rental equipment
Approx. $20 an hour.
Must have own uncovered pickup.
Tom, (650)218-3693
110 Employment
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Customer Service
Are you…..Dependable, friendly,
detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English
skills, a desire for steady
employment and employment
benefits?
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: 650-342-6978
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS,
HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 200
San Mateo, CA 94401
Please Call
650-206-5200
Or Toll Free:
800-380-7988
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or apply
online at www.assistainhomecare.com
110 Employment
- MECHANIC -
Lyngso Garden Materials, Inc has
an opening for a Maintenance Me-
chanic with recent experience as a
diesel mechanic servicing medium
to heavy-duty diesel trucks. Com-
petitive pay rate depends on quali-
fications. E-mail resume to hre-
sources@lyngsogarden.com or fax
to 650.361.1933
Lyngso Garden Materials, Inc is an
established company located in the
San Francisco Bay Area and is a
leading retailer of hardscape and
organic garden materials. Employ-
ees enjoy a friendly and dynamic
work environment. The company
has a reputation for a high level of
customer service and offers excel-
lent compensation and a full bene-
fit package including medical and
dental coverage after three
months, 401K, profit sharing and
two weeks’ vacation accrual during
the first year.
DRIVERS FOR TAXIS
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed per Month. Taxi Permit
required Call (650)703-8654
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part
time, various shifts. Counter help plus,
must speak English. Apply at Laun-
derLand, 995 El Camino, Menlo Park.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
23 Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NOW HIRING
Kitchen Staff
$9.00 per hr.
Apply in Person at or
email resume to
info@greenhillsretirement.com
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
DOJ/FBI Clearance required
OFFICE ASSISTANT
NEEDED!
24 Hours per week
Looking to hire someone
immediately!
Candidates must have
Quickbooks, Excel, and
some technical ability.
Apply in person at or send
your resume to:
William Colwell
Pecabu Inc.
1900 O'Farrell Street.
Suite 180
San Mateo CA 94403
650 274-0576 xt. 101
Email your resume to:
wcolwell@pecabu.com
RESTAURANT
EXPERIENCED Cook needed, full time,
$12 per hour. Bilingual Preferred. Apply
Original Nick's Pizzeria and Pub. Phone
calls only (650)389-4505 Ask for Jose
RETAIL -
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
EXPERIENCED DIAMOND
SALES ASSOC& ASST MGR
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
SALES TRAINEE Established CA con-
tractor (30 yrs.) looking to train a few
reps for newly established local branch.
Full support, including leads, exclusive
services & products. Career Opportunity
$1,500/week and up + expenses. Call
(650)372-2812 or fax (1) one page to
(650)372-2816
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260939
The following person is doing business
as: McCulloch Capital Advisors, 20 Per-
simmon Ct., BURLINGAME, CA 94010
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Eric Sigler, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Eric Sigler /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/23/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/28/14, 06/04/14, 06/11/14 06/18/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260861
The following person is doing business
as: The Hearing Aid Store, 260 Main St.,
Ste. F, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Northland Hearing Center, Inc, MN. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 04/22/2014.
/s/ Susan Mussell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/19/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/28/14, 06/04/14, 06/11/14 06/18/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260940
The following person is doing business
as: Bellevue Villa, 500 El Camino Real,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: 451 Lee
st, LLC, CA. The business is conducted
by a Limited Liability Company. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Edward K. Tam /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/23/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/28/14, 06/04/14, 06/11/14 06/18/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260901
The following person is doing business
as: City Entertainment, 130 Produce
Ave., Ste.A, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Stars International In-
vestment Corp, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Xin Pan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/21/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/28/14, 06/04/14, 06/11/14 06/18/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260589
The following person is doing business
as: Central Market, 517 S. B St., SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Karen P. Oda,
158 Belvedere, San Carlos, CA 94070.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Karen P. Oda /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/29/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/28/14, 06/04/14, 06/11/14 06/18/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261035
The following person is doing business
as: HSUB, 1001 Bayhill Drive, 2nd floor,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Boon G.
Teoh, 563 San Diego Ave., Daly City, CA
94014. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Boon G. Teoh/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/19/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/04/14, 06/11/14, 06/18/14, 06/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260976
The following person is doing business
as: BitCan, 800 Concar Drive Suite 100,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Vaulterus,
LLC The business is conducted by a
Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN onJanuary 2014
/s/ Ingrid C. Swenson/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/28/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/04/14, 06/11/14, 06/18/14, 06/25/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260977
The following person is doing business
as: Morpheus, 800 Concar Drive, Suite
100, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Mor-
pheus Data, LLC, same address. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN onJuly 2013
/s/ Ingrid C. Swenson/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/28/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/04/14, 06/11/14, 06/18/14, 06/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261038
The following person is doing business
as: Landsthetics, 2400 Gloria Way #104,
EAST PALO ALTO, CA 94303 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Juan
Moya, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Juan Moya/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/03/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/04/14, 06/11/14, 06/18/14, 06/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260992
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Anthony M. Payne Real Estate 2)
Anthony M.Payne Property Manage-
ment, 81 Orange Court, DALY CITY, CA
94014 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Anthony Martin Payne, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A
/s/ Anthony Martin Payne/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/29/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/04/14, 06/11/14, 06/18/14, 06/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261135
The following person is doing business
as: Morales Fresh Produce, 131 Termi-
nal Ct., Stall 40B, SOUTH SAN FRAN-
CISCO, CA 94080 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Juan Bernardo
Morales, 413 El Camino Real, Burlin-
game, CA 94010. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Juan Bernardo Morales /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/09/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/11/14, 06/18/14, 06/25/14, 07/02/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261101
The following person is doing business
as: SJC Electric, 77 E. 21 Ave., #B, SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Stephen James
Chibidakis, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Juan Bernardo Morales /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/05/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/11/14, 06/18/14, 06/25/14, 07/02/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261093
The following person is doing business
as: TCW Properties, 161 W. 25th Ave.
Ste 207, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Thomas Werbe, 1830 Parkwood Dr.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Thomas Werbe /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/05/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/11/14, 06/18/14, 06/25/14, 07/02/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260913
The following person is doing business
as: American Health Medical Group,
1900 O’Farrell St., Ste 250, SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Alpha Omega Pain
Medicine Associates, A Medical Group,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
05/09/2014.
/s/ Dr. William G. Brose /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/22/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/11/14, 06/18/14, 06/25/14, 07/02/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261234
The following person is doing business
as: Scherzo Music School, 173 South
Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Scher-
zo Piano Corp., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 06/01/14
/s/ Aurelio Pena Torres /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/16/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/18/14, 06/25/14, 07/02/14, 07/09/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261247
The following person is doing business
as: NewCoda, 1400 Marsten Rd., #N,
Burlingame, CA 94010 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Ryan Sig-
man, 1285 Hamilton Ave., Palo Alto, CA
94301. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Ryan Sigman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/16/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/18/14, 06/25/14, 07/02/14, 07/09/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260912
The following person is doing business
as: Pinnacle Real Estate. 520 South El
Camino Real, Suite 620. SAN MATEO,
CA 94402 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Robert Reyes, 520
South El Camino Real, Suite 600, SAN
MATEO, CA 94402. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 05/01/2014
/s/ Robert Reyes /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/22/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/18/14, 06/25/14, 07/02/14, 07/09/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261229
The following person is doing business
as: Bellagio Nail & Spa, 1784 El Camino
Real, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Da-
vid Truong, 1467 Sunny Court, San
Jose, CA 95116. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 06/15/2014
/s/ David S. Truong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/18/14, 06/25/14, 07/02/14, 07/09/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261054
The following person is doing business
as: Jeka Accessory, 600 Elm Ave.. SAN
BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Zi Ye, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Zi Ye /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/03/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/18/14, 06/25/14, 07/02/14, 07/09/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261220
The following person is doing business
as: ASPEN, 5 Pine Court, Hillsborough,
CA 94010 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Nelson Li, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Nelson Li /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/18/14, 06/25/14, 07/02/14, 07/09/14).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
ANNE M. PAYE
Case Number: 124554
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Anne M. Paye. A Peti-
tion for Probate has been filed by Amy
Paye Venuto in the Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Amy
Paye Venuto be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests the descedant’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The willand any codicils are availa-
ble for examination in tehfile kept by the
court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ister the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: July 11, 2014 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal au-
thority may affect your rights as a cred-
itor. You may want to consult with an at-
torney knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
203 Public Notices
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Donald G. Dougherty, Jr.
Carter, Dougherty, McGuire & Keiley
2397 Forest Ave.
SAN JOSE, CA 95128
(408)241-2121
Dated: June 5, 2014
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on June 11, 18, 25, 2014.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - silver locket on May 6, Crest-
view and Club Dr. Call to describe:
(650)598-0823
FOUND: KEYS (3) on ring with 49'ers
belt clip. One is car key to a Honda.
Found in Home Depot parking lot in San
Carlos on Sunday 2/23/14.
Call 650 490-0921 - Leave message if no
answer.
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST HEARING AID
Inside a silver color case. Lost around
May 15 in Burlingame possibly near
Lunardi’s or Our Lady of Angels
Church. Please let me know if you’ve
found it! Call FOUND!
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
50 SHADES of Grey Trilogy, Excellent
Condition $25. (650)615-0256
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
24
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Books
BOOKS, PAPERBACK/HARD cover,
Coonts, Higgins, Thor, Follet, Brown,
more $20.00 for 60 books, (650)578-
9208
295 Art
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest
Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169
296 Appliances
HOOD, G.E. Good condition, clean,
white.. $30. (650)348-5169
OMELETTE MAKER $10. also hot pock-
ets, etc. EZ clean 650-595-3933
PONDEROSA WOOD STOVE, like
new, used one load for only 14 hours.
$1,200. Call (650)333-4400
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SANYO REFRIGERATOR with size 33”
high & 20" wide in very good condition
$85. 650-756-9516.
SEARS KENMORE sewing machine in a
good cabinet style, running smoothly
$99. 650-756-9516.
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
MAGNA 26” Female Bike, like brand
new cond $80. (650)756-9516. Daly City
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all
(650)365-3987
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
298 Collectibles
FRANKLIN MINT Thimble collection with
display rack. $55. 650-291-4779
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
299 Computers
1982 TEXAS Instruments TI-99/4A com-
puter, new condition, complete accesso-
ries, original box. $75. (650)676-0974
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all
(650)365-3987
HOCKEY FIGURES, unopened boxes
from 2000 MVP players, 20 boxes $5.00
each
K'NEX BUILDING ideas $30. (650)622-
6695
LEGO DUPLO Set ages 1 to 5. $30
(650)622-6695
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
SMALL WOOD dollhouse 4 furnished
rooms. $35 650-558-8142
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $700. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
302 Antiques
PERSIAN RUGS
(650)242-6591
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
OLD STYLE 32 inch Samsung TV. Free
with pickup. Call 650-871-5078.
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
SONY TRINITRON 21” Color TV. Great
Picture and Sound. $39. (650)302-2143
WESTINGHOUSE 32” Flatscreen TV,
model#SK32H240S, with HDMI plug in
and remote, excellent condition. Two
available, $175 each. (650)400-4174
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
3 PIECE cocktail table with 2 end tables,
glass tops. good condition, $99.
(650)574-4021l
BED RAIL, Adjustable. For adult safety
like new $95 (650)343-8206
BURGUNDY VELVET reupholstered vin-
tage chair. $75. Excellent condition.
650-861-0088
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549
COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for key-
board, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
FREE SOFA and love seat set. good
condtion (650)630-2329
304 Furniture
FULL SIZE mattress & box in very good
condition $80.(650)756-9516. Daly City
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LIVING & Dining Room Sets. Mission
Style, Trestle Table w/ 2 leafs & 6
Chairs, Like new $600 obo
(831)768-1680
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
NICHOLS AND Stone antique brown
spindle wood rocking chair. $99
650 302 2143
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OCCASIONAL, END or Sofa Table. $25.
Solid wood in excellent condition. 20" x
22". 650-861-0088.
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $80
OBO RETAIL $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
RECLINER LA-Z-BOY Dark green print
fabric, medium size. 27” wide $60.
(650)343-8206
ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condi-
tion with pads, $85.OBO 650 369 9762
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR, decorative wood /
armrest, it swivels rocks & rolls
$99.00.650-592-2648
SOFA - excelleNT condition. 8 ft neutral
color $99 OBO (650)345-5644
SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33” x 78”
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STURDY OAK TV or End Table. $35.
Very good condition. 30" x 24". 650-861-
0088
TEA/ UTILITY Cart, $15. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for ster-
eo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
304 Furniture
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS (2) stainless steel,
temperature resistent handles, 21/2 & 4
gal. $5. (650) 574-3229.
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
KING BEDSPREAD/SHAMS, mint con-
dition, white/slight blue trim, $20.
(650)578-9208
NEW FLOURESCENT lights, ten T-12
tubes, only $2.50 ea 650-595-3933
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
SINGER ELECTRONIC sewing machine
model #9022. Cord, foot controller
included. $99 O.B.O. (650)274-9601 or
(650)468-6884
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUUM EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
307 Jewelry & Clothing
COSTUME JEWELRY Earrings $25.00
Call: 650-368-0748
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
308 Tools
27 TON Hydraulic Log Splitter 6.5 hp.
Vertical & horizontal. Less than 40hrs
w/trailer dolly & cover. ** SOLD **
AIR COMPRESSOR M#EX600200
Campbell Hausfield 3 Gal 1 HP made
USA $40.00 used, (650)367-8146
AIR COMPRESSOR, 60 gallon, 2-stage
DeVilbiss. Very heavy. $390. Call
(650)591-8062
BLACK & DECKER 17” electric hedge
trimmer, New, $25 (650)345-5502
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
308 Tools
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6" bench grinder $40.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ELECTRIC WEED TRIMMER, works
great, 61” length. $20 (650)345-5502
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
SHEET METAL, 2” slip rolls x 36”, man-
ual operation, ** SOLD **
SHEET METAL, Pexto 622-E, deep
throat combination, beading machine. **
SOLD **
WHEELBARROW. BRAND new, never
used. Wood handles. $50 or best offer.
(650) 595-4617
309 Office Equipment
CANON ALL in One Photo Printer PIX-
MA MP620 Never used. In original box
$150 (650)477-2177
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55.
(650)269-3712
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER selectric II
good condition, needs ribbon (type
needed attached) $35 San Bruno
(650)588-1946
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
FLOWER POT w/ 10 Different cute
succulents, $5.(650)952-4354
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LEATHER BRIEFCASE Stylish Black
Business Portfolio Briefcase. $20. Call
(650)888-0129
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10"x10",
cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NEW SONICARE Toothbrush in box 3e
series, rechargeable, $49 650-595-3933
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
25 Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Part of a
Genesis-inspired
costume
8 Tom in an alley
15 Good-natured
16 Vivid language
17 Rolling Stones
guitarist
18 Fuddy-duddies
19 “__ said it!”
20 Cross at a frat
21 Bloke’s bathroom
22 “RUR” playwright
25 Harpers Ferry
raider
28 Trash emanation
29 Sponge, as a
smoke
30 TNT part
31 Chain including
the Matterhorn
34 Cancel, NASA-
style
38 “Oh, wow!”
39 1976 horror
classic ... and,
read another
way, group that
appears at 17-,
25-, 50- and 61-
Across and 20-
Down
41 “Huh?”
42 Weed control
giant
44 George Orwell or
George Eliot
46 Hoppy brew, for
short
48 Road surface
49 Re-re-re-re-
shared link on
Facebook, e.g.
50 Legendary
Manhattan
restaurateur
54 Fall beverage
55 Roadie’s unit
56 Dawson in the
first Super Bowl
57 Soft slip-on
58 More prepared
61 “The Joy of
Painting” artist
65 Suitable for
tweens, usually
66 Weaken from
disuse
67 Ancient provincial
governors
68 Suffragist
Elizabeth Cady __
DOWN
1 Not within
walking distance
2 “I’d say,” in texts
3 Rickey ingredient
4 Ones doing case
studies
5 Tablet download
6 Baseball’s
Moises
7 Gave lunch to
8 Old Testament
prophet
9 PayPal figure
10 Young chap
11 Quiche base
12 Hip-hop star
Green
13 “This way”
symbol
14 “The Pluto Files”
author Neil
deGrasse __
20 Regular on Bob
Newhart sitcoms
22 Fruity cocktail,
familiarly
23 Pitching duel?
24 Writing end
25 Minty Derby
cocktail
26 Product name
27 Baby-back
goodie
29 “Dang it!”
32 Local stations
33 Makeup mishap
35 Didn’t lease
36 Sample, for
example
37 Worker with
show tigers
40 31-Across locale:
Abbr.
43 Bomb opposite
45 Greek for “little
O”
47 Dreaming, say
50 Canvas covers
51 Greek for “big O”
52 Mesmerizing
designs
53 Steers the
steers
54 Deadly snake
57 Suffragist
Lucretia
59 Patriotic women’s
org.
60 Feminizing
Spanish suffix
61 English lit
degrees
62 Choose
63 “Homeland” airer,
briefly
64 Specimen, for
example: Abbr.
By Andrew J. Ries
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
06/18/14
06/18/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208
311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, ex-
cellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, ex-
cellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
KAMAKA CONCERT sized Ukelele,
w/friction tuners, solid Koa wood body,
made in Hawaii, 2007 great tone, excel-
lent condition, w/ normal wear & tear.
$850. (650)342-5004
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
311 Musical Instruments
YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337
312 Pets & Animals
AQUARIUM,” MARINA Cool 10”, 2.65
gallons, new pump. $20. (650)591-1500
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500
315 Wanted to Buy
WE BUY
Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
316 Clothes
ALPINESTAR JEANS - Tags Attached.
Twin Stitched. Knee Protection. Never
Used! Blue/Grey Sz34 $65.
(650)357-7484
ALPINESTAR JEANS - Tags Attached.
Twin Stitched. Knee Protection. Never
Used! Blue/Grey Sz34 $65.
(650)357-7484
DAINESE BOOTS - Zipper/Velcro Clo-
sure. Cushioned Ankle. Reflective Strip.
Excellent Condition! Unisex EU40 $65.
(650)357-7484
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
317 Building Materials
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
318 Sports Equipment
BAMBOO FLY rod 9 ft 2 piece good
condition South Bend brand. $50
(650)591-6842
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50. (650)637-
0930
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DIGITAL PEDOMETER, distance, calo-
ries etc. $7.50 650-595-3933
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840
HJC MOTORCYCLE Helmet, size large,
perfect cond $29 650-595-3933
IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiber-
glass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
NORDIC TRACK 505, Excellent condi-
tion but missing speed dial (not nec. for
use) $35. 650-861-0088.
NORDIC TRACK Pro, $95. Call
(650)333-4400
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
WORLD CUP 2014 shirt, unopened,
white, Bud Light/FIFA World Cup, heavy
cotton $10. (650) 578 9208
322 Garage Sales
MULTI-
FAMILY
GARAGE
SALE
SATURDAY
ONLY
8am to 2pm
1983 Bell Ave
San Carlos
Antique armoire, Eng-
lish oak dresser, anti-
que oak desk, antique
oak& leather couch
from the County Court-
house, child’s roll top
desk, set of six dining
chairs, housewares,
clothes, and much
more!
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $79
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, hardly
used. Paid $950. Asking $350 orb est of-
fer. SOLD!
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER WITH basket $30. Invacare
Excellent condition (650)622-6695
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedrooms, new carpets, new granite
counters, dishwasher, balcony, covered
carports, storage, pool, no pets.
(650)591-4046.
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.- $59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
DODGE ‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$4,500 OBO (650)481-5296
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LARADO
‘03, 2WD, V-6, 89K, original owner,
$3900 SOLD!
620 Automobiles
HONDA ‘96 LX SD Parts Car, all power,
complete, runs. $1000 OBO, Jimmie
Cassey (650)271-1056 or
(650)481-5296 - Joe Fusilier
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBILE ‘99 Intrigue, green, 4
door sedan, 143K miles. **SOLD!**
(650)740-6007.
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. ** SOLD **
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
1973 FXE Harley Shovel Head 1400cc
stroked & balanced motor. Runs perfect.
Low milage, $6,600 Call (650)369-8013
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘04 Heritage Soft
Tail ONLY 5,400 miles. $12,300. Call
(650)342-6342.
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS and
other parts and sales, $35.
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
AUTO REFRIGERATION gauges. R12
and R132 new, professional quality $50.
(650)591-6283
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
SNOW CHAIN cables made by Shur
Grip - brand new-never used. In the
original case. $25 650-654-9252.
SNOW CHAINS metal cambell brand
never used 2 sets multi sizes $20 each
obo (650)591-6842
680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
INSIDE OUT ELECTRIC INC
Service Upgrades
Remodels / Repairs
The tradesman you will
trust and recommend
Lic# 808182
(650)515-1123
Gardening
KEEP YOUR LAWN
LOOKING GREEN
Time to Aerate your lawn
We also do seed/sod of lawns
Spring planting
Sprinklers and irrigation
Pressure washing
Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831 Lic #751832
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Free Gutter & Roof Inspections
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
CALL TODAY
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Since 1985
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
by Greenstarr
&
Chris’s Hauling
• Yard clean up - attic,
basement
• Junk metal removal
including cars, trucks and
motorcycles
• Demolition
• Concrete removal
• Excavation
• Swimming pool removal
Tom 650. 834. 2365
Chri s 415. 999. 1223
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
Yard Boss
• Complete landscape
maintenance and removal
• Full tree care including
hazard evaluation,
trimming, shaping,
removal and stump
grinding
• Retaining walls
• Ornamental concrete
• Swimming pool removal
Tom 650. 834. 2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
NATE LANDSCAPING
• Tree Service • Pruning &
Removal • Fence Deck • Paint
• New Lawn • All concrete
• Ret. Wall • Pavers
• Yard clean-up & Haul
Free Estimate
(650)353-6554
Lic. #973081
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
Painting
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plaster/Stucco
MENA PLASTERING
Interior and Exterior
Lath and Plaster
All kinds of textures
35+ years experience
(415)420-6362
CA Lic #625577
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
SEWER PIPES
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters, Faucets,
Toilets, Sinks, & Re-pipes
(650)461-0326
Cleaning
Concrete
ASP CONCRETE
LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435 • (650)834-4495
by Greenstarr
Rambo
Concrete
Works
• Walkways
• Driveways
• Patios
• Colored
• Aggregate
• Block Walls
• Retaining walls
• Stamped Concrete
• Ornamental concrete
• Swimming pool removal
Tom 650.834.2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Construction
LEMUS CONSTRUCTION
(650)271-3955
Dry Rot • Decks • Fences
• Handyman • Painting
• Bath Remodels & much more
Based in N. Peninsula
Free Estimates ... Lic# 913461
Construction
Building
Customer
Satisfaction
º New Construction
º Additions
º Remodels
º Green Building
Specialists
Technology Solutions for
Building and Living
Locally owned in Belmont
650-832-1673
www. tekhomei nc. com
CA# B-869287
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont/Castro Valley, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
• New Construction,
• Remodeling,
• Kitchen/Bathrooms,
• Decks/ Fences
(650)589-0372
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
27 Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Screens
DON’T SHARE
YOUR HOUSE
WITH BUGS!
We repair and install all types of
Window & Door Screens
Free Estimates
(650)299-9107
PENINSULA SCREEN SHOP
Mention this ad for 20% OFF!
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
TILE CONTRACTOR
Bathroom Remodeling
Tile Installation
Lic. #938359 References
(650)921-1597
www.tileexpress
company.com
Window Washing
Windows
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
49ers, Giants & Warriors,
low prices, large selection.
450 W. San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
(650)771-6564
Dental Services
ALBORZI, DDS, MDS, INC.
$500 OFF INVISALIGN TREATMENT
a clear alternative to braces even for
patients who have
been told that they were not invisalign
candidates
235 N SAN MATEO DR #300,
SAN MATEO
(650)342-4171
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
RUSSO DENTAL CARE
Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno
(650)583-2273
www.russodentalcare.com
Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities
(650) 295-6123
1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
Food
SCANDIA
RESTAURANT & BAR
Breakfast• Lunch• Dinner
OPEN EVERYDAY
Scandinavian &
American Classics
742 Polhemus Rd. San Mateo
HI 92 De Anza Blvd. Exit
(650)372-0888
SEAFOOD FOR SALE
FRESH OFF THE BOAT
(650) 726-5727
Pillar Point Harbor:
1 Johnson Pier
Half Moon Bay
Oyster Point Marina
95 Harbor Master Rd..
South San Francisco
Financial
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay
Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Housing
CALIFORNIA
MENTOR
We are looking for quality
caregivers for adults
with developmental
disabilities. If you have a
spare bedroom and a
desire to open your
home and make a
difference, attend an
information session:
Thursdays 11:00 AM
1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.
Suite 230
San Mateo
(near Marriott Hotel)
Please call to RSVP
(650)389-5787 ext.2
Competitive Stipend offered.
www.MentorsWanted.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
Jewelers
INTERSTATE
ALL BATTERY CENTER
570 El Camino Real #160
Redwood City
(650)839-6000
Watch batteries $8.99
including installation.
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy Coins, Jewelry, Watches,
Platinum, Diamonds.
Expert fine watch & jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave. Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Locks
COMPLETE LOCKSMITH
SERVICES
Full stocked shop
& Mobile van
MILLBRAE LOCK
(650)583-5698
311 El Camino Real
MILLBRAE
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ACUHEALTH
Best Asian Healing Massage
$29/hr
with this ad
Free Parking
(650)692-1989
1838 El Camino #103, Burlingame
sites.google.com/site/acuhealthSFbay
ASIAN MASSAGE
$55 per Hour
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $19.99
Body Massage $44.99/hr
10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame
(650)389-2468
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
Aria Spa,
Foot & Body Massage
9:30 am - 9:30 pm, 7 days
1141 California Dr (& Broadway)
Burlingame.
(650) 558-8188
HEALING MASSAGE
• Newly remodeled
• New Masseuses every two
weeks
$50/Hr. Special
2305-A Carlos St.,
Moss Beach
(Cash Only)
OSETRA WELLNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY
Prenatal, Reiki, Energy
$20 OFF your First Treatment
(not valid with other promotions)
(650)212-2966
1730 S. Amphlett Blvd. #206
San Mateo
osetrawellness.com
Pet Services
CATS, DOGS,
POCKET PETS
Mid-Peninsula Animal Hospital
Free New Client Exam
(650) 325-5671
www.midpen.com
Open Nights & Weekends
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity based direct lender
Homes • Multi-family
Mixed-use • Commercial
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Bureau of Real Estate
Retirement
Independent Living, Assisted Liv-
ing, and Memory Care. full time R.N.
Please call us at (650)742-9150 to
schedule a tour, to pursue your life-
long dream.
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway
Millbrae, Ca 94030
www.greenhillsretirement.com
Schools
HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY
Where every child is a gift from God
K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco
(650)588-6860
ww.hillsidechristian.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10
28
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
www.smdailyjournal.com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Wednesday • June 18, 2014 • Vol XIII, Edition 261
SECT-ON-SECT VIOLENCE
WORLD PAGE 8
AOTS: GOLF
AND TENNIS
SPORTS PAGE 11
COCKTAIL OF
CRAFT BEER
FOOD PAGE 17
OMINOUS SIGNS EMERGING THAT OPEN WARFARE BETWEEN THE TWO
MAIN MUSLIM GROUPS HAS RETURNED TO IRAQ
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Burlingame school officials
won’t appeal a judge’s ruling to
stop construction at Hoover
Elementary School, but they are
asking to secure and stabilize the
site before an environmental
impact report is conducted.
On Tuesday, San Mateo County
Superior Court judge Marie Weiner
made no ruling at a hearing to con-
sider the Burlingame Elementary
School District’s request to do
some additional construction
work at the site, which the district
contends is necessary to secure the
site now that overall construction
has been put on hold. She intends
to visit the school Thursday. In
May, Weiner ruled in favor of the
Alliance for Responsible
Neighborhood Planning that sued
the district stating it needs to pre-
pare a full EIR on traffic impacts
for the entire property, which
means all construction must be
stopped until this is done. At this
point, the district doesn’t plan to
appeal the final ruling,
Superintendent Maggie MacIsaac
said.
A group of Hillsborough resi-
dents filed the lawsuit in January
2013. At a July 2013 hearing, the
alliance’s attorney Kevin Haroff
said the district failed to address
traffic impacts in its December
2012 mitigated negative declara-
tion study and review. Amitigated
negative declaration is like an
environmental impact review but
less extensive. Haroff, who
attended the hearing Tuesday,
believes the judge will take the
alliance’s side in favor of not
allowing any more work to be
Hoover constructionhalt won’t be appealed
Burlingame school officials want to secure property before an EIR
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Envisioning the future of San
Mateo’s Central Park is underway
as the City Council, the Parks and
Recreation Commission and the
public discussed building a new
recreation center, relocating
amenities, constructing a plaza
and potentially expanding the
park to promote open space as
transit-oriented development con-
tinues to boom.
The proposal to update the San
Mateo Central Park Master Plan
was reviewed at a meeting Monday
night.
“The park’s been there for such a
long time, it really hasn’t been
updated or upgraded and as we
build, almost a new city, with the
TOD, transit development stuff, I
think we need to upgrade our plans
so it matches the rest of the city, ”
Mayor Robert Ross said.
Central Park is at the southern
end of downtown at El Camino
Real and Fifth Avenue and its cur-
rent Master Plan was adopted in
1982. Updating the plan is one
step in a line of many before any
price tags are attached or physical
changes are made. The city has
conducted a four-month-long
pubic participation and outreach
Feedback on
Central Park
Master Plan
San Mateo officials weigh in on update,
changes both big and small discussed
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Deciding on how much commu-
nity engagement to do before for-
mulating ideas on overcrowding
issues in the San Mateo-Foster
City Elementary School District is
a concern for its Next Steps
Advisory Committee.
The committee is looking at
hosting what could end up being
50 meetings to gather feedback on
ways of alleviating the lack of
facilities in the district, with
potential town halls, focus
District’s overcrowding committee
working on engagement options
Next Steps trying to find right balances of thoroughness, efficiency
See HOOVER, Page 20
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
When the next winter swell
picks up monstrous enough to
draw surfers from all over the world
to risk their lives and compete in
the renowned Mavericks
Invitational, international specta-
tors will be able to tune in and the
athletes could take home a hefty
prize after local organizers paired
with a Los Angeles management
company.
The invite-only event brings 24
professional big wave surfers to
the thrilling break near Pillar
Point Harbor in Half Moon Bay. It
has changed hands throughout the
years and is currently being culti-
vated by a
group of locals.
Ma v e r i c k s
pioneer Jeff
Clark, his wife
C a s s a n d r a
Clark, Rocky
Raynor and
Brian Overfelt
make up the
board of direc-
tors and have joined forces with
Cartel Management, a boutique
talent agency owned by the young
Griffin Guess.
“It’s not every day you find a
really really good fit, both from
the sense of business, also the
sense of community. And [Guess
is] really into this,” Clark said.
“He’s been watching Mavericks
for years kind of go in and out of
the highs and the lows. And we do
a lot of things really well and
some of the things that we don’t
do well, he does better. So we’re
really looking forward to this
partnership getting underway and
really carving out a stable event.”
Cartel’s star-studded portfolio
includes working with musicians
and athletes like Kanye West and
Barry Bonds, along with organiza-
tions and companies like the NFL,
Apple, Victoria’s Secret and
Harley-Davidson Motorcycles.
Guess said taking over the
Mavericks brand and elevating it
New management for Mavericks
Local surf competition organizers pair with Cartel Management
DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
A surfer catches a break during the Mavericks surf contest.A new management partnership seeks to focus more
on the surfers with an emphasis on their talent.
Griffin Guess
See MAVERICKS Page 19
See PARK, Page 20
See NEXT STEPS, Page 18

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