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The Goodness of God.

The Goodness of God.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY REV. C. SIMEON, M. A.


Ps. cxix. 68. Thou art good, and doest good : teach me thy

statutes.
BY REV. C. SIMEON, M. A.


Ps. cxix. 68. Thou art good, and doest good : teach me thy

statutes.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Jun 21, 2014
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THE GOODESS OF GOD.

BY REV. C. SIMEO, M. A.
Ps. cxix. 68. Thou art good, and doest good : teach me thy
statutes.
THE perfections of God, if considered only in a
speculative view, must excite our admiration ; but,
if contemplated in reference to our state and con-
duct.
•423.] THE GOODESS OF GOD, 413
duct, tliey will be to us a source of unspeakable
comfort, and a spring of incessant activity. What
emotions a knowledge of the Divine goodness will
produce in the soul, we see in the words before us ;
in discoursing upon which we shall notice,
I. The goodness of God —
In conformity with the text, v/e shall call your
attention to,
J . His essential goodness —
[This is not an indiscriminate regard to all, whether they
be good or evil ; for such a regard would not consist with justice,
or holiness, or truth : but it is a general benevolence towards the
whole creation, operating incessantly for the good of the whole.
The manner in which it discovers itself is as various as the states
of men ; but, however diversified its operations may be, it is the
same principle in God. It is the sum of all his perfections : to-
wards the undeserving it is grace; and to the ill-deserving, mercy :
to the indigent it is bounty; to the distressed, pity and com-
passion: towards the impenitent it is forbearance ; and to the
obstinate and incorrigible it is justice. This is the view which
God himself gives us of his goodness^; and, in this view, it
resides in him necessarily, in him only, and in him continually.]
1. His communicative goodness —
[This he manifests to the ivorld at large. When first he
created the world, he formed every thing " very good." And if
we look around us, we shall be constrained to say, " The earth is
full of his goodness."
Toivards man in particular, his goodness is more abundantly
displayed. Towards the ungodly he has shewn it, by giving his
only dear Son to die for them, and his good Spirit to instruct
them : yea, he has set apart an order of men also to intreat them
in his name to accept the proffered salvation. Towards the godly
he has abounded yet still more in the exceeding riches of his
grace: for, in addition to all that he has done for the ungodly,
he has made his word effectual for their conversion; and he
watches over them with paternal care, supplying all their wants,
and protecting them in all their dangers ; and, to complete the
whole, he will crown them finally with his glory''.]
Such a view of God as this cannot but lead us to
adopt,
n. The
• Moses prays for a sight of God's glory ; God promises to shew
him \\\% goodness ; and then represents it as consisting in an united
exercise of all his perfections. Exod. xxxiii. 18, 19- & xxxiv. Q, 7-
" Ps.ciii. 1— 5.
414 PSALMS, cxix. 68. [423.
II. The petition grounded upon it —
The petition itself is such as all ought to offer for
themselves —
[By " the statutes " of God we understand both the truths
he has revealed, and the precepts he has enjoined. Of these
we are by nature ignorant ; nor can we by me;-e human exer-
tions ever acquire a right understanding of them"^. We must
be taught of God: our eyes must be opened by his Spirit:
then only shall we keep his statutes, when God himself shall
*^ write them on the fleshly tables of our hearts."]
But the petition has peculiar force as grounded on
a discovery of God's goodness ; for, in that, as in a
glass, we see,
1. Our duties —
[The law of God primarily declares our duty towards him :
but none ever attain a just knowledge of that duty from the
law alone : they cannot see the necessity of loving God with
all their hearts, till they have some idea of the obligations
they lie under to him for the stupendous work of Redemption.
But let the love of God in Christ Jesus be once clearly revealed
to the soul, and the excellency of the law will instantly appear ;
and obedience to it will be considered as perfect freedom.]
2. Our defects—
[We are naturally averse to acknowledge our vileness and
wickedness. But a sight of the Divine goodness softens the
mind, and renders it ingenuous. Hence the more we are ac-
quainted with God, the more we know of ourselves; and the
more we have experienced of his love, the more we abhor our-
selves for our ingratitude to him, and our want of conformity to
his image '^." ]
3. Oar encouragements —
[Wherever we look, we have no encouragement but in
God. Indeed, if only we be acquainted with his goodness, we
want no other encouragement: for, what will not he do, who
is so good in himself? and what will He refuse us, who has
done so much for us already^? Such considerations as these
are sufficient to counterbalance every difficulty that the world,
or the flesh, or the devil can place in our way. Having this
God for our God, we can want nothing for time or for eternity.]
" 1 Cor. ii. 14. '' Job xlii. 5, 6. Ezek. xvi. 63.
^ Rom. viii. 32.
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