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FlightSafety International, Inc.

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(718) 565-4100
www.FlightSafety.com
KING AIR
350/350C
(Model B300/B300C)
PRO LINE 21
PILOT
TRAINING
MANUAL
REVISION 0.2
The best safety device in any aircraft is a well-trained crew. REVISION 0.2
KING AIR 350/350C
(Model B300/B300C)
PRO LINE 21
PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
FOR TRAI NI NG PURPOSES ONLY
FOR TRAI NI NG PURPOSES ONLY
NOTICE
The material contained in this training manual is based on information
obtai ned from the ai rcraft manufacturers Pi l ot Manual s and
Maintenance Manuals. It is to be used for familiarization and training
purposes only.
At the time of printing it contained then-current information. In the
event of conflict between data provided herein and that in publications
issued by the manufacturer or the FAA, that of the manufacturer or the
FAA shall take precedence.
We at FlightSafety want you to have the best training possible. We
welcome any suggestions you might have for improving this manual or
any other aspect of our training program.
Courses for the King Air 300/350C are taught at the following FlightSafety Learning
Center:
FlightSafety International
Wichita Hawker Beechcraft Learning Center
9720 E. Central Avenue
Wichita, KS 67206
Phone: (316) 612-5300
Toll-Free: (800) 488-3747
Fax: (316) 612-5399
Copyright 2011 by FlightSafety International, Inc.
All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America.
INSERT LATEST REVISED PAGES, DESTROY SUPERSEDED PAGES
LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES
Dates of issue for original and changed pages are:
Revision............... 0 .............. August 2008
Revision............... .01 ......... October 2009
Revision............... 0.2 .........February 2011
THIS PUBLICATION CONSISTS OF THE FOLLOWING:
*Zero in this column indicates an original page.
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CONTENTS
Chapter 1 AIRCRAFT GENERAL
Chapter 2 ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS
Chapter 3 LIGHTING
Chapter 4 MASTER WARNING SYSTEM
Chapter 5 FUEL SYSTEM
Chapter 6 AUXILIARY POWER UNIT
Chapter 7 POWERPLANT
Chapter 8 FIRE PROTECTION
Chapter 9 PNEUMATICS
Chapter 10 ICE AND RAIN PROTECTION
Chapter 11 AIR CONDITIONING
Chapter 12 PRESSURIZATION
Chapter 13 HYDRAULIC POWER SYSTEMS
Chapter 14 LANDING GEAR AND BRAKES
Chapter 15 FLIGHT CONTROLS
Chapter 16 AVIONICS
Chapter 16A WIDE AREA AUGMENTATION SYSTEM (WAAS)
Chapter 17 OXYGEN
Chapter 18 MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS
Chapter 19 MANEUVERS AND PROCEDURES
Chapter 20 WEIGHT AND BALANCE
Chapter 21 FLIGHT PLANNING AND PERFORMANCE
Chapter 22 CREW RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
WALKAROUND
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B
ANNUNCIATOR PANELS
1-i
CHAPTER 1
AIRCRAFT GENERAL
CONTENTS
Page
INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................... 1-1
GENERAL ........................................................................................................................... 1-2
Configuration................................................................................................................. 1-5
Specifications ................................................................................................................. 1-6
DOORS.................................................................................................................................. 1-8
Airstair Entrance........................................................................................................... 1-8
Emergency Exits ......................................................................................................... 1-10
Cargo Door.................................................................................................................. 1-11
350C Airstair Entrance .............................................................................................. 1-11
FLIGHT DECK ................................................................................................................ 1-12
Seats.............................................................................................................................. 1-12
Instruments/Controls.................................................................................................. 1-13
CABIN FEATURES ......................................................................................................... 1-20
Seats.............................................................................................................................. 1-20
Toilet............................................................................................................................. 1-20
AC Power..................................................................................................................... 1-21
BAGGAGE COMPARTMENT ...................................................................................... 1-21
CONTROL SURFACES................................................................................................... 1-22
GENERAL OPERATING INFORMATION............................................................... 1-23
Preflight Inspection..................................................................................................... 1-23
Tiedown and Securing................................................................................................ 1-23
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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Taxiing .......................................................................................................................... 1-24
Servicing Data ............................................................................................................. 1-26
LIMITATIONS................................................................................................................... 1-26
Airspeed Limitations.................................................................................................. 1-26
Weight Limits .............................................................................................................. 1-26
Maximum Operating Limits ...................................................................................... 1-28
Maximum Outside Air Temperature Limits............................................................ 1-28
General Limitations.................................................................................................... 1-28
Cracked or Shattered Windshield............................................................................. 1-28
Crack in Side Window (Cockpit or Cabin) ............................................................. 1-29
Miscellaneous Airspeeds............................................................................................ 1-29
QUESTIONS...................................................................................................................... 1-31
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ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Title Page
1-1 King Air 350........................................................................................................... 1-2
1-2 Dual Aft Strakes.................................................................................................... 1-3
1-3 King Air 350 General Arrangement ................................................................... 1-4
1-4 King Air 350 Cabin Seating Arrangement......................................................... 1-5
1-5 King Air 350 Dimensions ..................................................................................... 1-7
1-6 Airstair Door ......................................................................................................... 1-8
1-7 Door Lock.............................................................................................................. 1-8
1-8 Plunger-Out/Plunger-In ........................................................................................ 1-9
1-9 Visual Inspection Ports ......................................................................................... 1-9
1-10 Emergency Exit .................................................................................................. 1-10
1-11 Emergency Exit Placards ................................................................................... 1-10
1-12 Overhead Light Control Panel .......................................................................... 1-14
1-13 Glareshield........................................................................................................... 1-14
1-14 Left Instrument Panel......................................................................................... 1-15
1-15 Right Instrument Panel ...................................................................................... 1-15
1-16 Center Instrument Panel .................................................................................... 1-16
1-17 Pilot Subpanels .................................................................................................... 1-17
1-18 Copilot Subpanels ............................................................................................... 1-17
1-19 Center Pedestal.................................................................................................... 1-18
1-20 Circuit Breaker PanelRight Console ............................................................ 1-19
1-21 Fuel Control PanelLeft Console.................................................................... 1-19
1-22 Passenger Seats.................................................................................................... 1-20
1-23 Toilet Seat............................................................................................................. 1-20
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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1-24 Flight Control Locks........................................................................................... 1-22
1-25 Preflight Inspection............................................................................................. 1-23
1-26 Tiedowns............................................................................................................... 1-24
1-27 Turn Radius and Danger Areas......................................................................... 1-25
1-28 Service Data......................................................................................................... 1-27
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INTRODUCTION
This training manual provides a description of the major airframe and engine
systems in the King Air 350 Pro Line 21 aircraft. Information on the cargo (350C)
and extended range (350ER) models is also included. This manual is an instruc-
tional aid. Its material does not supersede, nor is it meant to substitute for, any of
the manufacturer operating manuals. Changes in aircraft appearance or system
operation are covered during academic training and subsequent revisions to
this manual.
This introductory chapter presents an overall view of the aircraft for familiariza-
tion. Information includes general specifications and limitations, cabin features,
and general cockpit layout.
CHAPTER 1
AIRCRAFT GENERAL
GENERAL
The King Air 350 is a high performance
pres s ur i zed t wi n- engi ne t ur boprop
(Figure1-1). The aircraft is equipped for
day or night IFR conditions and flight into
known icing conditions in and out of small
airports within operating limits stated in the
Pilot Operating Handbook.
FL 381, 383 and subsequent aircraft have
the Pro Line 21 avionics package. In late
20 07, t he 350ER was cert i f i ed. It has
additional nacelle fuel tanks, heavy-weight
l andi ng gear, and a maxi mum t akeoff
wei ght i ncreas e. The 350ER has an
extended range of 2,300 nm (4,260 km)
and eight hour endurance.
The structure is an all aluminum low-wing
monoplane with fully cantilevered wings
and a T-tail empennage. The wings are an
efficient, high-aspect ratio design. The
airfoil provides an excellent combination
of low drag for cruise conditions and easy
handling for low speed terminal or small
airport operations. The NASA-designed
winglets further improve performance.
All Pro Line 21 aircraft also include dual aft
strakes (Figure1-2). The wing/body vortices
normal l y di srupt ai rfl ow under the aft
fuselage. This creates drag. The strakes
eliminate this separation by channeling the
vortices and accelerating the air. They are,
in effect, pushing the aircraft through the air.
The dual strakes eliminate or raise yaw
damper limits to increase dispatch reliabil-
ity. They permit flight with the yaw damper
off until 19,000 ft.
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Figure 1-1. King Air 350 (Sheet 1 of 2)
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The faired-oval nacelle on each side of the
wing center section houses the engine and
l andi ng gear. The nacel l es maxi mi ze
propeller-to-ground clearance, minimize
cabin noise, and provide a low drag instal-
lation of the powerplants on the wing. The
pitot-type intakes and smaller frontal area
of the exhaust stacks reduce drag to also
boost performance.
The distinctive T-tail provides improved
aerodynamics, lighter control forces, and a
wi der cent er- of - gravi t y range. Model
350ER has an increased rudder area.
The fuselage is a conventional monocoque
structure with high strength aluminum
alloys. The basic cross-sectional cabin is a
favorable compromise between passenger
comfort and efficient cruise performance.
The squared-oval cabin allows passengers
to sit comfortably. The floors are flat from
side to side for passenger ease in entering
and leaving the cabin (Figure 1-3).
Figure 1-2. Dual Aft Strakes
Figure 1-1. King Air 350 (Sheet 2 of 2)
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24
23
1
6
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
3
15
14
5
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
4
5
3
2
1. Weather Radar Antenna
2. Communications, Navigation and Radar Equipment
3. Outboard Flap Section
4. Ground Escape Hatch
5. Inboard Flap Section
6. Liquid Storage Cabinet
7. Lavatory Privacy Curtain
8. Belted Lavatory
9. Pressurization Safety and Outflow Valves
10. Oxygen Bottle
11. Emergency Locator Transmitter
12. Elevator Trim Tabs
13. Rudder Trim Tab
14. Baggage Area
15. Airstair Door
16. Aileron Trim Tab
17. Box Section Fuel Tanks
18. Leading Edge Fuel Tanks
19. Auxiliary Fuel Tank
20. Wing Ice Check Light
21. Nacelle Fuel Tank
22. PT6A Turboprop Engine
23. Heated Pitot Mast
24. Landing and Taxi Lights
Figure 1-3. King Air 350 General Arrangement
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CONFIGURATION
The King Air 350 is certificated for up to 17
people (15 passengers and 2 crew), but
normal corporate configuration is 9 to 11
(Figure 1-4).
In addition to the standard configurations,
Beechcraft offers optional items that are
available at additional cost and weight.
Basic specifications are detailed below.
Refer to the appropriate aircraft POH for
detailed, up-to-date information.
Figure 1-4. King Air 350 Cabin Seating Arrangement
SPECIFICATIONS
CrewFAA Certificated ........................ 1
Except where otherwise prescribed
by t he appropr i at e operat i ng
regul at i ons, one pi l ot wi t h FAA
approved passenger seating config-
urat i ons of ni ne or l es s ; or one
pilot and one copilot for all other
approved configurations.
OccupancyMax. FAA Cert.
(with crew) ................................................ 17
Passengers
Normal Configuration .................... 9 to 11
EnginesP & W Turboprop,
1050 SHP ................................ 2 PT6A-60A
Propellers4 Blade,
Reversible.................................... 2 Hartzell
Landing GearRetractable,
Tricycle, Dual Main Wheels .... Hydraulic
Wing Area .................................... 310 sq. ft.
Cabin and Entry Dimensions
Cabin Width (Max) .................... 54 inches
Cabin Length (Max between pressure
bulkheads) .................... 24 feet, 10 inches
Cabin Height (Max) .................. 57 inches
Airstair Entrance Door
Width (Min) .......................... 26.75 inches
Airstair Entrance Door
Height (Min) ............................ 51.5 inches
Cargo Door Width ...................... 49 inches
Cargo Door Height .................... 52 inches
Pressure Vessel
Volume ................................ 443 cubic feet
Potential Cargo area
volume ................................ 303 cubic feet
Specific Loadings
Wing Loading: 48.4 pounds per square foot
Power Loading: 7. 14 pounds per shaft
horsepower.
Figure 1-5 illustrates the King Air 350
dimensions.
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Figure 1-5. King Air 350 Dimensions
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DOORS
AIRSTAIR ENTRANCE
The cabin entry airstair door is on the left
side of the fuselage, just aft of the wing
(Figure 1-6). The swing-down door, hinged
at t he bott om, provi des a conveni ent
stairway for entry and exit.
Two of the four steps are movable and
automatically fold flat against the door in
the closed position.
A self-storing platform that automatically
folds down over the doorsill when the door
opens provides a stepping platform for
door seal protection. A plastic encased
cabl e s uppor t s t he door i n t he open
position. It also provides a handhold and a
means t o cl ose t he door f rom i nsi de.
Additional handhold cable is available as
an option.
A hydraulic damper permits the door to
lower gradually. Because excessive weight
could damage the door attach fitting, no
more than one person should be on the
airstair door at a time.
The door can be locked with a key for
security on the ground.
Airstair Locking Mechanism
Ei ther one of two verti cal l y staggered
handles, one inside and one outside, lock the
door. The handl es are mechani cal l y
interconnected. When either is rotated per
placard instructions, two bayonet pins on
each side of the door and two hooks at the
t op engage t he door f rame t o s ecure
the door.
Opening the Door
A button next to the door handle must
be depressed before the handle can be
rotated to open the door. As an additional
safety measure, a differential pressure-
sensi t i ve di aphragm i s i n t he rel ease
button mechanism.
Securing the Door
To secure the airstair door inside, rotate the
handle clockwise as far as it will go. The
release button should pop out. The handle
should be pointing down (Figure 1-7).
Figure 1-7. Door Lock
Figure 1-6. Airstair Door
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Attempt to rotate the handle counter-
clockwise without depressing the release
button to check security. The handle should
not move.
Next lift the folded airstep just below the
door handle. Ensure that the safety lock is
in position around the diaphragm shaft when
the handle is in the locked position. To
observe this area, depress a red switch near
the window. This illuminates a lamp inside
the door (Figure 1-8).
If the arm is properly positioned around the
shaft, proceed to check indication in each of
the visual inspection ports near each corner
of the door. Ensure the green stripe on the
latch bolt is aligned with the black pointer
in the visual inspection port (Figure 1-9).
To check the upper door hook engagement,
view the hooks through two inspection
openings in the headliner just above the
fore and aft upper corners. To illuminate the
hook engagement areas, depres s t he
CABIN DOOR HOOK, OBSV LT SW
but t on bet ween t he t wo i ns pect i on
openings in the headliner.
Never attempt to unlock or check
the security of the door in flight.
If the CABIN DOOR annunciator
illuminates in flight, or if the pilot
has any reason to suspect the door
may not be s ecurel y l ocked,
instruct all occupants to remain
seated with seatbelts fastened.
Reduce cabi n pressure t o t he
lowest practical value (consider-
i ng al t i t ude f i r s t ) . Af t er t he
ai rcraf t has made a f ul l - s t op
landing, a crewmember should
check the security of the airstair
door. Perform the Cabin Door
Annunciator Circuitry Check in
t he POH Nor mal Procedures
section prior to the first flight of
the day. If any condition specified
in this procedure is not met, DO
NOT TAKE OFF.
WARNING
Figure 1-9. Visual Inspection Ports
PLUNGER-OUT
PLUNGER-IN
Figure 1-8. Plunger-Out/Plunger-In
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EMERGENCY EXITS
The emergency exits are on the left and right
side of the fuselage at the forward ends of
the passenger compartment (Figure 1-10).
From inside, release the hatches with the
EXIT-PULL pull-down handle. From the
outside, a flush-mounted, pullout handle
releases the hatches. The nonhinged, plug-
type hatches can be removed completely from
the frame into the cabin when the latches are
released (Figure 1-11).
The hatch can be locked so that it cannot
be removed or opened from the outside.
The hatch is locked when the lock lever
inside is in the down or locked position.
When the aircraft is parked, lock the hatch
for security. Prior to flight, the lock lever
should be in the up or unlocked position to
allow removal of the hatch from the outside
in an emergency.
Removal of the hatch from inside is possible
at all times with the EXIT-PULL handle
because it is not locked by the lock lever. An
exit lock placard on the lock lever can be
read when the lever is in the locked position.
PUSH
EMERGENCY EXIT
INSIDE
OUTSIDE
EXIT-PULL
1. PULL HANDLE
2. PUSH IN AFTER RELEASE
Figure 1-11. Emergency Exit Placards
Figure 1-10. Emergency Exit
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CARGO DOOR
A large, swing-up cargo door is hinged at the
top to provides access for loading large
items. Two handles operate the door lock
system. One is in the upper aft area of the
door, and the other is in the lower forward
area of the door. Two separate access covers
must be opened to operate the two handles.
There are no lock handles on the outside
of the cargo door. It can be opened and
closed only from inside the aircraft.
To move the upper aft handle out of the
locked position, depress the black release
button in the handle. Then rotate the yellow
handle upward as far as it will go. This
movement transmi ts vi a cabl es to two
hollow, crescent latches on the forward side
and two on the aft side. The latches rotate
to release latch posts in the cargo door frame.
To move the lower lock handle out of the
locked position (forward), lift the orange
lock hook from the stud and rotate the
handle aft as far as it will go. This movement
transmits via linkage to four latch pins on
the bottom of the cargo door. The pins move
aft to disengage latch lugs at the bottom of
the cargo door frame.
After unlocking the bottom latch
pins, close the forward lock handle
access cover. If this cover is left
open, it rotates on its hinge until
a portion of it extends below the
bottom of the cargo door when
the cargo door is opened. When
the cargo door is subsequently
closed, the access cover breaks.
To open the cargo door after it is unlocked,
push out on the bottom of the door. After
the cargo door is manually opened a few
feet, gas springs raise the door to the fully
open position.
To close the cargo door, pull it down and
inboard. The gas springs resists the closing
effort until the door is only open a few feet.
Then, as the springs move over center, they
begin applying a closing force to the door.
An inflatable rubber seal around the perime-
ter of the cargo door seats against the door
frame when cl osed. When the cabi n i s
pressurized, air seeps into the rubber seal
through small holes in the outboard side of
the seal. The higher the cabin differential
pressure, the more the seal inflates. This is
a passive seal system and has no mechani-
cal connection to a bleed air source.
Never attempt to unlock or check
the security of the door in flight.
If the door annunciator illumi-
nates in flight, or if the pilot has
any reason to suspect the door
may not be s ecurel y l ocked,
instruct all occupants to remain
seated with seatbelts fastened.
Reduce cabi n pressure t o t he
lowest practical value (consider-
i ng al t i t ude f i r s t ) . Af t er t he
ai rcraf t has made a f ul l - s t op
landing, a crewmember should
check the security of the airstair
door. Perf orm t he Ci rcui t ry
Check i n t he POH Nor mal
Procedures section prior to the
f i r s t f l i ght of t he day. I f any
condi t i on s peci f i ed i n t hi s
procedure is not met, DO NOT
TAKE OFF.
350C AIRSTAIR ENTRANCE
The airstair door is built into the cargo
door. It is hinged at the bottom and swings
downward when opened. The stairway is
built onto the inboard side.
Two of the stairsteps fold flat against the
door when it is closed. When the door is
opened, a self-storing platform automati-
cally folds down over the door sill to protect
the rubber door seal.
WARNING
CAUTION
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A hydraul i c damper ensures the door
swings down slowly when it opens. While
the door is open, a plastic-encased cable
that serves as a handrail supports the door.
Additionally, this cable is used when closing
the door from inside.
An i nf l at abl e rubber seal around t he
perimeter seats against the door frame as
t he door i s cl osed. When t he cabi n i s
pressurized, air seeps into the rubber seal
through small holes in the outboard side of
the seal. The higher the cabin differential
pressure, the more the seal inflates. This is
a passive-seal system with no mechanical
connection to a bleed air source.
The outside door handle can be locked with
a key, f or s ecur i t y of t he ai rcraf t on
the ground.
Onl y one person shoul d be on
the airstair door stairway at any
one time.
Locking Mechanism
Rotati ng ei ther outsi de or i nsi de door
handle locks the door. The handles move
simultaneously. Three hollow, crescent
latches on each side of the door rotate to
capture or release latch posts in the cargo
door to secure the airstair door. When
l ocked, t he ai rst ai r door becomes an
integral part of the cargo door.
Whether unlocking the door from outside or
inside, depress and hold the release button
adjacent to the door handle before rotating
the handle. Inside, rotate the handle counter-
cl ockwi se; out si de, rot at e t he handl e
clockwise. Unlocking the door is a two-hand
operation requiring deliberate action.
The release button acts as a safety device to
prevent accidental opening. As an additional
safety measure, a differential-pressure-
sensitive diaphragm is in the release-button
mechani sm. The out board si de of t he
diaphragm is open to atmospheric pressure;
the inboard side opens to cabin air pressure.
As the cabi n-to-atmospheri c pressure
differential increases, it becomes increas-
ingly difficult to depress the release button
because the di aphragm moves i nboard
when either the outboard or inside release
button is depressed.
FLIGHT DECK
SEATS
The pilot and copilot sit side by side in
individual chairs, separated by the control
pedestal. The seats are adjustable fore, aft,
and vertically with release levers beneath the
seats. Depressing the release lever on the
side of the seat adjusts the angle of the seat.
A button on the lower inboard side of the
seat back controls the firmness of the lower
seat back for lumbar control. After adjust-
ing the seat back to a comfortable position,
move forward on the seat to remove all the
weight from the seat back. Hold the button
in until the support fully inflates. Release
the button and lean back in the seat. If the
support is too firm, hold the button in until
the desired degree of firmness is obtained.
Each seat has seat belts and inertia-type
shoulder harnesses. The shoulder harness
consists of a Ystrap mounted to an inertia
reel in the lower seatback. One strap is
wor n over each s houl der. The s t rap
terminates with a fitting that inserts into a
rotary buckle.
CAUTION
Release the shoulder harness straps and
i nboar d l ap bel t s i mul t aneous l y by
rotating the buckle release 1/8 of a turn
in a clockwise direction.
The armrests have angular adjustment and
vertical stowing. To stow the armrest, release
the lever on its forward end and rotate the
armrest aft to the vertical position.
Sun Visors
Each crewmember has a sun visor. If the
visor is stowed, push straight back and
allow the visor to rotate down. Move it
along the track to desired place. Pivot it
out near the windshield or window. Rotate
knob clockwise to lock.
To change positions, rotate knob counter-
clockwise to unlock. Then move to desired
location and position; relock.
To stow the visor, rotate knob counter-
clockwise and then move it along the track
to recessed area of headliner. Pivot the visor
up and press forward until the catch retains
the assembly.
INSTRUMENTS/CONTROLS
Due to conventional dual controls, the
aircraft can be flown by either pilot. The
controls and instruments are arranged for
convenient single-pilot operation, or pilot
and copilot crew.
The instrument panel poster that accompa-
nies this manual illustrates a typical cockpit
arrangement . The annunci at or panel
chapter at the end of this manual locates
specific annunciators and control panels.
Each system chapter describes in detail the
controls and instruments appropriate to
that system.
Fi gures 1- 12 t hrough 1- 21 i l l us t rat e
each section.
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Figure 1-12. Overhead Light Control Panel
Figure 1-13. Glareshield
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Figure 1-14 . Left Instrument Panel
Figure 1-15. Right Instrument Panel
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Figure 1-16. Center Instrument Panel
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Figure 1-17. Pilot Subpanels
Figure 1-18. Copilot Subpanels
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Figure 1-19. Center Pedestal
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Figure 1-20. Circuit Breaker PanelRight Console
Figure 1-21. Fuel Control PanelLeft Console
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CABIN FEATURES
SEATS
Passenger seats are installed on continuous
tracks mounted on the floor. A placard on
the horizontal leg cross brace denotes each
seat as FRONT or AFT FACING.
Al l pas s enger s eat s have adj us t abl e
headrests and shoulder harnesses. The seats
are adjustable fore and aft (7 inches [17.8
cm]) and laterally (2 1/2 inches [6.35 cm]).
Seat backs may be adjusted for maximum
comfort. Some seats may swivel through
approximately 45 (Figure 1-22).
A two-position lever on the forward face of
the inboard armrest and a button on the
inboard side of the armrest adjust the seats.
Moving the lever upward releases the seat for
fore and aft and/or lateral movement. Release
the lever to lock seat in desired position.
Depressing the button adjusts the seatback.
Release the button when the back is in the
desired position. If no weight is applied to
the seatback when the button is depressed,
the seatback returns to the upright position.
Before takeoff and landing, lateral tracking
seats should be in the outboard position, all
seat backs posi t i oned upri ght , and al l
headrests fully extended.
The inboard armrest on each seat can be
stowed if desired. Lift the armrest to the
full-up position to unlatch the mechanism.
Lower the armrest to stow.
To use the armrest, simply raise it to the full-
up position. Then allow it to settle to the
locked position.
If the armrest does not l ock i n the up
position, cycle it fully down and back to the
up position to reset the locking mechanism.
Foyer Seat
A hinged seat cushion on the top of the
toilet forms an extra passenger seat when
the toilet is not is use (Figure 1-23).
TOILET
On B350 models, the side facing toilet in the
foyer faces the airstair door. On B350C
models, the forward facing toilet is in the
baggage compartment. Raise the hinged
lid to access the toilet.
If a Monogram electrically flushing toilet
is installed, the sliding knife valve should
be open at all times except during servic-
ing. Open the cabinet below the toilet to
access the knife valve actuator handle.
Figure 1-22. Passenger Seats
Figure 1-23. Toilet Seat
Relief Tubes
A relief tube is in the seat shroud of the side
facing toilet (B350) or on the baggage
compartment wall forward of the toilet
(B350C). An optional relief tube may also
be installed in the cockpit and stowed under
the pilot seat.
A valve lever is on the side of the relief tube
horn. When the tube is in use, the lever
must be depressed at all times.
The relief tubes are for use during flight only.
AC POWER
The aircraft has four AC power outlets to
provide 115 VAC for laptop computers.
The outlets are on each side of the cabin
beneath the cabin tables. Access by lifting
the cover placarded 115 VAC.
One 115-volt, 60-Hz inverter powers the
outlets. The inverter is in the right center
section wing just outboard of the nacelle.
The left generator bus supplies 28 VDC for
the inverter through the INVERTER circuit
breaker in the DC Power distribution panel
under the center aisle floor. A 115 VAC-5
AMP ci rcui t breaker adj acent t o t he
inverter protects its output.
For normal operation, input current to the
inverter can vary from approximately 0.5
amperes to approxi matel y 20 amperes
depending on the load. The inverter is
capable of providing a continuous output
of 4 amperes.
The total electrical load connected to the
four outlets must not exceed 4 amperes.
Excess load may cause the inverter input
circuit breaker to open.
The inverter shuts down for input over
voltage, under voltage and high internal
temperature conditions. It automatically
resets when the conditions are corrected.
The inverter also shuts down for an output
short ci rcui t. Fol l owi ng a short ci rcui t
shutdown, the inverter can be manually reset
by cycling the furnishing switch off and on.
Furnishing Switch
A switch on the cockpit overhead panel
controls the inverter. The two-position
switch FURN ON/OFF is standard. An
optional switch has the following positions:
FURN COFFEE ON/FURN ON/OFF. The
inverter operates when the switch is in
FURN ON or FURN COFFEE ON position.
BAGGAGE
COMPARTMENT
On Model 350, the entire aft-cabin area aft
of the foyer may be used as a baggage
compart ment . A nyl on web rest rai ns
loose items.
On Model 350C, a s eparat e baggage
compar t ment i s af t of t he pas s enger
compartment. A partition separates it from
the passenger area. The toilet is on the aft
wall of the baggage compartment. A nylon
web restrains items.
Unless authorized by applicable Departmen
of Transportation Regulations, do not carry
hazardous material anywhere in the aircraft.
Do not carry chi l dren i n t he baggage
compartment unless secured in a seat.
Secure baggage and other objects with webs
to prevent shifting in turbulent air.
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CONTROL SURFACES
The King Air 350 has conventional ailerons
and rudder. A T-tail horizontal stabilizer
and elevator mounted at the extreme top
of the vertical stabilizer. Conventional dual
controls in the flight deck operate the cable-
control surfaces.
Any time the aircraft is parked overnight
or in windy conditions, install the rudder
gust pi n and cont rol l ocks t o prevent
damage to the control surfaces and hinges
or the controls (Figure 1-24).
Dual push rod actuators are installed on all
pilot controlled trim tabs.
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Figure 1-24. Flight Control Locks
GENERAL OPERATING
INFORMATION
PREFLIGHT INSPECTION
The preflight inspection procedure has been
divided into five areas as shown in Figure
1-25. The inspection begins in the flight
compartment, proceeds aft, then moves
clockwise around the aircraft.
TIEDOWN AND SECURING
When the ai rcraft i s parked overni ght
or dur i ng hi gh wi nds, i t s houl d be
securely moored with protective covers
(Figure 1-26).
Place wheel chocks fore and aft of the main
gear wheels and nose wheel. Using the
mooring points, tie the aircraft down with
suitable chain or rope. Install the control
surface lock. Ensure flaps are up.
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Figure 1-25. Preflight Inspection
Secure t he propel l er s t o prevent
windmilling. This aircraft has free-spinning
propellers that could be hazardous if not
restrai ned. Al l owi ng engi ne gears and
bearings to windmill without lubrication
is not a good practice. Install the engine
inlet cover if there is blowing dust or rain.
Before towing the aircraft, release the
parking brake (brake handle pushed in) just
under the l eft corner of the subpanel .
Remove the rudder gust lockpin from the
pinhole in the pilot floorboard. Serious
damage to the tires, brakes, and steering
l i nkage can resul t i f t hese i t ems are
not released.
TAXIING
The ground turning radii are predicated on
the use of partial braking action and differ-
ential power. Locking the inside brake can
cause tire or strut damage.
If the wingtip clears obstacles when turning
the aircraft, the tail also clears.
Because of the propel l er wi ndstream,
an area directly to the rear of the engines
can be hazardous to persons or parked
aircraft when taxiing, turning, and starting
t he engi nes. Whi l e t he vel oci t i es and
t emperat ures cannot be accurat el y
measured, exercise reasonable care to
prevent incidents within these danger areas
(Figure 1-27).
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PARKING BRAKE
PROPELLER TIEDOWNS
Figure 1-26. Tiedowns
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Figure 1-27. Turn Radius and Danger Areas
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SERVICING DATA
The Handling, Servicing, and Maintenance
section of the POH outlines requirements
for mai ntai ni ng the Ki ng Ai r 350 i n a
condition equal to its original manufac-
ture. This information sets time intervals at
which the aircraft should be taken to a
Hawker/ Beechcraft Service Center for
periodic servicing or preventive mainte-
nance. Al l l i mi t s, procedures, s af et y
practices, time limits, servicing, and mainte-
nance requirements contained in the POH
are mandatory.
This section of the POH also includes a
consumabl e mat eri al s chart t hat l i st s
approved and recommended materials for
servicing the aircraft. The servicing data
diagram (Figure 1-28) lists and illustrates
servicing points and materials required.
This chart is for reference only and is always
superseded by the POH information.
LIMITATIONS
Model 350ER limitations are in parenthe-
sis where applicable.
AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS
Maneuvering Speed (V
A
) 184 (182) KIAS
Max Fl ap Extensi on/ Extended Speeds
(V
FE
):
Approach ............................... 202 KIAS
Full Down .............................. 158 KIAS
Maximum Landing Gear Extended Speed
(V
LE
)................................. 184 (182) KIAS
Max Landi ng Gear Operat i ng Speeds
(V
LO
)
Extension................... 184 (182) KIAS
Retraction .................. 166 (164) KIAS
Air Min Control Speed (V
MCA
)
Propeller Feathered/
Flaps Up ..................... 94 (101) KIAS
Propeller Feathered/
Flaps Approach............ 93 (98) KIAS
Maximum Operating Speed
V
MO
............................. 263 (245) KIAS
M
MO
....................................... 0.58 Mach
Airspeed Indicator Display
Red line ............................................ V
MCA
Solid red bar ........ Impending stallspeed
low speed cue
DN (white)...................... Maximum speed
permissible with flaps
extended beyond approach
APP (white) .................. Maximum speed
permissible with flaps
in approach position
Blue line .................................. One-engine
inoperative best rate-of-climb speed
Solid red bar at top .............. V
MO
marker
WEIGHT LIMITS
Max Ramp Weight .. 15,100 (16,600) lbs
Max Takeoff Weight 15,000 (16,500) lbs
Max Landing Weight 15,000 (15,675) lbs
Max Zero Fuel Weight 12,500 (13,000) lbs
Max Weight
in Baggage Compartment: .......... 550 lbs
Max Weight in Wing Lockers ........ 300 lbs
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Figure 1-28. Service Data
MAXIMUM OPERATING LIMITS
Normal Operation ...................... 35,000 ft
Yaw Damp System .... 5,000 or 19,000 ft
(strakes)
With Aviation Gasoline:
Both Standby Pumps Operative 35,000 ft
Either Standby Pump
Inoperative ................................ Prohibited
Climb without crossfeed
capability........................................ 20,000 ft
MAXIMUM OUTSIDE AIR
TEMPERATURE LIMITS
Sea Level to 25,000 ft
Pressure Altitude...................... ISA +37 C
Above 25,000 ft
Pressure Altitude...................... ISA +31 C
GENERAL LIMITATIONS
Acrobatic maneuvers, including spins, are
prohibited.
Seat back of each occupied aft-facing seat
must be in the upright position and headrest
fully extended for takeoff and landing.
All cargo must be properly secured by an
FAA-approved cargo restrai nt system.
Cargo must be arranged to permit free
access to all exits and emergency exits.
CRACKED OR SHATTERED
WINDSHIELD
Windshields with a shattered inner ply have
numerous cracks that obstruct forward
vision. Small particles or flakes of glass can
break free of the windshield and interfere
with the crew's vision. These windshields
must be replaced prior to the next flight
unless a special flight permit is obtained
f rom t he l ocal FAA Fl i ght St andards
District Office.
The f ol l owi ng l i mi t at i ons appl y when
continued flight is required with a cracked
outer or inner ply of the windshield.
Flight limited to 25 flight hours
Crack(s) must not impair visibility
Crack(s) must not interfere with use
of windshield wipers for flights requir-
ing use of wipers
Wi nds hi el d ant i - i ce mus t be
operati onal for fl i ghts i nto i ci ng
conditions
Following placard must be installed in
view of the pilot:
Windshields that have cracks in both the
inner and outer plies must be replaced
prior to the next flight unless a special
flight permit is obtained from the local
FAA Flight Standards District Office.
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MAXIMUM AIRPLANE ALTI-
TUDE IS LIMITED TO 25,000
FEET. CABIN P MUST BE
MAINTAINED BETWEEN 2.0
AND 4.6 PSI DURING FLIGHT
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CRACK IN SIDE WINDOW
(COCKPIT OR CABIN)
The fol l owi ng l i mi tati ons appl y when
continued flight is required with a cracked
outer or inner ply in any side window.
These limitations do not apply to minor
compression-type chips (clamshell) that
may occur on the milled edge of cockpit
side windows. Refer to the maintenance
manual for the disposition of such chips.
Limited to 25 flight hours.
Flights must be conducted with cabin
depressurized.
Following placard must be installed in
clear view of the pilot:
MISCELLANEOUS AIRSPEEDS
Emergency Airspeeds 15,000
(16,500) lbs
Model 350ER airspeeds are in parenthesis
where applicable.
One-Engine-Inoperative Best Angle-of-
Climb (V
XSE
) .............................. 125 KIAS
One-Engine-Inoperative Best Rate-of-
Climb (V
YSE
) .............................. 125 KIAS
Air Minimum Control Speeds (V
MCA
):
Flaps Up.................................... 94 KIAS
Flaps Approach....................... 93 KIAS
One-Engine-Inoperative Enroute
Climb ............................................ 125 KIAS
Emergency Descent .................. 184 KIAS
Maximum Range Glide ............ 135 KIAS
Airspeeds for Safe Operation
15,000 (16,500) Lbs
Max Demonstrated Crosswind
Component .................................... 20 KIAS
Two-Engine Best Angle-of-Climb
(V
X
).................................... 125 (135) KIAS
Two-Engine Best Rate-of-Climb
(V
Y
) .................................. 140 (135) KIAS
Cruise Climb:
Sea Level to 10,000 feet 170 KIAS
10,000 to 15,000 feet ...... 160 KIAS
15,000 to 20,000 feet ...... 150 KIAS
20,000 to 25,000 feet ...... 140 KIAS
25,000 to 30,000 feet ...... 130 KIAS
30,000 to 35,000 feet ...... 120 KIAS
Turbulent Air Penetration ...... 170 KIAS
Intentional One-Engine Inoperative Speed
(V
SSE
) .............................. 110 (135) KIAS
Overspeed Warning
An overspeed warning horn sounds when
the airspeed exceeds the barber pole by no
more than 6 knots or .01 Mach, whichever
is less. A test switch on the copilot left
s ubpanel al l ows t he pi l ot t o t es t t he
overspeed warning prior to flight.
PRESSURIZED FLIGHT IS
PROHIBITED DUE TO A
CRACKED SlDE WINDOW.
CONDUCT FLIGHT WITH THE
CABIN PRESSURE SWITCH IN
THE DUMP POSITION
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INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
1. Aircraft equipped with dual strakes
require yaw damper operation above
_________ feet:
A. 13,000
B. 15,000
C. 19,000
D. 20,000
2. Lateral-tracking seats must be in the
full _______ position for _______
A. Outboard; takeoff only.
B. Inboard; landing.
C. Inboard; takeoff and landing.
D. Outboard; takeoff and landing.
3. Illumination of the red master warning
annunciator [DOOR UNLOCKED]
indicates:
A. The emergency escape hatch i s
open or not secure.
B. The airstair door is open or not
secure.
C. The emergency or airstair door is
open or not secure.
D. Both the emergency and airstair
doors are open or not secure.
4. The maxi mum al l owed operat i ng
altitude limit is ________ feet.
A. 30,000
B. 35,000
C. 37,000
D. 41,000
5. The maxi mum al l owed operat i ng
temperature limit above 25,000 feet is
ISA + ______C.
A. 25
B. 27
C. 31
D. 37
6. Single pilot operations require:
A. The pilot to use a headset with a
boom microphone.
B. A flight attendant.
C. Operations not to be conducted
under 14 CFR Part 135.
D. Operations only during Day VFR.
7. With appropriate equipment, the kinds
of operations allowed:
A. Permit flight at night.
B. Prohibit flight at night.
C. Permi t f l i ght i n i ce duri ng day
operations only.
D. Prohibit flight in ICE during night
operations.
8. Passenger briefing cards are required
at one per seat for:
A. All operations.
B. 14 CFR Part 135 operations.
C. 14 CFR Part 135 operations with
out a flight attendant.
D. Single pilot operations only.
9. V
XSE
is _______ KIAS.
A. 84
B. 125
C. 135
D. 140
10. V
MCA
for Flaps Approach is ______
KIAS.
A. 85
B. 93
C. 94
D. 140
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QUESTIONS
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CHAPTER 2
ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS
CONTENTS
Page
INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................... 2-1
GENERAL ........................................................................................................................... 2-1
COMPONENTS................................................................................................................... 2-2
Battery ............................................................................................................................ 2-2
Starter/Generators ........................................................................................................ 2-3
Ammeters....................................................................................................................... 2-5
CIRCUIT BREAKERS ...................................................................................................... 2-5
Buses............................................................................................................................... 2-7
OPERATION....................................................................................................................... 2-9
Protection....................................................................................................................... 2-9
Starting ......................................................................................................................... 2-11
Normal Operation....................................................................................................... 2-13
EXTERNAL POWER...................................................................................................... 2-16
EMERGENCY AND ABNORMAL INDICATIONS ................................................ 2-17
Battery.......................................................................................................................... 2-18
Circuit Breaker Tripped ............................................................................................. 2-19
Generators ................................................................................................................... 2-19
System Distribution Schematics................................................................................ 2-22
CIRCUIT BREAKER LISTING.................................................................................... 2-27
QUESTIONS...................................................................................................................... 2-31
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ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Title Page
2-1 Basic Electrical Symbols....................................................................................... 2-2
2-2 Battery Installation ............................................................................................... 2-2
2-3 Starter/Generator Installation............................................................................. 2-3
2-4 Pilot Subpanel........................................................................................................ 2-4
2-5 Overhead Light Control and Meter Panel......................................................... 2-5
2-6 Left Circuit Breaker Panel ................................................................................... 2-5
2-7 Copilot Sidewall Circuit Breaker Panel ............................................................. 2-6
2-8 King Air 350 Electrical System Component Location ..................................... 2-7
2-9 Electrical System................................................................................................... 2-8
2-10 BAT Switch ON................................................................................................... 2-11
2-11 Right Engine Start .............................................................................................. 2-12
2-12 Cross Generator Start ........................................................................................ 2-13
2-13 Both Generators On........................................................................................... 2-14
2-14 Both Generators On Generator Ties Open................................................ 2-15
2-15 External Power.................................................................................................... 2-16
2-16 BAT TIE OPEN.................................................................................................. 2-18
2-17 L/R GEN TIE OPEN......................................................................................... 2-19
2-18 L/R DC GEN Annunciators.............................................................................. 2-19
2-19 Dual Generator Failure...................................................................................... 2-21
2-20 Battery Off........................................................................................................... 2-22
2-21 Right Generator On ........................................................................................... 2-23
2-22 Bus Sense Test with Both Generator On......................................................... 2-24
2-23 Left Generator Bus Isolated ............................................................................. 2-25
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
2-24 Center Bus Isolated ........................................................................................... 2-26
2-25 Triple-Fed Bus Isolated ..................................................................................... 2-27
TABLES
Table Title Page
2-1 King Air 350 Load Management...................................................................... 2-20
2-2 Circuit Breakers.................................................................................................. 2-28
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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INTRODUCTION
A thorough understanding of the aircraft electrical system eases pilot workload
in normal operations and prepares him for any electrical malfunctions that may
occur. This chapter describes the electrical system components and operations so
the pilot can quickly locate switches and circuit breakers for appropriate correc-
tive actions in abnormal and emergency situations.
GENERAL
The electrical system is a 28-volt DC system
with the negative lead of each power source
grounded to the main aircraft structure.
Two s t ar t er- generat or s connect ed i n
parallel and a battery provide the direct
current.
An external power receptacle is available
for an external power uni t to provi de
el ectri ci ty whi l e the ai rcraft i s on the
ground.
Power from these sources is distributed to
the individual electrical loads with a multi-
bus system. Each power source electrically
CHAPTER 2
ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS
connects to the distribution system through
relays and line contactors. Bus tie relays
and individual bus relays interconnect
the buses.
The electrical system provides maximum
protection against loss of electrical power
if a ground fault (or short) occurs.
The schematics in this chapter use basic
electrical symbols to illustrate the system.
(Figure 2-1) provides a key to those symbols.
COMPONENTS
BATTERY
The battery for the King Air 350 is a 42-
ampere-hour sealed lead acid battery. It is
in the right wing center section in an air-
cooled box (Figure 2-2).
The battery is used for engine starting and
as a final redundant power source if both
generators fail.
To meet specified battery duration times,
the battery charge current must be 10 amps
or less prior to takeoff. Takeoff with a
battery charge current above 10 amps is
permitted at the discretion of the pilot.
The BAT switch and BAT BUS switch on
the pilot left subpanel control the battery.
With both switches in OFF, the battery
disconnects from all electrical loads.
BAT BUS Switch
The BAT BUS switch controls a remote
cont rol ci rcui t breaker i n t he batt ery
compartment that functions as a battery
bus contactor.
2-2
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KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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BATTERY
FUSE
CURRENT LIMITER
(OR ISOLATION LIMITER) THIS ACTS
AS A LARGE, SLOW-BLOW FUSE
DIODE
THE DIODE ACTS AS A ONE-WAY
"CHECK VALVE" FOR ELECTRICITY.
(Triangle points in direction of power flow.
Power cannot flow in opposite direction.)
CIRCUIT BREAKER
SWITCH - TYPE
CIRCUIT BREAKER
BUS TIE &
SENSOR
RELAY OPEN
RELAY CLOSED
Figure 2-1. Basic Electrical Symbols
Figure 2-2. Battery Installation
When the switch is in the NORM position,
battery power is applied to the battery bus.
Because the battery bus powers such items
as ent ry l i ght s and cl ocks, t hi s i s t he
normal position.
When the switch is in the EMER OFF
position, the remote control circuit breaker
opens t o i sol at e t he batt ery f rom t he
battery bus.
BAT Switch
When the BAT switch is in ON, it closes the
battery relay to apply power to the triple-
fed bus. The battery bus tie closes to apply
power to the center bus.
In the OFF position, both the battery relay
and the battery bus tie relay open to discon-
nect the battery from all buses except the
battery bus.
STARTER/GENERATORS
The t wo 28- vol t , 30 0- ampere st art er/
generators are dual-purpose, engine-driven
units (Figure 2-3). The unit is used as a
starter to drive the engine during engine
start and as a engine-driven generator to
provide electrical power. A series starter
winding is used during starter operation; a
shunt field winding is used during genera-
tor operation.
The regulated output voltage of the genera-
tor is 28.25 (0.25) volts with a maximum
continuous load rating of 300 amperes.
In addition to the starter/generators, the
generat or syst em consi st s of cont rol
switches, generator control units (GCU),
line contactors and loadmeters.
Starter Function
The center bus provides starter power
through a starter relay. A three-position
IGNITION AND ENGINE START switch
for each engine on the pilot left subpanel
controls the operations. Switch positions
are ON-OFF-STARTER ONLY.
2-3
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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Figure 2-3. Starter/Generator Installation
Actuating a switch to either the STARTER
ONLY or ON position supplies a signal to
the start relay and generator field sense
relay. The start relay energizes the starter.
The generator field sense relay disables
t he s hunt f i el d t o prevent generat or
operation during the start cycle. The starter
drives the compressor section of the engine
through accessory gearing.
Generator Function
The generating function is self-exciting
and does not require battery power for
operat i on. It uses generat or resi dual
voltage for initial generator buildup.
GEN Switch
The L GEN and R GEN switches in the
pilot left subpanel are under the MASTER
SWITCH gang bar (Figure 2-4). Switch
positions are GEN RESETONOFF.
Placing the switch momentarily in GEN
RESET and then rel easi ng to the ON
position brings the generators on-line. In
the GEN RESET position, the generator
voltage builds up to 28 volts and the line
contactor is open. When the generator
switch is released to ON, the line contac-
tor closes.
Generator Control Unit
Two generat or cont rol uni t s (GCUs)
control generator operation. The GCU
below the center aisle floor makes constant
vol t age avai l abl e t o t he buses duri ng
variations in engine speed and electrical
load requirements.
The GCUs provide the following functions:
Voltage regulation/line contactor
control
Overvoltage/overexcitation protec-
tion
Paralleling/load sharing
Reverse-current protection
Cross-generator-start current limiting
2-4
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KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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Figure 2-4. Pilot Subpanel
Each of t hes e prot ect i on f eat ures i s
discussed in detail in the Operation portion
of this chapter.
AMMETERS
Left and right loadmeters on the overhead
met er panel di spl ay t he l oad on each
generator (Figure 2-5).
Voltage on each bus may also be monitored
on the voltmeter with the VOLTMETER
BUS SELECT s wi t ch adj acent t o
the voltmeter. Selector positions include
EXT PWR, CTR , L GEN, R GEN, TPL
FED, BAT.
Move the selector switch to appropriate
position and then read the voltage on the
adjacent loadmeter.
CIRCUIT BREAKERS
DC power is distributed to the various
systems via circuit breakers that protect
most of the components in the aircraft.
Two of these circuit breaker panels are in
the cockpit. Each of the circuit breakers has
its amperage rating printed on it.
The smaller breaker panel is to the left of
the pilot below the fuel management panel
(Figure 2-6). The larger circuit breaker panel
is on the copilot sidewall (Figure 2-7).
2-5
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KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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Figure 2-5. Overhead Light Control
and Meter Panel
Figure 2-6. Left Circuit Breaker Panel
A color-coded ring around each circuit
breaker indicates the bus to which the
circuit breaker connects. The triple-fed bus
and battery bus circuit breakers are color-
coded yellow; left generator bus circuit
breakers are bl ue; ri ght generator bus
circuit breakers are green; and the standby
bus circuit breakers are red.
Circuit breaker switches on the pilot right
subpanel protect components such as
ext er i or l i ght i ng and i ce prot ect i on
equi pment . Thes e s wi t ches have t he
amperage rating stamped on the end of
the switch.
A typical listings of all buses and circuit
breakers is at the end of this chapter.
Procedures for handling tripped circuit
breakers and other related electrical system
war ni ngs are i n t he Emergency and
Abnormal Procedures section of the Pilots
Operating Handbook.
As a general rule if a nonessential circuit
breaker tri ps i n fl i ght, do not reset i t.
Resetting a tripped breaker could cause
f ur t her damage t o t he component
or system.
If an essential system circuit breaker such
as an avionics breaker trips, let it cool and
then reset it. If it fails to reset, do not
attempt to reset it again. Take corrective
action according to the procedures in the
appropriate section of the POH.
2-6
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KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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Figure 2-7. Copilot Sidewall Circuit Breaker Panel
2-7
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KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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BUSES
Electrical loads are divided among the
buses. Equipment on the buses is arranged
so that all items with duplicate functions
(such as ri ght and l eft l andi ng l i ghts)
connect to different buses (Figure 2-8).
In normal operation, all buses are automat-
ically tied into a single-loop system where
all sources supply power through individ-
ual protective devices.
Bus es and mai n power s ources are
the following:
Batt ery busBatt ery t hrough a
remote control circuit breaker
Left and right generator busLeft
and right generators
Triple-fed busBattery and both
generators buses
Center busBoth generator buses
and battery
The generator buses connect to the center
bus with the left and right bus tie relays. The
battery connects through the battery bus
tie, which closes when the BAT switch is in
LEGEND ABBREVIATIONS USED
L = LEFT EPR = EXTERNAL POWER RELAY
R = RIGHT STR/GEN = STARTER GENERATOR
B = BATTERY GEN CONT = GENERATOR CONTROL
BT = BUS TIE EXT PWR = EXTERNAL POWER
LC = LINE CONTACTOR CTR BUS = CENTER BUS
SB = SUB BUS RG = RIGHT GENERATOR
SR = STARTER RELAY LG = LEFT GENERATOR
BB = BATTERY BUS RCCB = REMOTE CONTROL CIRCUIT BREAKER
DFB = DUAL FED BUS
R
L
C
L
S
R
R
S
B
R
S
R
L
B
T
EXT
PWR
EPR
BATTERY
B
R
STR/
GEN
STR/
GEN
R
G
B
U
S
L
G
B
U
S
TRIPLE
FED
BUS
GEN
CONT
GEN
CONT
BBS
BS
RCCB
CTR
BUS
BATT
BUS
DUAL
FED
BUS
B
B
T
R
B
T
L
L
C
L
S
B
Figure 2-8. King Air 350 Electrical System Component Location
ON. The battery is then available for center
bus loads or recharging (Figure 2-9).
GEN TIES Switch
In the OPEN position, both the left and
right bus tie relays open to isolate both
generator buses from the center bus.
The NORM posi ti on al l ows automati c
closure of the left and right bus tie relays
when either generator or external power
comes on line. If the battery is the only power
source on line, both generator bus ties open
to isolate the left and right generator buses
from the battery. Equipment that remains
operational during battery only operations
has a white ring around the control switch.
Momentarily placing the MAN TIE switch
in the MAN CLOSE position during battery
operation closes both generator bus ties. The
battery then powers the generator buses.
2-8
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KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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R DC GEN
R GEN TIE
OPEN
BAT TIE
OPEN
MAN TIES
CLOSE
L GEN TIE
OPEN
L DC GEN
BUS SENSE
RESET
TEST
GEN TIES
MAN CLOSE
OPEN
SPRING
LOADED
TOCENTER
SPRINGLOADED
FROMMANCLOSE
TOCENTER
LEVERLOCK
OUTOFCENTER
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
LEFT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
LEFT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
LEFT GEN BUS
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
RIGHT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
RIGHT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
RIGHT GEN BUS
RIGHT
GENERATOR
BUS TIE
BATTERY
BUS TIE
H
E
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CENTER BUS
H
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RCCB
60
BATT
SWITCH
FROM BAT BUS
EXT PWR
RECEPTACLE
EXT PWR
RELAY
2
7
5
BATTERY
BATTERY
RELAY
60
20A
TRIPLE FED BUS
BATTERY
AMMETER
DUAL-FED BUS
ESIS BATT BUS
ESIS
BATT
BAT BUS
BAT BUS
CONTROL
.5A
BAT BUS
SWITCH
NORMAL
60
5
HED
Figure 2-9. Electrical System
The green advisory MAN TIES CLOSE
annunciator illuminates to indicate the
generator bus ties have been manually
closed during battery operation.
BUS SENSE Switch
Bus current sensors sense current to each
generator bus from the center bus and
current to the center bus from the battery.
If either generator bus sensor senses a high
current condition, it opens the correspon-
ding generator bus tie to isolate the bus.
If the battery bus sensor senses a high
battery discharge current, it opens the
battery bus tie to isolate the battery. The
battery bus sensor does not work during
engine starts and landing gear operation.
The BUS SENSE swi t ch on t he pi l ot
subpanel resets and tests the sensors.
The RESET position resets the bus current
sensors if they have tripped because of a
test or an actual high current condition.
The momentary TEST position opens the
bus current sensors for the generator bus
ties and battery ties. The yellow caution L
and R GEN TIE OPEN and BAT TIE
OPEN annunciators illuminate.
AVIONICS MASTER
POWER Switch
Three avi oni cs buses are el ect ri cal l y
connected to the main distribution system
through avionics relays. The AVIONICS
MASTER POWER switch on the pilot
subpanel controls these relays.
The ON position opens the control circuit
so the relays are in their normally closed
posi t i ons. Thi s suppl i es power t o t he
avionics buses.
The OFF position applies control power to
the relays to disconnect the avionics buses.
The AVIONICS MASTER circuit breaker
in the right circuit breaker panel provides
the power to control the avionics relays.
If the avionics buses become disconnected
as a result of a control circuit fault, the
AVIONICS MASTER circuit breaker can
be pulled to restore power.
OPERATION
The DC power di st ri but i on syst em i s
commonl y cal l ed a t ri pl e- f ed syst em
because most buses receive power from
three sources.
The triple-fed bus powers many systems.
Three s ources ( generat or bus es and
battery) power the triple-fed bus. It only
receives power; it does not transfer electric-
ity from one part of a system to another.
That is a function of the the center bus.
Because of this arrangement, a backup
power source is available to most of the
aircraft electrical systems.
In normal operation, all buses are automat-
ically tied together so that the battery and
two generators collectively supply power
through individual protective devices.
PROTECTION
The bus tie system protects the electrical
system from excessively high current flow.
The abilities to isolate a bus and load shed
are equally important protective features.
The system automatically removes excess
loads (generator buses) when the power
source is reduced to battery only.
When both generators fail, the generator
bus ties open to shed generator bus loads.
The battery continues to power the center,
triple-fed, and battery buses. If necessary,
use the GEN TIE switch to manually close
the generator ties. This restores power to the
generator buses.
2-9
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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When load shedding occurs in flight, land
as soon as practical unless the situation
can be remedied and at least one genera-
tor brought back onl i ne. Refer to the
Abnormal Indications discussion in this
section and emergency procedures section
of the POH for more details.
GCU Protection
Voltage Regulation/Line Contactor
Control
The generators are normally regulated to
28.25 (.25) VDC. When the GEN switch
i s hel d i n RESET, generat or resi dual
voltage is applied through the GCU to the
generator shunt field. This causes genera-
tor output voltage to rise.
When the switch is released to ON, the 28-
volt regulator circuit takes over. It controls
the generator shunt field to maintain a
const ant out put vol t age. The vol t age
regulator circuit varies shunt field excita-
tion to maintain a constant 28-volt output
from the generator for all rated conditions
of generator speed, load, and temperature.
When the GEN switch is released to ON,
the GCU enables the line contactor control
circuit. The GCU compares generator output
voltage with aircraft bus voltage. If output
voltage is within 0.5 volts of bus voltage, the
GCU closes the line contactor to connect the
generator to the aircraft bus. It also closes
both generator ties to connect the center
bus and generator buses. The generator can
now recharge the aircraft battery and power
all aircraft electrical loads.
When a generator fails or is turned off, the
GCU opens the line contactor to isolate the
inoperative generator from its bus.
Overvoltage/Overexcitation
The GCU provides overvoltage protection
to prevent excessive generator voltage to
electrical equipment. If a generator output
reaches the maximum allowable 32-volts,
the overexcitation circuits of the GCU
det ect whi ch generat or i s produci ng
excessive voltage output and attempting to
absorb al l el ect ri cal l oads. The GCU
overexcitation circuit disconnects that
generator from the electrical system.
The overexcitation portion of the GCU
activates if generator voltage increases
without control, but does not reach an
overvoltage condition. If the generator field
reaches the limitation value, this circuitry
removes the affected generator from the bus.
Paralleling/Load Sharing
The paralleling circuit averages the output
of both generators to equalize load levels.
This feature is operative when both genera-
tors are online.
The paralleling circuits sense the interpole
winding voltages of both generators to
provi de an i ndi cati on of the l oad. The
voltage regulator circuits are then biased
up or down as requi red to i ncrease or
decrease generator loads until both genera-
tors share the load equally. The GCUs
balance loads to within 10%.
Reverse-Current Protection
When a generator becomes underexcited
or cannot maintain bus voltage for some
reason (i.e., low generator speed during
engine shutdown), it begins to draw current
(reverse current) from the el ectri cal
system. The GCU senses reverse current by
comparing generator output voltage to
generator bus voltage. When bus voltage
exceeds output voltage, the GCU opens
the line contactor to protect the generator.
Cross-Generator
Start Current Limiting
When t he IGNITION AND ENGINE
START switch on the second engine is
activated to ON during a cross-generator
start, a signal from the switch is applied to
the GCU of the operating generator.
Thi s act i vat es t he cross- st art current
limiting circuit to limit output of the operat-
ing generator to no more than 400 amps.
This protects the 250-amp current limiter
on the operating generator side.
When a starter is selected, the bus tie
sensors are disabled to prevent them from
opening their respective bus tie relays.
When using STARTER ONLY to motor
the engine, the same functions occur.
STARTING
When BAT switch is turned to ON (Figure
2-10), the battery relay and battery bus tie
rel ays cl ose. Batt ery power i s rout ed
as follows:
Through the battery rel ay to the
triple-fed bus
Through the battery bus tie relay to
the center bus
To bot h st art er rel ays t o permi t
starting either engine
2-11
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R DC GEN
R GEN TIE
OPEN
BAT TIE
OPEN
MAN TIES
CLOSE
L GEN TIE
OPEN
L DC GEN
BUS SENSE
RESET
TEST
GENTIES
MANCLOSE
OPEN
SPRING
LOADED
TOCENTER
SPRINGLOADED
FROMMANCLOSE
TOCENTER
LEVERLOCK
OUTOFCENTER
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
LEFT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
LEFT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
LEFT GEN BUS
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
RIGHT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
RIGHT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
RIGHT GEN BUS
RIGHT
GENERATOR
BUS TIE
BATTERY
BUS TIE
H
E
D
CENTER BUS
H
E
D
RCCB
60
BATT
SWITCH
FROM BAT BUS
EXT PWR
RECEPTACLE
EXT PWR
RELAY
2
7
5
BATTERY
BATTERY
RELAY
60
20A
TRIPLE FED BUS
BATTERY
AMMETER
DUAL-FED BUS
ESIS BATT BUS
ESIS
BATT
BAT BUS
BAT BUS
CONTROL
.5A
BAT BUS
SWITCH
NORMAL
60
5
HED
Figure 2-10. BAT Switch ON
Wi thout generator or external power,
neither generator bus is powered because
the generator bus ties are normally open
when only battery power is available.
The starter relay connects the battery to the
starter/generator during engine starts. With
one engine running and its generator online
(Figure 2-11), the opposite engine can be
started with power from the battery and
operating generator channeled through
the starter relay. This is called a cross-
generator start.
Normally one engine is started on battery
power alone; the second engine uses a
cross-generator start (Figure 2-12).
The operating GCU limits its generator
output to no more than 400 amps during a
cross-generator start. This ensures that the
250-amp current limiter on the operating
generat or s i de does not open due t o
transient surges.
2-12
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R DC GEN
R GEN TIE
OPEN
BAT TIE
OPEN
MAN TIES
CLOSE
L GEN TIE
OPEN
L DC GEN
BUS SENSE
RESET
TEST
GEN TIES
MAN CLOSE
OPEN
SPRING
LOADED
TOCENTER
SPRINGLOADED
FROMMANCLOSE
TOCENTER
LEVERLOCK
OUTOFCENTER
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
LEFT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
LEFT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
LEFT GEN BUS
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
RIGHT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
RIGHT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
RIGHT GEN BUS
RIGHT
GENERATOR
BUS TIE
BATTERY
BUS TIE
H
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D
CENTER BUS
H
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D
RCCB
60
BATT
SWITCH
FROM BAT BUS
EXT PWR
RECEPTACLE
EXT PWR
RELAY
2
7
5
BATTERY
BATTERY
RELAY
60
20A
TRIPLE FED BUS
BATTERY
AMMETER
DUAL-FED BUS
ESIS BATT BUS
ESIS
BATT
BAT BUS
BAT BUS
CONTROL
.5A
BAT BUS
SWITCH
NORMAL
60
5
HED
Figure 2-11. Right Engine Start
2-13
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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In addition, while a starter is selected, the
bus tie sensors are disabled to prevent them
from opening their respective bus tie relays.
Do not exceed the starter motor
operat i ng t i me l i mi t s of 30
seconds ON, five minutes off, 30
seconds ON, five minutes off, 30
seconds ON, then 30 minutes off.
NOTE
The above l i mi t at i on i s onl y
appl i cabl e when the starter i s
driving the engine, not when the
engine is driving the starter.
NORMAL OPERATION
After either engine has been started and its
generat or s wi t ch has been moved t o
RESET, the GCU brings the generator up
CAUTION
R DC GEN
R GEN TIE
OPEN
BAT TIE
OPEN
MAN TIES
CLOSE
L GEN TIE
OPEN
L DC GEN
BUS SENSE
RESET
TEST
GEN TIES
MAN CLOSE
OPEN
SPRING
LOADED
TOCENTER
SPRINGLOADED
FROMMANCLOSE
TOCENTER
LEVERLOCK
OUTOFCENTER
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
LEFT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
LEFT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
LEFT GEN BUS
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
RIGHT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
RIGHT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
RIGHT GEN BUS
RIGHT
GENERATOR
BUS TIE
BATTERY
BUS TIE
H
E
D
H
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D
RCCB
60
BATT
SWITCH
FROM BAT BUS
EXT PWR
RECEPTACLE
EXT PWR
RELAY
2
7
5
BATTERY
BATTERY
RELAY
60
20A
TRIPLE FED BUS
BATTERY
AMMETER
DUAL-FED BUS
ESIS BATT BUS
ESIS
BATT
BAT BUS
BAT BUS
CONTROL
.5A
BAT BUS
SWITCH
NORMAL
60
5
HED
CENTER BUS
Figure 2-12. Cross Generator Start
2-14
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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to normal system voltage. Releasing the
spring-loaded GEN switch to the center
ON posi ti on cl oses the generator l i ne
contactor. This powers the the generator
bus and closes both generator ties automat-
ically (the green MAN TIES CLOSED
annunciator extinguishes if the generator
ties have been manually closed).
This action distributes power through the
right 250-amp current limiter and genera-
tor bus tie relay to the center bus. From the
center bus, electricity flows to the battery
through the battery bus tie and to the left
generator bus through the left generator
bus tie and 250-amp current limiter. Power
is also fed to the triple-fed bus from the
right generator bus.
When both generators are operating, each
generator directly feeds its own generator
bus which, in turn, feeds the center bus,
triple-fed bus, battery bus, and battery, if
it is discharged (Figure 2-13).
R DC GEN
R GEN TIE
OPEN
BAT TIE
OPEN
MAN TIES
CLOSE
L GEN TIE
OPEN
L DC GEN
BUS SENSE
RESET
TEST
GEN TIES
MAN CLOSE
OPEN
SPRING
LOADED
TOCENTER
SPRINGLOADED
FROMMANCLOSE
TOCENTER
LEVERLOCK
OUTOFCENTER
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
LEFT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
LOAD METER
LEFT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
LEFT GEN BUS
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
RIGHT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
LOAD METER
RIGHT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
RIGHT GEN BUS
RIGHT
GENERATOR
BUS TIE
BATTERY
BUS TIE
H
E
D
CENTER BUS
H
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D
RCCB
60
BATT
SWITCH
FROM BAT BUS
EXT PWR
RECEPTACLE
EXT PWR
RELAY
2
7
5
BATTERY
BATTERY
RELAY
60
20A
TRIPLE FED BUS
BATTERY
AMMETER
DUAL-FED BUS
ESIS BATT BUS
ESIS
BATT
BAT BUS
BAT BUS
CONTROL
.5A
BAT BUS
SWITCH
NORMAL
60
5
HED
GENERATOR
CONTROL
GENERATOR
CONTROL
Figure 2-13. Both Generators On
The center bus ties the generator bus and
battery together. The tri pl e-fed bus i s
powered (or fed) from the battery and each
generator bus through 60-amp limiters and
through diodes that provide fault isolation
protection between the power sources.
(Figure 2-14) depicts the system with the
generator ties open.
2-15
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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R DC GEN
R GEN TIE
OPEN
BAT TIE
OPEN
MAN TIES
CLOSE
L GEN TIE
OPEN
L DC GEN
BUS SENSE
RESET
TEST
GEN TIES
MAN CLOSE
OPEN
SPRING
LOADED
TOCENTER
SPRINGLOADED
FROMMANCLOSE
TOCENTER
LEVERLOCK
OUTOFCENTER
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
LEFT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
LOAD METER
LEFT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
LEFT GEN BUS
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
RIGHT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
RIGHT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
RIGHT GEN BUS
RIGHT
GENERATOR
BUS TIE
BATTERY
BUS TIE
H
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D
CENTER BUS
H
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D
RCCB
60
BATT
SWITCH
FROM BAT BUS
EXT PWR
RECEPTACLE
EXT PWR
RELAY
2
7
5
BATTERY
BATTERY
RELAY
60
20A
TRIPLE FED BUS
BATTERY
AMMETER
DUAL-FED BUS
ESIS BATT BUS
ESIS
BATT
BAT BUS
BAT BUS
CONTROL
.5A
BAT BUS
SWITCH
NORMAL
60
5
HED
GENERATOR
CONTROL
Figure 2-14. Both Generators On - Generator Ties Open
EXTERNAL POWER
The external power receptacle under the
right wing outboard of the nacelle facili-
tates connecting a 28 VDC external power
unit to the aircraft electrical system.
An EXT PWR control switch in the pilot
left subpanel controls the external power
relay. The external power relay closes when
the switch is in the ON position (Figure
2-15). It is recommended that the battery
be online (BAT switch in ON) whenever
the external power is in use.
Before selecting the ON position of the
EXT PWR swi tch, veri fy the external
power voltage is within acceptable limits
(28.0 28 4 volts). Turn the VOLTMETER
BUS SELECT switch in the overhead panel
t o t he EXT PWR pos i t i on and read
the voltage.
2-16
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
2

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TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
LEFT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
LEFT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
LEFT GEN BUS
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
RIGHT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
RIGHT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
RIGHT GEN BUS
RIGHT
GENERATOR
BUS TIE
BATTERY
BUS TIE
H
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D
CENTER BUS
H
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D
RCCB
60
BATT
SWITCH
FROM BAT BUS
EXT PWR
RECEPTACLE
EXT PWR
RELAY
2
7
5
BATTERY
BATTERY
RELAY
60
20A
TRIPLE FED BUS
BATTERY
AMMETER
DUAL-FED BUS
ESIS BATT BUS
ESIS
BATT
BAT BUS
BAT BUS
CONTROL
.5A
BAT BUS
SWITCH
NORMAL
60
5
HED
R DC GEN
R GEN TIE
OPEN
BAT TIE
OPEN
MAN TIES
CLOSE
L DC GEN
BUS SENSE
RESET
TEST
GEN TIES
MAN CLOSE
OPEN
SPRING
LOADED
TOCENTER
SPRINGLOADED
FROMMANCLOSE
TOCENTER
LEVERLOCK
OUTOFCENTER
L GEN TIE
OPEN
EXT PWR
Figure 2-15. External Power
Reverse polarity protection and overvolt-
age protection are provided. The reverse
polarity protection circuit prevents the
external power relay from closing if the
external power polarity is different than the
aircraft electrical system.
The overvoltage protection circuit opens
the external power relay to electrically
disconnect the external power from the
aircraft if an over voltage occurs. After an
overvoltage disconnection occurs, turn the
EXT PWR s wi t ch t o of f t o res et t he
overvoltage circuit.
The yellow caution EXT PWR annuncia-
tor illuminates to indicate the state of the
ext er nal power. St eady i l l umi nat i on
indicates that the external power is electri-
cally connected and supplying power to
the aircraft electrical system. A flashing
EXT PWR annunciator indicates that an
external power plug is connected to the
aircraft, but the external power output
voltage is low or the external power is
electrically disconnected from the aircraft
electrical system. Correct either condition
to prevent depleting the battery.
Observe the following precautions when
using an external power source.
The recommended mi ni mum
indicated battery voltage prior to
connecting external power is 23
volts; however, never connect an
ext ernal power source t o t he
aircraft unless a battery indicating
a charge of at least 20 volts is in
the aircraft.
If the battery voltage is less than
20 vol t s, t he bat t er y mus t be
recharged or repl aced wi t h a
battery indicating at least 20 volts
before connecting external power.
Use only an external power source
fitted with an AN-type plug.
Voltage is required to energize
the avionics master power relays
t o remove power f rom t he
avionics equipment. Therefore,
never apply external power to the
ai rcraft wi thout fi rst appl yi ng
battery voltage.
The battery may be damaged if
exposed to voltages higher than 30
volts for extended periods of time.
Refer to the Normal Procedures section
of the POH for using external power.
EMERGENCY
AND ABNORMAL
INDICATIONS
El ect r i cal f i res are covered i n t he
Emergency Procedures secti on of the
Pi l ot s Operat i ng Handbook ( POH) .
Emergency and abnor mal i n- f l i ght
situations are described in the Emergency
and Abnormal Procedures section of the
POH. Generator and battery irregulari-
ties are described there under Electrical
System Failures.
Generat or bus and cent er bus f aul t s/
malfunctions are normally associated with
illumination of the corresponding bus tie
annunci at ors. A t ri pl e- f ed bus f aul t /
malfunction does not have an associated
bus t i e i ndi cat i on. In al l cases, a bus
probl em s houl d be i nves t i gat ed by
referencing other bus indications, such as
loss of related equipment, and by checking
bus voltages with the VOLTMETER BUS
SELECT and/or loadmeter indications.
Compl ete bus l oss i s a hi ghl y unl i kel y
situation. The multi-bus electrical system
has protection devices that normally isolate
a fault with minimum equipment loss.
CAUTION
2-17
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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Battery malfunctions are extremely rare.
There have been a few cases in aircraft with
similar installations where malfunctions
have occurred; however, the battery monitor-
ing system has provided sufficient warning
to the pilot for timely corrective action to be
completed before the situation could deteri-
orate to a more serious condition.
There are t wo reasons f or t hi s saf et y
margin. First, battery malfunctions are
historically slow to develop and can be
identified early with the charge monitor-
ing system. Second, sufficient cooling is
provided to the battery in flight to diminish
the likelihood of serious damage to the
aircraft or its electrical system.
Therefore, when identified early, a battery
malfunction will not deteriorate into a
seri ous condi t i on as l ong as the pi l ot
complies with the proper procedures as
outlined in the POH.
BATTERY
BAT TIE OPEN Annunciator
Illuminated
If the BAT TIE OPEN annunci ator i s
illuminated, the battery bus tie relay is
open (Figure 2-16). This indicates a possible
center bus fault/malfunction. Check the
center bus for proper voltage indication.
If it is within normal limits (24 to 28 volts),
attempt to reset the bus tie by momentar-
ily actuating the BUS SENSE switch to
RESET. If this is successful, a transient
spike in the electrical system tripped the
sensor and opened the battery tie relay.
If this procedure was unsuccessful, there is
a probable malfunction within the battery
bus tie circuitry that cannot be reset at
this time.
If center bus voltage is 0, there is a possible
center bus fault. Open the generator bus tie
relays by moving the GEN TIES switch to
OPEN. Check to ensure that both GEN
TIE OPEN annunciators illuminate. Pull
the LANDING GEAR RELAY ci rcui t
breaker on the pilot right subpanel.
If electrical power is applied to
the landing gear hydraulic pump
motor relay with the center bus
shorted, damage may occur to the
electrical system.
NOTE
It will not be possible to charge
the battery and the landing gear
will have to be manually extended.
With the center bus unpowered, turn the air
conditioning system off prior to landing.
Refer to the POH for procedural details.
CIRCUIT BREAKER TRIPPED
If one of the circuit breakers in the cockpit
trip and it is a nonessential circuit, do not
reset in flight.
If it is an essential circuit, push to reset. If
the circuit breaker trips again, do not reset.
In this situation, a connected item may be
inoperative.
WARNING
2-18
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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Figure 2-16. BAT TIE OPEN
2-19
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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GENERATORS
L or R GEN TIE OPEN
Annunciator Illuminated
Illumination of a L or R GEN TIE OPEN
annunciator indicates a left or right genera-
tor tie is open (Figure 2-17). This signals a
possible generator bus fault/malfunction.
Monitor the corresponding loadmeter. If it
is less than 100 percent and a normal indica-
ti on, move the BUS SENSE swi tch to
RESET. If it is greater than 100 percent or
an abnormal indication, turn the appropri-
at e generat or OFF and moni t or t he
opposi te l oadmeter not to exceed 100
percent. If the generator bus tie relay does
not reset, monitor the loadmeters.
In this situation, the generator paralleling
circuit is open. The generators, therefore,
are not sharing the aircraft electrical loads
equally and the loadmeters need not be
within 10% of each other.
Monitor the loadmeters to ensure that
neither exceeds 100% total load. Refer to
the POH for procedural details.
L or R DC GEN Annunciator
Illuminated (Generator
Inoperative)
If the L or R DC GEN yellow caution
annunciator (Figure 2-18) illuminates
during flight, verify with the associated
loadmeter. Then push the corresponding
generator switch to RESET and after one
second to ON.
If the generator does not reset, turn it off
and rely on the other generator. Monitor
the loadmeter so the load on the remain-
ing generator does not exceed 100 percent.
Tur n of f al l nones s ent i al el ect r i cal
equipment as necessary.
Figure 2-18. L/R DC GEN Annunciators Figure 2-17. L/R GEN TIE OPEN
Load Management for Dual
Generator Failure
The equipment listed in Table 2-1 remains
operable after a dual generator failure
(Figure 2-19). With only the equipment
operat i ng l i st ed as cont i nuous i n t he
OPERATING TIME column, the battery
durati on i s approxi matel y 30 mi nutes
(based upon a 50-amp load and a 75%
battery capacity).
Use of the equi pment wi th prescri bed
operating times reduces battery duration
by the approximate times listed. Multiple
usage of this equipment is additive.
2-20
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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EQUIPMENT
OPERATING
TIME (MIN)
REDUCTION
IN MAIN
BATTERY
DURATION
(MIN)
Air-driven Attitude
Gyro
Continuous ----
Standby Attitude
Gyro
Continuous None*
Inverter 1 Continuous -----
Comm 1 Xmit 3 0.5
Pilot Audio Continuous -----
Nav 1 Continuous ----
RMI 2 Continuous ----
Pilot Altimeter Continuous ----
Pilot ADI (Electro-
mechanical)
Continuous ----
Pilot EADI (EFIS) Not
Operational
----
Pilot HSI (Electro-
mechanical)
Continuous ----
Pilot EHSI (EFIS) Not
Operational
----
Turn & Slip
Indicator
Continuous ----
* Optional equipment. Powered by Auxiliary battery.
Table 2-1. KING AIR 350 LOAD
MANAGEMENT
Annunciator Panel As Required -----
Instrument
Indirect/
Emergency Lights
Continuous -----
Cabin Lights 5 2
Ice Light 5 0.5
Beacon Lights Continuous ----
Taxi Lights 1 0.5
Digital OAT Continuous ----
Fuel Quantity
Indicator
Continuous ----
Single Standby
Fuel Pump
5 1
Left Bleed Air
Valve
Continuous ----
Pressurization
Control
Continuous ----
Cabin
Temperature
Control
Continuous ----
Engine Ignition 0.5 0.1
Surface Deice 6 cycles 0.1
Left and Right
Main Engine
Anti-ice
Single
Operation
0.1
Manual Prop
Deice
3 3
Windshield Wiper 1 0.1
Left Pitot Heat Continuous ----
Landing Gear Single
Operation
0.5
EQUIPMENT
OPERATING
TIME (MIN)
REDUCTION
IN MAIN
BATTERY
DURATION
(MIN)
Table 2-1. KING AIR 350 LOAD
MANAGEMENT (Cont)
NOTE
Equipment that remains operable
i s des i gnat ed wi t h a WHI TE
CI RCLE around t he cont rol
switch. Attitude reference will
depend upon the specific instru-
ment panel equipment. Refer to
t he LOAD MANAGEMENT
table to determine which attitude
instruments will remain operable
with a dual generator failure.
Do not pl ace t he GEN TI ES
s wi t ch i n t he MAN CLOSE
position. This action reconnects
the left and right generator bus
l oads and severel y l i mi t s t he
battery duration.
WARNING
2-21
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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R DC GEN
R GEN TIE
OPEN
BAT TIE
OPEN
MAN TIES
CLOSE
L GEN TIE
OPEN
L DC GEN
BUS SENSE
RESET
TEST
GEN TIES
MAN CLOSE
OPEN
SPRING
LOADED
TOCENTER
SPRINGLOADED
FROMMANCLOSE
TOCENTER
LEVERLOCK
OUTOFCENTER
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
LEFT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
LEFT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
LEFT GEN BUS
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
RIGHT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
RIGHT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
RIGHT GEN BUS
RIGHT
GENERATOR
BUS TIE
BATTERY
BUS TIE
H
E
D
CENTER BUS
H
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D
RCCB
60
BATT
SWITCH
FROM BAT BUS
EXT PWR
RECEPTACLE
EXT PWR
RELAY
2
7
5
BATTERY
BATTERY
RELAY
60
20A
TRIPLE FED BUS
BATTERY
AMMETER
DUAL-FED BUS
ESIS BATT BUS
ESIS
BATT
BAT BUS
BAT BUS
CONTROL
.5A
BAT BUS
SWITCH
NORMAL
60
5
HED
Figure 2-19. Dual Generator Failure
SYSTEM DISTRIBUTION
SCHEMATICS
The following pages present a variety of
el ectri cal scenari os. These i ncl ude the
following:
Figure 2-20: Battery Off
Figure 2-21: Right Generator On
Figure 2-22: Bus Sense Test with Both
Generators On
Fi gure 2- 23: Lef t Generat or Bus
Isolated
Figure 2-24: Center Bus Isolated
Figure 2-25: Triple-Fed Bus Isolated
2-22
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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R DC GEN
R GEN TIE
OPEN
BAT TIE
OPEN
MAN TIES
CLOSE
L GEN TIE
OPEN
L DC GEN
BUS SENSE
RESET
TEST
GEN TIES
MAN CLOSE
OPEN
SPRING
LOADED
TOCENTER
SPRINGLOADED
FROMMANCLOSE
TOCENTER
LEVERLOCK
OUTOFCENTER
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
LEFT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
LEFT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
LEFT GEN BUS
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
RIGHT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
RIGHT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
RIGHT GEN BUS
RIGHT
GENERATOR
BUS TIE
BATTERY
BUS TIE
H
E
D
CENTER BUS
H
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D
RCCB
60
BATT
SWITCH
FROM BAT BUS
EXT PWR
RECEPTACLE
EXT PWR
RELAY
2
7
5
BATTERY
BATTERY
RELAY
60
20A
TRIPLE FED BUS
BATTERY
AMMETER
DUAL-FED BUS
ESIS BATT BUS
ESIS
BATT
BAT BUS
BAT BUS
CONTROL
.5A
BAT BUS
SWITCH
NORMAL
60
5
HED
Figure 2-20. Battery Off
2-23
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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R GEN TIE
OPEN
BAT TIE
OPEN
MAN TIES
CLOSE
L GEN TIE
OPEN
L DC GEN
BUS SENSE
RESET
TEST
GEN TIES
MAN CLOSE
OPEN
SPRING
LOADED
TOCENTER
SPRINGLOADED
FROMMANCLOSE
TOCENTER
LEVERLOCK
OUTOFCENTER
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
LEFT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
LEFT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
LEFT GEN BUS
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
RIGHT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
RIGHT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
RIGHT GEN BUS
RIGHT
GENERATOR
BUS TIE
BATTERY
BUS TIE
H
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CENTER BUS
H
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RCCB
60
BATT
SWITCH
FROM BAT BUS
EXT PWR
RECEPTACLE
EXT PWR
RELAY
2
7
5
BATTERY
BATTERY
RELAY
60
20A
TRIPLE FED BUS
BATTERY
AMMETER
DUAL-FED BUS
ESIS BATT BUS
ESIS
BATT
BAT BUS
BAT BUS
CONTROL
.5A
BAT BUS
SWITCH
NORMAL
60
5
HED
Figure 2-21. Right Generator On
2-24
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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R GEN TIE
OPEN
BAT TIE
OPEN
MAN TIES
CLOSE
L GEN TIE
OPEN
L DC GEN
BUS SENSE
RESET
TEST
GEN TIES
MAN CLOSE
OPEN
SPRING
LOADED
TOCENTER
SPRINGLOADED
FROMMANCLOSE
TOCENTER
LEVERLOCK
OUTOFCENTER
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
LEFT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
LEFT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
LEFT GEN BUS
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
RIGHT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
RIGHT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
RIGHT GEN BUS
RIGHT
GENERATOR
BUS TIE
BATTERY
BUS TIE
H
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CENTER BUS
H
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RCCB
60
BATT
SWITCH
FROM BAT BUS
EXT PWR
RECEPTACLE
EXT PWR
RELAY
2
7
5
BATTERY
BATTERY
RELAY
60
20A
TRIPLE FED BUS
BATTERY
AMMETER
DUAL-FED BUS
ESIS BATT BUS
ESIS
BATT
BAT BUS
BAT BUS
CONTROL
.5A
BAT BUS
SWITCH
NORMAL
60
5
HED
Figure 2-22. Bus Sense Test with Both Generator On
2-25
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OPEN
BAT TIE
OPEN
MAN TIES
CLOSE
L GEN TIE
OPEN
L DC GEN
BUS SENSE
RESET
TEST
GEN TIES
MAN CLOSE
OPEN
SPRING
LOADED
TOCENTER
SPRINGLOADED
FROMMANCLOSE
TOCENTER
LEVERLOCK
OUTOFCENTER
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
LEFT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
LEFT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
RIGHT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
RIGHT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
RIGHT GEN BUS
RIGHT
GENERATOR
BUS TIE
BATTERY
BUS TIE
H
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CENTER BUS
H
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RCCB
60
BATT
SWITCH
FROM BAT BUS
EXT PWR
RECEPTACLE
EXT PWR
RELAY
2
7
5
BATTERY
BATTERY
RELAY
60
20A
TRIPLE FED BUS
BATTERY
AMMETER
DUAL-FED BUS
ESIS BATT BUS
ESIS
BATT
BAT BUS
BAT BUS
CONTROL
.5A
BAT BUS
SWITCH
NORMAL
60
5
HED
LEFT GEN BUS
Figure 2-23. Left Generator Bus Isolated
2-26
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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OPEN
BAT TIE
OPEN
MAN TIES
CLOSE
L GEN TIE
OPEN
L DC GEN
BUS SENSE
RESET
TEST
GEN TIES
MAN CLOSE
OPEN
SPRING
LOADED
TOCENTER
SPRINGLOADED
FROMMANCLOSE
TOCENTER
LEVERLOCK
OUTOFCENTER
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
LEFT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
LEFT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
LEFT GEN BUS
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
RIGHT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
LOAD METER
RIGHT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
RIGHT GEN BUS
RIGHT
GENERATOR
BUS TIE
BATTERY
BUS TIE
H
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H
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60
BATT
SWITCH
FROM BAT BUS
EXT PWR
RECEPTACLE
EXT PWR
RELAY
2
7
5
BATTERY
BATTERY
RELAY
60
20A
TRIPLE FED BUS
BATTERY
AMMETER
DUAL-FED BUS
ESIS BATT BUS
ESIS
BATT
BAT BUS
BAT BUS
CONTROL
.5A
BAT BUS
SWITCH
NORMAL
60
5
HED
CENTER BUS
RCCB
GENERATOR
CONTROL
Figure 2-24. Center Bus Isolated
CIRCUIT BREAKER
LISTING
The Table 2-2 provides a handy reference
of the buses and their circuit breakers.
2-27
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R GEN TIE
OPEN
BAT TIE
OPEN
MAN TIES
CLOSE
L GEN TIE
OPEN
L DC GEN
BUS SENSE
RESET
TEST
GEN TIES
MAN CLOSE
OPEN
SPRING
LOADED
TOCENTER
SPRINGLOADED
FROMMANCLOSE
TOCENTER
LEVERLOCK
OUTOFCENTER
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
LEFT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
LEFT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
LEFT GEN BUS
TO
GENERATOR
FIELD
RIGHT
GENERATOR
SWITCH
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOAD METER
RIGHT
LINE
CONTACTOR
STARTER/
GENERATOR
LEFT
STARTER
RELAY
275
250
RIGHT GEN BUS
RIGHT
GENERATOR
BUS TIE
BATTERY
BUS TIE
H
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D
CENTER BUS
H
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D
RCCB
60
BATT
SWITCH
FROM BAT BUS
EXT PWR
RECEPTACLE
EXT PWR
RELAY
2
7
5
BATTERY
BATTERY
RELAY
60
20A
BATTERY
AMMETER
DUAL-FED BUS
ESIS BATT BUS
ESIS
BATT
BAT BUS
BAT BUS
CONTROL
.5A
BAT BUS
SWITCH
NORMAL
60
5
HED
TRIPLE FED BUS
Figure 2-25. Triple-Fed Bus Isolated
2-28
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LEFT GENERATOR BUS
AVIONICS ENVIRONMENTAL FURNISHINGS Pilot Cntl Instr Lights
Pilot PFD Heater Bleed Air Control, R Cigar Lighter Pilot PFD & DCP Lights
DBU Blower,Cabin Fwd Furnishings Master Control Plt Flt Instr & Side Pnl Lights
Radiant Heat (Cargo Door) Inverter (Cabin Outlets) Tail Flood Lights
ELECTRICAL Refreshment Bar
Bus Tie Power ESIS LIGHTS WEATHER
ESIS Battery Charge FGP Lights Engine Anti-Ice, Standby, L
ENGINES Landing, L Fuel Vent, L
Chip Detector, L FLIGHT CONTROLS MFD & RTU Lights Pilot Wdshld Anti-Ice Contro
DCU 1 Flap Ind & Control Nav Lights Pilot Wdshld Anti-Ice Pwr
EDC 1 Flap Motor No Smk, FSB, & Baggage Prop Deice, Auto
ESIS BATTERY BUS
ESIS Bus Control ESIS Disp ESIS Lights HDG Snsr
CENTER BUS
ELECTRICAL Test Jack LANDING GEAR Ice Lights
Bus Tie Control ENVIRONMENTAL Landing Gear Motor Taxi Lights
Bus Tie Indicator Condenser Blower LIGHTS WEATHER
Bus Tie Power Elec Heat Beacon Lights Man Prop Deice, L & R

RIGHT GENERATOR BUS
AVIONICS ENVIRONMENTAL LIGHTS WEATHER
EGPWS Air Cond Clutch CDU 1/CDU 2 Brake Deice (opt.)
MFD Heater Blower, Cabin Aft Copilot PFD & DCP Lts Copilot Windshield Anti-Ice
ELECTRICAL Blower,Cockpit Copilot PFD & DCP Lts Engine Anti-Ice, Stby, R
Bus Tie Power, R Gen Copilot Flight Instr Lts Fuel Vent, R
ENGINES Landing, R Pitot Heat, R
Chip Detector, R FLIGHT CONTROLS Pedestal Light Control Stall Warn Heat
DCU 2 Pitch Trim Reading Lights Window Defog
EDC 2 Recognition Lights
Prop Gov Test FURNISHINGS Strobe Lights
Prop Sync Toilet Subpnl, Ovhd, Cons Lts
BATTERY BUS
ELECTRICAL Bat Relay Gnd Com
Avionics Bat Bus Cont Gnd Heat
DUAL-FED BUS
ENGINES Eng Fire Ext, R LIGHTS
Eng Fire Ext, L Cabin Entry Lts
Table 2-2. CIRCUIT BREAKERS
2-29
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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TRIPLE-FED BUS
AVIONICS Gen Reset FLIGHT INSTRUMENTS WARNINGS/ANNUNCIATORS
AHC 2 Secondary ENGINES Outside Air Temp Annunciator Ind
Aural Warn Autofeather FUEL Annunciator Power
Avionics Master DCU 1 and 2 Secondary Aux Fuel XFR & Warn, L & R Avionics Annunciator
Cabin Audio Fire Detect, L & R Crossfeed Bleed Air Warning, L & R
* CCP Ignitor Power, L & R Firewall Valve, L & R Ldg Gear Ind
DC Converter 2 Oil Press, L & R Fuel Press Warn, L & R Ldg Gear Warn
FGC 1 Servo Start Control, L & R Fuel Qty, L & R Oil Press Warn, L & R
FGC 2 Servo Torque Meter, L & R Fuel Qty Warn, L & R Stall Warn
IAPS, L & R ENVIRONMENTAL Stby Pump, L & R
MFD Bleed Air Control, L LANDING GEAR WEATHER
Pilot Audio Cabin Alt High LDG Gear Control Control Eng Anti-Ice, Main, L & R
Pilot Audio Control Cabin Diff Press Manual Prop Deice Cont
Voice Rcdr Oxygen Control LIGHTS Pitot Heat, L
ELECTRICAL Press Control Cabin Lights Surface Deice
Bus Tie Power Temp Control Instrument Indirect Lights Wshd Wiper
LEFT GENERATOR AVIONICS BUS
AVIONICS * FSU HF COM (opt.) TEL
CDU 1 * FSU FAN Radar
DIALER GPS 1 SELCAL (opt.) ENVIRONMENTAL
DME 1 HF ANT (opt.) TCAS Nose Equipment Cooling
TRIPLE-FED AVIONICS BUS
AVIONICS AHC 1 Secondary
DC Converter 1
Pilot PFD
ADC 1 ATC 1 NAV 1 RTU
AHC 1 COM 1 Pilot DCP
RIGHT GENERATOR AVIONICS BUS
AVIONICS Copilot Audio GPS 2 (opt.)
ADC 2 Copilot Audio Control NAV 2
AHC 2 Copilot DCP Radio Altimeter
ATC 2 Copilot PFD * XM WX (opt.)
CDU 2 (opt.) Copilot PFD Heater ENVIRONMENTAL
COM 2 * CMU (opt.) Flight Instr Pnl Cooling
* COM 3 (opt.) DME 2 (opt.) IEC
* If Installed
Table 2-2. CIRCUIT BREAKERS (Cont)
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
2-30
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1. During a battery start, prior to select-
i ng ON wi th the IGNITION AND
ENGINE START switch and before
starting the second engine, the DC
percent loadmeter should read approx-
imately _______ percent or less.
A. 50
B. 55
C. 65
D. 75
2. The minimum battery voltage required
for an external power start is _______
volts.
A. 17
B. 18
C. 20
D. 23
3. Control switches which are operable
during a dual generator failure are
indicated by ______________the switch.
A. A white circle around
B. The abs ence of a whi t e ci rcl e
around
C. A number engraved on the tip of
D. The absence of a number engraved
on the tip of
4. A generator bus tie will open automat-
ically to protect the electrical system
from a malfunction when excessive
cur rent i s s ens ed on
_____________________ bus.
A. The center
B. The off-side generator
C. The same-side generator
D. On either generator
5. The external power cart will be set to
_______volts and be capable of generat-
i ng a mi ni mum of 10 0 0 amps
momentarily and 300 amps continu-
ously.
A. 20.0 20.4
B. 24.0 20.4
C. 28.0 28.4
D. 29.0 29.4
6. The maximum sustained generator
load at 30,000 feet is _______ percent.
A. 65
B. 70
C. 95
D. 100
7. The first immediate action item for a
DUAL GENERATOR FAILURE is:
A. Generators ....RESET, THEN ON
B. ECS Mode .................................OFF
C. Instrument Emergency Lights
(if requied) ..................................ON
D. Non-essential Equipment .....OFF
2-31
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CHAPTER 3
LIGHTING
CONTENTS
Page
INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................... 3-1
INTERNAL LIGHTING.................................................................................................... 3-1
Cockpit ........................................................................................................................... 3-1
Cabin Lighting............................................................................................................... 3-2
EXTERIOR LIGHTING.................................................................................................... 3-4
Landing/Taxi Lights ...................................................................................................... 3-5
Wing Ice Lights.............................................................................................................. 3-5
Anti-collision/Strobe Lights......................................................................................... 3-6
Navigation Lights .......................................................................................................... 3-6
Recognition Lights........................................................................................................ 3-6
Floodlights...................................................................................................................... 3-6
QUESTIONS ........................................................................................................................ 3-7
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
3-iii
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Title Page
3-1 Cabin Light Control Panel ................................................................................... 3-2
3-2 Threshold Light Switch......................................................................................... 3-3
3-3 Baggage Compartment Light Switch.................................................................. 3-3
3-4 Exterior Lights Control ........................................................................................ 3-4
3-5 Landing/Taxi Lights .............................................................................................. 3-5
3-6 Wing Ice Light ....................................................................................................... 3-5
3-7 Anti-Collision/Strobe Light ................................................................................. 3-6
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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INTRODUCTION
The King Air 350 lighting system consists of cockpit-controlled interior and exterior
lights. Interior lights are in the cockpit and passenger cabin. They also include entry
and exi t threshol d l i ghts and baggage area l i ghts. Exteri or l i ghts consi st
of lights for navigation and identification. The aircraft is also equipped with
emergency lights.
INTERNAL LIGHTING
COCKPIT
The overhead panel contains a functional
arrangement of all lighting controls for the
cockpit (Figure 3-1). The controls are easily
accessible to the pilot and copilot. A master
switch turns all the lights on. Each light
group then has its own BRTOFF rheostat
for individual adjustment.
CHAPTER 3
LIGHTING
3-2
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The top row of rheostats are the PILOT and
COPILOT FLOOD l i ght s. The cent er
rheostat INSTR INDIRECT i s for the
center instrument panel.
The next row of rheostats, left to right,
include the following:
PILOT PNL
PILOT DISPLAYS
OVHD PED & SUBPANEL, INSTR
SIDE PANEL
COPILOT DISPLAYS
COPILOT INSTR PANL
The MASTER PANEL LIGHTS switch at
the extreme left of the overhead panel
controls all the cockpit lights.
Annunciator Adjustment
To the right of the top row is an adjustment
pushbutton for the cockpit annunciators.
Emergency Lighting
An INSTRUMENT EMERG LTS switch
is to the right of the electrical gages at the
base of the overhead panel. If the normal
cockpit lighting is not working, this switch
powers the lights from the dual-fed bus.
CABIN LIGHTING
A three-position CABIN LIGHTS switch
controls the indirect fluorescent cabin
l i ghts. The swi tch has three posi ti ons:
BRIGHT-DIM-OFF.
Figure 3-1. Cabin Light Control Panel
A t wo- sect i on (+i ncrease/ decrease)
switch in the center of the cabin headliner
midway between the exit signs can control
light intensity.
When the cockpit CABIN LIGHTS switch
is moved from the OFF position to the
DIM position, the cabin indirect lights
illuminate in the full bright mode. Dim
control is enabled. The intensity of the
cabin indirect lights may then be changed
by momentarily touching the appropriate
section of the headliner switch.
If the CABIN LIGHTS switch is placed in
either the BRIGHT or OFF position, the
dim switch is overridden.
When the CABIN LIGHTS master switch
is on, passengers may turn the individual
reading lights along the top of the cabin on
or off with a switch in the sidewall tables.
Threshold Light
A threshold light is forward of the airstair
door at floor level. In addition, two aisle
lights at floor level are on both sides of the
spar cover.
A switch adjacent to the threshold light turns
these lights on and off (Figure 3-2). This
switch also activates the exterior entry light
under the left wing center section and the
lights under each step on the airstair door.
When t he ai rst ai r door i s cl osed and
latched, all the lights controlled by this
switch are extinguished.
The dual-fed bus powers these lights.
Baggage Compartment
Two reading lights in the headliner illumi-
nat e t he af t compart ment when t he
three-position BAGGAGE switch is placed
in BAGGAGE. The switch is just inside
the airstair door aft of the door frame
(Figure 3-3).
The INDIRECT position of this switch is
operable only when the triple-fed bus is
powered. The BAGGAGE position connects
directly to the dual-fed bus.
3-3
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Figure 3-2. Threshold Light Switch
Figure 3-3. Baggage Compartment
Light Switch
Seat Belt-No Smoking Signs
A s wi t ch t o t he r i ght of t he CABI N
LIGHTS activates the no-smoking/fasten-
seat-belt signs in the cabin. Accompanying
chimes also sound. The switch has three
positions: NO SMK FSBOFFFSB. No
smoking configurations have the same
switch even though the NO SMK position
is inoperative.
Exit Lights
Two exit lights are in the center of the cabin
headliner. One is in the forward cabin
between the emergency exit; the second is
in the aft cabin at the airstair door.
Each light has two light sources. During
normal operation, the aircrafts electrical
systems power one light source. During
abnormal conditions, internal batteries
power the other source.
A three-position rocker switch spring-loaded
to the center OFF position controls the
internal light source. When the switch is
moment ari l y pl aced i n t he ON- TEST
position, the light illuminates. It extinguishes
when the switch is momentarily placed in the
OFF-RESET position.
An internal switch automatically activates
the internal light source if rapid decelera-
tion is sensed.
EXTERIOR LIGHTING
The pilot right subpanel contains switches
for the exterior lights (Figure 3-4).
These include the following:
Left and right landing lights
Taxi light
Wing ice lights
Anti-collision/strobe lights
Navigation lights
Recognition lights
Flood lights
3-4
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Figure 3-4. Exterior Lights Control
3-5
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LANDING/TAXI LIGHTS
Two landing lights and one taxi light are on
the nose landing gear (Figure 3-5).
The LANDI NG s wi t ches LEFT and
RIGHT control these through 10-amp
circuit breakers. The TAXI switch controls
the 15-amp circuit breaker for the taxi light.
WING ICE LIGHTS
Wing ice lights are on the outboard side of
each nacelle (Figure 3-6). They illuminate
the wing leading edges so the flight crew
can determine ice buildup.
The ICE circuit-breaker switch on the pilot
right sub-panel controls these lights.
Use the wing ice lights as required during
night flight to check for wing ice accumu-
lation. Because these lights operate at a
high temperature, do not use for prolonged
periods while the aircraft is on the ground.
Figure 3-6. Wing Ice Light
Figure 3-5. Landing/Taxi Lights
3-6
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ANTI-COLLISION/STROBE
LIGHTS
The standard anti-collision lights consist
of an upper light in the upper empennage
and a lower light on the bottom of the
fuselage. The BEACON switch controls the
10-amp circuit breaker. An optional high-
intensity anti-collision light may be in each
wing tip along with a flashtube and socket
assembly in the tail.
The pulsating strobe lights provide a means
of recognition for the aircraft during night
fights. The STROBE switch controls a 5-
amp circuit breaker.
Each strobe has a separate power supply.
The wing strobe light power source is just
outboard of each nacelle near the wing
leading edge. The wing tips incorporate the
navigation, recognition, and strobe light
systems (Figure 3-7).
The separate power supply for the tail
strobe light is within the tail fairing just
forward of the tail strobe light. The power
supply units are wired to operate the strobe
lights wing tips and tail synchronously.
NAVIGATION LIGHTS
The navigation light consists of two red
lights in the left wing tip, two green lights
in the right wing tip, and a light in the aft
end of the empennage. The NAV switch
controls the 7.5 amp circuit breaker for
these lights.
If optional high intensity anti-collision
lights are installed, the tail navigation light
is a halogen lamp in the same assembly as
the flash tube.
RECOGNITION LIGHTS
The optional recognition lights are in each
wing tip just forward and inboard of the
strobe lights. They are focused to the front
and outboard of the aircraft. The RECOG
switch controls a 7.5 amp circuit breaker.
FLOODLIGHTS
Tail floodlights are part of the horizontal
stabilizers. They illuminate both sides of the
vertical stabilizer.
A flush-mounted floodlight forward of the
flaps in the bottom of the left wing illumi-
nates the area around the airstair door.
This is for the convenience of the passen-
gers at night.
It i s control l ed by the threshol d l i ght
switch just inside the door on the forward
doorframe. It extinguishes automatically
whenever t he cabi n door i s cl os ed
and latched.
Figure 3-7. Anti-Collision/Strobe Light
1. Selecting the landing light switches on
will illuminate both landing:
A. Lights if the gear is extended.
B. And t axi l i ght s i f t he gear i s
extended.
C. Lights regardless of gear position.
D. And taxi lights regardless of gear
position.
2. Both wing ice lights are required to
be operabl e dur i ng f l i ght dur i ng
_______ operations.
A. VFR night
B. IFR day
C. IFR night
D. Icing conditions
3. The EXIT signs automatically illumi-
nate during normal flight operations
when:
A. Battery power is lost.
B. Generated power is lost.
C. Rapid acceleration is sensed.
D. Rapid deceleration is sensed.
3-7
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QUESTIONS
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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CHAPTER 4
MASTER WARNING SYSTEM
CONTENTS
Page
INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................... 4-1
GENERAL ........................................................................................................................... 4-1
ANNUNCIATOR SYSTEM............................................................................................... 4-2
Master Warning and Warning Annunciators ............................................................. 4-3
Master Caution and Caution Annunciators .............................................................. 4-4
Advisory and Status Annunciators..................................................................................... 4-4
Dimming......................................................................................................................... 4-4
Testing............................................................................................................................. 4-5
ANNUNCIATOR DESCRIPTIONS................................................................................ 4-6
QUESTIONS...................................................................................................................... 4-11
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Title Page
4-1 Master Warning System........................................................................................ 4-2
4-2 Master Warning and Master Caution Flashers.................................................. 4-3
4-3 Warning Annunciators.......................................................................................... 4-3
4-4 Caution/Advisory/Status Annunciator Panel..................................................... 4-4
4-5 Annunciator Lamp Replacement........................................................................ 4-5
TABLES
Table Title Page
4-1 King Air 350 Warning Annunciators .................................................................. 4-6
4-2 King Air 350 Caution Annunciators................................................................... 4-7
4-3 King Air 350 Advisory Annunciators ................................................................. 4-9
4-4 King Air 350 Status Annunciators .................................................................... 4-10

KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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INTRODUCTION
This chapter presents a description of the warning system on the King Air 350. The
warning system includes flashing annunciators to alert the crew of a problem and a
series of warning, caution, advisory, and status annunciators. The description of the
annunciator panels includes an explanation for the illumination of each annunciator.
GENERAL
Warning and caution annunciators are the
first indication of trouble or malfunction in
a system or component of the aircraft.
Crewmember s s houl d be compl et el y
f ami l i ar wi t h t hese annunci at ors. For
warning and caution annunciators, the crew
should also know the action required to
correct t he probl em or cope wi t h t he
situation until the problem can be corrected
or a safe landing can be made.
CHAPTER 4
MASTER WARNING SYSTEM
ANNUNCIATOR SYSTEM
The annunci at or syst em (Fi gure 4- 1)
consi sts of fl ashers, a red annunci ator
warning panel centrally located in the
glareshield, and a caution/advisory/status
annunciator panel on the center subpanel.
A red MASTER WARNING flasher is in
the glareshield in front of the pilot. A
second red flasher is in front of the copilot.
A yellow MASTER CAUTION flasher is
just inboard of the MASTER WARNING
flasher on ea ch side of the cockpit.
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MASTER WARNING
AND
CAUTION FLASHERS
WARNING
ANNUNCIATORS
PRESS
TO
TEST
CAUTION/ADVISORY/STATUS
ANNUNCIATORS
Figure 4-1. Master Warning System
Whenever a fault condition covered by the
annunciator system occurs, a signal illumi-
nates the appropriate annunciator.
A PRESS TO TEST switch is immediately
to the right of the warning annunciator panel.
MASTER WARNING AND
WARNING ANNUNCIATORS
If a fault requires the immediate attention
and reaction of the pilot, both MASTER
WARNING annunciators begin flashing
(Figure 4-2). The appropriate annunciator in
the warning annunciator panel also illumi-
nates (Figure 4-3).
An i l l umi nat ed l ens i n t he war ni ng
annunciator panel remains on until the
fault is corrected.
The MASTER WARNI NG f l as her s,
however, can be extinguished even if the
fault is not corrected. Depress the face of
either flasher to extinguish the light and
reset the circuit. If an additional warning
annunciator illuminates, the MASTER
WARNING flashers re-activate.
When a warning fault is corrected, the
affected annunciator extinguishes. The
flashers continue flashing until one of them
is depressed.
4-3
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KING AIR 350
Figure 4-3. Warning Annunciators
Figure 4-2. Master Warning and
Master Caution Flashers
MASTER CAUTION AND
CAUTION ANNUNCIATORS
If a fault requires the pilots attention but
not his immediate reaction, the appropri-
ate yellow caution annunciator illuminates
(Figure 4-4). Both MASTER CAUTION
annunciators also begin flashing.
Depres s t he f ace of ei t her f l as hi ng
MASTER CAUTION to extinguish the
light and reset the circuit. Subsequently, if
any other caution annunciator illuminates,
the MASTER CAUTION fl ashers are
activated again. An illuminated caution
annunciator remains on until the fault
condi t i on i s cor rect ed. One of t he
MASTER CAUTION annunciators must
be depressed to extinguish the flashers.
ADVISORY AND STATUS
ANNUNCIATORS
The annunciator panel also contains green
advisory and white status annunciators.
There are no master flashers associated
wi t h t he green or whi t e annunci at ors
because they indicate functional situations
that do not demand immediate attention
or reaction.
These annunciators extinguish when the
condition indicated by the illuminated
lens changes.
The green advisory annunciators confirm
that a pilot-initiated operation occurred
(e.g., the tail deice has been turned on).
Two green AUTOFEATHER annuncia-
tors adjacent to the torquemeters on the
instrument panel function the same even
t hough t hey are not on t he caut i on/
advisory/status annunciator panel.
The white status annunciators indicate a
condition that can be normal or abnormal
and may or may not have been initiated by
the pilot (e.g., notice that the N
1
flow to the
air conditioning system is too low).
DIMMING
The red and yellow flashers, annunciator
panels, firewall fuel valve pushbuttons,
landing gear handle lights, and gear position
lights have a BRIGHT and a DIM mode
of var i abl e i nt ens i t y as s ens ed by a
photoelectric cell.
4-4
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Figure 4-4. Caution/Advisory/Status Annunciator Panel
The DIM mode is selected automatically
whenever all of the following conditions
are met:
Generator on line
Pilot or copilot overhead floodlights
OFF
MASTER PANEL LIGHTS switch
ON
Pilot flight lights ON
Ambient light level in the cockpit (as
sensed by a photoelectric cell in the
overhead light control panel) is below
a preset value
Unless all these conditions are met, the
BRIGHT mode is selected automatically.
The annunciators in the fire extinguisher
pushbuttons do not have a DIM mode. A
rheostat on the instrument panel dims the
AUTOFEATHER annunciators.
TESTING
Test the lamps in the annunciator system
bef ore every f l i ght and any t i me t he
integrity of a lamp is in question.
Depress the PRESS TO TEST button to
the right of the warning annunciator panel
i n t he gl ares hi el d. Al l t he MASTER
WARNING and MASTER CAUTION
lamps should flash. In addition, all the
annunciators on the warning annunciator
panel and the caution/advisory/ status
annunci at or panel shoul d i l l umi nat e.
Replace any lamp that fails to illuminate
(Figure 4-5).
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Figure 4-5. Annunciator Lamp Replacement
Lamp Replacement
To replace a lamp, depress the center of the
annunciator with your finger. Release your
finger. The lens pops out slightly.
Pul l t he annunci at or f rom t he panel .
Remove the lamp from the rear of the
annunciator. Replace the failed bulb with
a spare lamp from an unused annunciator.
Replace the annunciator. Depress until it
locks in place.
ANNUNCIATOR
DESCRIPTIONS
Tables 4-1 through 4-4 list all the warning,
caution, advisory, and status annunciators.
The cause for illumination is included
beside each annunciator.
4-6
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ANNUNCIATOR CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION
DOOR UNLOCKED
L FUEL PRES LO
CABIN ALT HI
CABIN DIFF HI
R FUEL PRES LO
R OIL PRES LO
L OIL PRES LO
L BLEED FAIL
R BLEED FAIL
AIRSTAIR DOOR OR CARGO DOOR IS OPEN OR NOT SECURE
FUEL PRESSURE FAILURE ON THE LEFT SIDE
CABIN PRESSURE ALTITUDE EXCEEDS 1,200 FEET
CABIN DIFFERENTIAL PRSSURE EXCEEDS 6.9 PSI
FUEL PRESSURE FAILURE ON THE RIGHT SIDE
LOW OIL PRESSURE LEFT ENGINE
LOW OIL PRESSURE RIGHT ENGINE
MELTED OR FAILED PLASTIC LEFT BLEED-AIR FAILURE WARNING LINE
MELTED OR FAILED PLASTIC RIGHT BLEED-AIR FAILURE WARNING LINE
Table 4-1. KING AIR 350 WARNING ANNUNCIATORS
4-7
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ANNUNCIATOR CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION
L DC GEN
L GEN TIE OPEN
HYD FLUID LOW
RVS NOT READY
R GEN TIE OPEN
L CHIP DETECT
R DC GEN
L NO FUEL XFR
BAT TIE OPEN
LEFT GENERATOR IS OFF LINE
LEFT GENERATOR BUS IS ISOLATED FROM THE CENTER BUS
HYDRAULIC FLUID IN THE POWER PACK IS LOW
PROPELLER LEVERS ARE NOT IN THE HIGH-RPM, LOW-PITCH POSITION
WITH THE LANDING GEAR EXTENDED
RIGHT GENERATOR BUS IS ISOLATED FROM THE CENTER BUS
RIGHT GENERATOR IS OFF LINE
METAL CONTAMINATION IN LEFT ENGINE OIL IS DETECTED
NO LEFT AUXILIARY FUEL TRANSFER
BATTERY IS ISOLATED FROM THE GENERATOR BUSES
DUCT OVERTEMP
L ENG ICE FAIL
L FUEL QTY
ELEC HEAT ON
EXT PWR
R FUEL QTY
R NO FUEL XFR
R CHIP DETECT
DUCT AIR IS TOO HOT
NO RIGHT AUXILIARY FUEL TRANSFER
METAL CONTAMINATION IN RIGHT ENGINE OIL IS DETECTED
LEFT ENGINE SELECTED ANTI-ICE SYSTEM IS INOPERATIVE
LEFT FUEL QUANTITYLESS THAN 30 MINUTES REMAINING AT MAXIMUM
CONTINUOUS POWER
UNCOMMANDED OPERATION OF ELECTRIC HEAT (FL-544 AND SUBSEQUENT)
EXTERNAL POWER CONNECTOR IS PLUGGED IN
RIGHT FUEL QUANTITYLESS THAN 30 MINUTES REMAINING AT MAXIMUM
CONTINUOUS POWER
Table 4-2. KING AIR 350 CAUTION ANNUNCIATORS
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ANNUNCIATOR CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION
R ENG ICE FAIL
L BL AIR OFF
AUTOFTHER OFF
OXY NOT ARMED
RUD BOOST OFF
L PITOT HEAT
R BL AIR OFF
PROP GND SOL
R PITOT HEAT
AUTOFEATHER SWITCH IS NOT ARMED, AND LANDING GEAR IS EXTENDED
OXYGEN ARMING HANDLE HAS NOT BEEN PULLED, OR SYSTEM FAILED TO
CHARGE
RUDDER BOOST SWITCH IS OFF
RIGHT BLEED-AIR VALVE SWITCH IS NOT OPEN
LEFT PITOT HEAT IS INOPERATVE OR SWITCH IS IN THE OFF POSITION
RIGHT PITOT HEAT IS INOPERATVE OR SWITCH IS IN THE OFF POSITION
ONE OR BOTH GROUND IDLE LOW-PITCH-STOP SOLENOIDS ARE
POWERED BY 28 VOLTS
RIGHT ENGINE SELECTED ANTI-ICE SYSTEM IS INOPERATIVE
LEFT BLEED-AIR VALVE SWITCH IS NOT OPEN
Table 4-2. KING AIR 350 CAUTION ANNUNCIATORS (Cont)
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ANNUNCIATOR CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION
L IGNITION ON
L ENG ANTI-ICE
FUEL CROSSFEED
R ENG ANTI-ICE
L BK DEICE ON
WING DEICE
MAN TIES CLOSE
LEFT IGNITION AND ENGINE START SWITCH IS ON, OR LEFT AUTOIGNITION
SYSTEM IS ARMED WITH LEFT ENGINE TORQUE BELOW 17%
LEFT ENGINE ANTI-ICE VANES ARE IN POSITION FOR ICING CONDITIONS
FUEL CROSSFEED IS SELECTED
RIGHT IGNITION AND ENGINE START SWITCH IS ON, OR LEFT AUTOIGNITION
SYSTEM IS ARMED WITH LEFT ENGINE TORQUE BELOW 17%
WING SURFACE DEICE SYSTEM IS IN OPERATION
LEFT BRAKE DEICE SYSTEM IS IN OPERATION
MANUALLY CLOSED GENERATOR BUS TIES
TAIL DEICE
RIGHT BRAKE DEICE SYSTEM IS IN OPERATION
HORIZONTAL STABILIZER SURFACE DEICE SYSTEM IS IN OPERATION
R IGNITION ON
R BK DEICE ON
RIGHT ENGINE ANTI-ICE VANES ARE IN POSITION FOR ICING CONDITIONS
Table 4-3. KING AIR 350 ADVISORY ANNUNCIATORS
4-10
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ANNUNCIATOR CAUSE FOR ILLUMINATION
L PROP PITCH
CABIN ALTITUDE
LDG/TAXI LIGHT
PASS OXYGEN ON
R PROP PITCH
LEFT PROPELLER IS BELOW THE FLIGHT IDLE STOP
CABIN ALTITUDE EXCEEDS 10,000 FEET
LANDING LIGHTS OR THE TAXI LIGHT IS ON WITH THE LANDING GEAR UP
PASSENGER OXYGEN SYSTEM IS CHARGED
RIGHT ENGINE N
1
IS TOO LOW FOR THE AIR-CONDITIONING LOAD
RIGHT PROPELLER IS BELOW THE FLIGHT IDLE STOP
AIR COND N
1
LOW
Table 4-4. KING AIR 350 STATUS ANNUNCIATORS
1. The MASTER WARNING FLASHERS
illuminate when ___________ annunci-
ator illuminate(s).
A. A red warning
B. An amber caution
C. A red warning or amber caution
D. A red warning and amber caution
2. A red war ni ng annunci at or wi l l
extinguish when:
A. The Mast er Warni ng f l asher i s
canceled.
B. The fault is no longer sensed.
C. A new f aul t i s sensed, causi ng
illumination of a new red warning
annunciator.
D. The appropriate checklist proce -
dure is accomplished.
3. Faults that illuminate the ______________
annunci at or s requi re i mmedi at e
attention and reaction of the pilot.
A. Red warning
B. Amber caution
C. Green advisory
D. White status
4-11
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QUESTIONS
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CHAPTER 5
FUEL SYSTEM
CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................... 5-1
GENERAL ........................................................................................................................... 5-1
FUEL STORAGE AND CAPACITY............................................................................... 5-2
Main Tank System......................................................................................................... 5-2
Auxiliary Tank System.................................................................................................. 5-3
King Air 350ER Saddle Tank ...................................................................................... 5-4
Fuel Capacity................................................................................................................. 5-4
Fuel Tank Vents ............................................................................................................. 5-4
FUEL COMPONENTS....................................................................................................... 5-6
Pumps ............................................................................................................................. 5-6
Firewall Fuel Valves ..................................................................................................... 5-8
CONTROLS AND INDICATIONS.................................................................................. 5-9
Fuel Quantity Indications .......................................................................................... 5-10
Fuel Pressure Indication............................................................................................. 5-12
Fuel System Operation............................................................................................... 5-12
Normal Operation....................................................................................................... 5-12
Transfer......................................................................................................................... 5-13
Crossfeed...................................................................................................................... 5-16
Fuel Manifold Purge System...................................................................................... 5-18
PREFLIGHT AND SERVICING................................................................................... 5-19
Drain System............................................................................................................... 5-19
Fuel Handling Practices ............................................................................................. 5-20
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Fuel Types and Additives ........................................................................................... 5-21
Filling the Tanks .......................................................................................................... 5-22
Defueling the Aircraft ................................................................................................ 5-22
LIMITATIONS................................................................................................................... 5-23
QUESTIONS...................................................................................................................... 5-25
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Title Page
5-1 Main Fuel Tank System......................................................................................... 5-2
5-2 Auxiliary Fuel Tank System.................................................................................. 5-3
5-3 350ER Saddle Tank............................................................................................... 5-4
5-4 Fuel Vents ............................................................................................................... 5-5
5-5 Fuel System Schematic Diagram......................................................................... 5-7
5-6 Firewall Fuel Valves............................................................................................... 5-8
5-7 Fuel Control Panels ............................................................................................... 5-9
5-8 Fuel Quantity Indication System....................................................................... 5-10
5-9 Auxiliary Fuel Transfer SystemOperating.................................................... 5-13
5-10 Auxiliary Fuel Transfer SystemOverride...................................................... 5-14
5-11 Auxiliary Fuel Transfer SystemEmpty.......................................................... 5-15
5-12 Crossfeed Schematic ........................................................................................... 5-17
5-13 Fuel Manifold Purge System Schematic........................................................... 5-18
5-14 Fuel Drain Locations .......................................................................................... 5-19
5-15 Main and Auxiliary Filler Caps ......................................................................... 5-23
5-16 Saddle Tank Filler Cap ....................................................................................... 5-23
TABLE
Table Title Page
5-1 Fuel Drain Locations .......................................................................................... 5-19
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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CHAPTER 5
FUEL SYSTEM
INTRODUCTION
A complete understanding of the fuel system is essential to competent and confident
operation of the aircraft. Management of fuel and fuel system components is a major
everyday concern of the pilot. This section presents a description of the fuel system
components and operation including physical layout of fuel cells, vents, and drains.
Specific procedures such as taking fuel samples are also presented. The chapter
discussion also includes information on the King Air 350ER model with extended
fuel capabilities.
GENERAL
The King Air 350 fuel system simplifies
cockpit flight procedures and provides easy
access for ground servicing. A crossfeed
system connects the two wing main fuel
systems. Each wing also has an auxiliary
fuel tank.
The King Air 350ER has a supplemental
fuel system that includes two extended
range fuel tanks that increase fuel supply.
FUEL STORAGE
AND CAPACITY
MAIN TANK SYSTEM
The main fuel system in each wing consists
of two wing leading edge bladder-type
cells, two box-section bladder-type cells,
one wet wing integral-type cell, and the
nacelle tank (Figure 5-1).
Gravity feed lines connect all the cells to
allow fuel to flow into the nacelle tank that
pumps fuel directly to each engine.
The filler cap is near the wingtip by the
l eadi ng edge. An ant i si phon val ve i s
installed at each filler port to prevent the
loss of fuel or collapse of fuel tank bladder
if the filler cap is improperly installed.
A crossfeed line connects each nacelle tank
to the engine on the opposite side. Fuel in
either wing system is available to either
engine during single-engine operation.
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Figure 5-1. Main Fuel Tank System
AUXILIARY TANK SYSTEM
The auxiliary fuel system consists of a fuel
tank on each side of the aircraft in the wing
center section (Figure 5-2). Because the
cells are lower than the nacelle tank, they
cannot gravity feed into the nacelle tanks.
A jet pump adjacent to the outlet strainer
and drain transfers fuel to the nacelle tank.
The auxiliary transfer system is automatic. If
the auxiliary tank contains any usable fuel,
the system transfers it. Auxiliary tank fuel is
used first during normal operation for the
King Air 350.
On the 350ER model, the auxiliary system
begi ns operati on after the fuel i n the
extended range tanks is depleted.
If the tank has fuel but does not transfer
because of some system discrepancy, a
yellow caution NO FUEL XFR annuncia-
tor illuminates. An override switch backs up
the automatic system.
Each auxi l i ary tank has i ts own fi l l er
opening with an antisiphon valve.
5-3
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Figure 5-2. Auxiliary Fuel Tank System
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KING AIR 350ER SADDLE TANK
A supplemental fuel tank is added to each
side of the aircraft (Figure 5-3). The saddle
tanks add 236 gallons to the aircraft for
extended range capability.
FUEL CAPACITY
The main system has a capacity of 380
gallons or 190 gallons on each side of usable
fuel. The auxiliary system has 159 gallons
or 79.5 gallons on each side. Total capacity
for each side is 539 gallons.
Approximately 2,546 pounds are available
in the main system with about 1,273 pounds
on each side. An estimated 1,065 pounds are
available in the auxiliary system with about
533 pounds on each side. Total usable fuel
is 539 gallons or 3,611 pounds.
King Air 350ER
The ER model has an additional 236 gallons
with the extended tanks for a total of 775
gallons or 5,192 pounds.
FUEL TANK VENTS
The main and auxiliary fuel systems are
vented through a recessed vent coupled to
a heated ram vent on the underside of the
wing adjacent to the nacelle (Figure 5-4).
One vent is recessed to prevent icing. The
other vent is heated to prevent icing.
Vent Float Valve
The vent float valve in the integral fuel
cell and the one in the top of the nacelle
tank allow air to flow in either direction.
However, when the fuel level rises up to the
level of the vent float valve, the float rises
with the fuel to seal the vent system at that
point. This prevents fuel from flowing into
the vent system.
Float Check Valve
The float check valve accomplishes the
same job as the vent float valve. The float
check valve looks like an ordinary check
valve, but it is not installed in any tank or
cell. It is in a short vent line between the
recessed and heated ram vents and the
auxiliary tank.
When fuel is not present at the float check
valve, the float is down to allow air to pass
in either direction. When fuel is present, the
float rises with the fuel and seals the check
valve to prevent fuel flow through it.
Vent Lines
Air is vented into or out of the auxiliary fuel
cell through a line that extends from the
recessed and heated ram vents through the
float check valve to the auxiliary fuel cell.
The wing cells are cross-vented with one
another through a float-operated vent valve
on the integral fuel cell.
Air enters the wing cells through four
passages. The first two are primary; the last
two are applicable only in flight if the first
two passages are plugged.
Line extending from heated ram vents
through the leading edge of the wing
to the vent float valve on the integral
fuel cell
Line extending from the heated ram
vents through the float check valve
and then through the center of the
wing to the vent float valve on the
integral fuel cell
Figure 5-3. 350ER Saddle Tank
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Line extending from the air inlet on
the underside of the wing near the
tip through a check valve to the vent
float valve on the integral fuel cell;
this passage is primarily a siphon
break that prevents siphoning of fuel
from the auxiliary tank through the
wing tip to the heated ram vents when
t he ai rcraf t i s s hut down on
the ground
Line that bypasses the vent float valve
altogether to extend from the air inlet
on the underside of the wing near the
tip through a tee and check valve to
the integral fuel cell
Vent Operation
Air vents into the nacelle tank through a
vent float valve in the tip of the tank and/or
through a tube next to the vent float valve.
Both the vent float valve and the tube next
to it have a check valve downstream to
prevent air or fuel from expanding out of
the nacelle tank through these passages.
Air flows to these passages and into the
nacelle tank from the ram vents through the
float check valve to a tee that is just prior
to the auxiliary tank and then through
a vent line that leads to the top of the
nacelle tank.
Another tee on top of the nacelle tank
divides this line into the passages that lead
to the vent float valve or to the tube next
to the vent float valve. Air can escape from
the nacelle tank through the vent float
valve and then through the fuel return line
leading to the auxiliary tank. From there air
is vented overboard.
VENT FLOAT VALVE
FLOAT CHECK VALVE
FLAME ARRESTOR
HEATED RAM VENT
INTERGRAL FUEL CELL
VENT FLOAT VALVE
AIR INLET
RECESSED VENT
PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE
Figure 5-4. Fuel Vents
When the ai rcraft i s shut down on the
ground and all tanks are full of fuel that is
colder than the ambient air temperature,
the fuel must expand overboard.
Fuel expands from the wing cells through
the gravity feed line to the nacelle tank. It
then expands out the top of the nacelle
tank through the fuel return tube, pressure
relief valve, and fuel return line to the
auxiliary tank.
When fuel expands out of the auxiliary fuel
tank to the float check valve, the float closes
the check valve to prevent some of the
excess fuel from being discharged through
the vents.
When the check valve closes, the auxiliary
f uel expands t hrough a l i ne rout ed
outboard from the check valve through the
center of the wing to the wing tip. It then
continues down the wing leading edge vent
line to the recessed and heated ram vents
and onto the ground. When the fuel has
expanded fully, the siphon break prevents
continued siphoning of fuel.
FUEL COMPONENTS
Components to operate the fuel system
include three pumps, a firewall shutoff valve,
various switches and gauges (Figure 5-5).
PUMPS
Engine-Drive Pumps
The engine-driven high-pressure fuel pump
mounts on the accessory case of each
engine in conjunction with the fuel control
unit. An internal 200-mesh strainer protects
the pump against fuel contamination.
This pump along with the FCU regulates
fuel flow to the fuel nozzles in the engine.
The pump has an output pressure of up to
a maximum of 1050 psi that varies with N
1
rpm and FCU operation.
Primary Boost Pumps
The primary fuel boost pump is also engine-
driven. It mounts on a drive pad on the aft
accessory section of each engine. The boost
pump has an operating capacity of 1,250
pounds per hour at a pressure of 30 psi.
Any time the gas generator (N
1
) is turning,
this pump operates to provide sufficient
fuel to the engine-driven fuel pump for all
conditions except operation with crossfeed
or operation with aviation gasoline above
20,000 feet.
Standby Boost Pumps
An electrically driven standby pump in the
bottom of each nacelle tank backs up the
boost pump. It also provides additional
pressure required for fuel crossfeed from
one side of the aircraft to the other.
The boost pump or the standby boost pump
is capable of supplying fuel to the engine-
driven fuel pump at the minimum pressure
requirements.
Level l ock STANDBY PUMP t oggl es
switches on the fuel control panel to control
electrical power to the standby pumps.
The respective generator bus supplies the
fuel subpanel circuit breakers. Two 10-
ampere circuit breakers below the fuel
control panel protect the circuit. The triple-
fed bus is the other source of power to the
standby pumps. A diode network prevents
interaction between the two power sources.
The engine can operate with the failure of
one or both boost pumps; failure, however,
of the engine-driven high-pressure fuel
pump causes the engine to flame out.
5-6
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5 FUEL SYSTEM
L FUEL QTY
FUEL
QUANTITY
PROBE
INTEGRAL (WET CELL)
35 GALLONS
WING LEADING EDGE
13 GALLONS
WING LEADING EDGE
40 GALLONS
25 GALLONS
BOX SECTION
25 GALLONS
BOX
SECTION
AUXILIARY
DRAIN
AIR INLET
RECESSED VENT
HEATED RAM VENT
FLAME ARRESTOR
FLOAT CHECK VALVE
DRAIN VALVE
TRANSFER JET PUMP
79.5 GALLONS
WS 290.92
TO FLOW DIVIDER
VENT FLOAT VALVE
DRAIN VALVE
FUEL LOW LEVEL SENSOR
PRESSURE SWITCH FOR LEFT NO FUEL
TRANSFER LIGHT ON CAUTION PANEL
MOTIVE FLOW VALVE
STRAINER, DRAIN
AND FUEL SWITCH
CROSSFEED VALVE
PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE
VENT FLOAT VALVE
NACELLE TANK 54 GALLONS
STANDBY BOOST PUMP
FIREWALL SHUTOFF VALVE
ENGINE DRIVEN BOOST PUMP
FIREWALL FUEL FILTER
FUEL PURGE TANK
ENGINE
FUEL
MANIFOLD
CHECK VALVE
LEFT FUEL PRESSURE ANNUNCIATOR PRESSURE SWITCH
FUEL CONTROL PURGE LINE
AIR FILTER
FUEL HEATER
ENGINE-DRIVEN HIGH PRESS FUEL PUMP
GRAVITY FLOW CHECK VALVE
DRAIN VALVE
FUEL CONTROL UNIT
P
3
BLEED-AIR LINE
FUEL FLOW TRANSMITTER AND INDICATOR
FUEL QUANTITY PROBE
FUEL
QUANTITY
PROBE
/
P
3
AIR LINE FOR FUEL PURGE
Figure 5-5. Fuel System Schematic Diagram
Jet Transfer Pumps
A jet pump transfers fuel from the auxiliary
cell to the nacelle tank.
The pump in the sump of the auxiliary cell
is mounted adjacent to the outlet strainer
and drain.
The fuel line that supplies the motive flow
to the jet transfer pump is routed along
the outboard side of the nacelle through the
jet pump motive control valve just aft of
the firewall.
King Air 350ER Additional Jet Pumps
Each of the saddle supplementary tanks
has a jet pump that transfers fuel from the
tank to the nacelle tank.
Fuel pressure from the engine-driven boost
pump provides the motive flow to drive
the jet pump.
FIREWALL FUEL VALVES
The supply line from the nacelle tank is
routed from the inboard side of the nacelle
tank forward to the engine-driven boost
pump through a normally open firewall
shutoff valve in the fuel line immediately
behind the engine firewall.
The F/ W VALVE PUSH annunci at or
switch on the instrument panel glareshield
closes its respective firewall shutoff valve
to shut off the flow of fuel to the engine
( Fi gure 5- 6) . The l egend i l l umi nat es
CLOSED to indicate the firewall valve is
cl osed. When the val ve i s i n the open
position, the legend is extinguished. A
flashing annunciator indicates the vale is
not in the selected position.
When ei t her annunci at or s wi t ch i s
depressed, t he red EXTINGUISHER
PUSH annunciator in the corresponding
fire extinguisher switch illuminates to
indicate the fire extinguisher is armed.
5-8
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Figure 5-6. Firewall Fuel Valves
CONTROLS AND
INDICATIONS
The fuel panel on the pi l ot si de panel
contai ns a fuel quanti ty gage for each
engine, a placard stating the usable fuel, and
the following switches (Figure 5-7):
Left and ri ght STANDBY PUMP
with ONOFF postions to control the
standby boost pumps
AUX TRANSFER with OVERRIDE-
AUTO posi t i ons t o cont rol f uel
t ransf er. For t he 350ER, XFR
OVERRIDE wi t h AUXAUTO
ER positions
CROSSFEED FLOW wi t h ON-
OFF positions
FUEL QUANTI TY s wi t ch wi t h
T E S T MAI N AUX I L I ARY
positions
Each of these switches is discussed in detail
in the appropriate operation section.
5-9
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KING AIR 350
KING AIR 350ER
Figure 5-7. Fuel Control Panels
FUEL QUANTITY INDICATIONS
The fuel quantity system is a capacitance
gaging system with one quantity indicator
per wing (Figure 5-8). A spring-loaded
selector allows the pilot to individually
check tank quantity.
The system compensates for specific gravity
and reads in pounds on a linear scale. An
electronic circuit in the system processes
the signals from the fuel quantity (capaci-
tance) probes in the various fuel cells for an
accurate readout by the fuel quantity indica-
tors. A Density Variation of Aviation Fuel
graph i s i n t he Wei ght and Bal ance
Equipment List section of the POH to
allow more accurate calculations of weights
for all approved fuels.
Fuel Quantity Probes
Each side of the aircraft has an independ-
ent gaging system consisting of the follow-
ing fuel quantity (capacitance) probes:
One in nacelle fuel cell
One in aft inboard fuel cell
Two in integral (wet wing) fuel cell
Two in inboard leading edge fuel cell
Two in center section fuel tank
The fuel quantity probe is a variable capaci-
tor composed of two concentric tubes. The
tubes serve as fixed electrodes. The fuel in
the space between the tubes acts as the
dielectric of the fuel quantity probe.
5-10
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AUX FUEL
FUEL PROBE
STANDBY BOOST PUMP
OUTLET STRAINER
NACELLE TANK INSTALLATION
CAPACITANCE
PROBES
PROBES
FUEL LOW LEVEL SENSOR
FUEL LOW LEVEL SENSOR
GRAVITY FEED FROM
OUTBOARD MAIN TANKS
Figure 5-8. Fuel Quantity Indication System
Fuel densi t y and el ect ri cal di el ect ri c
constant vary with respect to temperature,
fuel type, and fuel batch. The capacitance
gaging system senses and compensates for
these variables.
The capacitance of the probe varies with
respect to the change in the dielectric that
results from the ratio of fuel to air in the fuel
cell. As the fuel level between the inner and
outer tubes ri ses, ai r wi th a di el ectri c
constant of one is replaced by fuel with a
dielectric constant of approximately two,
thus increasing the capacitance of the probe.
This variation in the volume of fuel in the
fuel cell produces a capacitance variation
that is a linear function of that volume. This
is converted to linear current that actuates
the fuel quantity indicator.
Fuel Quantity Gauges
When the FUEL QUANTITY sel ector
switch is in the MAIN position, the fuel
quantity gages indicate the amount of fuel
remai ni ng i n the mai n tank. When the
switch is in the AUXILIARY position, the
gages indicate the fuel remaining in the
auxiliary tank
The FUEL QUANITY switch is spring-
loaded to the center position. The TEST
position provides a test function of the L
and R FUEL QTY fi ber opti c sensi ng
circuitry and caution annunciators.
When the FUEL QUANTITY switch is in
the MAIN position, the 5-ampere QTY
IND circuit breaker supplies power through
the fuel quantity gage to the capacitance
probes in the main fuel system tanks.
When the switch is in the AUXILIARY
position, the circuit breaker supplies power
to ground through the coil of the gage
switching relay. Power is then supplied
through the fuel quanti ty gage to the
capaci t ance probes i n each auxi l i ary
fuel tank.
King Air 350 ER Fuel Quantity
The FUEL QUANTITY swi t ch i n t he
350ER is essentially the same except that
the switch upper portion is for reading the
quanlity of the ER tanks.
A separate TEST switch is to the lower left
of the panel.
Whi l e transmi tti ng on the HF system,
devi ati ons of ER fuel quani ty may be
obs er ved t hroughout t he us abl e HF
frequency band (2 MHz to 30 MHz).
The frequency at which the deviations are
observed may vary, due to issues such as the
actual fuel quantity in the ER fuel tank, the
tuned frequency on which the HF system
is transmitting, etc. The displayed ER fuel
quantity valve returns to the correct value
after the HF transmission ceases.
Low Fuel Quantity Indication
Fiber optic sensors in both nacelle fuel tanks
alert the pilot to a low fuel situation. When
fuel quantity remaining in the main system
is below approximately 300 pounds (45
gallons) or 30 minutes of fuel at maximum
continuous power, the corresponding yellow
caution L or R FUEL QTY annunciator
illuminates. This also triggers the MASTER
CAUTION flashes.
A five- to seven-second delay is built into
the annunciator circuit to reduce the likeli-
hood of fuel sloshing that might cause
transient indications. A holding circuit
keeps the annunciator illuminated for three
to five seconds once it does illuminate.
Testing the System
Test the system by hol di ng the FUEL
QUANTITY switch in TEST. A simulated
low quantity signal is sent to the fiber optic
sensor in the nacelle tank; the L and R
FUEL QTY annunciators illuminate after
a five second delay.
5-11
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When the switch is released, it springs back
to center. The annunciators extinguish after
approximately five seconds.
FUEL PRESSURE INDICATION
The fuel pressure switch is directly above
t he f i rewal l - mount ed f uel f i l t er and
indicates fuel boost pressure.
At 9 to 11 psig of decreasing pressure, the
switch closes and actuates the red warning
L or R FUEL PRESS annunciator in the
warning annunciator panel.
With low boost pressure indicated, switch
on the electric standby boost pump unless
a fuel leak is indicated.
Operation with the FUEL PRESS
l i ght on i s l i mi ted to 10 hours
between overhaul or replacement
of the engine-driven high pressure
fuel pump. Shoul d both boost
pumps fail, suction lift operation
may be empl oyed; however,
suction lift operation is restricted
to 10 hours total time between
hi gh pressure pump overhaul
periods. If the pump is operated
on suction lift beyond the 10-hour
limit, overhaul or replacement of
t he hi gh- pres s ure pump i s
necessary. Windmilling time is not
equivalent to operation of the
engine at high power with respect
to the effects of cavitation on fuel
pump components. Consequently,
wi nd mi l l i ng t i me i s not t o be
included in the 10-hour limit on
engi ne operat i on wi t hout a
boost pump.
The red FUEL PRESS annunci at or
extinguishes with 9 to 11 psig of increasing
fuel pressure.
FUEL SYSTEM OPERATION
Fuel flow from each wing outer main cell
and auxiliary tank system is automatic
without pilot action (see Figure 5-1).
Fuel i n the auxi l i ary tank i s used fi rst
followed by the fuel in the main tanks.
On the King Air 350ER, the fuel in the
saddle tanks is used first followed by the
fuel in the auxiliary tanks, and by fuel in the
main tanks.
The outer wing cells gravity-feed into the
nacelle tank. The line extends from aft
i nboard wi ng cel l , f orward al ong t he
outboard side of the nacelle tank, and aft
of the fi rewal l i mmedi atel y under the
motive flow valve. A gravity flow check
valve in the end of the gravity feed line
prevents any backflow of fuel into the outer
wing cells.
NORMAL OPERATION
The supply line from the nacelle tank is
routed from the inboard side of the nacelle
tank through a motorized firewall fuel valve
immediately behind the engine firewall.
From the firewall fuel valve, fuel is routed
to the engine-driven boost pump and then
to the main fuel filter on the lower center
of the engine firewall. The filter has a
bypass valve that permits fuel flow in case
of plugging and a drain valve to drain the
filter prior to each flight. A pressure switch
mounted directly above the filter senses
boost pump fuel pressure at the filter.
From the main filter, fuel is routed through
the fuel heater that uses heat from the
engine oil to warm the fuel. The fuel is then
routed to the high pressure pump and fuel
control unit (FCU) that regulates fuel flow
to the fuel nozzles.
A fuel flow transmitter located adjacent to
the FCU sends a signal to an electric DC
powered fuel flow gage in the cockpit.
CAUTION
TRANSFER
The jet pump transfers fuel from the sump
of the auxiliary tank to the nacelle tanks.
Fuel pressure from the engine-driven boost
pump or t he el ect ri cal st andby boost
pump provides the motive flow for the jet
transfer pump.
The fuel line that supplies the motive flow
is routed along the outboard side of the
nacelle through the motive flow valve just
aft of the firewall to the jet pump. A check
valve in the motive flow line immediately
af t of t he mot i ve f l ow cont rol val ve
prevents the engine from taking in air when
the boost pump is not operating.
Transfer Operation
The AUX TRANSFER lever-lock toggle
switch on the fuel control panel actuates the
jet transfer pumps.
In the AUTO position, the automatic fuel
transfer modul e appl i es power to the
normally closed motive flow valve to open
it (Figure 5-9). The module applies the
power when the boost pump pressure
switch senses fuel pressure and the float
switch senses fuel in the auxiliary tank.
5-13
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AUTOMATIC
FUEL
TRANSFER
MODULE
6.5 SEC
DELAY
11 2 SEC
DELAY
BOOST
PUMP
PRESSURE
SWITCH
PRESSURE
WARNING
FROM AUX
TANK SUMP
JET TRANSFER
PUMP TO
NACELLE
TANK
TO
ENGINE
FROM
BOOST
PUMP
CROSSFEED
ON
IGNITION
ON
AUTO
IGNITION
NC
FLOAT
SWITCH
NOT EMPTY
EMPTY
AUX
TRANSFER
AUX TRANSFER
SWITCH
OVERRIDE
AUTO
MOTIVE FLOW
PRESSURE
SWITCH
(ON ONLY)
MOTIVE
FLOW VALVE
L FUEL
PRESS LOW
LIGHT
L NO
FUEL XFER
LIGHT
Figure 5-9. Auxiliary Fuel Transfer SystemOperating
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Once the motive flow valve opens, the jet
transfer pump pumps fuel from the sump
of the auxiliary fuel tank into the nacelle
fuel cell for as long as there is fuel in the
auxi l i ary t ank and t he engi ne- dri ven
boost pump or electrical standby boost
pump operate.
A motive flow pressure actuates at 6 (1)
psi to confirm motive flow fuel pressure.
The switch is in the fuel line between the
motive flow valve and check valve.
When the auxiliary fuel is depleted, the
float switch sends a signal after a six- to
seven-second time delay to the automatic
fuel transfer module. The module deener-
gizes the motive flow valve; the valve closes.
The time delay prevents cycling of the
motive flow valve because of sloshing fuel
(Figure 5-10).
The OVERRIDE position of the AUX
TRANSFER position bypasses the fuel
transfer module to apply power directly to
the motive flow valve.
Overflow Line
The f uel t ransf er rat e i s great er t han
normal engi ne fuel consumpti on. As a
result, an overflow return line is required.
The overflow line is plumbed from the
nacelle tank back to the auxiliary tank to
provide a return for excess fuel.
AUTOMATIC
FUEL
TRANSFER
MODULE
6.5 SEC
DELAY
11 2 SEC
DELAY
BOOST
PUMP
PRESSURE
SWITCH
PRESSURE
WARNING
FROM AUX
TANK SUMP
JET TRANSFER
PUMP TO
NACELLE
TANK
TO
ENGINE
FROM
BOOST
PUMP
CROSSFEED
ON
IGNITION
ON
AUTO
IGNITION
NC
FLOAT
SWITCH
NOT EMPTY
EMPTY
AUX
TRANSFER
AUX TRANSFER
SWITCH
OVERRIDE
AUTO
MOTIVE FLOW
PRESSURE
SWITCH
(ON ONLY)
MOTIVE
FLOW VALVE
L FUEL
PRESS LOW
LIGHT
L NO
FUEL XFER
LIGHT
X
Figure 5-10. Auxiliary Fuel Transfer SystemOverride
The overflow of fuel from the nacelle tank
comes out of an overflow tube at the top of
the nacelle tank. It then continues past a 1-
1/2 psi pressure relief valve and into a fuel
return line to the auxiliary tank.
Abnormal Conditions
NO FUEL XFR Annunciator
Illumination of the yellow caution L or R
NO FUEL XFR can s i gnal s everal
different conditions in the auxiliary fuel
system transfer. The annunciator has an 11
second delay to prevent transients from
t r i gger i ng bot h i t and t he MASTER
CAUTION flashers.
The appropriate NO FUEL XFR annunci-
ator illuminates when there is less than
6 (1) psi of pressure and the float switch
in the auxiliary tank does not sense an
empty tank.
With fuel in the auxiliary tank, should this
pressure switch not be actuated, the L or R
NO FUEL XFR illuminates or remains
illuminated to indicate that the motive flow
val ve i s s t i l l cl os ed. Pl ace t he AUX
TRANSFER switch in the OVERRIDE
position (Figure 5-11).
5-15
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AUTOMATIC
FUEL
TRANSFER
MODULE
6.5 SEC
DELAY
11 2 SEC
DELAY
BOOST
PUMP
PRESSURE
SWITCH
PRESSURE
WARNING
FROM AUX
TANK SUMP
JET TRANSFER
PUMP TO
NACELLE
TANK
TO
ENGINE
FROM
BOOST
PUMP
CROSSFEED
ON
IGNITION
ON
AUTO
IGNITION
NC
FLOAT
SWITCH
NOT EMPTY
EMPTY
AUX
TRANSFER
AUX TRANSFER
SWITCH
OVERRIDE
AUTO
MOTIVE FLOW
PRESSURE
SWITCH
(ON ONLY)
MOTIVE
FLOW VALVE
L FUEL
PRESS LOW
LIGHT
L NO
FUEL XFER
LIGHT
Figure 5-11. Auxiliary Fuel Transfer SystemEmpty
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The auxiliary fuel system does not feed
into the main fuel system if there is a failure
of both boost pumps or a failure of the
motive flow valve. This condition is visible
on the auxiliary tank FUEL QUANTITY
gage and with the illumination of the NO
FUEL XFER annunciator. Any time the
engine ignition circuit is powered through
t he AUTO I GNI TI ON or START &
IGNITION swi tch, the automati c fuel
transfer module removes power from the
motive flow valve. If the system is transfer-
ring fuel, the valve closes; the appropriate
NO FUEL XFR annunciator illuminates.
Selecting crossfeed also causes the fuel
transfer module to interrupt electricity
and close the motive flow valve.
The appropriate NO FUEL XFER light
al so i l l umi nates i f there i s fuel i n the
auxiliary tank.
Low Boost Pressure
If fuel boost pressure drops below 10 psi
(FUEL PRESS annunciator illuminated),
the automatic fuel transfer module removes
power to close the motive flow valve. This
prevents continued operation of the jet
transfer pump.
The jet transfer pump is not damaged by
operating after the tank is dry, but extended
operation with an empty auxiliary tank
tends to draw unnecessary moist air into the
main fuel system from the empty, vented
auxiliary tanks.
King Air 350ER Transfer
Operation
During transfer of extended range fuel,
the auxiliary tanks and nacelle tanks are
maintained full. A check valve in the gravity
feed line from the outboard wing prevents
reverse fuel flow from the nacelle tank.
When all usable fuel in the extended range
tank is transferred, a float switch toward the
aft end of the tank actuates and supplies
power to a 30-second time-delay relay. This
relay closes the extended range motive
flow valve and opens the valves associated
with the auxiliary fuel tank.
Upon exhaustion of the extended range
fuel tank and auxiliary fuel tank, a float
switch in the auxiliary fuel tank sends a
signal to close all valves associated with
fuel transfer. Normal gravity transfer of
t he mai n wi ng f uel i nt o t he nacel l e
tanks begins.
When the XFR OVERRIDE switch is in
the AUTO position and the extended range
fuel tank i s empty, the automati c fuel
transfer module along with additional relay
logic simultaneously remove power and
close the extended range motive flow valve.
This prevents continued operation of the
jet pump.
ER Switch Positions
When the XFR OVERRIDE switch is in
the ER position and the extended range
fuel tank is empty, the XFR OVERRIDE
switch must be manually positioned to the
AUTO or AUX pos i t i on. The AUTO
position returns control to the automatic
fuel transfer module; the AUX position
commands fuel to be supplied from the
auxiliary fuel tank.
The extended range fuel system does not
feed into the main fuel system if there is a
failure of both boost pumps (engine-driven
and electrical) or a failure of the extended
range motive flow valve.
The NO FUEL XFR annunciator illumi-
nat es f or t he same condi t i ons as t he
auxiliary transfer system.
CROSSFEED
A crossfeed line connects each nacelle tank
to the engine on the opposite wing. The
line is routed from the inboard side of
the nacelle aft to the center wing section
and across t o t he i nboard si de of t he
opposite nacelle.
A valve connected into the line at the aft
inboard corner of the left nacelle controls
the crossfeed line (Figure 5-12).
Crossfeed requires standby boost pump
operation on the side from which crossfeed
i s des i red. I t s operat i on ens ures an
adequate fl ow of fuel to the recei vi ng
engine. It also maintains motive flow for the
jet transfer pump on the supply side.
When the CROSSFEED switch on the fuel
control panel is actuated, a 5-ampere circuit
breaker on the fuel control panel supplies
power t o t he sol enoi d t hat opens t he
crossfeed valve.
The automatic fuel transfer module simulta-
neously energizes the standby pump on the
side from which crossfeed is desired and
deenergizes (closes) the motive flow valve
on the side being crossfed.
5-17
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FUEL CROSSFEED
TO FLOW
DEVIDER
TO FLOW
DIVIDER
MOTIVE FLOW
VALVE
MOTIVE FLOW
VALVE
CROSSFEED
VALVE
FIREWALL
SHUTOFF VALVE
LOW PRESSURE
ENGINE-DRIVEN
FUEL PUMP
STANDBY
BOOST PUMP
LOW FUEL
QUANTITY
PROBE
Figure 5-12. Crossfeed Schematic
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Crossfeed does not transfer fuel from one
cell to another; its primary function is to
supply fuel from one side to the opposite
engine during an engine-out condition.
If the standby boost pumps on both sides
are operating and the crossfeed valve is
open, fuel is supplied to the engines in the
normal manner because pressure on each
side of the crossfeed valve is equal.
When crossfeed i s sel ected, the green
advisory FUEL CROSSFEED annuncia-
tor illuminates indicating that the crossfeed
valve has opened.
Precautions
When performing crossfeed, be aware of
the following precautions:
AUX TRANSFER switch must be in
AUTO for the side receiving fuel. If
the swi tch i s i n OVERRIDE, the
motive flow valve remains open. In
addition, incoming fuel would start
filling the tanks through the auxiliary
transfer line and could result in fuel
being dumped overboard.
Both STANDBY PUMP swi tches
should be in the OFF position. The
crossfeed system automatically turns
on the pump it needs to establish
crossfeed.
If the firewall fuel valve was closed on
t he i noperat i ve engi ne duri ng
shutdown, the FUEL PRESSURE
annunciator remains illuminated, and
any auxi l i ary fuel on that si de i s
unusabl e due t o l ack of mot i ve
flow pressure.
FUEL MANIFOLD PURGE
SYSTEM
Thi s ai rcraf t i s equi pped wi t h a f uel
mani f ol d purge syst em t o ensure any
res i dual f uel i n t he f uel mani f ol d i s
cons umed dur i ng engi ne s hut down
(Figure 5-13).
Duri ng engi ne operati on, compressor
discharge (P3 air) is routed through a filter
and check valve to pressurize a small air
tank on the engine truss mount.
On engine shutdown, the pressure differ-
ential between the air tank and the fuel
manifold causes air to be discharged from
the air tank through a check valve and into
the fuel manifold system. The air forces all
residual fuel remaining in the fuel manifold
out t hrough t he nozzl es and i nt o t he
combustion chamber.
The f uel f orced i nt o t he combus t i on
chamber is consumed, which in turn causes
a momentary rise in engine speed.
Figure 5-13. Fuel Manifold Purge
System Schematic
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PREFLIGHT
AND SERVICING
DRAIN SYSTEM
During each preflight, the fuel drains on the
tanks, lines, and filters should be drained
to check for fuel contamination.
Each wing has four tank drains, one line
drain, and one filter drain (Figure 5-14).
See Table 5-1.
The main and auxiliary fuel systems have
five sump drains, a standby pump drain
manifold, and a firewall filter drain in each
wing. The drain valve for the firewall fuel
filter is to the right of the filter at the
firewall on the underside of the nacelle.
Figure 5-14. Fuel Drain Locations
DRAINS LOCATION
Flush fuel drain
Gravity line drain
Fuel drain
Strainer drain
Filter drain
Inboard of fuel tank drain
Underside of wing
forward of aileron
Outboard of nacelle
underside of wing
Outboard of nacelle
underside of wing
Bottom of nacelle
Forward of wheel well
Underside of wing by
wing root
Table 5-1. FUEL DRAIN LOCATIONS
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The nacelle tank has two drains on the
bottom of the nacelle forward of the wheel
well. The inboard drain is for the standby
boost pump and the outboard drain is for
the nacelle fuel sump and strainer. Do not
drain the standby pump drain on preflight.
The leading edge tank has a drain on the
underside of the wing just outboard of the
nacelle. The integral (wet wing) fuel tank
has a sump drain approximately midway on
the underside of the wing aft of the main
spar. The drain for the auxiliary tank is at
the wing root midway between the main
and aft spars.
The gravity feed line from the wing tanks
to the nacelle tank also has a drain line
that extends aft along the outboard side of
the main gear wheel well to a drain valve
just aft of the wheel well.
Because jet fuel and water are of similar
densities, water does not settle out of jet fuel
as easily as from aviation gasoline. For
maximum water and fuel separation, the
aircraft should sit perfectly still with no
fuel being added for approximately four
hours prior to draining the sumps. If there
is a substantial amount of water in the
fuel, however, water and fuel separation
does occur soon after fueling or moving
the aircraft.
Although turbine engines are not as critical
as reciprocating engines regarding water
ingestion, remove water periodically to
prevent formations of fungus and contam-
ination-induced inaccuracies in the fuel
gaging system.
When draining the flush-mounted drains, do
not turn the draining tool. Turning or twisting
unseats the O-ring seal causing a leak.
King Air 350ER Drains
The extended range fuel tanks have one
drain valve on the lower aft end of each fuel
tank. Fl apper val ves i nsi de each tank
prevent the fuel from surging forward.
FUEL HANDLING PRACTICES
Al l hydrocar bon f uel s cont ai n s ome
dissolved and some suspended water. The
quantity of water in the fuel depends on
temperature and type of fuel.
Kerosene, with its higher specific gravity,
tends to absorb and suspend more water
than aviation gasoline. Along with the
water, i t suspends rust, l i nt, and other
foreign materials longer. Given sufficient
time, these suspended contaminants settle
to the bottom of the tank. The settling time
for kerosene is five times that of aviation
gasoline; therefore, jet fuels require good
fuel handling practices to ensure the aircraft
is serviced with clean fuel.
If recommended ground procedures are
carefully followed, solid contaminants
settle and free water can be reduced to 30
parts per mi l l i on (ppm). Thi s val ue i s
currently accepted by the major airlines.
Si nce mos t s us pended mat t er can
be removed from the fuel by sufficient
settling time and proper filtration, it is not
a major problem.
Dissolved water has been found to be the
major fuel contamination problem. Its effects
are multiplied in aircraft operating primarily
in humid regions and warm climates.
Dissolved water cannot be filtered from
the fuel by micronic-type filters. It can be
released by lowering the fuel temperature;
this occurs in flight. For example, kerosene
fuel may contain 65 ppm (8 ounces per
1,000 gallons) of dissolved water at 80F.
When the fuel temperature i s l owered
to 15F, onl y about 25 ppm remai n i n
solution. The difference of 40 ppm has been
released as supercooled water droplets that
need only a piece of solid contaminant or
an i mpact s hock t o conver t t hem t o
ice crystals.
Tests indicate that these water droplets do
not settle during flight; they pump freely
through the system. If they become ice
crystals in the tank, they do not settle
because the specific gravity of ice is approx-
imately equal to that of kerosene.
Forty ppm of suspended water seems like
a very small quantity, but when added to
suspended water in the fuel at the time of
delivery, it is sufficient to ice a filter. While
the critical fuel temperature range is from
0F to 2F, which produces severe system
icing, water droplets can freeze at any
temperature below 32F.
Water in jet fuel also creates an environ-
ment favorable to the growth of a microbi-
ological sludge in the settlement areas of
the fuel cells. This sludge, in addition to other
contaminants in the fuel, can cause corrosion
of metal parts in the fuel system as well as
clog the fuel filters.
Although this aircraft uses bladder-type fuel
cells in addition to an integral (wet wing) fuel
cell in each wing and all metal parts (except
the standby boost pumps and jet transfer
pumps) are mounted above the settlement
areas, the possibility of filter clogging and
corrosive attacks on fuel pumps exists if
contaminated fuels are consistently used.
The primary means of fuel contamination
control by the owner/operator is good
housekeeping. This applies not only to
fuel supply, but to keeping the aircraft
system clean.
The following is a list of steps to recognize
and prevent contamination problems:
1. Know your supplier. It is impractical
to assume fuel free from contaminants
is always available. But it is feasible to
exercise caution and be watchful for
signs of fuel contamination.
2. Ensure as much as possible that the
f uel obt ai ned has been proper l y
stored, that it is filtered as it is pumped
to the truck, and again as it is pumped
from the truck to the aircraft.
3. Per f or m f i l t er i ns pect i ons t o
determine if sludge is present.
4. Mai nt ai n good hous ekeepi ng by
periodically flushing the fuel tank
system. The frequency of flushing is
det er mi ned by t he cl i mat e and
presence of sludge.
5. Aviation gas is an emergency fuel.
Observe t he 150 hours maxi mum
operation on aviation gasoline.
6. Use only clean fuel servicing equipment.
7. After refueling, allow a settle period
of at l eas t f our hour s whenever
pos s i bl e, and t hen drai n a s mal l
amount of fuel from each drain.
Remove spi l l ed f uel f rom t he
ramp area immediately to prevent
the contaminated surface from
causing tire damage.
Even if the fuel does not contain water,
there is still a possibility of fuel icing at very
low temperatures.
FUEL TYPES AND ADDITIVES
Jet A, Jet A-1, Jet B, JP-4,-5, and -8 fuels may
be mixed in any ratio. Aviation Gasoline
Grades 80/87, 91/96, 100 LL, 100/130 and
115/145 are emergency fuels and may be
mixed in any ratio with the normal fuels
when necessary.
Use of the lowest octane rating available
i s suggested because of i ts l ower l ead
content. The use of aviation gasoline shall
be limited to 150 hours operation during
each time between overhaul (TBO) period.
CAUTION
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The Fuel Brands and Type Designations
char t i n t he Handl i ng, Ser vi ce, and
Maintenance section of the POHgives fuel
ref i ner s brand name al ong wi t h t he
corresponding designations established by
the American Petroleum Institute (API)
and t he Ameri can Soci et y of Test i ng
Material (ASTM). The brand names are
l i sted for ready reference and are not
specifically recommended by the aircraft
manufactuter. Any product conforming to
t he recommended s peci f i cat i on may
be used.
Anti-icing Fuel Additive
Engine oil heats the fuel before it enters the
FCU. Because no temperature measure-
ment is available for the fuel at the nacelle
tank, it must be assumed to be the same as
the outside air temperature (OAT).
If the OAT is below -45C, ice formation
could occur during takeoff or in flight. An
anti-icing additive per MIL-I-27686 should
be mixed with the fuel at refueling to ensure
safe operati on. Refer to the POH and
manufacturers maintenance manual for
procedures to follow when blending anti-
icing additive with the aircraft fuel.
Fuel Biocide Additive
Fuel biocide-fungicide BIOBOR JF in
concentrations of 135 ppm or 270 ppm may
be used in the fuel. BIOBOR JF may be
used as the only fuel additive, or it may be
used with the anti-icing additive conform-
ing to MIL-I-27686 specification. Used
together, the additives have no detrimen-
tal effect on the fuel system components.
See t he manuf act urer s mai nt enance
manual for concentrations to use and for
procedures for adding BIOBOR JF to the
aircraft fuel.
FILLING THE TANKS
When filling the aircraft fuel tanks, always
observe the following:
1. Ens ure t he ai rcraf t i s s t at i cal l y
grounded to the servicing unit and
to the ramp.
2. Service the main tanks on each side
first. The main filler caps are in the
outboard fuel cell on the leading edge
of each wing near the wingtip. The
auxiliary filler caps are on top of the
center section, inboard of each nacelle
(Figure 5-15); filler caps for the King
Air 350 ER are on top of the saddle
tank (Figure 5-16).
3. Al l ow a four-hour settl i ng peri od
whenever possi bl e. Then drai n a
sufficient amount of fuel from each
drai n poi nt t o remove wat er and
contaminants.
DEFUELING THE AIRCRAFT
As an integral part of the nacelle fuel tank,
a defueling adapter aft of the standby pump
contains a check valve to prevent fuel
drainage when the plug is removed.
Drain each wing fuel system as follows:
1. Remove cover on the bottom of the
nacelle to access the adapter plug.
2. Remove plug and screw the long end
of an AN832- 12 uni on i nt o t he
adapter. The fuel begins draining as
the union unseats the check valve.
3. The fuel may be gravity-drained or, to
facilitate defueling, pumped out with
the aid of a fuel truck.
Refer to the manufacturers maintenance
manual for more details.
LIMITATIONS
The limitations that pertain to the fuel
system are briefly summarized below. Refer
t o t he Pi l ot s Operat i ng Handbook,
Maintenance Manual, and other specific
topics in this section for more details.
1. Operation with a fuel pressure light
illuminated is limited to ten hours
before overhaul or replacement of the
engine-driven high-pressure fuel pump.
2. The King Air 300 maximum zero fuel
weight is 11,500. The King Air 350
maximum zero fuel weight is 12,500.
3. Maximum operation with aviation
gas ol i ne i s l i mi t ed t o 150 hour s
between engi ne overhaul s. Use of
aviation gasoline is limited to 150
hours due to lead deposits which form
in the turbine section during aviation
gas consumption and cause power
degradation. Since the aviation gas
will probably be mixed with jet fuel
already in the tanks, it is important to
record t he number of gal l ons of
aviation gas taken aboard. As a rough
approximation, it is expected that the
PT6A-60A will have an average fuel
consumption of 55 gallons per hour
per engine, therefore each time 55
gallons of aviation gasoline are added,
one hour of the 150-hour limitation is
being used for that engine. Consult
t he manuf act urer s mai nt enance
manual for more details.
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Figure 5-15. Main and Auxiliary Filler Caps
Figure 5-16. Saddle Tank Filler Cap
4. If the tanks have been serviced with
aviation gasoline, operation is prohib-
ited if either standby boost pump is
inoperative. The chart found in the
Weight and Balance section of the
Pilots Operating Handbook shows that
the density of aviation gasoline is
considerably less than that of jet fuel.
Because i t i s l ess dense, avi at i on
gasoline delivery is much more critical
than jet fuel delivery. Aviation gasoline
feeds well under pressure feed but does
not feed well on suction feed, particu-
larly at high altitudes. For this reason,
two alternate means of pressure feed
must be available for aviation gasoline
at high altitude. These two means are
the standby boost pump and crossfeed
f rom t he opposi t e si de. Thus, a
crossfeed capability is required for
climbs above 20, 000 feet pressure
altitude.
5. When fueling the Super King Air 300
or 350, the main fuel tanks should be
f ul l bef ore any f uel i s put i n t he
auxiliary tanks to reduce the structural
bending moment in flight.
6. The Super King Air 300 and 350 have
a maximum fuel imbalance of 300
pounds between wing fuel systems.
7. Takeoff is prohibited when the fuel
quantity indicator needles are in the
yellow arc or when there is less than
265 pounds of f uel i n each mai n
system.
8. Crossfeeding of fuel is permitted only
when one engine is inoperative.
9. Mi ni mum known or f orecas t ai r
temperature for operation without
fuel anti-icing additive is 45C.
One operative standby fuel pump
is required for takeoff when using
recommended engine fuels, but in
such a case, crossfeed of fuel will
not be available from the side
of t he i noperat i ve s t andby
fuel pump.
WARNING
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1. I f auxi l i ar y f uel i s requi red, t he
auxiliary tank _______ be filled _______
filling the main fuel tanks.
A. May; after
B. May; before
C. Must; before
D. Must; after
2. Illumination of the amber [L/R FUEL
QTY] annunciator indicates less than
30 minutes of fuel remaining:
A. In the appropriate auxiliary fuel
tank.
B. In the appropriate main fuel tank.
C. At maximum continuous power.
D. At maximum range power.
3. Illumination of the red [L/R FUEL
PRESS LO] warni ng annunci at or
dur i ng nor mal f l i ght operat i ons
indicates:
A. Insufficient pressure at the fuel
pressure switch.
B. Dur i ng al l operat i ons wi t h
emergency fuel.
C. Cros s f eed operat i on i s not
available.
D. Powerplant failure is imminent.
4. According to the checklist, crossfeed
is selected:
A. When fuel transfer is required.
B. Onl y dur i ng s i ngl e engi ne
operations.
C. Anyt i me a f uel i mbal ance i s
exceeds a limitation during normal
operations.
D. When the auxiliary fuel is empty
after being used.
5. The approved military grade fuels are:
A. JP-4, JP-5, and JP-8.
B. 100LL and 115/145.
C. Jet A and Jet A-1.
D. Jet A and Jet B.
6. The maximum allowed lateral fuel
imbalance is _______ lbs.
A. 100
B. 300
C. 500
D. 700
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QUESTIONS
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CHAPTER 7
POWERPLANT
CONTENTS
Page
INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................... 7-1
GENERAL ........................................................................................................................... 7-1
Engine Ratings .............................................................................................................. 7-1
Engine Stations.............................................................................................................. 7-2
Engine Terms ................................................................................................................. 7-4
POWERPLANT................................................................................................................... 7-4
General Principles......................................................................................................... 7-5
General Operation........................................................................................................ 7-6
Engine Airflow.............................................................................................................. 7-8
Ignition System.............................................................................................................. 7-9
Accessory Section ....................................................................................................... 7-10
Lubrication System..................................................................................................... 7-13
Engine Fuel System.................................................................................................... 7-16
Engine Power Control ................................................................................................ 7-21
Engine Instruments .................................................................................................... 7-23
Engine Limitations ..................................................................................................... 7-25
PROPELLER .................................................................................................................... 7-28
Blade Angle ................................................................................................................. 7-31
Primary Governor....................................................................................................... 7-31
Overspeed Governor.................................................................................................. 7-44
Fuel Topping Governor.............................................................................................. 7-45
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Power Levers ............................................................................................................... 7-45
Propeller Control Levers ........................................................................................... 7-46
Propeller Feathering................................................................................................... 7-46
Synchrophaser ............................................................................................................. 7-51
QUESTIONS...................................................................................................................... 7-53
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ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Title Page
7-1 PT6A-60A Specifications...................................................................................... 7-2
7-2 Engine Cutaway..................................................................................................... 7-3
7-3 PT6A-60A Powerplant Installation..................................................................... 7-4
7-4 Engine Modular Concept ..................................................................................... 7-5
7-5 Engine Gas Flow and Stations............................................................................. 7-7
7-6 Jet-Flap, Compressor Bleed Valve, and Swing Check Valve ............................ 7-9
7-7 Engine Start and Ignition Switches................................................................... 7-10
7-8 Typical PT6A Engine.......................................................................................... 7-11
7-9 Front and Rear Accessory Drive....................................................................... 7-12
7-10 Accessory Gearbox Geartrain........................................................................... 7-12
7-11 Engine Lubrication Diagram............................................................................. 7-14
7-12 Magnetic Chip Detector..................................................................................... 7-13
7-13 Engine Oil Dipstick ............................................................................................ 7-15
7-14 Simplified Fuel System Diagram....................................................................... 7-16
7-15 Simplified Fuel Control System......................................................................... 7-18
7-16 Fuel Pressure Annunciator................................................................................. 7-20
7-17 Fuel Flow Indicator............................................................................................. 7-20
7-18 Control Pedestal (Typical).................................................................................. 7-21
7-19 Control Levers..................................................................................................... 7-22
7-20 Engine Display .................................................................................................... 7-23
7-21 ITT Reading......................................................................................................... 7-24
7-22 Torquemeter......................................................................................................... 7-24
7-23 Gas Generator Tachometer................................................................................ 7-24
7-24 Engine Limits Chart ........................................................................................... 7-25
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7-25 Overtorque Limits............................................................................................... 7-26
7-26 Overtemperature Limits..................................................................................... 7-27
7-27 In-Flight Engine Data Log................................................................................. 7-27
7-28 Hartzell Propeller................................................................................................ 7-29
7-29 Propeller System Complete................................................................................ 7-30
7-30 Propeller Blade Angle Diagram........................................................................ 7-31
7-31 Propeller Pitch Diagram..................................................................................... 7-32
7-32 Primary Governor ............................................................................................... 7-33
7-33 Complete Propeller System................................................................................ 7-33
7-34 Propeller Onspeed Diagram.............................................................................. 7-34
7-35 Propeller Overspeed Diagram........................................................................... 7-35
7-36 Propeller Underspeed Diagram........................................................................ 7-35
7-37 Low Pitch Stop Diagram.................................................................................... 7-37
7-38 GROUND FINE Range and REVERSE Diagram....................................... 7-38
7-39 Propeller PositioningFlight Idle to Ground Low Pitch Stop..................... 7-40
7-40 King Air 350 Ground Idle Stop Electrical Circuit .......................................... 7-43
7-41 Overspeed Governor Diagram.......................................................................... 7-44
7-42 Power Levers ...................................................................................................... 7-45
7-43 Propeller Control Levers.................................................................................... 7-46
7-44 Autofeather DiagramArmed......................................................................... 7-47
7-45 Autofeather DiagramTest .............................................................................. 7-48
7-46 Autofeather DiagramLeft Engine Failure Armed ...................................... 7-49
7-47 Autofeather Test Diagram (Right Engine)Low Power and Feathering... 7-49
7-48 Propeller Synchrophaser System....................................................................... 7-51
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INTRODUCTION
In-depth knowledge of the powerplant and propeller systems is essential to good
power management. Operating within the design parameters extends engine life
and ensures safety. To better equip the pilot for effective power management, this
chapter describes the basic components of the engines and propellers along with
their limits. It also discusses details of engine operation so the pilot can familiar-
ize himself with normal and abnormal conditions.
GENERAL
ENGINE RATINGS
In turboprop engines, power is measured in
shaft horsepower (SHP) and equivalent
s haf t hor s epower ( ESHP) . SHP i s
determined by propeller rpm and torque
applied to turn the propeller shaft.
Power transmitted through the propeller
shaft, however, is only a portion of the total
thrust created by the engine. Hot exhaust
gases exiting the engine also develop some
kinetic energy similar to a turbojet engine.
This additional thrust created by the exhaust
amounts to about 10% of the total engine
CHAPTER 7
POWERPLANT
horsepower. ESHP is the term applied to
the total horsepower deliveredincluding
the exhaust thrust.
Turboprop engine specifications usually
show both ESHP and SHP al ong wi th
limiting ambient temperatures. (Figure 7-
1) lists the engine rating and temperatures
and (Figure 7-2) illustrates the various
engine sections.
ENGINE STATIONS
To identify points in the engine, station
numbers are est abl i shed. To ref er t o
pressure or temperature in the airflow path
at a specific point, the appropriate station
number is used.
For example, temperature of the airflow
measured between the compressor and first
stage power turbi ne at engi ne stati on
number 5 is called T
5
, which is read in
the cockpit as ITT. Engine bleed air after
t he cent ri f ugal compressor st age and
prior to entering the combustion chamber
i s ref er red t o as P
3
ai r. Thi s ai r i s
for cabin heat, pressurization, and the
pneumatic system.
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Figure 7-1. PT6A-60A Specications
7
-
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3
5
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3
5
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7 POWERPLANT
POWER SECTION
EXHAUST OUTLET
TWO-STAGE POWER
TURBINE
SINGLE-STAGE
COMPRESSOR
TURBINE
INTAKE AIR
COMBUSTION
SECTION
ENGINE AIR INLET
COMPRESSOR SECTION
Figure 7-2. Engine Cutaway
ENGINE TERMS
Several basi c terms ai d i n the general
understanding of the PT6A series engines:
N
1
or N
g
Gas generator rpm i n
percent of turbine speed
N
p
Propeller rpm
N
2
or N
f
Power turbine rpm (not
indicated on engine instruments)
P
2.5
Air pressure between engine
stations 2 and 3. Also referred to as
axi al s t age ai r or compres s or
interstage air
P
3
Air pressure at engine station 3;
the source of bleed air used for some
aircraft systems
I TT or T
5
I nt er s t age t ur bi ne
temperature in degrees centigrade at
engine station 5.
POWERPLANT
The powerplant for the King Air 350 is the
Pratt and Whitney Canada PT6A-60A free-
turbine-turboprop engine that drives a four-
bladed propeller (Figures 7-3). The engine
is flat-rated to 1,050 shaft horsepower.
The power pl ant s are equi pped wi t h
conventional, four-blade, full-feathering,
reversing, constant-speed propellers. The
propellers mount on the output shaft of
the engine reduction gearbox.
Engine oil pressure controls the propeller
pitch and speed through single-action,
engine-driven propeller governors. The
propellers feather automatically when the
engines are shut down. They unfeather when
the engines are started.
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Figure 7-3. PT6A-60A Powerplant Installation
GENERAL PRINCIPLES
The PT6A-60A engine consists basically
of a free-turbine, reverse-flow engine that
dri ves a propel l er t hrough pl anet ary
gearing. The term free-turbine refers to
the turbine sections of the single-stage
engine. There are two turbine sections: the
compressor turbi ne dri ves the engi ne
compressor and accessories and the dual-
power turbine drives the power section
and propeller.
The power turbine section has no physical
connection to the compressor turbine. The
compressor and power turbines, mounted
on separate shafts, are driven in opposite
directions by the gas flow across them.
The term reverse flow refers to airflow
through the engine. Inlet air enters the
compressor at the aft end of the engine. It
then moves forward through the combus-
tion section and the turbines. Finally, it is
exhausted at the front of the engine.
Engine Modular Concept
An important feature of the PT6A-60A
engine is its modular construction. The
engi ne i s bas i cal l y di vi ded i nt o t wo
modules: a gas generator section and a
power section (Figure 7-4).
The gas generator section includes the
compressor and the combustion section.
Its function is to draw air into the engine
and add energy to it in the form of burning
fuel to produce the gases necessary to drive
the compressor and power turbines.
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Figure 7-4. Engine Modular Concept
The function of the power section is to
convert the gas flow from the gas genera-
tor section into mechanical action to drive
t he propel l er. An i nt egral pl anet ar y
gearbox converts the high speed and low
torque of the power turbine to the low
speed and hi gh torque requi red at the
propeller. The reduction ratio from power
turbine shaft rpm (N
f
) to propeller rpm
(N
p
) is approximately 17.6:1.
The engine requires a minimum of mainte-
nance. A hot section inspection (HSI) is
usual l y carri ed out at mi d- TBO. Thi s
involves splitting the engine between the
compressor and power turbines. Since it is
not necessary to remove the engine from
the aircraft to carry out the HSI, the inspec-
tion is both simple and fast.
The modul ar desi gn al l ows compl et e
replacement of either the gas generator
section or the combustion section independ-
ently of the other section. This permits easy
maintenance, modular overhaul, and on-
wing HSI.
GENERAL OPERATION
Another important feature of the PT6A-
60A engine is the reverse flow. Inlet air
enters the rear of the engine through an
annular plenum chamber formed by the
compressor inlet case. The air is directed
forward to the compressor. (Figure 7-5).
The compressor consists of three axial
stages combined with a single centrifugal
stage. They are assembled as an integral
unit on a common shaft.
A row of stator vanes between each stage
of compression diffuses the air, raises its
static pressure, and then directs it to the
next stage of compression. The compressed
air passes through diffuser tubes that turn
the air through 90 in direction and convert
velocity to static pressure. The diffused air
then passes through straightening vanes
to the annulus surrounding the combus-
tion chamber liner.
The flow of air changes direction 180 as it
enters and mixes with fuel in the combus-
tion chamber. The combustion chamber
liner has varying size perforations that
allow entry of compressor delivery air.
Approximately 25% of the air mixes with
fuel to support combustion. The remaining
75% enters the flame in the combustion
chamber can and i nt er nal l y cool s
the engine.
The fuel/air mixture is ignited. The result-
ant expanding gases are directed to the
t ur bi nes. The uni que l ocat i on of t he
combust i on chamber l i ner usi ng f l ow
reversal eliminates the need for a long shaft
between the compressor and the compres-
sor turbine.This reduces the overall length
and weight of the engine.
For ease of starting, fuel is injected into the
combusti on chamber l i ner through 14
simplex nozzles arranged in two sets. A
dual fuel manifold of primary and second-
ary transfer tubes and adapters supplies
the fuel.
For s t ar t i ng onl y, t wo s par k i gni t er s
that protrude i nto the l i ner i gni te the
f uel / ai r mi xt ure. Af t er s t ar t i ng, t he
igniters are turned off bcause combustion
is self-sustaining.
The resultant gases expand from the liner,
reverse direction in the exit duct zone, and
pass through the compressor turbine inlet
guide vanes to the single-stage compressor
drive turbine. The guide vanes ensure that
the expanding gases impinge on the turbine
blades at the correct angle with minimum
loss of energy. The expanding gases are
then directed forward to drive the power
turbine section.
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Figure 7-5. Engine Gas Flow and Stations
The compressor turbine extracts approxi-
mately 60% of the energy from the combus-
tion gases. The power turbines extract the
remaining energy. The dual-stage power
turbine consists of inlet guide vane and
turbines that drive the propeller shaft
through a reduction gearbox.
The compressor and power turbines are in
the approximate center of the engine with
t hei r res pect i ve s haf t s ext endi ng i n
opposite directions. This feature simplifies
the installation and inspection procedures.
The exhaust gas from the power turbines
is directed through an annular exhaust
plenum to the atmosphere through twin
opposed exhaust ports provided in the
exhaust duct.
ENGINE AIRFLOW
Compressor Bleed Valve
The compressor bleed valve is a pneumatic
piston that references the pressure differ-
ential between the axial and centrifugal
stages. Looking forward, the valve is at the
3 oclock position. The function of this
valve is to prevent compressor stalls and
surges in the N
1
rpm range.
At low N
1
rpm, the compressor axial stages
produce more compressed air than the
centrifugal stage can use. To compensate for
this excess airflow at low rpm, the open
compressor bl eed val ve overboards or
bleeds axial-stage air (P
2.5
). This reduces
back pressure on the axial stages (Figures
7-5 and 7-6). The pressure rel i ef hel ps
prevent compressor stall.
At low N
1
rpm, the valve is open. At takeoff
and cruise above approximately 90% N
1
rpm, the bleed valve is closed.
If the compressor bleed valve remains
closed at low N
1
speeds, compressor stalls
would result as the engine attempts to
accelerate to takeoff power. If the valve
remains open at high N
1
speeds, ITT would
be higher than normal and torque consid-
erabl y l ower than normal . Thi s woul d
reduce power output as the engine becomes
temperature-limited at reduced torque.
Therefore, at both low speeds and high speeds,
proper compressor bleed valve operation is
critical to normal engine operation.
Jet-Flap Intake System
A unique feature of the PT6A-60A engine
is its efficient utilization of P
2.5
air. In most
other PT6A engines, it is ported overboard.
In this engine, it is incorporated in a jet
flap system. A jet flap, or slot, is machined
into one side of each hollow strut that
s ecures t he acces s or y s ect i on t o t he
compressor section of the engine.
The jet flap intake system (Figure 7-6)
f unct i ons as a var i abl e i nl et gui de
vane wi thout vari abl e geometry. Each
hollow core provides a passageway for
compressor interstage air (P
2.5
) to exit
through the narrow slot parallel to the
engine centerline.
The interstage air passing into the intake
zone provides a swirl effect on inlet air
entering the compressor. This pre-swirl effect
improves low speed compressor character-
istics. It also eliminates one of the compres-
sor bleed valves found in most of the PT6A
series engines.
Swing Check Valve
A swing check valve is on the right side at
the 3 oclock position on the compressor
bleed valve cover. It is a plate valve hinged
at the upper edge and capable of pivoting
through approximately 90.
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The valve relieves excess P
2.5
pressure that
can not be used by the jet flap system when
the compressor bleed valve is open.
IGNITION SYSTEM
The combustion chamber has two spark-
type igniters to provide positive ignition
during engine start.
When t he IGNITION AND ENGINE
START switch is moved to the ON position,
these igniters activate. Although the engine
is equipped with two igniters, it needs only
one to start. The system is designed so that
if one igniter is open or shorted, the remain-
ing igniter continues to function.
Because combustion is self-sustaining, the
igniters may be turned off once the engines
start. Move the IGNITION AND ENGINE
START switch to the OFF position.
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Figure 7-6. Jet-Flap, Compressor Bleed Valve, and Swing Check Valve
The spark ignition provides the engine with
an ignition system capable of quick light-
ups over a wide temperature range.
Components and Controls
The system consists of an airframe-mounted
ignition exciter, two individual high tension
cable assemblies, and two spark igniters. It
is energized from the aircraft nominal 28-volt
DC supply. The system operates in the 9- to
30-vol t range. The i gni ter control box
produces up to 3,500 volts.
Switches for start and ignition are are on
the pilot left subpanel (Figure 7-7).
The IGNITION AND ENGINE START
switches have three positions: ON, OFF,
and STARTER ONLY. The ON position
activates both the starter and igniters. The
STARTER ONLY position is a holddown
position, spring- loaded to center (OFF).
It onl y provi des motori ng to cl ear the
engine of unburned fuel. With the switch
in this position, there is no ignition.
The ignition system features an automatic
backup f or emergenci es. The AUTO
IGNITION switches should be moved to
the ARM position in turbulence, precipi-
tati on, and i ci ng condi ti ons. If engi ne
torque falls below approximately 17% and
aut o- i gni t i on i s ar med, t he i gni t er s
automatically energize to attempt a start if
an engine flames out.
The green advi s or y I GNI TI ON ON
annunciators illuminate when the system
is armed.
ACCESSORY SECTION
Al l of t he engi ne- dr i ven acces s or i es
except t he propel l er t achomet er and
propeller governors are mounted on the
accessory gearbox.
The accessory gearbox is at the rear of the
engine (Figures 7-8). The compressor shaft
(N
1
) dri ves the accessori es through a
coupling shaft.
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Figure 7-7. Engine Start and Ignition Switches
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Figure 7-8. Typical PT6A Engine
The lubricating and scavenge oil pumps are
mounted inside the accessory gearbox. Two
scavenge pumps are externally mounted.
The starter/generator, high-pressure fuel
pump, N
g
tachometer generator, and other
optional accessories are mounted on pads on
the rear of the accessory drive case. There are
several such mounting pads, each with its
own different gear ratio (Figures 7-9 and 7-10).
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Figure 7-9. Front and Rear Accessory Drive
Figure 7-10. Accessory Gearbox Geartrain
LUBRICATION SYSTEM
The PT6A engine lubrication system has a
dual function (Figure 7-11). Its primary
function is to cool and lubricate the engine
bearings and bushings. Its second function
is to provide oil to the propeller governor
and propeller reversing control system.
Components and Operation
The mai n oi l t ank houses a gear- t ype
engi ne- dr i ven pres s ure pump, an oi l
pressure regulator, and an oil filter. The
engine oil tank is an integral part of the
compressor inlet case and is in front of the
accessory gearbox.
As oil is pumped from the tank, it passes
through the pressure and temperature
sensing bulbs mounted on or near the rear
accessory case. The oil then proceeds to
the various bearing compartments and nose
case through an external oil transfer line
below the engine.
Scavenge oil returns from the nose case
and bearing compartments through the
gear- t ype oi l s cavenge pumps i n t he
accessory case, through external oil transfer
lines, and through the external oil cooler
below the engine.
The oil cooler is thermostatically controlled
to maintain the desired oil temperature.
Another external l y mounted uni t, the
oil-to-fuel heat exchanger, uses hot engine
oil to heat fuel before it enters the engine
fuel system. Thi s prevents i ci ng at the
pump filter.
Magnetic Chip Detector
A magnetic chip detector is in the bottom
of each engine nose gearbox (Figure 7-12).
This detector activates a yellow caution L
CHIP DETECT or R CHIP DETECT
annunciator on the annunciator panel to
alert the pilot of possible oil contamination.
Illumination of a CHIP DETECT annunci-
ator indicates possible metal contamination
i n the engi ne oi l suppl y. Al though the
annunciator indicates a possible or pending
engi ne fai l ure, i l l umi nati on of a CHIP
DETECT annunciator is not in itself cause
for an engine to be shut down. Monitor
engine parameters for abnormal indications.
If parameters are abnormal, a precautionary
shut down may be made at the pilots discre-
tion. After illumination of a CHIP DETECT
annunciator, determine cause of malfunction
and correct prior to the next flight.
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VALVE
PREFORMED
PACKING
ADAPTER
ASSEMBLY
PREFORMED
PACKINGS
DETECTOR
HOUSING
MAGNETIC POLES
PREFORMED
PACKING VALVE
SEAT
INSULATION
ADAPTER
RETAINING NUT
VALVE HOUSING
ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR
Figure 7-12. Magnetic Chip Detector
7
-
1
4
F
O
R

T
R
A
I
N
I
N
G

P
U
R
P
O
S
E
S

O
N
L
Y
K
I
N
G

A
I
R

3
5
0
/
3
5
0
C

P
R
O

L
I
N
E

2
1

P
I
L
O
T

T
R
A
I
N
I
N
G

M
A
N
U
A
L
7 P O W E R P L A N T
Figure 7-11. Engine Lubrication Diagram
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Servicing
The oil tank has a filler neck and integral
quantity dipstick housing. The cap and
dipstick are secured to the filler neck that
passes through the gearbox housing and
accessory diaphragm and into the tank.
The markings on the dipstick indicate the
number of U.S. quarts of oil less than full
(Figure 7-13).
The engine oil system has a total capacity
of four U.S. gallons including the 2.5 gallon
oil tank. Maximum oil consumption is one
quart every10 hours of operation. Normal
oil consumption may be as little as one
quart per 50 hours of operation.
Most PT6A engines normally seek an oil
level of one to two quarts down on the dip-
stick with hot oil, and approximately one
quart lower than that when oil is cold. Do
not overfill.
When adding oil between oil changes, do
not mix types or brands of oil due to the
possibility of chemical incompatibility and
loss of lubricating qualities. A placard
inside the engine cover shows the brand and
type of oil needed.
Although the preflight checklist requires
checking the oil level, the best time to
check oil quantity is shortly after shutdown
because oi l l evel s are most accuratel y
indicated at that time.
Oi l l evel checks duri ng prefl i ght may
require motoring the engine for a brief
period for an accurate level reading.
When gas generator speeds are above 72%
N
1
, normal oil pressure is between 90 and
135 psi.
Figure 7-13. Engine Oil Dipstick
ENGINE FUEL SYSTEM
The fuel control system for PT6A-60A
engines is a fuel governor that increases or
decreas es f uel f l ow t o t he engi ne t o
maintain selected engine operating speeds.
The engine fuel control system consists of
the main components shown in the block
diagram (Figure 7-14).
Components
These components include the following:
Engine-driven boost pump
Firewall fuel filter and pressure switch
Oil-to-fuel heat exchanger
High-pressure fuel pump
Fuel control unit
Fuel flow transmitter
Minimum pressure flow valve
Flow divider
Dual fuel manifolds with 14 simplex
nozzles
The engine-driven boost pump operates
when the gas generator shaft (N
1
) is turning
to provide sufficient fuel head pressure
(approximately 30 psi) to the high-pressure
pump. This prevents cavitations.
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Figure 7-14. Simplied Fuel System Diagram
The oil-to-fuel heat exchanger uses warm
engi ne oi l t o mai nt ai n a desi red f uel
temperature at the fuel pump inlet.This
prevents icing at the pump filter. It occurs
automatically rquiring no pilot action.
After fuel passes through the oil-to-fuel
heat exchanger, it flows into the high-
pressure, engine-driven fuel pump and on
into the fuel control unit (FCU).
The high-pressure fuel pump is an engine-
driven, gear-type pump with an inlet and
outlet filter. Flow rates and pressures vary
with gas generator (N
1
) rpm and FCU
operation. The high-pressure pump supplies
fuel up to a maximum pressure of 1,050 psi
to the fuel-receiving side of the FCU. Its
primary purpose is to provide sufficient
pressure at the fuel nozzles for a good spray
pattern in all modes of engine operation.
A fuel-purge line positioned at the output
s i de of t he hi gh- pres s ure f uel pump
constantly directs a small amount of fuel
back to the gravity-feed line between the
wing and nacelle tanks. This ensure the
FCU stays clear of vapors and bubbles.
Al so l ocat ed i n t he FCU i s t he pump
unl oadi ng val ve. The condi t i on l ever
controls this valve. It is either open to
unload the pressure or closed. There is no
intermediate position.
The minimum pressurizing valve is located
in conjunction with the flow divider. It
blocks fuel flow during starts until fuel
pressure builds sufficiently to maintain a
proper spray pattern in the combustion
chamber. About 100 psi is required to open
t he mi ni mum pressuri zi ng val ve. The
engine-driven high-pressure fuel pump
maintains this required pressure. If the
pump fails, the valve closes and the engine
flames out.
For starting, fuel flows initially through
the flow divider to the primary fuel spray
nozzles in the combustion chamber. As the
engine accelerates through approximately
35 to 40% N1, fuel pressure i ncreases
sufficiently to also supply the secondary
fuel nozzles. At this time, all 14 nozzles are
delivering atomized fuel to the combus-
tion chamber.
This progressive sequence of primary and
secondary fuel nozzle operation provides
cooler starts. During engine starts, there
may be an increased acceleration in N
1
speed when the secondary fuel nozzles start
delivering fuel.
Fuel Manifold Purge System
A fuel manifold purge system disposes of
residual fuel in the flow divider and fuel
manifold after engine shutdown. It consists
of a P
3
pressure tank with connections for
P
3
air input at one end and a discharge to
the flow divider at the other end.
During normal engine operation, P
3
air
enters the tank through a check valve to
pressurize the tank. Fuel pressure against
the discharge check valve prevents the air
from escapi ng as l ong as the engi ne i s
running. As fuel pressure drops to zero
during shutdown, P
3
air escapes through the
flow divider into the fuel manifold and
nozzles. The airfow pushes any residual
fuel into the combustion chamber where it
is burned. As a result, the pilot may notice
a one- to two-second delay in initial engine
spool down after shutdown.
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Fuel Control Unit
The fuel control unit (FCU) has multiple
functions. Its main purpose is to meter the
proper fuel amount to the nozzles in all
modes of engine operation.
The fuel control consists of the following
major components (Figure 7-15):
Condition lever that selects start, low
idle, and high idle functions
Power lever that selects gas genera-
tor speed (N
1
) between i dl e and
maximum through the 3D cam, cam
follower lever, and fuel valve
Flyweight governor that controls fuel
flow to maintain selected speed
Pneumatic bellows that control the
accel erati on schedul e and act to
reduce gas generat or s peed i f a
propeller overspeed occurs
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P
3
AIR
P
3
FILTER
P
T
P
O
P
O
P
1
P
3
P
2
P
Z
P
Y
MIN FLOW ADJ
P
2
BYPASS
VALVE
P
1
3D CAM
FOLLOWER
FUEL VALVE FOLLOWER
PUMP UNLOADING VALVE
HIGH
IDLE CAM
POWER
LEVER
FUEL
CONDITION
LEVER
N
G
GOVERNOR
N
F
GOVERNOR
FUEL FLOW DIVIDER
AND DUMP VALVE
10-MICRON
FILTER
74-MICRON
FILTER
FUEL PUMP
FILTER BYPASS VALVE
BYPASS
REG VALVE
ULTIMATE
RELIEF
VALVE
FUEL INLET
(FROM
OIL-TO-FUEL
HEATER)
(P
3
) SENSOR
BELLOWS ASSEMBLY
MINIMUM
PRESSURIZING
AND SHUTDOWN
VALVE
LEGEND
P
1
UNMETERED PUMP DELIVERY FUEL
P
2
METERED FUEL
P
3
COMPRESSOR DISCHARGE AIR
P
O
BYPASS FUEL
P
T
FUEL SERVO PRESSURE
P
Y
GOVERNING AIR PRESSURE
P
Z
INTERMEDIATE FUEL PRESSURE
Figure 7-15. Simplied Fuel Control System
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The FCU is calibrated for starting flow
rates, acceleration, and maximum power. It
compares gas generator speed (N
1
) with the
power lever setting and regulates fuel to the
engine fuel nozzles. The FCU also senses
compressor section discharge pressure,
compares it to rpm, and establishes acceler-
ation and deceleration fuel flow limits.
A minimum flow adjustment set to approx-
i mat el y 90 pounds / hour guarant ees
suff i ci ent f uel f l ow t o sust ai n engi ne
operation at minimum power.
The FCU is mounted on the rear flange of the
fuel pump. A splined coupling between the
pump and the FCU transmits a speed signal,
proportional to gas generator shaft speed
(N
1
), to the governing section in the FCU. The
FCU determines the fuel schedule for the
engine to provide power required by control-
ling gas generator speed.
Engine power output is directly dependent
upon gas generator speed (N
1
), which is
controlled by regulating the amount of fuel
to the combustion section of the engine.
Compressor discharge pressure (P
3
) is
sensed by the FCU is used to establish
accel erati on fuel fl ow l i mi ts. Thi s fuel
limiting function prevents overtempera-
ture conditions in the engine during starting
and acceleration.
FCU Operation
A br i ef, s i mpl i ed di s cus s i on of FCU
operation follows. For detailed description
and operation, refer to the Pratt & Whitney
Maintenance Manual for this engine.
The condition lever selects the LOW IDLE
to HIGH IDLE N
1
speeds. The power lever
selects speeds between idle and maximum,
104% N
1
and positions a 3D cam in the
FCU. The cam, through a cam follower and
lever, determines fuel flow corresponding
to the selected N
1
speed.
The gas generator (N
1
) governor that
cont rol s engi ne speed cont ai ns t wo
flyweights mounted on an engine-driven
ballhead. The flyweight governor is the
feedback element of the speed select system.
It control s the on-speed condi ti on by
positioning the 3D cam in response to speed
variations in the gas generator.
As N
1
speed increases or decreases, the
resulting flyweight action changes the 3D
cam setting. This, in turn, changes the fuel
flow valve setting to maintain the selected
N
1
speed.
The N
1
governor maintains these forces in
balance continually so the axial position of
the 3D cam always represents engine speed.
The cam follower and arm transmit motion
of the 3D cam to the fuel valve. As the 3D
cam moves upward, fuel flow to the engine
is increased and N
1
speed increases.
Downward movement of t he 3D cam
decreases fuel flow and N
1
speed. The N
1
governor, in response to variations in power
lever position, maintains N
1
speed. The
governor adjusts fuel flow as required.
Compressor discharge pressure (P
3
air) is
a second input affecting the fuel flow valve
position during acceleration or decelera-
t i on t o mai nt ai n t he s el ect ed s peed
condition of the gas generator. An increase
in P
3
causes the fuel flow valve to increase
f uel f l ow i n response t o i ncreased P
3
pressure until N
1
speed is stabilized. A
decrease in P
3
causes the fuel flow valve to
decreas e f uel f l ow unt i l N
1
s peed i s
stabilized at the lower selected value.
Overspeed Condition
In an overspeed condi ti on, i ncreasi ng
pressure by the governor flyweights moves
the 3D cam downward. Thi s resul ts i n
decreased fuel flow from the fuel flow valve
to the engine. A balance point is reached
when t he N
1
speed i s reduced t o t he
selected speed, and the cam is stationary at
the new speed position.
Underspeed Condition
In an underspeed condition, decreasing
pressure by the governor flyweights moves the
3D cam upward. This results in increased fuel
flow from the fuel flow valve to the engine
until the system is in equilibrium again.
Fuel Pressure Indicators
If a primary engine-driven boost pump fails,
the approrpiate red warning FUEL PRESS
annunciator in the warning annunciator
panel i l l umi nat es (Fi gure 7- 16). The
MASTER WARNING lights also flash.
The FUEL PRESS annunciator illuminates
when outlet pressure at the engine-driven
boos t pump decreas es bel ow 10 ps i .
Switching on the standby fuel boost pump
should increase fuel pressure above 11 (2)
psi and extinguish the warning.
Engine operation with the FUEL
PRESS annunciator on is limited
to 10 hours between overhaul or
replacement of the engine-driven
high-pressure fuel pump. Boost
pump fuel pressure is needed to
l ubr i cat e, cool and prevent
cavitations of the high pressure
fuel pump.
In the event of an engine-driven fuel pump
(high pressure) failure, the engine flames
because this high-pressure fuel is required
to open the minimum pressurizing valve.
Fuel Flow Indicator
A transmitter in the engine fuel supply line
between the FCU and the flow divider
senses fuel flow information. This informa-
tion displays on the multi-function display
i n the center of the i nstrument panel
(Figure 7-17). The displays indicate fuel
flow in pounds-per-hour units.
Fuel Additives
Two fuel additives are approved for the
Ki ng Ai r 350. An ant i - i ci ng addi t i ve
conforming to specification MIL-I-27686
is required when flying into known forecast
condi t i ons bel ow 45C. It shoul d be
blended in accordance with the procedures
outlined in the POH.
The fuel biocide Biobor JF is also approved
for prevention of microorganism growth
within fuel tanks and lines. It should be
bl ended as out l i ned i n t he Ki ng Ai r
Maintenance Manual.
ENGINE POWER CONTROL
The power lever acting on the gas genera-
tor governor (N
1
) controls torque. When
the position of the power lever calls for
more torque, the governor settings prevent
the bleed-off of internal pressure and some
of the P
3
air in the FCU. This moves the
metering nozzle to allow the necessary fuel
CAUTION
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Figure 7-17. Fuel Flow Indicator
Figure 7-16. Fuel Pressure Annunciator
flow into the spray nozzles to meet the
power condition called for.
The propeller lever adjusts the propeller
governor to the desired propeller speed.
The propeller maintains the set speed by
varying the blade angle as more or less
torque is applied.
Power Management
Power management is relatively simple
with two primary operating limitations:
temperature and torque.
Engine torque and ITT operating parame-
ters are affected by ambient temperature
and altitude. During operation requiring
maxi mum engi ne performance at col d
temperature or low altitude, torque limits
power. At hot temperature or high altitude,
ITT limits power. Whichever reaches its
limit first determines the power available.
Control Pedestal
The control pedestal extends between pilot
and copilot (Figure 7-18). The three sets of
control levers are, left to right, the power
levers, propeller rpm and feather levers,
and the condition levers.
Power Levers
The power levers control engine power
from idle to takeoff power through the
operat i on of t he gas generat or ( N
1
)
governor in the FCU. Increasing N
1
rpm
results in increased engine power.
The power l evers have t hree cont rol
regions: forward thrust, ground fine, and
reverse. When the levers are lifted over
the IDLE gate and pulled back into the
GROUND FINE range, they hold engine
power at the selected idle speed and control
propeller blade angle.
7-21
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DOWN
UP
20 2
1
4
2
1
4
6 0
.5
.5
80
60
FLAPS TAKEOFF
AND
APPROACH
CABIN CLIMB
THDS FT PER MIN
0
5
10
15 20
25
30
35
40
1
2
3
4 5
6
7
ALT
1000 FT
Figure 7-18. Control Pedestal (Typical)
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The GROUND FINE range is normally
used for taxi. When the levers are lifted
over the GROUND FINE gate into the
REVERSE range, they control engi ne
power and propeller blade angle.
Propeller Levers
The propeller levers are conventional in
setting the required rpms for takeoff and
cruise positions (Figure 7-19). The normal
governing range is 1,450 to 1,700 rpm.
This aircraft is equipped with both manual
and aut omat i c propel l er f eat her i ng
systems. To feather a propeller manually,
pul l the propel l er l ever back past the
fri cti on detent i nto the red and whi te
striped section of the quadrant.
To unfeather, push the lever back into the
governing range. The propellers go to the
feathered position when the engines shut
down because of the loss of oil pressure in
the propeller hub.
Condition Levers
The condition levers have three positions:
FUEL CUTOFF, LOW IDLE, and HI
IDLE (Figure 7-19). At FUEL CUTOFF
position, fuel flow to the engines is cut off.
At LOW IDLE, engine gas generator speed
(N
1
) is a minimum of 62%; at HI IDLE it
is 70%. The levers can be set between these
two values for any proportional speed
between 62% and 70% N
1
speed.
Control Lever Operation
The propeller, power, and condition levers
control the engines from the cockpit. Both
t he power and condi t i on l ever s are
connected to the N
1
governing section of
the FCU. Either lever resets the FCU to
maintain a new N
1
rpm.
For starting, the power levers are at IDLE
position. Once the condition levers are
moved to LOW IDLE, the fuel cutoff valve
allows fuel to flow to the nozzles. The N
1
gover nor i s s et at LOW I DLE. The
condition levers are continuously variable
from LOW IDLE at 62% to HI IDLE at
70% N
1
. Thi s vari abl e i dl e speed wi th
power levers at IDLE enhances engine
cooling by maintaining a steady airflow
through the engines.
With the condition levers at LOW IDLE,
the power levers select N
1
rpm from 62%
t o 104%, t he maxi mum f or t akeof f.
However, if the condition levers are at
HI IDLE, the power levers can select N
1
rpm only from 70% to 104%.
Moving either the power levers or the
condition levers changes N
1
rpm. As the
power or condition levers are advanced,
ITT, torque and fuel flow increases. These
indicators are by-products of the N
1
speed
maintained by the FCU. With power levers
in a fixed position, N
1
remains constant
even i n a cl i mb or descent. However,
I TT, t or que and f uel f l ow var y wi t h
altitude, ambient air temperature, and
propeller setting.
POWER
LEVERS
PROPELLER
LEVERS
CONDITION
LEVERS
Figure 7-19. Control Levers
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ENGINE INSTRUMENTS
Figure 7-20 presents the engine display
along with their operating limits.
INTERSTAGE TURBINE TEMPERATURE GAGE
400-820C NORMAL OPERATING RANGE
820C MAXIMUM CONTINUOUS LIMIT
1000C MAXIMUM STARTING ONLY LIMIT
TORQUE METER
0 TO 100% NORMAL OPERATING RANGE
100% MAXIMUM LIMIT
PROPELLER TACHOMETER (N
P
SPEED)
1450-1700 RPM NORMAL OPERATING RANGE
1700 RPM MAXIMUM LIMIT
GAS GENERATOR TACHOMETER (N
1
SPEED)
62-104% NORMAL OPERATING RANGE
104% MAXIMUM LIMIT
NO LIMITATIONS MARKINGS
OIL TEMPERATURE SCALE
0-99C NORMAL OPERATING RANGE
99-110C CAUTION RANGE
110 MAXIMUM OIL TEMPERATURE LIMIT
OIL PRESURE SCALE
60 PSI MINIMUM LIMIT
60-90 PSI CAUTION RANGE
90-135 PSI NORMAL OPERATING RANGE
200 PSI MAXIMUM LIMIT
Figure 7-20. Engine Display
ITT Gage
The ITT gage moni tors the i nterstage
turbine temperature at Station 5 (Figure 7-
21). ITT is a prime limiting indicator of
the amount of power available from the
engine under varying ambient tempera-
ture and altitude conditions.
The
I TT
readout i s i n the center of the engi ne
display on the multifunction display.
The normal operating range is 400C to
820C. These limits also apply to maximum
continuous power.
The maximum starting-only temperature is
1,000C .This starting limit is limited to
five seconds. The engines can be damaged
if limiting temperatures are exceeded.
Torquemeter
The torquemeter constantl y measures
rotational force applied to the propeller
shaft (Figure 7-22). The maximum permis-
sible sustained torque is 100%. Cruise
torques vary with altitude and temperature.
Torque is measured by a hydromechanical
t orquemet er i n t he f i rst st age of t he
reduction gearcase. Rotational force on
the first-stage ring gear compresses oil in
the torquemeter chamber. The difference
between the torquemeter chamber pressure
and reduct i on gear i nt ernal pressure
accuratel y i ndi cates the torque bei ng
produced at the propeller shaft.
The torquemeter transmitter measures this
t or que and di s pl ays i t on t he cent er
multifunction display.
Gas Generator Tachometer
The gas generat or ( N
1
) t achomet er
measures rotational speed of the compres-
sor shaft in percent rpm,based on 37,500
rpm at 100% (Figure 7-23). The N
1
indica-
tor is self-generating.
The tachometer generator sensing unit in
the engine accessory section supplies the
information to the N
1
display to indicate
the percent of N
1
revolutions.
Maximum continuous gas generator speed
is limited to 39,000 rpm, which is 104% on
the N
1
indicator.
7-24
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Figure 7-21. ITT Reading
Figure 7-22. Torquemeter
Figure 7-23. Gas Generator Tachometer
ENGINE LIMITATIONS
Aircraft and engine limits are described in
the Limitations section of the POH(Figure
7-24). These limitations have been approved
by the Federal Aviation Administration and
must be observed in the operation of the
King Air 350.
The ENGINE OPERATING LIMITS chart
gi ves t he maj or operat i ng l i mi t s.
The POWERPLANT INSTRUMENT
MARKINGS chart l i sts the mi ni mum,
normal, and maximum limits. Figure 7-20 for
a l i st i ng of t he operat i ng ranges f or
torque, ITT, propeller, gas generator, oil
temperature and pressure.
7-25
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OPERATING
CONDITION
TORQUE
%
(1)
MAXIMUM
ITT
C
GAS
GENERATOR
RPM
% N1
PROP
RPM
N2
OIL
PRESS
PSI (2)
OIL
TEMP
C (3) (4)
STARTING - - - 1000 (5) - - - - - - 0 to 200 -40 (min)
IDLE - - - 750 (6) 62 (min) 1050
(min)
60 (min) -40 to
+110
TAKEOFF 100 (10) 820 104 1700
(9)
90 to 135 0 to 110
MAX CONT 100 (10) 820 104 1700
(9)
90 to 135 0 to 110
CRUI SE
CLIMB
(7) (10) 785 104 1700
(9)
90 to 135 0 to 110
MAX CRUISE (7) (10) 820 104 1700
(9)
90 to 135 0 to 110
MAX
REVERSE
- - - 760 - - - 1650 90 to 135 0 to 99
TRANSIENT 156 (8) 850 (8) 104 1870
(8)
200 0 to 110
FOOTNOTES:
(1) Torque limit applies within range of 1000 - 1700 propeller rpm (N2). Below
1000 propeller rpm, torque is limited to 62%.
(2) Normal oil pressure is 90 to 135 psi at gas generator speeds above 72%. With
engine torque below 62%, minimum oil pressure is 60 psi at normal oil temperature
(60 degrees to 70 degrees C).
Oil pressures under 90 psi are undesirable. Under emergency conditions, to
complete a flight, a lower oil pressure limit of 60 psi is permissible at a reduced
power, not to exceed 62% torque. Oil pressures below 60 psi are unsafe and
require that either the engine be shut down or a landing be made at the nearest
suitable airport, using the minimum power required to sustain flight.
Fluctuations of plus or minus 10 psi are acceptable.
During extremely cold starts, oil pressure may reach 200 psi. In flight, oil pressures
above 135 psi but not exceeding 200 psi are permitted only for the duration
of the flight.
(3) A minimum oil temperature of 55C is recommended for fuel heater operation at take-off power.
(4) Oil temperature limits are -40C and +110C. However, temperatures between 99C and 110C
are limited to a maximum of 10 minutes.
(5) This value is time limited to 5 seconds.
(6) High ITT at ground idle may be corrected by reducing accessory load and/or increasing N1 rpm.
(7) Cruise torque values vary with altitude and temperature.
(8) These values are time limited to 20 seconds.
(9) To account for power setting accuracy and steady state fluctuations, inadvertent propeller RPM
excursions up to 1735 RPM are time limited to 7 minutes.
(10) To account for power setting accuracy and steady state fluctuations, inadvertent torque excursions
up to 102% is time limited to 7 minutes.
Figure 7-24. Engine Limits Chart
7-26
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During engine start, temperature is the
most critical limit. The ITT starting limit of
1,000C is limited to five seconds. For this
reason, it is helpful during starts to keep the
condition lever out of the LOW IDLE
detent so that the lever can be quickly
pulled back to FUEL CUTOFF.
Monitor oil pressure and oil temperature.
During the start, oil pressure should come
up to the minimum 60 psi quickly, but should
not exceed the maximum of 200 psi. During
normal operation the oil temperature and
pressure should be green, from 90 to 135 psi.
Fluctuations of 10 psi are acceptable.
Oi l pressure between 60 and 90 psi i s
undesirable; it should be tolerated only for
completion of the flight, and then only at a
reduced power setting.
Oi l pressure bel ow 60 psi i s unsafe; i t
requires that either the engine be shut
down or that a landing be made as soon as
possible using minimum power required
to sustain flight.
A minimum oil temperature of 55C is
recommended f or oi l - t o- f uel heat er
operation at takeoff power. Oil tempera-
ture limits are 40C and +110C during
IDLE, and 0C to +110C during normal
operat i ons. However, t emperat ures
between +99C and +110C are limited to
a maximum of 10 minutes.
During ground operations, ITT tempera-
tures are critical. They can be controlled by
the N
1
rpm, air conditioning, P
3
use, and the
generator load. With the condition levers
at LO IDLE, high ITT can be corrected by
reducing the generator and other N
1
loads,
then increasing the N
1
rpm by advancing
the condition levers. The air conditioner,
for example, draws a heavy load on the
r i ght engi ne N
1.
I t may have t o be
temporarily turned off.
At approximately 70% N
1
rpm, the HI
IDLE condition lever position normally
reduces the ITT. Once ITT is reduced below
the IDLE limit of 750C, the N
1
loads may
be restored as desired as long as ITT stays
bel ow 750 C. Dur i ng nor mal f l i ght
operat i ons, t he I TT s houl d never be
allowed to exceed the maximum continu-
ous limit of 820C .
During the climb, torque decreases; ITT
may increase slightly. The cruise climb ITT
limit is not placarded. Torque, ITT, N
1
, and
propeller limits are the same in maximum
cruise as they are for takeoff; however,
cruise torque values vary with altitude
and temperature.
Transient limits provide buffers for surges
during engine acceleration. Torque and
ITT have an allowable excursion duration
of 20 seconds. A momentary peak of 156%
and 850C is allowed for torque and ITT
respectively during acceleration.
The OVERTORQUE LI MI TS char t
(Figure 7-25) shows actions required if
t orque l i mi t s are exceeded under al l
conditions. If the torque limits are exceeded
for more than a few minutes, the gearbox
can be damaged. The chart shows the
specific limits and action required if they
are exceeded.
Figure 7-25. Overtorque Limits
The Generator Limits table in the POH
shows l i mi t s f or ground operat i on at
various N
1
rpms. Any time these limits are
exceeded, the accessory l oad must be
reduced or N
1
increased to the limits shown
in the table. A generator load of 75% is
maximum for ground operation at an N
1
of
between 62% and 70%.
The Inflight limits are 100% generator load
from sea level to 34,000 feet. Above 34,000
feet, maximum sustained generator load
limit is 95%. Maximum continuous and
maximum cruise share the same generator
limits, but due to N
1
loading, certain limits
must not be exceeded as indicated in the
Before Takeoff (Final Items) checklist in
the POH.
The overtemperature chart (Figure 7-26)
shows the specific actions required if ITT
l i mi t s are exceeded dur i ng s t ar t i ng
conditions. For Area A, determine and
correct the cause of overtemperature. If it
is during a start, have the engine visually
inspected through the exhaust duct, then
record the action in the engine logbook
(Figure 7-27).
Overtemperature in Area B requires that a
hot section inspection be performed. During
a hot section inspection, the combustion
chamber and turbine areas and components
are examined and replaced. Parts should be
repaired or replaced as necessary.
7-27
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Figure 7-26. Overtemperature Limits
Figure 7-27. In-Flight Engine Data Log
In Area C, overtemperatures may require
that the engine be returned for overhaul.
Exceeding ITT limits in this area for more
than a few seconds may cause extensive
engine damage.
Starter Operating
Temperature Limits
The engine starters are time-limited during
the starting cycle if for any reason multiple
starts are requi red i n qui ck sequence.
The starter is limited to 30 seconds ON
then five minutes OFF for cooling before
the next sequence of 30 seconds ON, five
minutes OFF.
After the third cycle of 30 seconds ON, the
starter must stay OFF for 30 minutes. If
these limits are not observed, overheating
may damage the starter.
The second starter cycle is used for clearing
the engine of residual fuel.
Trend Monitoring
During normal operations, gas turbine
engines are capable of producing rated
power for extended periods of time. Engine
operat i ng paramet ers, such as out put
torque, interstage turbine temperature,
compressor speed, and fuel flow for individ-
ual engines, are predictable under specific
ambient conditions.
On PT6A engi nes, t hes e predi ct abl e
characteristics may be taken advantage of
by establishing and recording individual
engine performance parameters. These
paramet er s can t hen be compared
periodically to predicted values to provide
day- t o- day vi s ual conf i r mat i on of
engine efficiency.
The engine condition trend monitoring
system recommended by Pratt & Whitney
is a process of periodically recording engine
instrument readings and then comparing
them to a set of typical engine character-
istics. Such comparisons produce a set of
deviations in ITT, compressor speed, and
fuel flow.
Readings that should be collected include
the torque, ITT, compressor speed, and
fuel flow.
Cor rect t he readi ngs f or al t i t ude,
outside air temperature, and airspeed,
if applicable.
Data Collection
The trend moni tori ng procedure used
specifies that flight data be recorded on
each flying day, every five flight hours, or
other flight period. Select a flight with
long-established cruise, preferably at a
representative altitude and airspeed.
Wi t h engi ne power es t abl i s hed and
stabilized for a minimum of five minutes,
record the following data on a form similar
t o t hi s i nf l i ght engi ne dat a l og ( s ee
Figure 7-27):
Indicated airspeed (IAS)Knots
Outside air temperature (OAT)
Degrees Centigrade
Pressure altitude (ALT)Feet
Propeller speed (N
p
)RPM
Torque (T
q
)Percentage
Gas generator speed (N
g
or N
1
)
Percent of gas generator speed
Interturbine temperature (ITT)
Degrees Centigrade
Fuel flow (WF)Pounds per hour
PROPELLER
This section on the description, operation,
and testing of the propeller system should
increase the pilots understanding of the
propeller and system checks in the POH.
7-28
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Each engine is equipped with a conven-
tional four-blade, constant speed, full-
f eat her i ng, rever s i ng propel l er. The
propeller is mounted on the output shaft of
the reduction gearbox (Figure 7-28).
Oil pressure controls the propeller pitch
t hrough a reduct i on gearbox- dri ven
propeller governor. An oil pump that is part
of the propeller governor boosts engine oil
pressure to move the propeller toward the
low pitch (high rpm) position and into
reverse (Figure 7-29).
Without oil pressure to counteract the
counterweights and feathering springs, the
propeller blades would move into feather.
Counter-weights and feathering springs
move the propeller blades toward high pitch
(low rpm) and into the feathered position.
Because there are no high pitch stop locks,
the propeller feathers after engine shutdown.
A mechanically actuated hydraulic stop
determines low pitch propeller position.
Power levers on the pedestal adjust the
lower pitch stop position to control the
GROUND FINE and REVERSE blade
angl es i n t he GROUND FI NE and
REVERSE range.
Three governors that may control propeller
rpm include the primary, overspeed, and
fuel topping governors.
The primary and overspeed governors use
oil pressure to change propeller blade angle
so that the propeller rpm is adjusted or
limited. The fuel topping governor limits
fuel to limit propeller rpm.
The propeller control lever adjusts the
pri mary governor t hrough i t s normal
governing range of 1,450 to 1,700 rpm. If
the primary governor malfunctions, the
7-29
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Figure 7-28. Hartzell Propeller
7
-
3
0
F
O
R

T
R
A
I
N
I
N
G

P
U
R
P
O
S
E
S

O
N
L
Y
K
I
N
G

A
I
R

3
5
0
/
3
5
0
C

P
R
O

L
I
N
E

2
1

P
I
L
O
T

T
R
A
I
N
I
N
G

M
A
N
U
A
L
7 P O W E R P L A N T
REVERSING CAM
PUSH-PULL CONTROL
RESET POST
Py
AIR BLEED LINK
MAXIMUM
STOP
MINIMUM
GOVERNOR
ADJ.
BETA ROD
HYDRAULIC
LOW PITCH ADJ.
COUNTERWEIGHT
FEATHERING
VALVE
TEST
SOLENOID
BETA VALVE
SPEEDER SPRING
PILOT
VALVE
FCU ARM
OVERSPEED
GOVERNOR
TO SUMP
TO SUMP
Figure 7-29. Propeller System Complete
overspeed governor prevents the propeller
speed f rom exceedi ng approxi mat el y
1,768 rpm.
If the propeller blade angle cannot be
changed by ei t her t he pr i mar y or
overspeed governor, the fuel toppi ng
governor i ntervenes. The fuel toppi ng
governor attempts to limit the propeller
rpm to 106% of selected propeller rpm
when the power lever is in the forward
thrust range. In the GROUND FINE and
REVERSE ranges, t he f uel t oppi ng
governor resets to approximately 95% of
selected propeller rpm. This ensures that
t he pr i mar y gover nor remai ns i n an
under s peed condi t i on whi l e i n t he
REVERSE range on the ground.
BLADE ANGLE
Blade angle is the angle between the chord
of the propeller and the propellers plane
of rotation. Because of the normal twist
in-corporated in a blade to increase its
efficiency, blade angle is different near the
hub than it is near the tip.
In the propellers, the cord 42 inches out
f rom t he propel l er s cent er has been
selected as the position at which blade
angle is measured. This position is referred
to as the 42-inch station. All blade angles
in this chapter are approximations based on
the 42-inch station (Figure 7-30).
PRIMARY GOVERNOR
The primary governor mounted on top of
the engine reduction gearbox converts a
variable pitch propeller into a constant
speed propeller. It does this by changing
blade angle to maintain the propeller speed
the operator has selected.
The primary governor can maintain any
selected propeller speed from 1,450 rpm to
1,700 rpm.
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BLADE ANGLES
14 MAXIMUM REVERSE
3 GROUND FINE (ZERO THRUST)
+1 (300) GROUND LOW PITCH STOP
+2 (350)
+13 (300) FLIGHT LOW PITCH STOP
+12 (350)
CRUISE 3045
79.5 (300)
79.3 (350)
FEATHER
0
Figure 7-30. Propeller Blade Angle Diagram
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If an aircraft is in normal cruising flight
with the propeller turning at 1,500 rpm
and the pilot trims the aircraft down into
a descent without changing power, the
airspeed increases. This decreases the angle
of attack of the propeller blades and causes
less drag on the propeller. Its rpm begins
to increase.
If the propeller has variable pitch capabil-
ities and is equipped with a governor set at
1, 50 0 r pm, t he gover nor s ens es t hi s
overspeed condition and increases blade
angle to a higher pitch. The higher pitch
i ncreases t he bl ade s angl e of att ack,
slowing it back to 1,500 rpm or onspeed.
This propeller control process occurs many
times per second.
Likewise, if the aircraft moves from cruise
to climb airspeeds without a power change,
the propeller rpm tends to decrease. The
governor responds to thi s underspeed
condition by decreasing blade angle to a
lower pitch (Figure 7-31). Rpm returns to
its original value.
Thus, the governor gives constant speed
charact eri st i cs t o t he vari abl e pi t ch
propeller. Power changes, as well as airspeed
changes, cause the propeller to momentar-
ily experience overspeed or underspeed
conditions. The governor reacts to maintain
the onspeed condition. Because the actions
of the governor are smooth, the pilot notices
few, if any, of these minor adjustments.
Primary Governor Operation
The propel l er l evers adj ust pri mary
propeller governor settings between 1,450
rpm and 1,700 rpm. The propeller governor
can select any constant propeller rpm within
the range of 1,450 to 1,700. The propeller
governor adjusts propeller rpm by control-
ling the oil supply to the propeller hub
mechanism (Figure 7-32).
An integral part of the primary propeller
governor is the governor pump. The N
p
shaft drives this pump that can raise engine
oil pressure from its normal range to a
maximum of 375 psi. The greater the oil
pressure sent to the propeller dome, the
lower the propeller pitch and the higher the
propeller rpm. Oil pressure is always trying
to maintain a low pitch. The feathering
springs and counterweights, however, are
trying to send the propeller to feather.
Figure 7-31. Propeller Pitch Diagram
Propel l er control i s a bal anci ng act of
opposing forces.
A transfer gland surrounds the propeller
shaft. This transfer gland allows the oil to
enter and exit the propeller dome as the
propeller pitch is adjusted (Figure 7-33).
The primary propeller governor uses a set
of rot at i ng f l ywei ght s geared t o t he
propeller shaft. The flyweights provide a
comparison between the desired reference
speed (as requested by the propeller levers
in the cockpit) and the actual speed the
propeller is turning.
These flyweights connect to a free-floating
pilot valve. The slower the flyweights are
turning in relation to the desired reference
speed, the lower the position of the pilot
valve. If the propeller and flyweights turn
faster, the additional centrifugal force
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Figure 7-32. Primary Governor
Figure 7-33. Complete Propeller System
makes t he pi l ot val ve ri se i nsi de t he
gover nor. The pi l ot val ve pos i t i on
determines how much oil pressure is sent
to the propeller dome (Figure 7-33).
Propeller Onspeed
If a propeller rpm of 1,500 is selected and
the propeller is actually turning at 1,500,
the flyweights are in their center or onspeed
condition. The pilot valve is in the middle
posi ti on (Fi gure 7-34). Thi s mai ntai ns
a constant oil pressure to the propeller
dome t o creat e a cons t ant pi t ch and
constant rpm.
Propeller Overspeed
If the aircraft enters a descent or if engine
power is increased without any change to
the propeller levers, there is tendency for
airspeed to increase and the propeller to
turn faster.
The flyweights, in turn, rotate faster. The
additional centrifugal force makes the pilot
valve rise. Notice that oil can now escape
via the pilot valve (Figure 7-35).
Lower oil pressure results in a higher pitch
and a reducti on of propel l er rpm. The
propeller returns to its original rpm setting.
The flyweights then slow down; the pilot
valve returns to the middle position to
maintain selected propeller rpm.
Propeller Underspeed
If the aircraft enters a climb or if engine
power is decreased without any change in
the propeller controls, airspeed decreases.
The propeller tends to slow down.
The flyweights in the propeller governor
also slow down due to a loss in centrifugal
force. The pilot valve moves lower (Figure
7-36). This allows more oil pressure to the
propeller dome. Higher oil pressure results
in a lower pitch. This, in turn, causes an
increase in propeller rpm.
As the propeller increases to its original
rpm setting, the flyweights speed up. The
pi l ot val ve ret ur ns t o i t s mi ddl e or
onspeed position.
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Figure 7-34. Propeller Onspeed Diagram
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Figure 7-36. Propeller Underspeed Diagram
Figure 7-35. Propeller Overspeed Diagram
The flyweights and pilot valve are always
maki ng smal l adj ustments so that the
propeller rpm is held constant by changing
the propeller blade angles.
The cockpit propeller lever adjusts when
the onspeed condition occurs. The pilot
can select any constant propeller rpm from
1,450 to 1,700 rpm, that is used for takeoff.
Maximum range power and recommended
cruise power use 1,500 rpm.
If a failure in the governor control linkage
occurs, an external spring on top of the
governor moves the governor adjustment
to 1,700 rpm propeller speed.
If the blade angle could decrease all the
way to 0 or reverse, the propeller would
creat e so much drag, ai rcraf t cont rol
woul d be dramat i cal l y reduced. The
propeller, acting as a large disc, would
creat e exces s i ve drag and bl ank t he
airflow around the wing and tail surfaces.
To prevent undesirable flight character-
istics, a mechanism stops the governor
from selecting blade angles that are too
low for safety. This mechanism provides
for an adjustable low pitch stop.
As t he governor decreases t he bl ade
angle, the flight low pitch stop is eventu-
ally reached where blade angle becomes
fixed and cannot continue to a lower pitch.
The governor is, therefore, incapable of
restoring the onspeed condition. Propeller
rpm decreases below the selected primary
governor rpm.
Low Pitch Stop
In situations such as final approach where
power and airspeed are being reduced, the
primary governor cannot maintain the
selected propeller rpm. With the progres-
sive reduction of power and airspeed on
final, the propeller and rotating flyweights
tend to go to the underspeed condition
where the pilot valve drops and increases
oil pressure to the dome. Propeller pitch
then decreases as power and ai rspeed
are reduced.
NOTE
Momentary periods of underspeed
are not being considered. In this
situation, propeller rpm is stabilized
below selected governor rpm.
Assuming the propeller is not feathered
or in the process of being feathered when
propel l er r pm i s bel ow t he s el ect ed
governor rpm, the propeller blade angle is
at the low pitch stop. If the aircraft is on the
ground, it is called the ground low pitch
stop. If the aircraft is in flight, it is called
the flight low pitch stop.
On many aircraft, the low pitch stop is
s i mpl y t he l ow pi t ch l i mi t of t ravel
determined by propeller construction. But
with a reversing propeller, the extreme
travel in the low pitch direction is past 0
into reverse or negative blade angles. The
low pitch stop then can be moved or reposi-
tioned when reversing is desired.
A mechanical linkage senses blade angle
and creates the low pitch stop. The linkage
closes a valve that stops the flow of oil into
the propeller dome. Because oil flow causes
low pitch and reversing, a low pitch stop is
created when it is blocked. The low pitch
stop valve, commonly referred to as the
beta valve, is quite positive in its mechan-
ical operation. Furthermore, the valve is
spring-loaded to cut off the flow of oil and
dump it out of the propeller dome if valve
control is lost because of linkage failure.
The propeller dome is connected by four
s pr i ng- l oaded pol i s hed rods t o t he
feedback ring behind the propeller (Figure
7-37). A carbon block riding in the feedback
ring transfers the movement of the latter
through the propeller reversing lever to
the beta valve on the governor. The initial
forward motion of the beta valve blocks off
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the flow of oil to the propeller. Further
motion forward dumps the oil from the
propeller into the reduction gearbox sump.
A mechani cal stop l i mi ts the forward
mot i on of t he bet a val ve. Rear ward
movement of the beta valve does not affect
nor mal propel l er cont rol . When t he
propeller is rotating at a speed slower than
that selected, the governor pump provides
oil pressure to the propeller dome. It also
decreases the pitch of the propeller blades
until forward motion on the feedback ring
pulls the beta valve into a position that
blocks supply of oil to the propeller. This
prevents further pitch reduction.
The power lever controls the position of the
low pitch stop. When the power lever is at
IDLE or above, the flight low pitch stop is
set at 12. The ground low pitch stop is set
at 2. Bringing the power lever aft of IDLE
progressively repositions the low pitch stop
to smaller blade angles. The geometry of the
power lever linkage through the cam box
means that power lever increments from
IDLE to full forward thrust have no effect
on the position of the beta valve. When the
power lever is moved from IDLE into the
GROUND FINE and REVERSE ranges,
i t pul l s the reverse l ever and the beta
valve aft.
The blade angle decreases because this
action opens the beta valve to increase oil
pressure to the propeller. As the blade
angle decreases, the distance traveled by
the propeller dome is fed back to the beta
valve through the rods, ring, and reverse
lever, which pulls the beta valve forward.
This closes the valve and stops oil flow into
t he propel l er dome. The bl ade angl e
stabilizes at the selected position.
The opposite occurs when the power lever
is moved forward to IDLE. The power lever
pushes the reverse lever and beta valve
fully forward to relieve oil pressure from
the propeller dome. This increases blade
IDLE
GATE
ON
GROUND
GROUND
FINE
GATE
MAXIMUM
REVERSE
GROUND
FINE
GATE
IDLE
+1 OR 2
-3
-14
REVERSE
GROUND
FINE
CARBON
BLOCK
COUNTERWEIGHT
FEATHER
RETURN
SPRINGS
RING,
ROD END
LOW-PITCH
STOP NUT
POLISHED
ROD
REVERSE RETURN
SPRING
FEEDBACK
RING
Figure 7-37. Low Pitch Stop Diagram
angle. As the blade angle increases, the
distance traveled by the propeller dome is
fed back to the beta valve through the rods,
ring, and reverse lever. This pushes the
beta valve aft until the port relieving oil
pressure closes. The blade angle is now
stabilized at the selected position.
GROUND FINE Range
The region between the ground low pitch
stop and 3 blade angle is the GROUND
FINE range (Figure 7-38). In this range,
t he engi ne s compres s or s peed ( N
1
)
remains at the value it had when the power
lever was at IDLE (62% to 70% based on
condition lever position).
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Figure 7-38. GROUND FINE Range and REVERSE Diagram
To enter the GROUND FINE range, the
power lever must be lifted beyond the
I DLE gat e and moved af t . Wi t h af t
movement of t he power l ever s i n
GROUND FI NE, bl ade angl e moves
progressively from the ground low pitch
stop to 3 (GROUND FINE gate).
When a power lever is lifted up and over
the IDLE gate into the GROUND FINE
range, it is pulling aft on the top of the
reverse lever. As the reverse lever moves
aft, the beta val ve i s pushed aft to re-
establish oil flow to the propeller dome.
This moves the propeller blade angle below
the ground low pitch stop. As the propeller
blade angle continues below the ground
low pitch stop, the propeller dome and
feedback ri ng conti nue forward. They
eventually pull the beta valve forward to
the oil cutoff position.
REVERSE Range
The region between 3 and 14 blade
angle is the REVERSE range. In this range,
N
1
progressively increases to a maximum
val ue of 87 1% whi l e bl ade angl e
decreases. To enter the REVERSE range,
the power lever must be lifted beyond the
GROUND FINE gate and moved aft. With
af t movement of t he power l evers t o
REVERSE, bl ade angl e progressi vel y
decreases from 3 (GROUND FINE gate)
to 14 (maximum reverse).
When a power lever is moved forward,
away from or out of the GROUND FINE
or REVERSE ranges toward IDLE, i t
pushes the reverse lever forward. This, in
turn, pulls the beta valve fully forward.
This opens a port so oil is dumped from the
propel l er dome t o t he nose case. The
propeller blade angle then increases until
the rods and ri ng movi ng aft wi th the
propeller dome have pushed the reverse
lever and the beta valve far enough aft to
cut off the oil.
PROP PITCH Annunciators
The white status L PROP PITCH and R
PROP PI TCH annunci at or s i ndi cat e
propeller blade angle has decreased below
the flight low pitch stop. The FAA requires
these ammunciators to alert the pilot any
time the propeller pitch changes more than
8 below the flight low pitch stop without
any direct pilot action. The system uses a
magnetic proximity sensor to sense the
position of the feedback ring and, thereby,
the position of the propeller dome and
blade angle.
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Low Pitch Stop Operation
(Figure 7-39) illustrates the sequence of
flight idle to ground stop low pitch stop.
As power levers are advanced above 68 to
70% N
1
, a microswitch on each power lever
breaks the circuit to the respective ground
low pitch stop solenoid. The blade angle
changes from the ground low pitch stop of
+2 to the flight low pitch stop of +12.
When t he bl ade angl e changes, t he
propel l er rpm decreases momentari l y
becaus e of t he i ncreas ed rot at i onal
drag. This helps prevent surging as power
is added.
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IDLE
OIL
IDLE
OIL
IDLE
OIL
12
12
2
FLIGHT IDLE
AS AIRCRAFT DECREASES AIR-
SPEED, THE PROPELLER BLADE
ANGLE DECREASES TO MAINTAIN
PROPELLER GOVERNOR RPM AS
THE BLADE ANGLE APPROACHES
13, THE BETA VALVE IS PULLED
INTO THE CUTOFF POSITION,
CREATING A LOW PITCH STOP.
IN TRANSIT
AS THE AIRCRAFT TOUCHES
DOWN, A SQUAT SWITCH ACT-
UATED ELECTRICAL SOLENOID
REPOSITIONS THE BETA LEVER
AFT, MOVING THE BETA VALVE
INTO THE OPEN POSITION. THIS
ALLOWS OIL TO FLOW TO THE
PROPELLER DOME.
AS THE PROPELLER DOME
FILLS WITH OIL, IT MOVES FOR-
WARD, CARRYING THE BETA
ROD AND LEVER ASSEMBLY,
AND CONSEQUENTIALLY ROTAT-
ING THE PROPELLER BLADES
TO A LOWER ANGLE.
GROUND LOW PITCH
STOP
AS THE PROPELLER DOME
MOVES FORWARD, THE BETA
VALVE REPOSITIONS THE LOW
PITCH STOP. OIL IS AGAIN
TRAPPED IN THE PROPELLER
DOME, EFFECTIVELY CREATING
THE GROUND LOW PITCH STOP.
2
Figure 7-39. Propeller PositioningFlight Idle to Ground Low Pitch Stop (Sheet 1 of 3)
Do not lift the power levers at the
IDLE gate in flight. Doing so will
energize the ground low pitch stop
sol enoi ds and cause the bl ade
angle, if the primary governor is
in an under-speed condition (the
indicated propeller rpm is less
t han t hat s el ect ed wi t h t he
propel l er cont rol l ever s ) , t o
decrease from the flight low pitch
stop to the ground low pitch stop.
This will cause excessive drag and
the aircraft will develop a high
sink rate.
Attempti ng to pul l the power
levers into the GROUND FINE
and REVERSE ranges with the
propellers in feather will cause
damage to the reversing linkage of
the power lever. Also, pulling the
power l ever s i nt o GROUND
FI NE and REVERSE on t he
ground with the engines shut down
will damage the reversing system.
WARNING CAUTION
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GROUND
IDLE
OIL
GROUND
FINE
OIL
2
2 3
OIL
3
GROUND LOW PITCH STOP
THE GROUND FINE IS A RANGE IN
WHICH OPTIMUM AIRCRAFT CON-
TROL AND ENGINE PERFORMANCE
ARE MAINTAINED DURING TAXI.
ONCE THE AIRCRAFT IS ON THE
GROUND, THE PILOT MOVES THE
POWER LEVER AFT.
IN TRANSIT
THIS MOVES THE BETA LEVER AFT
AND REPOSITIONS THE BETA VALVE
TO THE OPEN POSITION ALLOWING
OIL TO FLOW TO THE PROPELLER
DOME. AS THE PROPELLER DOME
FILLS WITH OIL, IT MOVES FOR-
WARD, CARRYING THE BETA ROD
AND LEVER ASSEMBLY, FURTHER
ROTATING THE PROPELLER
BLADES TO A LOWER ANGLE.
GROUND FINE GATE
THIS ACTION MOVES THE BETA
VALVE TO THE CLOSED POSITION,
TRAPPING OIL IN THE PROPELLER
DOME, EFFECTIVELY CREATING A
STOP AT ZERO THRUST OR
GROUND FINE.
Figure 7-39. Propeller PositioningFlight Idle to Ground Low Pitch Stop (Sheet 2 of 3)
In flight, do not lift the power levers at the
IDLE gate. Doing so energizes the ground
low pitch stop solenoids (Figure 7-40). If the
pri mary governor i s i n an underspeed
condition, the blade angle decreases from
the flight low pitch stop to the ground low
pitch stop. This causes excessive drag, and
the ai rcraft devel ops a hi gh si nk rate.
Attempting to pull the power levers into
t he GROUND FI NE and REVERSE
ranges with the propellers in feather causes
damage to the reversing linkage of the
power lever. Also, pulling the power levers
into GROUND FINE and REVERSE on
the ground with the engines shut down
damages the reversing system.
When the propeller is not in feather during
normal operation on the ground, maintain
propeller rpm above 1,050 rpm. With the
engine idling, operation with the propeller
feathered is permissible because the speed
is below the resonance rpm range. Avoid
sustai ned operati on i n feather on the
ground, however, because excessive heat
may build up in the nacelle, nose avionics
area, and fuselage.
While on the ground, the minimum blade
angle is approximately 2 at IDLE.
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GROUND
FINE
FULL
REVERSE
OIL L I O L I O
14
14
3
3
GROUND FINE GATE
TO ENTER THE REVERSE RANGE
FROM GROUND FINE, THE PILOT
MUST LIFT UP ON THE POWER LEVER
AND MOVE THE POWER LEVER AFT.
IN TRANSIT
AGAIN, THIS MOVES THE BETA LEV-
ER AFT, MOVING THE BETA VALVE
TO THE OPEN POSITION, ALLOWING
OIL TO FLOW TO THE PROPELLER
DOME, MOVING IT FORWARD. AS
THE PROPELLER DOME MOVES
FORWARD, IT CARRIES THE BETA
ROD AND LEVER ASSEMBLY, FUR-
THER ROTATING THE PROPELLER
BLADES TO A NEGATIVE ANGLE.
FULL REVERSE
THIS ACTION MOVES THE BETA
VALVE TO THE CLOSED POSI-
TION, TRAPPING OIL IN THE
PROPELLER DOME, EFFECTIVE-
LY CREATING A STOP FOR FULL
REVERSE.
Figure 7-39. Propeller PositioningFlight Idle to Ground Low Pitch Stop (Sheet 3 of 3)
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The r i ght l andi ng gear s af et y s wi t ch
normal l y cont rol s t he l ow pi t ch st op.
During the landing flare at idle power, the
propeller blade angle is at the flight low
pitch stop. Upon touchdown the squat
switch causes the propeller blade angle to
immediately decrease to the ground low
pitch stop. Decreasing to the ground low
pitch stop occurs because the ground low
pitch stop solenoid is energized after the
pri mary governor i s i n an underspeed
condi t i on. The sol enoi d pul l s a smal l
distance aft on the REVERSE lever. This,
in turn, pushes the beta valve aft to open.
Oil pressure increases to the propeller
dome. The propeller dome moves forward;
the blade angle decreases.
As the blade angle decreases, the propeller
dome pulls the polished rods, feedback
ri ng, REVERSE l ever, and beta val ve
forward. When the blade angle reaches
approximately 2, the beta valve has been
pulled far enough forward to cut off oil
pressure to the dome to stabilize the blade
angle at the ground low pitch stop.
Figure 7-40. King Air 350 Ground Idle Stop Electrical Circuit
As a backup for the right squat, a switch in
the power quadrant ensures the ground
low pitch stop solenoids are activated when
either or both power levers are lifted at
the IDLE gate. The propeller blade angle
remains at the ground low pitch stop until
the power lever is moved aft of the IDLE
gate. The PROP GOV TEST circuit breaker
on the right circuit breaker panel protects
the electric circuits of the ground low pitch
stop solenoids. After the solenoids are
energized, resistors reduce voltage to the
ground l ow pi t ch st op sol enoi d f rom
approximately 28 volts to approximately 14
volts. This ensures that excess heat does
not build up on the solenoids.
Propeller Resonance
To avoid propeller resonance, maintain the
propeller rpm above 1,050 or below 400
during ground operations. The most severe
resonance is in the range of 850 to 900 rpm.
It is especially severe with a quartering
tail wind. Sustained operation in this rpm
zone exposes the propeller to increased
resonance and stress.
OVERSPEED GOVERNOR
The overspeed governor (Fi gure 7-41)
provi des protecti on agai nst excessi ve
propel l er speed i f a pri mary governor
malfunctions. Because the PT6 propeller is
driven by a free turbine independent of
the engine compressor, overspeed can
occur rapidly, if a primary governor fails.
The overspeed governor is on the left side
of the propeller reduction gearbox.
Overspeed Governor Operation
The overspeed governor is set at approxi-
mately 1,768 rpm. Its operation is very
similar to that of the primary governor
with two major differences:
Pilot cannot select a particular speed
except when the overspeed governor
is tested
Overspeed governor only reduces oil
pressure to the propeller dome. Only
the primary governor can increase
oil pressure.
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Figure 7-41. Overspeed Governor Diagram
If a propeller overspeeds up to the value
of the overspeed governor, it is safe to
assume the blade angle is too low for the
amount of power applied to the propeller.
It is also assumed that the reason for the
low blade angle is too much oil pressure in
the propeller dome. If a propeller speed
reaches approxi matel y 1, 768 rpm, the
overspeed governors flyweights rotate fast
enough to overcome the preset speeder
spring tension. The flyweights move out
and, in turn, pull the overspeed governor
pilot valve up. This allows oil pressure to
be dumped from the propeller dome back
to the case to increase propeller blade angle
and slow the propeller down.
From a pilots point of view, a propeller
tachometer stabilized at approximately
1, 768 i ndi cates fai l ure of the pri mary
governor and proper operati on of the
overspeed governor.
Pre-Takeoff Check
For pre-takeoff check purposes, the set
point of this governor can be rescheduled
down to approximately 1,565 rpm with the
GOV test switch on the pilot left subpanel.
FUEL TOPPING GOVERNOR
The primary propeller governor contains
a fuel topping governor (FTG) that helps
protect against propeller overspeeding if
the primary or overspeed governors have
no effect on blade angle (e.g., a frozen
propeller hub assembly).
The FTG attempts to limit propeller speed
by limiting the amount of fuel flowing to
the fuel nozzl es. It reduces the P
3
ai r
pressure i n t he FCU. Thi s ul t i mat el y
reduces the power applied to the propeller
shaft and, hopefully, limits propeller rpm.
When the power lever is in the forward
thrust range, the value at which the FTG
attempts to limits propeller rpm is approx-
imately 106% of selected propeller rpm.
When the power lever is in the GROUND
FINE or REVERSE range, the value FTG
attempts to limit propeller rpm to approx-
imately 95% of selected propeller rpm.
This ensures that the primary governor
remains in an underspeed condition while
in the REVERSE range on the ground.
POWER LEVERS
The power levers (Figure 7-42) are on the
power lever quadrant (first two levers
on the left side) on the center pedestal.
They are mechani cal l y i nterconnected
through a cam box to the fuel control unit,
reverse l ever, beta val ve, and the fuel
topping governor.
The power l ever quadrant per mi t s
movement of t he power l ever i n t he
f or ward t hr us t range f rom I DLE t o
maximum thrust and in the GROUND
FINE or REVERSE range from IDLE to
maximum reverse. Gates in the power lever
quadrant at the IDLE and GROUND
FI NE pos i t i ons prevent i nadver t ent
movement of the lever into the GROUND
FINE or REVERSE range.
The pilot must lift the power levers up and
over these gates to select the GROUND
FINE or REVERSE range.
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Figure 7-42. Power Levers
The function of the power levers in the
forward thrust range i s to sel ect a gas
generator rpm through the FCU. The FCU
thens set a fuel flow that produces and
maintains the selected N
1
rpm.
In the GROUND FINE range, the power
lever is used to: (1) select a propeller blade
angle proportionate to the aft travel of the
lever, thus reducing residual propeller
t hrust , and (2) reset t he f uel t oppi ng
governor from its normal 106 percent to
approximately 95 % of selected propeller
r pm. N
1
r pm i s not af f ect ed i n t he
GROUND FINE range.
In the REVERSE range, the power lever
functions to (1) select a propeller blade
angle proportionate to the aft travel of the
lever, (2) select an N
1
that sustains the
selected reverse power, and (3) reset the
fuel topping governor from its normal 106
percent to approximately 95 percent of
selected propeller rpm.
Therefore, propeller rpm in the GROUND
FINE or REVERSE range is a function of
N
1
and power lever position. It may be
limited by the FTG acting through the FCU
t o l i mi t f uel f l ow and, consequent l y,
propeller rpm in relation to power lever
position.
PROPELLER CONTROL
LEVERS
Propeller rpm within the primary governor
range of 1,450 to 1,700 rpm is set by the
position of the propeller control levers
(Figure 7-43).
These l evers, one for each engi ne, are
between the power levers and the fuel
cutoff levers on the center pedestal. The full
forward position sets the primary governor
at 1,700 rpm. In the full aft position forward
of t he f eat heri ng det ent , t he pri mary
governor is set at 1,450 rpm. Intermediate
propeller rpm positions can be selected by
moving the propeller levers to select the
desired rpm as indicated on the propeller
t achomet er. Thes e t achomet er s read
directly in revolutions per minute.
A detent at the low rpm position has red
and white stripes across the lever slot to
prevent i nadvertent movement of the
propeller lever into the FEATHER detent.
PROPELLER FEATHERING
Move the propeller lever full aft into the
feather detent to feather the propeller.
This action opens the feathering dump
valve. All oil pressure quickly drains from
the propeller dome; the propeller feathers.
In this type of turbine engine, the propeller
shaft and N
1
shaft are not connected. Thus,
the propeller can be feathered with the
engine at idle power without damaging the
engine or gearbox.
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Figure 7-43. Propeller Control Levers
If the engine is shut down in cruise flight
without the autofeather system armed, the
propeller stays onspeed and in sync unless
it is manually feathered or all oil pressure
is lost.
At the feather position, the propeller lever
positions the feathering dump valve to
dump oil pressure from the propeller dome.
This allows the counterweights and springs
to position the propeller blades at the
feather position.
Autofeather System
The automatic feathering system provides
a means of immediately dumping oil from
t he propel l er dome. Thi s enabl es t he
feathering spring and counterweights to
feather the propeller blades if an engine
fails.
An AUTOFEATHER s wi t ch on t he
subpanel controls the system. When the
switch is in the ARM position (Figure 7-44),
the completion of the arming phase occurs
when both power l evers are advanced
above 88% N
1
and both torque indications
are above 17%. At this point, both the right
and left green AUTOFEATHER annunci-
ators indicate a fully armed system.
When the switch is in the ARM position, the
system is inoperative as long as either power
lever is retarded below 88% N
1
position.
Autofeather Operation
Autofeather is required to be operable for
all flights and armed for takeoff, climb, and
approach. Wi t h t he AUTOFEATHER
switch in the ARM position and starting
with both power levers above 88% N
1
as
well as both torque indications above 17%,
the feathering springs and counterweights
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Figure 7-44. Autofeather DiagramArmed
move the propeller blades for a particular
engine toward feather. This occurs after
the following occur:
Torque manifold oil pressure for that
engi ne dropped bel ow t he
t or quemet er val ue of 17%. Thi s
di s ar ms t he oppos i t e engi ne
aut of eat her el ect r i cal ci rcui t as
evidenced by its AUTOFEATHER
annunciator extinguishing.
Torque continues to drop below 10%.
Thi s f eat hers i t s propel l er and i s
evidenced by the extinguishing of its
AUTOFEATHER annunciator.
If the torque for the last operating engine
drops below 17% or either power lever is
retarded below 88% N
1
, the autofeather
system is completely disarmed.
When the AUTOFEATHER switch is in
the TEST position (Figure 7-45), it works
the same as above except:
Power levers do not have to be above
88% N
1
. However, both torque indica-
ti ons must start from above 17%,
preferably 22%, because the TEST
position on the switch bypasses both
power lever switches.
When an engine failure is simulated
with a power lever (Figure 7-46), the
associated annunciator flashes off and
on when the power lever is pulled to
IDLE because there is still idle power.
Autofeather SystemTest
The syst em may be t est ed as f ol l ows
(Figure 7-47):
1. Power LeversApproximately 22%
torque; 22% torque is a power setting
s uf f i ci ent t o s i mul at e nor mal
operation of both engines.
2. AUTOFEATHER SwitchHold to
TEST. This action completes a circuit
bypassing the 88% autofeather arming
switches inside the pedestal to allow
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Figure 7-45. Autofeather DiagramTest
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Figure 7-46. Autofeather DiagramLeft Engine Failure Armed
Figure 7-47. Autofeather Test Diagram (Right Engine)Low Power and Feathering
the test at power settings below the
normal operating range. Both yellow
caut i on AUTOFEATHER OFF
annunciators illuminate when switch
moved to TEST.
3. Power LeversSimulate engine-out
situations by retarding each engine
power lever individually. At approxi-
mat el y 17% t orque, t he
AUTOFEATHER OFF annunciator
extinguishes for the engine not being
ret arded. Thi s check veri f i es t he
autofeather system disarms itself on
the operative engine.
Conti nui ng to retard power l ever
results in initiation of the feathering
action at approximately 10% torque.
At thi s ti me the propel l er on the
simulated inoperative engine tries to
f eat her i ndi cat ed by a bl i nki ng
annunci ator l i ght and fl uctuati ng
torque. The AUTOFEATHER OFF
annunciators cycle on and off with
each fl uctuati on of torque as the
propeller moves in and out of feather.
4. Power LeversRetard both to IDLE.
Upon completion of Step 3 for each
power l ever, check that wi th both
l evers retarded whi l e hol di ng the
AUTO-FEATHER switch to TEST
neither propeller feathers. The loss of
both AUTOFEATHER OFF annunci-
ators verifies this disarming of both
s ys t ems due t o t he i nt ent i onal
reduction of power. Upon completion
of this test, arm the system for takeoff.
Then, with the condition levers in LOW
IDLE, propeller feathering (manual, as
compared to AUTOFEATHER) is checked.
In this free-turbine engine, the propeller
may be allowed to completely feather with
the compressor operating at LOW IDLE
wi t h no engi ne damage s us t ai ned.
Operation on the ground and in feather for
extended periods of time may overheat the
f us el age and pos s i bl y damage nos e-
mounted avionics because hot exhaust gases
are not being blown aft by the propellers
air blast.
Green AFX annunciators display in the
ITT torque indicator for each engine on
the MFD. Illumination of this annuncia-
tion indicates the respective system is armed
and that the power lever is advanced above
90% N
1
.
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SYNCHROPHASER
The propeller synchrophaser (Figure 7-48)
automatically matches the rpm of the two
propellers. It also maintains the blades of
one propeller at a predetermined relative
pos i t i on t o t he bl ades of t he ot her
propeller. It is not a designated master-
slave system because it functions to match
the rpm of the slower propeller to the faster
propel l er and establ i sh a bl ade phase
relationship between them. Its actions
reduce propeller beat from unsynchronized
propellers to minimize cabin noise.
The synchrophaser system is an electronic
system certified for use during all flight
operations including takeoff and landing.
The synchrophaser has a limited range of
aut hor i t y i n rel at i on t o t he pr i mar y
governor setting. The maximum increase
possible is approximately 20 rpm. In no
case does the rpm fall below that selected
by the propeller control lever. Normal
governor operati on i s unchanged; the
synchrophaser simply monitors propeller
r pm cont i nuous l y and res et s ei t her
governor as required.
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LH PROP
RH PROP
RH PRIMARY
GOVERNOR
LH PRIMARY
GOVERNOR
CONTROL
BOX
RPM AND PHASE RPM AND PHASE
ON
OFF
PROP SYNC
5A
Figure 7-48. Propeller Synchrophaser System
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7-52
Components
A magnet i c pi ckup adj acent t o each
propel l er s pi nner bul khead s ens es
propeller rpm and position. This magnetic
pickup transmits electrical pulses once per
revolution to a control box forward of
the pedestal.
The control box converts any pulse rate
differences into correction commands that
when t rans mi t t ed t o coi l s, cl os e t he
flyweights of each primary governor. By
varying coil voltage, the governor speed
settings are biased until the propeller rpms
exactly match.
A PROP SYNC pushbutton above and to
the left of the LDG GEAR CONTROL
turns the system on. When depressed, the
green ON legend illuminates.
Synchrophaser Operation
To operate the synchrophaser system,
synchronize the propellers manually or
establish a maximum of 20 rpm difference
between the propellers.
First turn the synchrophaser on. The system
may be on at all times unless a malfunction
is indicated. To change rpm with the system
on, adjust both propeller controls at the
same time.
If the synchrophaser is on but does not
adjust the propeller rpms to match, the
system has reached the end of its range.
Increase the setting of the slow propeller
or reduce the setting of the fast propeller
to bri ng the speeds wi thi n the l i mi ted
synchrophaser range. If preferred, turn the
synchrophaser switch off, resynchronize
manually, and turn the synchrophaser on.
In the synchrophaser off posi ti on, the
governors operate at the manual speed
settings selected by the pilot.
1. The minimum N
1
required to select
LOW IDLE on the condition lever
during engine start is:
A. 10%.
B. 12%
C. 14%.
D. 16%.
2. Overfilling the oil may cause:
A. Discharge until a satisfactory level
is reached.
B. Discharge until an unsatisfactory
level is reached.
C. Inconsistent propeller operation.
D. Inconsistent propeller operation
i n rever s e and ground f i ne
operation.
3. If the compressor bleed valve fails to
close as static take-off power is set,
t orque wi l l i ndi cat e ________ t han
normal and ITT will indicate _______
than normal.
A. Lower; lower
B. Higher; higher
C. Higher; lower
D. Lower; higher
4. The shaft horse power rating of 1,050
is a direct function of:
A. Torque only.
B. Propeller RPM only.
C. Torque and Propeller RPM.
D. Torque, RPM and exhaust thrust.
5. Igni t i on operat i on occurs duri ng
engine start and during operations of
_____________ or less when engine auto
ignition is ____________.
A. 17% torque; armed or off
B. 17% torque; armed
C. 70% N
1
; armed or off
D. 70% N
1
; armed
6. The minimum oil temperature limit
allowed for engine start is _____C.
A. 40
B. 30
C. 27
D. 0
7. The maximum allowed continuous ITT
for takeoff is _______C.
A. 750
B. 820
C. 850
D. 1000
8. The minimum allowed oil pressure for
idle is _______ PSI.
A. 60
B. 70
C. 80
D. 100
9. Oil temperatures between 99C and
110C are limited to _______ minutes.
A. Two
B. Four
C. Eight
D. Ten
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QUESTIONS
10. The maximum gas generator N
1
RPM
limit for takeoff is:
A. 100.
B. 104.
C. 106.
D. 168.
11. The first immediate action item for an
ENGINE FIRE OR FAILURE IN
FLIGHT is affected engine:
A. Prop Lever ...................FEATHER.
B. Condition Lever ....................FUEL
CUTOFF.
C. Generator ..................................OFF.
D. Starter Switch..STARTER ONLY.
12. The immediate action items for and
ENGI NE FAI LURE DURI NG
TAKEOFF (AT OR BELOW V
1
)
TAKEOFF ABORTED are:
A. Power Levers ....GROUND FINE.
B. Brakes .........................MAXIMUM.
C. Power Levers ....GROUND FINE,
Brakes .........................MAXIMUM,
ATC ....................................NOTIFY.
D. Power Levers ....GROUND FINE,
Brakes .........................MAXIMUM.
13. In order to select ground fine after
landing, the pilot:
A. Lifts the power lever and moves
them aft to the first gate.
B. Leaves the power lever at flight
idle position and ground fine is
automatically engaged.
C. Lifts the propeller levers over the
low RPM gate.
D. Engages the ground fine switch on
control yoke.
14. The propeller governor is scheduled to
control RPM between _______ RPM.
A. 10501450
B. 12501450
C. 14501700
D. 10501700
15. The autofeather system will feather
the i noperati ve engi nes propel l er
when the opposite engine torque drops
below:
A. 89% N
1
.
B. 69% N
1
.
C. 17% torque.
D. 10% torque.
16. The f uel t oppi ng governor l i mi t s
propel l er RPM i n fl i ght to _______
percent of selected RPM.
A. 96
B. 100
C. 104
D. 106
17. The over s peed gover nor l i mi t s
propeller RPM to a maximum of:
A. 1700.
B. 1768.
C. 1800.
D. 1876.
18. The maxi mum al l owed conti nuous
RPM for takeoff is _______ RPM.
A. 1500
B. 1600
C. 1700
D. 1768
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8-i
CHAPTER 8
FIRE PROTECTION
CONTENTS
Page
INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................... 8-1
GENERAL ........................................................................................................................... 8-1
FIRE DETECTION ........................................................................................................... 8-2
Components................................................................................................................... 8-2
Operation ....................................................................................................................... 8-3
FIRE EXTINGUISHING................................................................................................... 8-5
Components................................................................................................................... 8-5
Operation ....................................................................................................................... 8-6
Portable Extinguishers.................................................................................................. 8-7
QUESTIONS ........................................................................................................................ 8-9
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8-iii
ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Title Page
8-1 Engine Fire Detection System ............................................................................ 8-2
8-2 ENGINE FIRE Annunciators ........................................................................... 8-3
8-3 Engine Fire Detection System Simplified Schematic ....................................... 8-4
8-4 Fire-Extinguishing System ................................................................................... 8-5
8-5 EXTINGUISHER Annunciators ...................................................................... 8-6
8-6 Portable Fire-Extinguishers ................................................................................. 8-7
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INTRODUCTION
Fire detection and fire-extinguishing systems provide fire protection in both engine
compartments. Detection is automatic, but the crew must manually activate the
extinguishing system.
GENERAL
The Ki ng Ai r 350 has an engi ne f i re
detection system that automatically alerts
the crew if an engine fire or overtempera-
ture situation occurs.
The extinguishing system consists of a
cylinder with extingushant for the engine
exhaust area and the engine accessory area.
For a fi re i n the cabi n or cockpi t, two
portable fire extinguishers are available.
CHAPTER 8
FIRE PROTECTION
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FIRE DETECTION
An engine fire detection system provides
an immediate visual warning if a fire occurs
in either engine compartment.
COMPONENTS
Sensing Cable
The main element of the system is a temper-
ature sensor cable that loops continuously
around the engine and terminates in the
responder unit (Figure 8-1).
The cable consists of a hermetically sealed,
corrosion-resistant, stainless-steel outer
tube filled with an inert gas. The inner
hydride core is filled with an active gas.
NOTE
The fire sensor cable section in
the plenum chamber area is two
f eet l ong and i s not a f i re or
overheat zone. Activation temper-
ature in this zone is approximately
900F.
Figure 8-1. Engine Fire Detection System
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Responder Unit
The res ponder uni t i s i n t he engi ne
accessory area approximately at the 10
oclock position. The responder contains
two sets of contacts.
The integrity switch contacts are for the
cont i nui t y t es t f unct i ons of t he f i re
det ect i on ci rcui t ry. The al arm swi t ch
contacts complete the circuit to activate
the fire warning system.
Detection Pushbuttons
The fire lights are on the glareshield just
bel ow the warni ng annunci ator panel .
These guarded pushbuttons have spl i t
lenses (Figure 8-2).
They serve the dual function of monitoring
the firewall fuel valve position and provid-
ing a visual warning of an overtempera-
ture condition in either engine area.
The red top lens (L or R ENGINE FIRE
illuminates when the fire detector tube
senses an overtemperature condition. The
L or R ENGI NE FI RE) annunci at or
triggers the MASTER WARNING flasher.
The lower lens (L or R FW VALVE PUSH)
indicates position of the firewall fuel valve.
When the battery switch is on, this annunci-
ator can indicate three situations.
Annunciator extinguishedFirewall
fuel valve open
Annunciator illuminatedFirewall
fuel valve closed
Annunciator flashingFirewall valve
position does not agree with firewall
fuel valve switch position
OPERATION
For fire detection/protection purposes,
critical areas around the engine have been
divided into three zones;
Zone 1The accessory compartment
Zone 2The plenum chamber area
Zone 3The engine exhaust area
The fire detector is preset at the factory to
activate the alarm when any of the follow-
ing conditions occur:
Any one-foot section of tube heated
to 800F
Average temperature of entire tube
reaches 360F
Temperature in accessory compart-
ment reaches 545F
Temperature in hot section compart-
ment reaches 540F
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Figure 8-2. ENGINE FIRE Annunciators
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If a fire or overtemperature occurs, the
t emperat ure around t he s ens or t ube
increases. The gases within the tube begin
to expand. When pressure from the expand-
ing gases reach a factory preset point, the
contacts of the responder alarm switch
close (Figure 8-3).
Si gnal s f rom each responder uni t are
transmi tted to a pri nted ci rcui t board
forward of the main spar underneath the
center aisle floor. From the printed circuit
board, the signal is routed to illuminate
the appropriate red L or R ENGINE FIRE
annunciator (Figure 8-3).
The MASTER WARNING annunciators
flash. A red annunciation of FIRE appears
on the MFD in the appropriate engines
TORQUE indicator.
Fire Detection System Test
Two ENG FIRE TEST toggle switches on
the copilot left subpanel test the integrity
of the fire detection system. The switches
have three positions: DETOFFEXT.
When either switch is placed in the DET
position, electrical current flows from a 5-
amp RIGHT or LEFT FIRE DET circuit
breaker on the right CB panel. The current
then flows through the engine fire detector
circuitry to activate the red L or R ENG
FIRE light. The MASTER WARNING
annunciators also flash.
In addition, a red annunciation of FIRE is
visible on the MFD in the ITT/TORQUE
indicator for the appropriate engine.
If either annunciator fails to illuminate
during the test for that side, a malfunction
wi t h t he sensor t ube, responder uni t ,
annunciator, or electrical portion of the
system is indicated. The malfunction must
be corrected prior to flight.
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Figure 8-3. Engine Fire Detection System Simplied Schematic
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The gases within the tubes form a pressure
barrier to keep the contacts of the respon-
der integrity switch closed for the test.
FIRE EXTINGUISHING
The aircraft contains a fire extinguishing
system and two portable fire extinguishers.
COMPONENTS
Extinguishing Cylinder
A fire extinguisher supply container is
mounted on brackets aft of the main spar
in each wheel well of each main landing
gear (Figure 8-4). Each cylinder is charged
wi t h 2. 50 pounds of bromot r i f l uo-
romethane (CBrF3) pressurized to 450 to
475 psi at 72F.
The line from the container runs along the
side of the nacelle and branches into eight
spray tubes strategically located about the
engine to diffuse the extinguishing agent.
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
Figure 8-4. Fire-Extinguishing System
Four of the nozzl es di scharge i nto the
engi ne exhaus t area. The ot her f our
discharge into the accessory area. Once
activated, the entire supply of extinguish-
ing agent is discharged for that side.
The cyl i nder al s o has a pyrot echni c
cartridge that discharges the extinguishant.
Extinguisher Pushbuttons
The EXTINGUISHER pushbuttons on the
glareshield activate the system (Figure
8-5). This guarded pushbutton is safetied.
A 5-amp RIGHT or LEFT ENG FIRE EXT
circuit breaker on the FUEL SYSTEM CB
panel powers the appropriate switch. The
push-to-activate pushbuttons have two
indicator lights: red EXTINGUISHER
PUSH and amber DISCHARGED.
The red EXTINGUISHER PUSH portion
indicates an electrical circuit from the FW
VALVE CLOSED pus hbut t on i n t he
detecti on system to the exti ngui shi ng
system is complete.
The DISCHARGED portion indicates the
pyrotechnic cartridge in the container has
been discharged.
OPERATION
Il l umi nat i on of ei t her of ENG FIRE
annunciators and a red annunciation of
FIRE i n t he ITT/ TORQUE i ndi cat or
indicate a fire or overheat condition in that
particular engine.
Lifting the plastic guard of the ENG FIRE
switch and depressing the lens illuminates
t he FW VALVE PUSH l ens and t he
EXTIN-GUISHER PUSH annunciator.
Illumination of the CLOSED annunciator
indicates the firewall valve for that side is
now closed. The extinguisher for that side
is armed.
To discharge the extinguisher, raise the
guard of the EXTINGUISHER PUSH
annunciator and depress the switch. This
completely discharges the appropriate fire
ext i ngui s her cyl i nder. The amber
DISCHARGED annunciator illuminates.
The DISCHARGED annunciator remains
illuminated regardless of battery switch
posi t i on unt i l t he expended cyl i nder
is replaced.
Fire Extinguisher System Test
The ENG FIRE TEST toggle switches on
the copi l ot l eft subpanel al so test the
functions of the fire extinguishing system.
When either switch is placed in the EXT
position, a circuit completes from the 5-
amp circuit breaker on the battery bus
through the following:
EXT test switch
EXTINGUISHER PUSH annunciator
Cartridge on the container
Ground
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Figure 8-5. EXTINGUISHER Annunciators
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Il l umi nati on of the EXTINGUISHER
PUSH annunciator indicates the cartridge
circuit is in good order. The test also checks
the cartri dge sensor for that si de. The
DISCHARGED annunciator should also
i l l umi nate to i ndi cate the sensor i s i n
good order.
Failure of either annunciator to illuminate
on a particular side indicates a malfunction
of the engine fire extinguisher system. The
mal f unct i on mus t be cor rect ed pr i or
to flight.
PORTABLE EXTINGUISHERS
Two portable fire extinguishers are in the
aircraft. One extinguisher is in the aft cabin
on the lower side of the door frame. The
other extinguisher is in the cockpit on the
bottom of the co-pilot seat (Figure 8-6).
Both extinguishers are mounted on red
quick-release brackets.
The portable extinguishers contain two
pounds of 1211 extinguishing agent and
100 psi of ni trogen for pressuri zati on.
Halon 1211 is a chemical agent effective
agai ns t combus t i bl e f i res ( Cl as s A) ,
f l ammabl e l i qui d f i res (Cl ass B), and
electrical fires (Class C). The smaller size
extinguishers do not contain enough agent
to qualify for a Class A rating.
The bottles have hand-operated actuating
valves. The portable extinguishers may be
recharged at l ocal l y approved f i re
equipment service shops.
Hal on 1211 or bromochl orodi f l uo-
romethane is in a liquefied gas state while
cont ai ned under pres s ure i n t he f i re
exti ngui sher. Upon rel ease, the l i qui d
quickly turns to a vapor that dissipates into
the air and leaves no residue to clean up.
As it changes from liquid to vapor, a rapid
temperature drop to below freezing occurs.
Do not direct the discharge at exposed skin
or eyes. When used on fires of intense heat,
decomposition of the Halon 1211 vapor
may be accompanied by a sharp acrid odor.
This odor warns the operator of excessive
exposure to the products of combustion
and to take evasive action.
Liquefied Halon 1211 can cause
f rost bi t e. Avoi d cont act wi t h
exposed skin or eyes. High concen-
t rat i ons can produce t oxi c by
products when appl i ed to fi re.
Avoi d i nhal at i on of t he by-
product s by evacuat i ng and
ventilating the area. Do not use in
confined space with less than 311
cubic feet per extinguisher.
WARNING
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
Figure 8-6. Portable Fire-Extinguishers
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
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1, Engine fire detection and extinguish-
ing is available when the battery bus
switch is selected to _________ and the
battery switch to __________.
A. EMERG OFF; OFF
B. EMERG OFF; ON
C. NORM; OFF
D. NORM; ON
2. Engine fire extinguishing is available
for the engine:
A. Compartment.
B. Compartment and wheel well.
C. Compartment and wing locker (if
installed).
D. Compartment, wheel well, and wing
locker (if installed).
3. With the hot battery bus powered, an
engi ne f i re ext i ngui s her may be
discharged:
A. Anyti me by depressi ng the fi re
extinguisher discharge switch.
B. After arming the switch by depress-
ing either firewall fuel valve shutoff
switch.
C. After arming the on-side switch
and closing the firewall fuel valve.
D. Af t er depres s i ng t he on- s i de
firewall fuel valve switch.
4. The f i r s t i mmedi at e act i on f or
ENVI RONMENTAL SYSTEM
SMOKE OR FUMES is:
A. Oxygen Mask(s) ......................DON
B. Land ................................NEAREST
SUITABLE AIRPORT
C. Passenger Manual
Drop Out .........................PULL ON
D. Descend ...............AS REQUIRED
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9-i
CHAPTER 9
PNEUMATICS
CONTENTS
Page
INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................... 9-1
GENERAL ........................................................................................................................... 9-1
Controls and Indications .............................................................................................. 9-2
OPERATION....................................................................................................................... 9-3
Pneumatic....................................................................................................................... 9-3
Vacuum........................................................................................................................... 9-5
SYSTEM USERS.................................................................................................................. 9-5
Engine Bleed-Air Warning System............................................................................. 9-5
Cabin Windows/Cockpit Side Window Defogging................................................... 9-7
Hydraulic Fill Can Pressure......................................................................................... 9-7
QUESTIONS ........................................................................................................................ 9-9
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9-iii
ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Title Page
9-1 BLEED AIR VALVE Switches .......................................................................... 9-2
9-2 Pneumatic Pressure Gages ................................................................................... 9-3
9-3 Pneumatic System Diagram................................................................................. 9-4
9-4 Bleed-Air Warning System Diagram.................................................................. 9-5
9-5 Bleed-Air Warning Plastic Tubing ...................................................................... 9-6
9-6 L/R BLEED FAIL Annunciator......................................................................... 9-6
9-7 Cabin Windows/Cockpit Side Windows Defogging.......................................... 9-7
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INTRODUCTION
The aircraft pneumatic and vacuum systems accomplish many small but important
tasks. This chapter presents a description of those tasks along with bleed air
sources, indications, and normal and abnormal operations.
GENERAL
Hi gh-pressure P
3
bl eed ai r from each
engine compressor is routed through the
normally-open, firewall-mounted shutoff
valves into the fuselage. The bleed air then
is regulated to 18 psi to supply pressure for
t he pneumat i c s ys t em and provi de a
vacuum source. Vacuum is derived from a
bleed air ejector.
The pneumatic system supports the following:
Flight hour meter
Brake deice (see Chapter 10)
Bleed air warning
Window defogging
Hydraulic fill can pressure
CHAPTER 9
PNEUMATICS
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In addition, pneumatic pressure creates a
vacuum source for the air-driven gyros,
pressurization control, and deflation of the
deice boots.
One engi ne nor mal l y can s uppl y
sufficient bleed air for all pneumatic and
vacuum systems. Duri ng si ngl e-engi ne
operation, a check valve in the bleed air line
from each engine prevents pressure loss
back t hrough t he s uppl y l i ne on t he
inoperative engine.
CONTROLS AND INDICATIONS
Switches
Two BLEED AIR VALVE switches (Figure
9-1) control bleed air entering the cabin for
pressurization and environmental functions
(refer to Chapters 11 and 12 for details).
When t he s wi t ches are i n t he OPEN
position, both environmental flow control
valves and pneumatic instrument air valves
are open. When the switches are in the
ENVIR OFF position, the environmental
f l ow cont rol val ves cl os e whi l e t he
pneumatic instrument air valves remain
open. I n t he PNEU & ENVI R OFF
position, all valves are closed.
Gages
A pneumatic pressure gage on the copilot
ri ght subpanel i ndi cat es ai r pressure
available to the pneumatic manifold in
pounds per square inch (Figure 9-2).
Figure 9-1. BLEED AIR VALVE Switches
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To the left of the pressure gage is a suction
gage calibrated in inches of mercury that
indicates instrument vacuum.
Below these two is the hour meter.
OPERATION
PNEUMATIC
P
3
bleed air at 90 to 120 psi pressure from
both engines flows through pneumatic lines
to a tee junction in the fuselage. Check
valves prevent reverse flow during single-
engine operation.
Downstream from the tee, the P
3
air passes
through an 18 psi regulator. The regulator
has a relief valve set to operate at 21 psi in
case of failure.
Bleed air extracted from the fourth stage
of the engine compressor is at a maximum
temperature of approximately 700F. By
the time it reaches the tee in the fuselage,
heat transfer in the pneumatic plumbing
cools the airflow to approximately 70
above ambient temperature.
This regulated pneumatic air (Figure 9-3):
Suppl i es pres s ure t o i nf l at e t he
surface deicers
Operates the flight hour meter and
bleed air failure warning system
Provides pressure to the hydraulic
system
Provides flow for vacuum ejector
Ordinarily, the pneumatic system pressure
regulator under the right seat deck immedi-
ately forward of the main spar provides 18
1 psi with the engine running at 70% to
80% N
1
. The pneumati c pressure gage
allows the crew to monitor system pressure.
Figure 9-2. Pneumatic Pressure Gages
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LEGEND
HIGH PRESSURE BLEED AIR
REGULATED BLEED AIR
VACUUM
DEICE
DISTRIBUTOR
VALVE
PRESSURE
SWITCH
RIGHT
SQUAT
SWITCH
TO PNEUMATIC
PRESSURE GAGE
(IN COCKPIT)
AIRSTAIR
DOOR SEAL
LINE
LANDING GEAR
HYDRAULIC
FILL CAN
LEFT
SQUAT
SWITCH
CLOSED ON
GROUND
(NO)
EXHAUST
OVERBOARD
EJECTOR
TO
DEICE
BOOTS
PRESSURATION
CONTROLLER,
OUTFLOW AND
SAFETY VALVES
GYRO
INSTRUMENTS
(PRIOR TO
PROLINE 21)
VACUUM
REGULATOR
TO GYRO
SUCTION
(IN COCKPIT)
18 PSI
PRESSURE
REGULATOR
WINDOW
DEFOGGING
REGULATOR
CHECK VALVE CHECK VALVE
CABIN AND
COCKPIT
SIDE WINDOWS
LEFT
P
3
AIR
RIGHT
P
3
AIR
RIGHT BLEED-AIR WARNING SYSTEM LEFT BLEED-AIR WARNING SYSTEM
PNEUMATIC
AIR VALVE
(NO)
PNEUMATIC
AIR VALVE
(NO)
LEFT BRAKE
DEICE
VALVE
(NC)
RIGHT BRAKE
DEICE
VALVE
(NC)
FLIGHT
HOURS
GAGE
Figure 9-3. Pneumatic System Diagram
VACUUM
Vacuum is obtained from pneumatic air
passing through the vacuum ejector.
The ejector is a pressure line that constricts
to form a venturi. At the apex or point of
lowest pressure, the vacuum line is attached.
As P
3
air passes through the ejector, it
draws air from the attached vacuum line to
create suction for the vacuum system.
The ejector is capable of supplying from 15
inches of mercury (in. Hg) vacuum at sea
level to 6 in. Hg vacuum at 31,000 feet.
The vacuum s ys t em s uppl i es vacuum
regulated 4.3 to 5.9 in. Hg for the deice
boots, air-driven gyro instruments, and
pressurization control system.
Even wi th one engi ne runni ng at 70%
to 80% N
1
, the vacuum gage normally reads
approxi mat el y 5. 9( +0, - 0. 2) i n. Hg at
sea level.
The vacuum line for the instruments is
routed through a regulator that maintains
sufficient vacuum for proper operation of
the instruments.
The vacuum regul at or i s i n t he nos e
compartment on the left side of the pressure
bul khead. A f oam f i l t er f or t he val ve
provides a filtered and sheltered air source
for the air-driven gyros.
SYSTEM USERS
ENGINE BLEED-AIR WARNING
SYSTEM
The engi ne bl eed- ai r warni ng syst em
visually warns the crew of a rupture in
the bleed air lines. This allows the crew to
shut off the affected bleed air valves before
heat from the escaping air damages the
skin and structure adjacent to the break
(Figure 9-4).
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PNEUMATIC BLEED-AIR LINES
ENVIRONMENTAL BLEED-AIR LINES
BLEED-AIR WARNING LINES
ENGINE P
3
BLEED-AIR
CONNECTOR
ENGINE P
3
BLEED-AIR
CONNECTOR
ENVIRONMENTAL
BLEED-AIR
SHUTOFF VALVE
ENVIRONMENTAL
BLEED-AIR
SHUTOFF VALVE
AMBIENT
AIR
AMBIENT AIR
PNEUMATIC
BLEED-AIR
SHUTOFF
VALVE
PNEUMATIC
BLEED-AIR
SHUTOFF
VALVE
ENGINE
FIREWALL
ENGINE
FIREWALL
PLUGS
WHEEL
WELL
18 PSI PRESSURE REGULATOR
PRESSURE
SWITCHES
PLUGS
WHEEL
WELL
PLUGS
Figure 9-4. Bleed-Air Warning System Diagram
EVA Tubes
Ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) tubes are in
cl ose proxi mi t y t o t he bl eed ai r l i nes
(environmental and pneumatic) leading
from the engines to the cabin. Pneumatic air
at 18 psi tapped off from the pneumatic
manifold pressurizes these tubes.
Pressure Switches
The system has two pressure switches, one
for each side, mounted under the cockpit
f l oorboard. A rupt ured bl eed ai r l i ne
produces excessi ve heat on the tubi ng
(Figure 9-5).
When the tubing melts, the air escapes and
pressure inside the tubing decreases. When
it drops below 2 psi, the normally-closed
switch in the line closes to complete a circuit
to the respective L BLEED FAIL and R
BLEED FAIL annunciator in the warning
panel (Figure 9-6).
Corrective Action
When the indication of a bleed air failure
becomes evident, turn off all bleed air for
that side by placing the respective BLEED
AIR VALVE switch in the PNEU & ENVIR
OFF posi t i on. Wi t h t he swi t ch i n t hi s
pos i t i on, bot h envi ronment al and
pneumatic shutoff valves close. This stops
bleed air flow at the engine firewall.
Next place the ECS switch in MAN HEAT
position. Hold the TEMP switch in decrease
position for 30 seconds. Then increase to
maintain cabin/cockpit temperature.
This action does not extinguish the BL AIR
FAIL annunciator.
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Figure 9-5. Bleed-Air Warning Plastic
Tubing
Figure 9-6. L/R BLEED FAIL Annunciator
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CABIN WINDOWS/COCKPIT
SIDE WINDOW DEFOGGING
Engine bleed air provides defogging for
t he cabi n wi ndows and cockpi t s i de
windows when one or both engines are
running (Figure 9-7). Bleed air tubes direct
bleed air directly onto the windows. The
WINDOW DEFOG switch on the copilot
subpanel controls this function. Refer to
Chapter 10.
A pressure regulator mounted under the
floorboard regulates the bleed air pressure.
From the regulator, the air flows to the
right of center and forward where the air
lines divide. At this point, part of the air
flows to the sides of the aircraft and up
the sidewall to just below the windows
where it tees and runs fore and aft under
the cabin windows.
Beneat h each cabi n wi ndow t here i s
another tee in the system that delivers the
air to the inside surface of the exterior
window through two tubes.
Caut i on mus t be us ed when
removi ng or i ns t al l i ng t he
emergency exi t s t o avoi d
damaging the bleed air lines. Make
certai n the bl eed ai r l i nes are
proper l y connect ed when
installing the hatches.
Air for the cockpit side windows is routed
forward from the pressure regulator to the
cockpit below the floorboard. At this point
the line tees, running to the sides of the
aircraft and up the sidewall to the windows.
The warm dry air is then directed to the
inside surface of the windows through a
manifold in the window frame.
HYDRAULIC FILL CAN
PRESSURE
Pneumatic air pressure is injected into the
landing gear hydraulic fill can. It provides
pos i t i ve pres s ure t o t he res er voi r t o
minimize vaporization of hydraulic fluid.
I t al s o provi des pos i t i ve f eed t o t he
hydraulic pump.
When t he engi nes are shut down, t he
pneumatic pressure in the hydraulic fill
bleeds off through a small orifice.
CAUTION
Figure 9-7. Cabin Windows/Cockpit
Side Windows Defogging
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
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1. Regulated pneumatic air pressure is
used to:
A. Deice the brakes.
B. Inflate the deice boots.
C. Operate the air conditioner.
D. Heat the aft cabin.
2. After selecting the bleed air valve to
pneumatic and environmental off after
i l l umi nat i on of a s i ngl e [ L or R
BLEED FAIL] red master warning
annunciator, the annunciator will:
A. Extinguish.
B. Remain illuminated.
C. Extinguish provided the opposite
system is functioning properly.
D. Remain illuminated if the system
continues to detect an overheat
condition.
3. Vacuum air is provided for:
A. Door seal inflation.
B. Flight hour meter operation.
C. Cross bleed engine starts.
D. Wing deice boot hold-down.
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CHAPTER 10
ICE AND RAIN PROTECTION
CONTENTS
Page
INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................. 10-1
GENERAL......................................................................................................................... 10-1
Controls........................................................................................................................ 10-2
ENGINE PROTECTION................................................................................................. 10-4
Engine Air Inlet .......................................................................................................... 10-4
Inertial Separators ...................................................................................................... 10-5
Auto-Ignition System.................................................................................................. 10-7
SURFACE DEICE............................................................................................................ 10-8
Components................................................................................................................. 10-8
Operation................................................................................................................... 10-10
BRAKE DEICE SYSTEM............................................................................................. 10-10
Components .............................................................................................................. 10-10
Operation................................................................................................................... 10-11
PROPELLER DEICE ................................................................................................... 10-12
Operation................................................................................................................... 10-13
WINDSHIELD ANTI-ICE............................................................................................ 10-14
Components .............................................................................................................. 10-14
Operation................................................................................................................... 10-15
Windshield Wipers ................................................................................................... 10-18
WINDOW DEFOGGING............................................................................................. 10-18
Cabin Windows ......................................................................................................... 10-18
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Cockpit Side Windows ............................................................................................. 10-19
FUEL SYSTEM ANTI-ICE........................................................................................... 10-19
Heated Vents ............................................................................................................. 10-20
Heat Exchanger ........................................................................................................ 10-20
ELECTRICAL HEATING ........................................................................................... 10-20
Pitot Heat .................................................................................................................. 10-20
Stall Warning Vane ................................................................................................... 10-21
PRECAUTIONS DURING ICING CONDITIONS ................................................. 10-22
Exterior Inspection................................................................................................... 10-22
Before Taxi................................................................................................................. 10-23
QUESTIONS.................................................................................................................... 10-25
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ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Title Page
10-1 King Air 350 Anti-Icing and Deicing Components ........................................ 10-2
10-2 Ice and Rain Protection Controls ..................................................................... 10-3
10-3 Engine Inlet Lip Heat......................................................................................... 10-4
10-4 Inertial Separator ................................................................................................ 10-5
10-5 Ice Vane Controls ................................................................................................ 10-6
10-6 Caution Annunciators......................................................................................... 10-6
10-7 Auto-Ignition Switches ....................................................................................... 10-7
10-8 Surface Deice Boot Installation ........................................................................ 10-8
10-9 Surface Deice System Diagram......................................................................... 10-9
10-10 Brake Deice ....................................................................................................... 10-10
10-11 Brake Deice Controls ....................................................................................... 10-11
10-12 Brake Deice Schematic (System On) ............................................................. 10-11
10-13 Propeller Deice Boots ...................................................................................... 10-12
10-14 Propeller Deice System.................................................................................... 10-13
10-15 Windshield Anti-Ice Switches.......................................................................... 10-15
10-16 Windshield Anti-Ice DiagramNormal Heat .............................................. 10-16
10-17 Windshield Anti-Ice DiagramHigh Heat ................................................... 10-17
10-18 Windshield Wiper.............................................................................................. 10-18
10-19 Fuel System Anti-Ice ........................................................................................ 10-19
10-20 Pitot Mast and Heat Controls ......................................................................... 10-20
10-21 Stall Warning Vane and Heat Control ............................................................ 10-21
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INTRODUCTION
The King Air 350 is FAA approved for flight in known icing conditions when the
required equipment is installed and operational. The Kinds of Operations Equipment
List in the Limitations section of the Pilots Operating Handbook lists the necessary
equipment. Flight in known icing conditions requires knowledge of conditions
conducive to icing as well as knowledge of the aircraft anti-ice and deice systems
that prevent excessive ice from forming. This chapter identifies these systems
and controls.
GENERAL
The aircraft has a variety of ice and rain
prot ect i on s ys t ems f or operat i on i n
inclement weather conditions. These include
(Figure 10-1):
Engine Inlet Lip Heat
Inertial Separators (Ice Vanes)
Auto-Ignition
Windshield Anti-Ice
Windshield Wipers
Side Window Defog
Propeller Deice
CHAPTER 10
ICE AND RAIN PROTECTION
Fuel System Anti-Ice
Pitot Heat
Stall Warning Heat
Surface Deice (Leading-Edge Boots)
Brake Deice (Optional)
Engine bleed is available for the leading
edge lip of the engine air inlet, wings,
horizontal stabilizer, window defogging,
and brake deice.
Electrical heating elements protect the
pitot masts, windshield, stall warning vane,
and fuel vent. An inertial separation system
with electric motors and actuators provide
engine ice protection.
Electrothermal boots on each blade protect
the propellers against icing.
An oi l - t o- f uel heat exchanger warms
the fuel prior to its entrance to the fuel
control unit.
An auto-ignition system ensures positive
engine ignition during turbulence or penetra-
tion into icing or percipitations conditions.
And, finally, heavy-duty windshield wipers
for both the pilot and copilot increase
visibility during rainy flight conditions.
CONTROLS
Crew cont rol s f or t he i ce prot ect i on
features are on the pilot subpanel. These
control panels include the following (Figure
10-2):
ENGINE ANTI-ICE
ICE PROTECTION
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Figure 10-1. King Air 350 Anti-Icing and Deicing Components
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Figure 10-2. Ice and Rain Protection Controls
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ENG AUTO IGNITION
The control knob for the windshield wipers
is on the overhead panel.
ENGINE PROTECTION
ENGINE AIR INLET
Hot exhaust gases prevent ice formation
around the lips of both engine cowling air
inlets (Figure 10-3).
A scoop in the left engine exhaust stack
deflects a small portion of the hot exhaust
gases downward into the hollow lip tube
that encircles the air inlet. The gases are
expelled into the right exhaust stack where
they move out with the engine exhaust
gases. No pilot action is necessary. Engine
exhaust air flows through the inlet heat
duct whenever the engine is running.
Figure 10-3. Engine Inlet Lip Heat
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INERTIAL SEPARATORS
An i nerti al separati on system i n each
engine air inlet prevents moisture from
entering the inlet plenum during freezing
conditions. The system consists of two
electrically actuated movable vanes.
I n nor mal operat i on, t he vanes are
positioned with the forward vane retracted
(up) and the aft vane extended (down) to
direct all incoming air into the engine air
plenum (Figure 10-4).
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
FORWARD ICE
VANE
INDUCTION
AIR
INLET LIP
ANTI-ICE
OIL COOLER INLET
OIL
COOLER
BYPASS
DUCT
BYPASS
DOOR
Figure 10-4. Inertial Separator
Components
An electrically operated linear actuator
simultaneously positions the vanes for each
engine through a linkage system. The actuator
t ravel i s maxi mum i n t he di rect i on
commanded; it has no intermediate positions.
The actuator is a primary and secondary
motor with a single actuator rod assembly.
The primary motor normally drives the
system. If a mal functi on occurs i n the
pri mary mot or, t he secondary mot or
provi des power. The mot or s are
interchangeable. The only difference is
their power source.
The triple-fed bus powers the primary
motor while the corresponding generator
bus powers the secondary motor.
Shoul d t he act uat or pr i mar y
motor malfunction, the cause must
be det ermi ned and correct ed
before the next flight.
Controls and Indicators
The L and R ENG ANTI-ICE switches on
the left outboard subpanel energize the
primary motor actuators (Figure 10-5). The
ACTUATORS s wi t ches bel ow t hem
energize the primary (MAIN position) or
secondary system (STANDBY position).
A posi ti on sense swi tch on each vane
linkage illuminates the green advisory L or
R ENG ANTI-ICE annunci ator i n the
caution/ advisory annunciator panel when
the ENGINE ANTI-ICE switches are in
the ON position (Figure 10-6).
CAUTION
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Figure 10-5. Ice Vane Controls
Figure 10-6. Caution Annunciators
When the ENGINE ANTI-ICE switches
are activated, a second position sense
swi t ch on each f orward vane l i nkage
energizes a 30 to 40 second time delay
circuit. If full vane extension is not attained
in this time, the yellow caution L and/or R
ENG ICE FAIL annunciator illuminates.
This indicates a fault in the primary motor
of the designated actuator.
To complete vane extension and extinguish
the yellow annunciator, place the appropri-
ate ACTUATORS switch to STANDBY.
When the ENGINE ANTI-ICE switches
are in the OFF position, the actuators move
in the opposite direction to return the
vanes to non-icing position. The green
annunciators extinguish.
Operation
Extend the inertial separators (ice vanes)
whenever there is visible moisture at ambient
temperatures of +5C or below. When the ice
vanes are extended, the green ENGINE
ANTI-ICE annunciators illuminate.
Because the airflow into the engine is now
restri cted, there may be a decrease i n
torque and a slight increase in ITT. Expect
a decrease in overall cruise performance
with vanes extended. When the vane doors
retract, the annunciators extinguish; ITT
and torque is restored.
Limitation
ENGINE ANTI-ICE shal l be OFF for
takeoff operations in ambient tempera-
tures of and above +10C.
AUTO-IGNITION SYSTEM
The engine auto-ignition system provides
el ectri cal power to the i gni ters i n the
event of an engi ne power l os s. The
system must be armed during periods of
turbulence and penetration of icing or
precipitation conditions.
The ENG AUTO IGN switches above the
ENGINE ANTI-ICE switches control the
system. In the ARM position, auto-ignition
aut omat i cal l y at t empt s t o rei gni t e
the engine if an engine flameout occurs
(Figure 10-7).
Operation
With the system armed, electrical power
energizes the engine igniters if engine
torque falls below approximately 17% for
any reason.
I f t hi s occur s, t he green advi s or y
I GNI TI ON ON annunci at or on t he
caution/advisory panel illuminates.
Duri ng ground operati ons, ensure the
switches are in the OFF position to prolong
igniter life.
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Figure 10-7. Auto-Ignition Switches
SURFACE DEICE
Pneumatic inflatable boots break off ice
that collects on the leading edge of the
wings and horizontal stabilizer (Figure 10-
8). Alternately inflating and deflating the
deice boots accomplishes the ice removal.
Pneumatic system pressure inflates the
boots; system vacuum deflates the boots
and holds them down while not in use. A
deice distributor valve controls the cycle.
COMPONENTS
Deice Boots
Each wing has an inboard and an outboard
boot. The horizontal stabilizer has one
boot on each of the left and right segments.
The vertical stabilizer is not deiced because
no adverse effects from icing were found
during certification.
Control Switch
A three-position SURFACE DEICE toggle
switch on the ICE PROTECTION panel
actuates the deicer system (Figure 10-9).
The switch is spring-loaded to return to
t he OFF pos i t i on f rom ei t her t he
MANUAL or SINGLE position. When the
switch is pushed to the SINGLE position,
one complete cycle of deicer operation
automatically follows as the distributor
valve opens to inflate the deicer boots.
After an inflation period of approximately
six seconds for the wings and four seconds
for the horizontal stabilizer, a timer relay
switches the distributor valve off (vacuum)
for deflation of the boots. Total cycle time
is approximately 10 seconds.
When t he s wi t ch i s pus hed t o t he
MANUAL position, all the boots inflate.
They hold in the inflated position as long
as the switch is held in position. Upon
release of the switch, the distributor valve
returns to the OFF position. The deicer
boots remain deflated until the switch is
actuated again.
Pressure Switches/
Annunciators
Two pressure sensing switches, one for each
wing, monitor deice boot pressure. When
both switches sense 1415 psi wing deice
boot pressure, the green advisory WING
DEICE annunciator illuminates to signal
boots are inflated.
A third pressure switch senses tail deice
boot pressure. It illuminates the green
TAIL DEICE annunciator when it senses
1415 psi tail deice boot pressure.
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Figure 10-8. Surface Deice Boot
Installation
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Figure 10-9. Surface Deice System Diagram
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OPERATION
Wing ice lights aid the crew in detecting ice
formation on the wing leading edge. The
lights are on the outboard side of each
engine nacelle. A 5-amp WING ICE circuit
breaker s wi t ch on t he pi l ot i nboard
subpanel controls the light.
Use the wing ice light to check accumulation.
For most effective deicing operation, allow
at least 1/2 inch, but no more than one inch,
of ice to form before attempting ice removal.
Very thin ice may crack and cling to the
boots instead of shedding. Subsequent
cyclings of the boots then have a tendency
to build a shell of ice outside the contour
of the inflated boot. This makes ice removal
efforts ineffective.
If ice is allowed to build to a depth greater
than one inch, removal with the deice boots
may be impossible.
Electrical Power
The distributor valve requires electrical
power to inflate the boots in either single-
cycle or manual operation. If power is lost,
vacuum holds them against the leading
edge surfaces.
The t ri pl e- f ed bus powers t he SURF
DEICE circuit breaker on the copilot CB
sidepanel to supply electrical power.
BRAKE DEICE SYSTEM
The brake deice system prevents ice and
slush build-up between the wheels. This
build-up freezes the brakes. The pneumatic
system supplies bleed air from the compres-
sor of each engine for brake deicing.
COMPONENTS
A pneumatic line on the outboard side of
each nacelle carries the engine P3 air to a
shutoff valve.
The normally closed solenoid shutoff valve
in each wheel well allows hot bleed air to
enter the brake deice lines. An electrically
powered module controls the shutoff valve.
The modul e i s under t he cent er ai sl e
floorboard immediately aft of the partition
between the cockpit and cabin.
When the shutoff valves open, a signal
illuminates the green advisory L and R
BRAKE DEICE ON annunciators on the
advisory panel.
A distributor manifold attached to the
brake piston and axle assembly directs the
heated air through orifices around each
ri ng of t he mani f ol d ont o t he brakes
(Figure 10-10).
Figure 10-10. Brake Deice
OPERATION
The BRAKE DEICE lever switch on the
pilot right subpanel controls the brake deice
operation (Figure 10-11).
When the switch is up, the right generator
bus supplies power through a 5-ampere
circuit breaker in the copilot sidepanel to
the control module.
The module supplies current to open the
shutoff valves so hot bleed air can enter the
brake deice lines. The BRAKE DEICE ON
annunciators illuminate.
From t he shut off val ve, t he hot ai r i s
plumbed through an insulated line down
the back of the mai n gear strut to the
distributor manifold. The hot P
3
air is
directed on the brakes (Figure 10-12).
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Figure 10-11. Brake Deice Controls
18-PSI
PRESSURE
REGULATOR
10 MINUTE
TIMER
BRAKE
DEICE CIRCUIT
BREAKER
BRAKE
DEICE
SWITCH
OFF
ON
LEFT MAIN
GEAR UPLOCK
SWITCH
UP
NOT UP
LEFT
BRAKE DEICE
MANIFOLD
RIGHT
BRAKE DEICE
MANIFOLD
TO BRAKE
DEICE VALVES
RIGHT BRAKE
DEICE VALVE (N.C.)
PNEUMATIC
RIGHT P
3
AIR
PNEUMATIC
LEFT P
3
AIR
T IN
WHEEL
WELL
T IN
WHEEL
WELL
LEFT BRAKE
DEICE VALVE (N.C.)
28 VDC
Figure 10-12. Brake Deice Schematic (System On)
When t he ai rcraf t i s i n f l i ght and t he
BRAKE DEI CE s wi t ch up, a ci rcui t
compl etes through the l eft mai n gear
uplock switch to a timing circuit in the
control module. This timing circuit cycles
the deice system off after 10 minutes of
operation by closing the solenoid valves.
This shuts off P
3
airflow to the brakes so
adjacent components in the wheelwell are
not damaged through overheating.
The system cannot be activated again until
the landing gear is cycled from the up and
locked position.
Limitation
The brake dei ce syst em i s not t o be
cont i nuousl y operat ed above 15C
ambient temperature.
PROPELLER DEICE
The propeller deice system includes the
fol l owi ng components: an el ectri cal l y
heated boot for each propeller blade, slip
rings, brush assemblies, timer, two on-off
switches, and an ammeter.
The heating elements in the deice boots
reduce the adhesion of the ice (Figure 10-
13). The centrifugal force of the spinning
propeller and blast of the airstream then
removes the ice.
Propel l er dei ce mus t not be
operated when the propellers are
static or the slip rings around the
propeller shaft will pit and burn,
eventually becoming useless.
The PROP s wi t ches are on t he I CE
PROTECTION panel on the pilot right
subpanel. The PROP ammeter is on the
overhead panel.
When the switch is on (up position), current
flows through a timer and then through
the brush assemblies to the slip ring where
it is distributed to the individual propeller
deice boots.
CAUTION
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Figure 10-13. Propeller Deice Boots
OPERATION
When the PROP-AUTO switch is turned
on, the ammeter registers the amount of
current (normally 26 to 32 amperes) passing
through the system. If the current rises
beyond normal limits, the circuit breaker
switch shuts off power to the deicer timer
(Figure 10-14).
Power to the deice boots is cycled in two
90-second phases. The first 90-second phase
simultaneously heats all of the boots on
one propeller. The second phase heats
the boots on the other propeller. The deice
t i mer compl et es one f ul l cycl e every
three minutes.
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Figure 10-14. Propeller Deice System
As the deice timer moves from one phase
to the next, a slight momentary deflection
of the propel l er ammeter needl e may
occasionally be noted. Once the system is
turned on for automati c operati on, i t
cycles continuously.
The heating sequences for the propeller
deice boots are the sequences in evidence
during normal operation. If power is turned
off, however, the timer moves ahead to the
start of the cycle on the next propeller. It
may restart on either propeller.
Manual System
A manual propel l er dei cer system i s a
back up to the automatic system. When
the PROP-MANUAL override switch is
activated, power is applied to all heating
elements on both props. This momentary
swi t ch must be hel d i n pl ace unt i l
t he i ce has been di sl odged f rom t he
propeller surface.
Although the propeller ammeter does not
indicate prop boot load in manual mode,
the loadmeters do indicate approximately
a 10% increase in load when the manual
deicer system operates.
WINDSHIELD ANTI-ICE
The pi l ot and copi l ot wi nds hi el ds
each have i ndependent cont rol s and
electrothermal circuits.
COMPONENTS
Windshields
The windshields are composed of three
physical layers. The inner layer is a thick
panel of glass that acts as the structural
member. The middle layer is a polyvinyl
sheet that carries fine wire heating grids.
The outer layer is a protective layer of glass
bonded to the first two layers. The outside
of the windshield is treated with a static
discharge film called a NESA coating.
Heating Elements
Electrical heating elements in the lamina-
tion of the windshields protect them against
icing. The elements consist of transparent
mat er i al ( s t anni c oxi de) wi t h hi gh
electrical resistance.
The resi st i ve mat eri al i s arranged t o
provi de pri mary heat ed surf aces and
secondary heated surfaces.
Each is also fitted with electrical connec-
tions for temperature sensing elements.
The heating elements connect at terminal
blocks in the corners of the glass to the
wi r i ng of t he WSHLD ANTI - I CE
control switches.
Temperature-Sensing Elements
A temperature-sensing element embedded in
each windshield and a temperature controller
in each windshield circuit automatically
control the windshield temperature.
The temperature controllers attempt to
maintain the temperature of the windshield
between 90 and 110F.
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WSHLD ANTI-ICE Switches
The WSHLD ANTI-ICE switches on the
ICE PROTECTION panel include one for
the PILOT windshield and one for the
COPILOT windshield (Figure 10-15).
When both switches are in the NORMAL
pos i t i on, t he s econdar y areas of t he
windshields are heated. When the switches
are in the HIGH position, the primary areas
are heated.
The primary areas are smaller areas that
heat faster. Each switch must be lifted over
a detent before it can be moved into the
HIGH position. This lever-lock feature
prevents inadvertent selection of the HIGH
position when moving the switches from
NORMAL to the OFF (center) position.
OPERATION
When the NORMAL position is selected
(Figure 10-16), an automatic temperature
controller senses the windshield tempera-
ture. It then attempts to maintain it at
approximately 90 to 110F by energizing
the power relay as necessary. In this mode,
almost the entire windshield is heated.
When HIGH is selected (Figure 10-17), the
same temperature controller senses the
windshield temperature and attempts to
maintain it at 90 to 110F. In this mode,
however, the controller also energize a
high heat relay switch to apply the electri-
cal heat to a more concentrated and more
essential viewing area of the windshield.
In HIGH, only the outboard two-thirds of
the windshield is heated.
A 50-ampere circuit breaker in the power
distribution panel under the center aisle
floor protects the power circuit of each
system. A 5-ampere circuit breaker on the
copilot CB panel protects each windshield
heater control circuit.
Windshield heat may be used at anytime
and i n any combi nat i on. I t i s bes t ,
however, to turn it on prior to entering
icing conditions. This helps ensure the
windshield is sufficiently warm to prevent
ice formation.
In addition, windshield heat may be used to
help in defrosting and defogging.
The electrical field created by the heating
elements may cause erratic operation of
the magnetic compass.
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Figure 10-15. Windshield Anti-Ice Switches
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Figure 10-16. Windshield Anti-Ice DiagramNormal Heat
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Figure 10-17. Windshield Anti-Ice DiagramHigh Heat
In the event of windshield icing
during sustained icing conditions,
it may be necessary to reduce the
ai rspeed i n order t o keep t he
windshield ice-free; 226 KIAS is
the maximum speed for effective
windshield anti-icing.
WINDSHIELD WIPERS
Separate windshield wipers are mounted on
the pilot and copilot windshields.
Use wipers as required on the ground or in
flight, but do not operate them on a dry
windshield because they may scratch a
protective electrostatic (NESA) coating on
the outer layer of glass.
A s i ngl e el ect r i c mot or operat es a
mechanism that drives the dual wipers.
Al l component s are f or ward of t he
instrument panel.
Control Switch
The WINDSHIELD WIPER knob on the
overhead panel (Figure 10-18) controls the
wipers. Settings include OFF, SLOW, FAST
and PARK. The windshield wiper circuit
breaker is on the copilot circuit breaker
panel in the WEATHER group.
WINDOW DEFOGGING
Engine bleed air provides cabin window
and cockpi t s i de wi ndow def oggi ng
whenever one or both engines are running.
A pressure regulator under the floorboard
regul at es t he bl eed ai r pres s ure f or
window defog.
CABIN WINDOWS
From the regulator, the bleed air flows to
the right of center and forward until the
air lines divide. At this point part of the air
is routed to the sides of the aircraft and up
the sidewall to just below the windows.
Here it tees and runs fore and aft under
the cabin windows.
CAUTION
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Figure 10-18. Windshield Wiper
Beneath each cabin window, another tee
in the system delivers the bleed air through
two tubes to the i nsi de surface of the
exterior windows.
Caut i on mus t be us ed when
removi ng or i ns t al l i ng t he
emergency exi t s t o avoi d
damaging the bleed air lines. Make
certai n the bl eed ai r l i nes are
proper l y connect ed when
installing the hatches.
COCKPIT SIDE WINDOWS
Air for the cockpit side windows is routed
forward from the pressure regulator to the
cockpit below the floorboard. At this point
the line tees and runs to the side of the
aircraft and up the sidewall to the windows.
The warm dry air is now directed to the
inside surface of the windows through a
manifold in the window frame.
FUEL SYSTEM ANTI-ICE
Two anti-ice systems protect fuel flow
through fuel lines to the engine (Figure
10-19). Without heat, moisture in the fuel
could freeze. This would diminish or cut
off fuel flow.
CAUTION
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Figure 10-19. Fuel System Anti-Ice
HEATED VENTS
Electrically heated vents in each wing
prevent i ce f or mat i on i n t he f uel
vent system.
The L and R FUEL VENT switches in the
ICE PROTECTION group control the
heat. The left and right generator buses
power the system.
Whenever ice is anticipated or encoun-
tered, turn the system on.
HEAT EXCHANGER
An oil-to-fuel heat exchanger on the engine
acces s or y s ect i on prot ect s t he f uel
against ice.
An engine oil line is next to the fuel line
within the heat exchanger. Heat transfer
occurs through conducti on to mel t i ce
particles that may have formed in the fuel.
This operation is automatic whenever the
engines are running.
Refer to the Fuel section of this manual for
more det ai l s about f uel heat and t he
Limitations section of the POHfor temper-
ature limitations concerning the oil-to-fuel
heat exchanger.
ELECTRICAL HEATING
PITOT HEAT
Two pitot masts on the nose of the aircraft
contain electric heating elements to ensure
proper airspeed indication during icing
conditions (Figure 10-20).
Two PITOT LEFT-RIGHT circuit breaker
switches on the pilot right subpanel control
the heating elements. In the up position, the
heating system is on; in the down position,
the system is off.
The triple-fed bus powers the left pitot
heat; the right generator bus powers the
right pitot heat.
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Figure 10-20. Pitot Mast and Heat Controls
Operation
The pi t ot heat s ys t em s houl d not be
operated on the ground except for testing
or for short intervals to remove snow or ice
from the mast. Turn pi tot heat on for
takeoff. It can be left on in flight during
i ci ng condi t i ons or whenever i ci ng
conditions are expected.
If a gradual reduction in airspeed indica-
tion occurs during flight at altitude, there
may be pitot icing. If turning pitot heat on
restores airspeed, leave the system on.
Many pilot use pitot heat as standard practice
during all flights at high altitude and/or cold
temperatures to prevent pitot icing.
Illumination of the amber L or R PITOT
HEAT annunciator indicates switch is off
or the pitot heat system is inoperative.
Icing of a pitot probe could impact validity
of aircraft instruments.
STALL WARNING VANE
Electric heat elements for the stall warning
vane and plate protect them against freeze-
up during icing conditions (Figure 10-21).
A two-position STALL WARN switch on
the ICE PROECTION panel activates the
system. Up position is on; down position
is off.
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KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
Figure 10-21. Stall Warning Vane and Heat Control
The right generator bus supplies power. A
safety switch on the left landing gear limits
face plate and stall vane current flow to
approximately 14 volts to prevent overheat-
ing while the aircraft is on the ground. In
flight, after the left strut extends, the full
28- vol t current i s appl i ed t o t he st al l
warning face plate and stall vane.
Precautions
Even though the heating elements protect
the lift transducer vane and face plate from
ice, a buildup of ice on the wing may change
or disrupt airflow. This prevents the system
from accurately indicating an imminent
stal l . Remember stal l speed i ncreases
whenever ice accumulates on any aircraft.
PRECAUTIONS DURING
ICING CONDITIONS
An aircraft needs special care and inspec-
tion before operating in cold or potential
icing weather.
When the aircraft is at rest, always cover
pitot masts. Once covers are removed,
ensure both masts and drains are free of ice
or water. If they are clogged, faulty readings
may result.
When the engine is not operating, install
tie-downs for propellers to ensure against
damage to internal engine components not
lubricated. Spinning propellers can also be
a source of danger to crew, passengers,
and ground support personnel. Propeller
blades in their tie-down position channel
moisture down the blades past the propeller
hub and of f t he l ower bl ade more
effectively than in other positions or when
left spinning.
During particularly icy ground conditions,
inspect the propeller hubs for ice and snow
accumulation. Turn the propellers by hand
in their normal rotation direction to ensure
they are free prior to engine start.
EXTERIOR INSPECTION
During the normal exterior inspection, pay
special attention to areas where frost and
ice may accumulate. It is not the thickness
of frost that matters, it is the texture. Any
slightly irregular surface can substantially
decrease proper airflow over the wings and
stabi l i zers. Do not underesti mate the
damaging effects of frost.
Remove all frost from leading edges of the
wings, stabilizers, and propellers before
the ai rcraft i s moved. The wi ndshi el d,
control surfaces, hinges, pitot masts, fuel
tank caps, and vents should also be free of
frost. Use deicing fluid when needed.
Fuel Checks
Test fuel drains for free flow. Water in the
fuel system has a tendency to condense
more readily during winter months. If left
unchecked, large amounts of moisture may
accumulate in the fuel tanks. Moisture does
not always settle at the bottom of the tank.
Occasi onal l y a t hi n l ayer of f uel get s
trapped under a large mass of water that
may deceive the tester. Make sure to take
a good-sized sample of fuel.
Add only the correct amount of anti-icing
additive to the fuel. A higher concentration
of anti-icer does not ensure lower fuel
freezing temperatures. It may actually
hinder the aircrafts performance. Consult
the Normal Procedures secti on of the
Pilots Operating Handbook to determine
correct blend.
Brakes and Tires
Check t he brakes and t i re- t o- ground
contact for lockup. Do not use any anti-ice
solution containing oil-based lubricant on
the brakes.
10-22
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If t i res are f rozen t o t he ground, use
undiluted defrosting fluid or a ground
heater to melt ice around tires. Move the
aircraft as soon as the tires are free. Heat
applied to tires should not exceed 160F or
71C.
BEFORE TAXI
Brake deice may be turned on before taxi
to help expel accumulated ice from the
brake mechanisms. If brake deice is used,
place the condition levers in HIGH IDLE.
Keep flaps retracted to avoid throwing
snow or slush into the flap mechanisms.
This minimizes the possibility of damage to
flap surfaces.
When taxiing in extremely icy conditions,
ensure the tires are rolling, not just sliding
on the icy surface.
The brake dei ce s ys t em i s not t o be
cont i nuous l y operat ed above 15 C
ambient temperature.
Leave auto-ignition off until immediately
before takeoff. Thi s hel ps prol ong the
service life of the igniter units.
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INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
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1. During flight in visible moisture, or at
night when flight from visible moister
cannot be assured, engine anti-ice must
be on at temperatures below _____C.
A. 0
B. 5
C. 10
D. 15
2. In the event of windshield icing, reduce
speed to ______ knots or below.
A. 140
B. 170
C. 184
D. 226
3. Operating the propeller deice in the
_______ mode provides _______ timer
operation.
A. MANUAL; automatic
B. MANUAL; manual
C. AUTO; manual
D. AUTO; automatic
4. The surface deice system removes ice
build up on the leading edge(s) of the:
A. Horizontal stabilizer.
B. Vertical stabilizer.
C. Wing and horizontal stabilizer.
D. Wing and vertical stabilizer.
5. The minimum airspeed for sustained
flight in icing conditions is _____ knots.
A. 140
B. 160
C. 226
D. 263
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QUESTIONS
11-i
CHAPTER 11
AIR CONDITIONING
CONTENTS
Page
INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................. 11-1
GENERAL......................................................................................................................... 11-1
FL-1, FL-4-492, FL-494-500............................................................................................... 11-4
Components................................................................................................................. 11-4
Operation..................................................................................................................... 11-9
Heating....................................................................................................................... 11-10
Electric Heat ............................................................................................................. 11-11
Vent Blower Control ................................................................................................ 11-12
FL-493, FL-500, AND SUBSEQUENT........................................................................ 11-12
Components .............................................................................................................. 11-12
Compressor................................................................................................................ 11-13
Operation................................................................................................................... 11-20
LIMITATIONS................................................................................................................. 11-22
EMERGENCY/ABNORMAL...................................................................................... 11-22
QUESTIONS.................................................................................................................... 11-23
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ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Title Page
11-1 Air Conditioning System (FL-1-492, FL-494-499)........................................... 11-2
11-2 Air Conditioning System (FL-493-500, and Subsequent) .............................. 11-3
11-3 Condenser and Receiver-Dryer Sight Gauge.................................................. 11-4
11-4 Air Conditioner Condenser Intake................................................................... 11-4
11-5 Floor and Ceiling Outlets................................................................................... 11-5
11-6 Cockpit Eyeball Outlets ..................................................................................... 11-5
11-7 Air Conditioning System Control Diagram..................................................... 11-6
11-8 ENVIRONMENTAL Panel .............................................................................. 11-7
11-9 CABIN TEMP MODE Control Knob............................................................. 11-7
11-10 MANUAL TEMP INCR-DECR Switch ......................................................... 11-8
11-11 ELECT HEAT-OFF Switch............................................................................... 11-8
11-12 Annunciator Panel .............................................................................................. 11-9
11-13 PILOT AIR and COPILOT AIR Knobs....................................................... 11-11
11-14 Condenser and Receiver-Dryer Sight Gauge................................................ 11-13
11-15 Cockpit Eyeball Outlets................................................................................... 11-14
11-16 Supplemental Heat Vent.................................................................................. 11-14
11-17 Floor and Ceiling Outlets ................................................................................ 11-14
11-18 Air Conditioning System Control Diagram................................................... 11-15
11-19 ENVIRONMENTAL Panel ............................................................................ 11-16
11-20 Environmental System Control Knobs........................................................... 11-16
11-21 COCKPIT and CABIN BLOWER Control Knobs ..................................... 11-17
11-22 MAN TEMP INCR-DECR Switch ................................................................ 11-18
11-23 ENVIR BLEED AIR Switch.......................................................................... 11-18
11-24 Annunciator Panel ............................................................................................ 11-19
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CHAPTER 11
AIR CONDITIONING
GENERAL
The ai r condi t i oni ng syst em provi des
cooling, heating, and unpressurized ventila-
tion inside the aircraft (Figures 11-1 and
11- 2). Ai rcraf t FL- 4- 492, FL- 50 0 and
subsequent includes the new Keith ECS
system. The dual zone system allows the
cabi n t emperat ure t o be cont rol l ed
independently of the cockpit temperature.
A refrigerant gas, vapor-cycle refrigera-
tion system provides cabin cooling. Bleed
air from the compressor of each engine
flows into the cabin for heating and for
pressurization. A supplemental electric
heating system is available.
INTRODUCTION
This chapter describes the air conditioning system on the King Air 350 that provides
cooling, heating, and unpressurized ventilation. Electric heat is also available. The
air conditioning system can be operated in the heating mode or cooling mode with
either automatic or manual mode control.
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1 1 A I R C O N D I T I O N I N G
COPILOT'S
CEILING
OUTLET
COPILOT'S
VENT AIR
CONTROL
CABIN AIR
CONTROL
RETURN AIR FILTER
RETURN AIR VALVE
FWD EVAPORATOR
FWD EVAPORATOR
AIR FILTER
VENT BLOWER
FRESH AIR VALVE
(CLOSED WHEN
PRESSURIZED)
RAMAIR SCOOP
CONDENSER
CONDENSER
BLOWER
OUTLET
AIR
RECEIVERDRYER
MIXING PLENUM
WINDHSHIELD DEFROSTER
(ON GLARESHIELD)
FWD
PRESSURE
BULKHEAD
CREW
HEAT DUCT
INSTRUMENT PANEL
PILOT'S VENT
AIR CONTROL
WINDSHIELD
DEFROSTER
CONTROL
ENVIRONMENTAL
BLEEDAIR
SHUTOFF VALVE
FIREWALL
ENVIRONMENTAL BLEED
AIR FLOW CONTROL UNIT
INCLUDING MODULATING
AND SHUTOFF VALVE
PNEUMATIC
BLEEDAIR
SHUTOFF VALVE
CABINHEAT
CONTROL
VALVE
AIRTOAIR
HEAT EXCHANGER
FLOOR DUCT
TO AFT FLOOR
OUTLETS
TO CEILING
OUTLETS
FWD
SIDE
VIEW
DOOR
DETAIL A
HOT ENGINE BLEED AIR
ENVIRONMENTAL BLEED AIR
RECIRCULATED CABIN AIR
(AIR CONDITIONED WHEN
EVAPORATOR IS ON)
AMBIENT AIR
PRESSURE VESSEL
LEGEND
ENVIRONMENTAL
BLEEDAIR FLOW
CONTROL UNIT
INCLUDING
MODULATING AND
SHUTOFF VALVE
PNEUMATIC
THERMOSTAT
AMBIENT AIR
MODULATING VALVE
PNEUMATIC
BLEEDAIR
SHUTOFF
VALVE FIREWALL
AIR
INLET
SCOOP
AIRTOAIR
HEAT
EXCHANGER
CABINHEAT
CONTROL VALVE
ENVIRONMENTAL
BLEEDAIR
SHUTOFF VALVE
CEILING
OUTLET
FLOOR
OUTLET
CEILING
OUTLETS
FLOOR
OUTLET
CEILING
OUTLET
AFT PRESSURE
BULKHEAD
NORMAL
OUTFLOW
VALVE
SAFETY/DUMP VALVE
AIRCONDITIONED AIR
FROM AFT EVAPORATOR
DOOR (COOLED AIR
TO FLOOR OUTLETS)
CEILING
OUTLET
FLOOR
OUTLET
AFT
HEATER
AFT
EVAPORATOR
AIR FILTER
AFT
EVAPORATOR
CEILING
OUTLET
CEILING
OUTLET
FLOOR
OUTLET
FLAP
PER
VALVE
REFRIGERANT LINES
AIR INLET
CABIN AIR
CONTROL
VALVE
DUCT
OVERTEMP
SENSOR
FORWARD
HEATER
CEILING
DUCT/FLOOR
DUCT DIVIDER
REFRIGERANT
COMPRESSOR
PNEUMATIC
THERMOSTAT
AMBIENT AIR
MODULATING
VALVE
Figure 11-1. Air Conditioning System (FL-1-492, FL-494-499)
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11 AIR CONDITIONING
Figure 11-2. Air Conditioning System (FL-493-500 and Subsequent)
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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FL-1, FL-4-492, FL-494-
500
COMPONENTS
The environmental system has the follow-
ing main components:
Belt-driven compressor (right engine)
Condenser blower
Evaporator
Aft evaporator
Forward vent blower
Mixing plenum
Floor outlet ducts
Ceiling eyeball outlets
Temperature-sensing device
Autotemperature controller
Flow control unit
Pilot/copilot outlets
Defroster
Air-to-air heat exchangers
Bleed air valves
Heating air outlets
Compressor
A bel t-dri ven compressor on the ri ght
engi ne operat es i n ei t her aut o or
manual cool modes. The compressor has
bui l t - i n s af et y devi ces t o prevent
i t s operat i on i n ref r i gerant over or
underpressure conditions.
Condenser Blower
The condenser sits slightly sideways in the
nose crossover duct (Figure 11-3). Ram air
pas s es t hrough t he condens er, t hen
condenses, and cools the refrigerant gas
passing through it into liquid form for use
in cooling the cabin air (Figure 11-4). The
condenser blower enhances airflow through
the condenser for more efficient operation.
Forward Evaporator
and Blower
The cockpit blower motor recirculates
cockpit air through the evaporator in the
right side of the nose behind the crossover
duct (al so ref erred t o as t he f orward
evaporator).
The ref r i gerant f l ows t hrough t he
evaporator and absorbs heat from the
recirculated cockpit air to cool the air
passing through it.
RECIEVER-
DRYER AND
SIGHT GAUGE
Figure 11-3. Condenser and Receiver-
Dryer Sight Gauge
Figure 11-4. Air Conditioner
Condenser Intake
Aft Evaporators and Blowers
The aft evaporator and blower are under
the floor in the rear of the cabin. The blower
draws in cabin air and blows it across the
evaporator to the aft floor and ceiling
outlets. It operates at high speed only.
Mixing Plenum
The mixing plenum is in the right side of the
nosecone under the copilot floorboard and
aft of the forward evaporator. Within the
plenum bleed air mixes with recirculated
cabin air, before it is routed back into
the cabin.
Cabin Floor Outlet Ducts
The f l oor out l et duct s are bet ween
the passenger seats al ong the ai rcraft
f l oor boards where t hey cont act t he
i nteri or si dewal l of the ai rcraft cabi n
(Figure 11-5).
Pressurization air heated as required by
the environmental system enters the cabin
through these vents.
Ceiling Eyeball Outlets
Eyeball outlets in the headliner provide
cool air to the crew and passengers (Figures
11-5 and 11-6).
Each outlet can be adjusted to direct the
airstream as desired. Twisting the nozzle
adjusts air volume from full open to closed.
As the nozzle is twisted, a damper opens or
closes to regulate airflow. The cockpit has
two eyeball outlets; the cabin has seven
such outlets.
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Figure 11-5. Floor and Ceiling Outlets
Figure 11-6. Cockpit Eyeball Outlets
Temperature-Sensing Device
The cabin temperature sensor works with
t he CABI N TEMP MODE s wi t ch t o
achieve desired temperature (Figure 11-7).
The sensor in the floor ducts monitors the
bleed air temperature. If excessive temper-
ature extreme is sensed, the sensor activates
an annunciator in the cockpit.
Auto Temperature Controller
When the CABIN TEMP MODE switch
i s posi ti oned to AUTO, the automati c
temperature controller uses inputs from the
cabin temperature sensor to adjust the
system to maintain the desired temperature
(Figure 11-7).
Flow Control Unit
In flight, flow control units on each engine
firewall mix outside ambient air with bleed
air to make bleed air temperature more
manageable for the environmental system.
On the ground, these flow control units supply
only bleed air to the environmental system.
Defrost System
Two ducts provide warm air to the defroster
below the windshields where they contact
the top of the glareshield.
The DEFROST AIR knob controls warm
air flow through the ducts.
Air-to-Air Heat Exchangers
An air-to-air heat exchanger is in the center
section of each wing inboard of the engines.
Bleed air passes through the air-to-air heat
exchangers to reduce air temperature.
Bleed Air Valves
The bleed air valves are in the environ-
mental flow control units on each engine
firewall. These valves control bleed air flow
into the aircraft and into the environmen-
tal, pressurization, and pneumatic systems
(Figure 11-7).
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LEFT ENGINE
BLEED AIR
RIGHT ENGINE
BLEED AIR
AIR CONDITIONER
MANUAL
TEMP
INCR
DECR
AUTO TEMP
CONTROLLER
DUCT
CABIN
SELECTOR
RH BYPASS
VALVE MOTOR
LH BYPASS
VALVE MOTOR
LH BYPASS
VALVE MOTOR
SWITCH
COOL
COOL
MANUAL
HEAT
OR COOL
HEAT
HEAT
AUTO
MANUAL
COOL
TO CABIN
TO CABIN
AIR TO AIR
HEAT
EXCHANGER
AIR TO AIR
HEAT
EXCHANGER
TEMP
SENSORS
Figure 11-7. Air Conditioning System Control Diagram
Cockpit Heating Air Outlets
Two ducts under the instrument panel deliver
warm air to the pilot and copilot. The PILOT
AIR knob and CO-PILOT AIR knob control
the warm air flow through these ducts.
Controls and Indications
The ENVIRONMENTAL panel on the
copilot left subpanel provides automatic
or manual control of the air conditioning
system (Figure 11-8).
BLEED AIR VALVES Switches
Two BLEED AIR VALVES swi t ches
control the inflow of pressurization air and
are used for cockpit and cabin climate
cont rol . The s wi t ches are on t he
ENVIRONMENTAL panel on the copilot
left subpanel (Figure 11-8).
Each switch has three positions:
OPENAllows bleed air into cabin
for pressurization and climate control
ENVIR OFFRestricts bleed air
from the respecti ve si de envi ron-
ment al f l ow cont rol uni t f rom
ent er i ng pres s ur i zat i on and ai r
conditioning systems (for maximum
cooling on ground, place switches in
ENVIR OFF position)
INSTR & ENVIR OFFRespective
bleed air valve closes completely to
deny bleed air to pressurization, air
conditioning and pneumatic systems
CABIN TEMP MODE Knob
The CABIN TEMP MODE knob has four
positions (Figure 11-9):
OFFAi r del i ver y s ys t em
completely shut off; no bleed air input
to cockpit or cabin
AUTOAi r condi t i oni ng and
heating systems operate automati-
cal l y to establ i sh pi l ot-requested
temperature
MAN COOLAi r condi t i oni ng
s ys t em operat es i n res pons e t o
manual i nput ; ai r condi t i oner
operates as long as system pressures
are acceptable and right engine N1
speed above 62%
MAN HEATHeat i ng s ys t em
operates in response to manual input
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Figure 11-8. ENVIRONMENTAL Panel
Figure 11-9. CABIN TEMP MODE
Control Knob
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MAN TEMP INCR-DECR Switch
The MAN COOL or MAN HEAT position
of the CABIN TEMP MODE switch allows
manual adjustment of cockpit and cabin
temperature. Momentarily positioning the
MANUAL TEMP switch (Figure 11-10) to
ei t her I NCR ( i ncreas e) or DECR
(decrease) repositions the bleed air valves
to adjust cabin and cockpit temperature.
When released, the switch returns to the
OFF position.
ELECT HEATOFF Switch
The electric heat system is operated by a
solenoid ELECT HEATOFF switch on
the copilot left subpanel (Figure 11-11).
The cabin can be warmed before engine
start with the electric heat system running
concurrent l y wi t h an auxi l i ary power
unit.Use of the electric heat system is only
permissible during ground operations. The
system i s squat swi tch protected from
airborne operation.
AIR COND N
1
LOW
Annunciator
The N
1
s peed s wi t ch ( engi ne s peed)
prevents compressor operation outside of
established limitation parameters. The N
1
speed switch disengages the compressor
clutch when engine speed is below 62% N
1
and air conditioning is requested.
If air conditioning is requested when the N
1
speed switch opens, the white AIR COND
N
1
LOW annunciator illuminates (Figure
11-12).
DUCT OVERTEMP Annunciator
If airflow in the ducts becomes too low, the
amber DUCT OVERTEMP annunciator
illuminates to indicate duct temperature
has reached approximately 300F (148C)
(Figure 11-12).
ELEC HEAT ON Annunciator
The green ELEC HEAT ON advi sory
annunciator indicates the power relays are
cl osed t o appl y power t o t he heat i ng
elements (Figure 11-12).
Before blowers are selected OFF when
electric heat is off, the ELEC HEAT ON
annunci at or must be ext i ngui shed t o
indicate power is removed from the heating
elements.
Figure 11-10. MANUAL TEMP
INCR-DECR Switch
Figure 11-11. ELECT HEAT-OFF Switch
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L-R BL AIR OFF Annunciators
Amber L-R BL AIR OFF annunciators
i l l umi nat e whenever t he res pect i ve
BLEED AIR VALVES OPEN switch is in
any position other than OPEN.
Airflow Control Knobs
Four additional manual airflow push-pull
knobs on the subpanels regulate cockpit
and cabin comfort. When the cockpit door
is closed and the cabin comfort level is
satisfactory, each CABIN/COCKPIT AIR
push-pull knob regulates airflow to the
cockpit and cabin.
When fully pulled out, each knob provides
maximum airflow to the respective area.
When fully pushed in, each knob provides
minimum airflow.
OPERATION
Automatic Mode Control
The AUTO position on the CABIN TEMP
MODE knob commands the automatic
temperature control to modulate the bypass
valves and activate the air conditioning
compressor (see Figure 11-9).
For greater heating, bleed air bypasses the
air-to-air heat exchangers in the wing center
sections. For greater cooling, the bleed air
passes through the air-to-air heat exchang-
ers to reduce its temperature. In either case,
the resulting bleed air mixes with recircu-
lated cabin air that can be additionally
cooled when the air conditioning compres-
sor in the forward mixing plenum is in
cooling mode.
Cooling
The plumbing from the compressor on the
right engine is routed through the right
wing and then forward to the condenser
coil, receiver-dryer, expansion valve, bypass
valve, and forward evaporator, all of which
are in the aircraft nose.
The forward vent blower moves recircu-
l at ed cabi n ai r t hrough t he f or ward
evaporator and into the mixing plenum,
the floor-outlet ducts, and ceiling eyeball
outlets. Approximately 75% of the recircu-
lated air passes through the floor outlets
whi l e approxi mat el y 25% of t he ai r
bypasses the mixing plenum and flows
through the ceiling outlets.
Figure 11-12. Annunciator Panel
With the system in AUTO, the forward
vent blower normally runs at low speed.
If the cooling mode is operating, refriger-
ant circulates through the forward evapora-
tor to cool the output air. If either BLEED
AIR VALVES swi t ch i s posi t i oned t o
OPEN, air entering the ceiling-outlet duct
is cooler than air entering the floor outlets.
The air discharges through the eyeball
outlet in the cockpit and cabin (see Figures
11-5 and 11-6).
Cool air also enters the floor-outlet duct.
In order to provide cabin pressurization,
however, warm bleed air also enters this
duct any time either BLEED AIR VALVES
switch is in the OPEN position. Therefore,
pressurized air discharged from the floor
outlets is always warmer than air discharged
from the ceiling outlets no matter what
temperature mode is used.
NOTE
On aircraft with cargo doors, a
lever on each floor outlet register
(except forward facing register in
baggage compartment) can be
moved ver t i cal l y t o regul at e
airflow. A vane-axial blower in
the nose section draws ambient
air through the condenser to cool
t he ref r i gerant gas when t he
cooling mode is operating on the
ground. Thi s bl ower shut s off
aut omat i cal l y when gear i s
retracted.
The recei ver- dr yer and s i ght gauge
(glass) are in the upper portion of the
condenser compartment.
Remove the upper-compartment access
panel on t op of t he nose sect i on l ef t
of centerline to view these components.
Thi s act i on, however, i s not a normal
preflight action.
If bubbles are seen through the sight glass
(see Fi gure 11-3), then the refri gerant
system is low on refrigerant gas. If, after
adding more refrigerant gas, bubbles still
appear in the sight glass, the system needs
to be evacuated and recharged.
Af t evaporat ors and bl owers provi de
additional cooling. The blowers recircu-
late cabin air across the evaporators and
route it to the aft floor and ceiling outlets.
The af t evaporat ors i ncrease ai rcraf t
cool i ng capaci t y f rom 18, 0 0 0 BTU
(wi th the forward evaporator onl y) to
32,000 BTU.
Refrigerant flows through the aft evapora-
tor any time it flows through the forward
evaporator. The additional cooling, however,
is provided only when the aft blower is
operating.
During flights in warm air, such as short,
low-altitude flights in the summer, all the
cabin ceiling outlets must be fully open for
maximum cooling.
HEATING
Description
Bleed air from the compressor of each
engine flows into the cabin for heating and
pressurization purposes. When the left
landing gear safety switch is in the ground
position, the ambient air valve in each flow
control unit is closed. Therefore, only bleed
air is delivered.
When airborne, bleed air is mixed with
outside ambient air from the ambient air
valve in each flow control unit until a cold
air temperature closes off the ambient flow.
Then, only bleed air is delivered.
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Operation
In the cockpit, adjust either pilot damper
to provide additional air. The PILOT AIR
and COPILOT AIR knobs control the
dampers (Figure 11-13). Movement of these
knobs aff ect s cockpi t t emperat ure by
adjusting air volume.
The CABIN/COCKPIT AIR knob on the
copilot left subpanel controls air volume to
the cabi n (see Fi gure 11-8). Thi s knob
controls the cabin air control valve. When
pulled out of its stop, a minimum amount
of air passes through the valve to the cabin
to increase the volume of air available to
the pilot and copilot outlets and defroster.
When the knob is pushed all the way in, the
valve opens to allow air in the duct to be
directed into the cabin floor outlets.
The DEFROST AIR knob controls a valve
on the pilot/copilot heat duct that admits
air to two ducts delivering warm air to the
defroster vents below the windshields.
The rest of the air in the bleed-air duct
mixes with recirculated cabin air and flows
af t t hrough t he f l oor- out l et duct t hat
handles 75% of the total airflow.
During high-altitude flights, cool-night
flights, and flights in cold weather, the
ceiling outlets must be closed for maximum
cabin heating.
ELECTRIC HEAT
Operation
Positioning the ELECT HEAT switch to
ON energizes the heating elements in the
forward duct and aft evaporator plenum
(see Figure 11-11). The green ELEC HEAT
ON annunciator illuminates to indicate
power i s bei ng appl i ed to the heati ng
elements (see Figure 11-12). The electric
heat system draws approximately 300 amps.
During electric heat operation, the forward
and the aft blowers must be operating.
Bef ore t he ELECT HEAT s wi t ch i s
positioned to OFF and the BLOWER knob
i s posi ti oned to OFF, the green ELEC
HEAT ON annunci at or mus t be
extinguished. This indicates the heating
elements have been sufficiently deener-
gized for safety.
Figure 11-13. PILOT AIR and COPILOT
AIR Knobs
VENT BLOWER CONTROL
Unpressurized Ventilation
Fresh air is available during unpressurized
flight with the CABIN PRESS switch in
the DUMP position. This ambient (ram)
air is obtained through the fresh air door
and the ram-air scoop in the aircraft nose
section (see Figure 11-4).
This door is open only during unpressurized
flight when the switch is in the DUMP
position and there is 0 psi. This allows the
forward blower to draw ram air into the
cabin. This air is mixed with recirculated
cabin air in the plenum chamber and then
directed to both the floor registers and
ceiling outlets. The CABIN AIR control
knob regulates the air volume.
NOTE
A flight conducted with the bleed-
air switches placed in any position
other than OPEN also results in
unpressurized flight, but the fresh
air door is not open.
Manual Mode Control
The MAN COOL or MAN HEAT position
of the CABIN TEMP MODE control knob
allows manual control of the cabin and
cockpit temperature.
The MANUAL TEMP I NCRDECR
switch returns to the center OFF position
when rel eas ed. When hel d i n ei t her
position, it modulates the bypass valves in
the bleed-air lines. Allow one minute (30
seconds per valve) for both valves to move
fully open or fully closed.
Only one valve moves at a time to vary the
amount of bleed air routed through the air-
t o- ai r heat exchanger. Thi s caus es a
variance in bleed-air temperature. The
bleed air mixes with recirculated cabin air
in the mixing plenum and is then routed to
the floor registers.
Cabi n t emperat ure vari es, t heref ore,
according to the position of the cabin-heat
control valves and whether or not the refrig-
erant system is working.
NOTE
The air conditioner compressor
does not operate unless the bypass
valves are closed. To ensure that
the valves are closed, select MAN
COOL then hold the MANUAL
TEMP s wi t ch i n t he DECR
position for one minute.
FL-493, FL-500,
AND SUBSEQUENT
COMPONENTS
The environmental system has the follow-
ing main components:
Belt-driven compressor (right engine)
Condenser blower
Evaporator
Aft evaporator
Forward vent blower
Forward and aft mixing plenums
Floor outlet ducts
Ceiling eyeball outlets
Temperature-sensing devices
Autotemperature controller
Flow control unit
Pilot/copilot outlets
Defroster
Air-to-air heat exchangers
Bleed air valves
Heating air outlets
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COMPRESSOR
A bel t-dri ven compressor on the ri ght
engine operates in either auto or manual
cool modes. The compressor has built-in
safety devices that prevent its operation
i n cases of refri gerant over- or under-
pressure conditions.
Condenser Blower
Two condensers joined together in a V are
in the nose crossover duct. Ram air flowing
through the condenser condenses and cools
the refrigerant gas passing through it into
l i qui d for use i n cool i ng the cabi n ai r
(Figure 11-14).
The condenser blower enhances airflow
through the condenser for more efficient
operation and runs in the auto or manual
cool modes when t he ai r condi t i oner
is operating.
Forward Evaporator
and Blower
The forward evaporator bl ower motor
recirculates cockpit air through the forward
evaporator in the right side of the nose
behind the crossover duct. The refrigerant
flowing through the evaporator absorbs
heat from the recirculated cockpit air,
cooling the air passing through it.
Aft Evaporators and Blowers
High speed fans blow recirculated cabin
air through two evaporators under the
floorboards in the center aft cabin behind
the main spar.
The ref r i gerant f l owi ng t hrough t he
evaporator tubing absorbs heat from the
recirculated air cooling it before it returns
to the cabin. The cooled air reenters the
cabin through the aft floor and ceiling
outlets. When the air conditioning system
is off, the blowers provide recirculated
cabin air for ventilation.
FWD and AFT Mixing Plenums
Bleed air coming into the aircraft is routed
i nt o f orward and af t mi xi ng pl enums
beneath the cabin floorboards. The mixing
pl enums combi ne bl eed ai r wi t h
recirculated cabin air to reduce bleed air
temperature for passenger comfort. The
condi t i oned ai r i s t hen rout ed i nt o
the cabin.
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RECIEVER-
DRYER AND
SIGHT GAUGE
Figure 11-14. Condenser and Receiver-
Dryer Sight Gauge
Cockpit Heating Air Outlets
Heating air outlets are under the instru-
ment panel and outboard of the pilot and
copilot seats on the floor (Figure 11-15). The
COCKPI T BLOWER cont rol knob
controls air flow volume to these outlets.
The supplemental electric heat system
discharges warm air directly aft of the
cockpit center pedestal through a single
floor outlet (Figure 11-16).
Cabin Floor Outlet Ducts
The floor outlet ducts are between the
passenger seat s al ong t he ai rcraf t
floorboards where they contact the interior
sidewall of the aircraft cabin (Figure 11-17).
Pressurization air heated as required by
the environmental system enters the cabin
through these vents.
Ceiling Eyeball Outlets
Eyeball outlets in the headliner provide cool
air to the crew and passengers (Figure 11-17).
Each outlet can be adjusted to direct the
airstream as desired. Twisting the nozzle
adjusts air volume from full open to closed.
As the nozzle is twisted, a damper opens or
closes to regulate airflow. The cockpit has
two eyeball outlets; the cabin has seven
such outlets.
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Figure 11-15. Cockpit Eyeball Outlets
Figure 11-17. Floor and Ceiling Outlets
Figure 11-16. Supplemental Heat Vent
Temperature-Sensing Devices
The cockpit and cabin temperature sensors
work with the following to adjust the air to
the desired temperatures (Figure 11-18):
ENVIRONMENT MODE switch
Cockpi t and cabi n t emperat ure
control knobs
A sensor in the floor ducts monitors the
bleed air temperature. If excessive temper-
ature is sensed, the sensor activates an
annunciator in the cockpit.
Auto Temperature Controller
With the ENVIRONMENT MODE switch
pos i t i oned t o AUTO, t he aut omat i c
temperature controller uses inputs from
cockpit and cabin temperature sensors to
adjust the system and maintain the desired
temperatures (Figure 11-18).
Environmentally conditioned air flows
constantly to the windshield defrost and
glareshield outlets.
In AUTO mode, the air is regulated to a
maximum temperature of 70F (21C). If
more heat is required in colder environ-
ments, the temperature of the outlet air is
allowed to increase to 105F (41C).
In MAN HEAT mode, the COCKIT TEMP
knob controls glareshield and overhead
temperatures. Airflow can be increased
with the BLOWER knob.
Flow Control Unit
In flight, flow control units on each engine
firewall mix outside ambient air with bleed
air to make bleed air temperature more
manageable for the environmental system.
On the ground, these flow control units supply
only bleed air to the environmental system.
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LEFT ENGINE
BLEED AIR
RIGHT ENGINE
BLEED AIR
AIR CONDITIONER
MANUAL
TEMP
INCR
DECR
AUTO TEMP
CONTROLLER
DUCT
CABIN
SELECTOR
RH BYPASS
VALVE MOTOR
LH BYPASS
VALVE MOTOR
LH BYPASS
VALVE MOTOR
SWITCH
COOL
COOL
MANUAL
HEAT
OR COOL
HEAT
HEAT
AUTO
MANUAL
COOL
TO CABIN
TO CABIN
AIR TO AIR
HEAT
EXCHANGER
AIR TO AIR
HEAT
EXCHANGER
TEMP
SENSORS
Figure 11-18. Air Conditioning System Control Diagram
Defrost System
Two ducts provide warm air to the defroster
below the windshields where they contact
the top of the glareshield.
Air-to-Air Heat Exchangers
An air-to-air heat exchanger is in the center
section of each wing inboard of the engines.
Bleed air passes through the air-to-air heat
exchangers to reduce the air temperature.
Bleed Air Valves
The bleed air valves are in the environ-
mental flow control units on each engine
firewall. The valves control bleed air flow
into the aircraft and into the environmen-
tal, pressurization and pneumatic systems
(Figure 11-19).
Controls And Indications
The ENVIRONMENTAL panel on the
copilot left subpanel provides automatic
or manual control of the air conditioning
system (Figure 11-19).
BLEED AIR VALVES Switches
Two BLEED AI R VALVES s wi t ches
control the inflow of pressurization air for
cockpit and cabin climate control (Figure
11-19). Each switch has three positions:
OPENAllows bleed air into the
cabin for pressurization and climate
control
ENVIR OFFRestricts bleed air
from the respecti ve si de envi ron-
ment al f l ow cont rol uni t f rom
entering the pressurization and air
conditioning systems; for maximum
cooling on the ground, place switches
in ENVIR OFF position
PNEU & ENVIR OFFRespective
bleed air valve closes completely to
deny bleed air to the pressurization,
ai r condi t i oni ng and pneumat i c
systems.
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Figure 11-19. ENVIRONMENTAL Panel
Environmental Control Knob
The environmental control system knob
has five positions (Figure 11-20):
OFFAir completely shut off; no
bleed air input to cockpit or cabin
AUTOAi r condi t i oni ng and
heating systems operate automati-
cal l y to establ i sh pi l ot-requested
temperature
MAN COOLAi r condi t i oni ng
s ys t em operat es i n res pons e t o
manual i nput f rom pi l ot ; ai r
conditioner operates as long as system
pressures acceptable and right engine
N
1
speed above 62%
MAN HEATBot h cabi n and
cockpi t fl oor heat servos opened
fully; accomplish cockpit and cabin
temperatures through MAN TEMP
switch to either INCR or DECR
ELEC HEATDi rect s ai r over
resistive heater elements into the
cabin; operative on the ground only.
COCKPIT/CABIN TEMP Knobs
The COCKPIT and CABIN TEMP control
knobs regulate the temperature in the AUTO
and manual positions (Figure 11-21).
Rotate the COCKPIT TEMP control knob
as required to adjust cockpit temperature.
A temperature sensor in the cockpit, in
conjunction with the temperature setting,
initiates a heat or cool command to the
temperature controller.
Rotate the CABIN TEMP control knob to
adjust cabin temperature. A temperature
sensor behind the first set of passenger
oxygen masks, i n conj uncti on wi th the
temperature setting, initiates a heat or cool
command to the temperature controller.
COCKPIT/CABIN BLOWER
Knobs
The COCKPIT and CABIN BLOWER
knobs control the forward and aft vent
bl ower (Fi gure 11-21). Each knob has
two positions:
AUTOBl ower operat es at l ow
s peed i f envi ronment al cont rol
system knob is in any position except
OFF and cabin/cockpit temperature
has reached the set point as selected
by t he crew. If t he cabi n/ cockpi t
temperature is significantly different
than the desired temperature, the
blowers automatically come on high
and then slow as the temperature
approaches the desired set point.
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Figure 11-21. COCKPIT and CABIN
BLOWER Control Knobs
Figure 11-20. Environmental System
Control Knobs
Out of AUTOAllows pilot to set
desired blower speed.
When t he VENT BLOWER s wi t ch i s
positioned to AUTO and the environmen-
tal control system knob is positioned to
OFF, the blower ceases operation.
MAN TEMP INCR-DECR Switch
The MAN COOL or MAN HEAT position
of the environmental control system knob
allows manual adjustment of the cockpit
and cabi n temperature (Fi gure 11-22).
Momentarily positioning the MAN TEMP
switch to the INCR or DECR regulates
bl eed ai r temperature as i t enters the
aircraft; it does not affect the flow rate.
ENVIR BLEED AIR Switch
The ENVIR BLEED AIR switch on the
copilot left subpanel controls bleed air flow
volume (Figure 11-23). The switch has three
positions:
NORMALFor increased heating or
pressurization airflow.; use during
climb to ensure optimum pressuriza-
tion at higher altitude
AUTOAl l ows envi ronment al
syst em cont rol l er t o sel ect f l ow
setti ng automati cal l y to mai ntai n
cockpit temperature or cabin pressure
requirements; recommended position
for most operations.
LOWDefault setting except when
system demands additional heating
If t he envi ronment al cont rol knob i s
positioned to MAN HEAT, the bleed flow
def aul t s t o NORMAL. I f t he f l ow i s
positioned to MAN COOL, the bleed flow
defaults to LOW.
Always monitor cabin pressur-
i zat i on requi rement s when i n
MAN COOL. Manual adj ust -
ments to the ENVIR BLEED AIR
flow setting may be required.
For maximum engine performance and/or
high altitude takeoff requirements, position
the ENVIR BLEED AIR switch to LOW.
CAUTION
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Figure 11-23. ENVIR BLEED AIR Switch
Figure 11-22. MAN TEMP INCR-DECR
Switch
AIR COND N
1
LOW
Annunciator
The N
1
s peed s wi t ch ( engi ne s peed)
prevents compressor operation outside of
established limitation parameters. The white
AIR COND N
1
LOW annunciator illumi-
nates to indicate that the right engine speed
is below 62% N
1
and air conditioning is
requested (Figure 11-24).
DUCT OVERTEMP Annunciator
If airflow in the ducts becomes too low, the
amber DUCT OVERTEMP annunciator
illuminates to indicate duct temperature
has reached approximately 300F (148C)
(Figure 11-24).
ELEC HEAT Position
The supplemental electric heat system is
operated on the ground with the ELEC
HEAT position on the ENVIRONMEN-
TAL control system knob (see Figure 11-
20). The system is squat-switch protected
from airborne operation.
ELEC HEAT ON Annunciator
The amber ELEC HEAT ON annunciator
indicates that the power relays are closed
to apply power to the heating elements
(Figure 11-24).
Before blowers are selected OFF when
electric heat is off, the ELEC HEAT ON
annunci at or must be ext i ngui shed t o
i ndi cat e power i s removed f rom t he
heating elements.
BL AIR OFF LR Annunciators
Green BL AIR OFF LR annunciators
i l l umi nat e whenever t he res pect i ve
BLEED AIR VALVES OPEN switch is in
any position other than OPEN.
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Figure 11-24. Annunciator Panel
OPERATION
Automatic Mode Control
The AUTO position of the ENVIRON-
MENTAL control knob allows the heating
and air conditioning systems to operate
automatically. The system adjusts bleed
ai r temperature and bl ower speed and
cycles the air conditioning compressor
as necessary t o mai nt ai n t he sel ect ed
temperature. The recommended setting on
these knobs i s the 12 o cl ock (strai ght
up) posi t i on, whi ch i s approxi mat el y
75F (24C).
If a different blower speed is desired, the
respective COCKPIT or CABIN BLOWER
knob can be rot at ed f rom t he AUTO
position to desired speed.
Cooling
Plumbing from the compressor on the right
engine is routed through the right wing and
t hen f or ward t o t he condens er coi l ,
receiver-dryer, expansion valve, bypass
valve, and forward evaporator. All of these
are in the nose of the aircraft.
The forward vent blower moves recircu-
l at ed cabi n ai r t hrough t he f or ward
evaporator, into the mixing boxes, into
the cockpit distribution ducts, and then out
the gl areshi el d outl ets and wi ndshi el d
defrost vents.
The cabi n bl owers provi de mai n cabi n
cooling by routing recirculated cabin air
through two evaporators and into the cabin
through the eyeball outlets in the cabin
and cockpit headliner.
When the system is commanded to provide
little or no warmed air to the cabin, the
majority of the warmer P3 air from the
engines is routed to the aft of the cabin
into the baggage compartment to avoid
interference with the cooling process. The
out f l ow val ves qui ckl y evacuat e t hi s
warmer air overboard.
Protection controls prevent compressor
operation if the following conditions occur:
Refrigerant pressure too high or low
Right bleed air bypass valve reaches
limit switch (indicates air condition-
ing not required because significant
heat introduced into system)
Ri ght engi ne s peed bel ow 62%
N
1
; whi t e AI R COND N
1
LOW
annunciator illuminates
Heating
Bleed air from the compressor of each
engi ne i s del i vered i nto the cabi n for
heating and pressurization purposes. When
the left landing gear safety switch is in the
ground position, the ambient air valve in
each flow control unit is closed. Therefore,
only bleed air is delivered. When airborne,
bleed air is mixed with outside ambient air
from the ambient air valve in each flow
control unit until a cold air temperature
closes off the ambient flow. Then, only
bleed air is delivered.
With the environmental control system
knob i n AUTO, t he t emperat ure of
conditioned air is set to approximately 70F
(21C). In colder temperature extremes
where more heat is initially demanded, this
is increased to approximately 105F (41C).
Electric Heat
When the ELEC HEAT position is selected
on the environmental control system knob,
air is directed over several heater elements
in a duct aft of the forward evaporator and
into the cabin. (see Figure 11-20). Air is
distributed through the electric heating
duct by the cockpit blower that operates
aut omat i cal l y when t he ELEC HEAT
position is selected.
The amber ELEC HEAT ON annunciator
illuminates to advise the flight crew that
power i s bei ng appl i ed to the heati ng
elements (see Figure 11-24). The electric
heat system draws approximately 160 amps.
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Heated air enters the cabin via a single flood
outlet directly aft of the cockpit pedestal.
The el ectri c heat must not be
operat ed wi t h t he cabi n door
cl os ed or t he pedes t al f l oor
outlet blocked.
During electrical heat operation, the blower
operates at maximum speed regardless of
the COCKPIT BLOWER knob setting.
This electrical heat system is a supple-
ment al heat i ng s ys t em f or ground
operation only.
Bef ore desel ect i ng t he ELEC HEAT
posi ti on, the amber ELEC HEAT ON
annunciator must be extinguished. This
indicates the heating elements have been
sufficiently deenergized for safety. If the
annunci at or remai ns i l l umi nat ed, t he
system is not functioning correctly.
To maintain adequate airflow across the
heat i ng el ement s, t he ELEC HEAT
posi t i on must be resel ect ed unt i l t he
engines have been shut down. Maintenance
is required prior to flight.
Af t er des el ect i ng t he ELEC HEAT
posi t i on, saf et y devi ces i n t he heat er
assembl y may conti nue to temporari l y
operate the blower at low speed. This allows
proper cooling of the heater elements to
avoid overheating the duct.
NOTE
If after desel ecti ng the ELEC
HEAT position and initial blower
shutdown, residual element heat
causes the duct temperature to
cont i nue t o r i s e, t he bl ower
automatically cycles to cool the
el ement s regardl ess of BATT
switch position.
Defrost
A cons t ant f l ow of envi ronment al l y
condi t i oned ai r i s provi ded t o t he
windshield defrost and glareshield outlets.
In the AUTO mode, the temperature of this
ai r i s approxi mat el y 70 F ( 21 C) . I n
extremely cold conditions, this air is allowed
to reach 105F (41C).
Vent Blower Control
Unpressurized Ventilation
Fresh air is available during unpressurized
flight with the CABIN PRESS switch in
the DUMP position. This ambient (ram)
air is obtained through the fresh air door
and the ram-air scoop in the aircraft nose
section (see Figure 11-4). There is no fresh
air scoop on the new Keith ECS system for
unpressurized flight.
This door is open only during unpressurized
flight when the switch is in the DUMP
position and there is 0 psi. This allows the
forward blower to draw ram air into the
cabin. This air is mixed with recirculated
cabin air in the plenum chamber and then
directed to both the floor registers and
ceiling outlets. The CABIN AIR control
knob regulates the air volume. There are no
longer CABIN AIR CONTROL KNOBS
on the new system.
NOTE
A flight conducted with the bleed-
air switches placed in any position
other than OPEN also results in
unpressurized flight, but the fresh
air door is not open. There is no
fresh air door.
Manual Mode Control
With the environmental knob in MAN
HEAT, control of the cabin and cockpit
temperatures is accomplished through the
MAN TEMP switch. Moving the switch to
either INCR or DECR regulates the bleed
air temperature as it enters the cabin; flow
rate is unchanged.
CAUTION
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Swi t ch i nput of t wo t o t hree seconds
duration is recommended with a full 60
seconds i n bet ween t o avoi d over- or
undershooting desired temperature. The
time it takes the bleed air temperature to
respond to switch input is proportional to
the time the MAN TEMP switch is actuated
(requiring approximately 30 seconds to go
f rom f ul l decrease t o f ul l i ncrease or
vice versa).
Switch actuation longer than 23
seconds and less than 60 seconds in
duration can result in duct overheat-
ing and illumination of the amber
DUCT OVERTEMP annunciator.
The CABIN TEMP or COCKPIT TEMP
knobs fully control the temperature of the
air to the glareshield and defrost vents
when either MAN HEAT or MAN COOL
is selected.
LIMITATIONS
For specific information on limitations
procedures, refer to the FAA-approved
Airplane Flight Manual (AFM).
EMERGENCY/
ABNORMAL
For specific information on emergency/
abnor mal pr oc edur es, r ef er t o t he
appropriate abbreviated checklists or the
FAA-approved AFM.
CAUTION
1. The vapor-cycle refrigeration compres-
sor is located:
A. On t he ri ght engi ne accessory
section.
B. On t he l ef t engi ne acces s or y
section.
C. In the baggage compartment.
D. On the forward pressure bulkhead.
2. If the engine speed is too low for the
ai r condi t i oni ng compres s or t o
properly engage, the:
A. Whi t e [ AI R COND N1 LOW]
status annunciator illuminates.
B. Green [ AI R COND N1 LOW]
advisory annunciator illuminates.
C. Engine will automatically increase
i n s peed t o al l ow compres s or
operation.
D. Compressor will engage and the
white [AIR COND N1 LOW] status
annunciator will illuminate.
3. For more eff i ci ent cool i ng on t he
ground, pl ace t he BLEED AI R
VALVES switches to the __________
position.
A. OPEN
B. CLOSED
C. ENVIR OFF
D. PNEU & ENVIR OFF
4. In the MAN HEAT mode on the ECS,
the pilot controls temperature with the:
A. CABIN TEMP knob.
B. COCKPIT TEMP knob.
C. ENVIR BLEED AIR switch.
D. MAN TEMP INCR DECR switch
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QUESTIONS
12-i
CHAPTER 12
PRESSURIZATION
CONTENTS
Page
INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................. 12-1
GENERAL.......................................................................................................................... 12-1
COMPONENTS................................................................................................................. 12-2
Flow Control Unit....................................................................................................... 12-2
CONTROLS AND INDICATIONS ............................................................................... 12-5
Pressurization Controller ........................................................................................... 12-5
Switches ........................................................................................................................ 12-6
Gauges ......................................................................................................................... 12-7
Annunciators ............................................................................................................... 12-7
OPERATION ..................................................................................................................... 12-8
Preflight Operation ..................................................................................................... 12-8
In-Flight Operation..................................................................................................... 12-8
Descent and Landing Operation............................................................................... 12-8
Abnormal Operation .................................................................................................. 12-9
LIMITATIONS................................................................................................................... 12-9
Cabin Differential Pressure Gauge........................................................................... 12-9
PRESSURIZATION PROFILES ................................................................................. 12-10
MALFUNCTIONS AND TROUBLESHOOTING................................................... 12-15
QUESTIONS.................................................................................................................... 12-17
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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12-iii
ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Title Page
12-1 Pressurization Controls ...................................................................................... 12-2
12-2 Electronic Flow Control Unit............................................................................ 12-2
12-3 Outflow Valve...................................................................................................... 12-3
12-4 Safety Valve ......................................................................................................... 12-4
12-5 Pressurization System Schematic ...................................................................... 12-5
12-6 BLEED AIR VALVES Switches ...................................................................... 12-6
12-7 ENVIR BLEED AIR Switch ............................................................................ 12-6
12-8 CABIN PRESS Switch ....................................................................................... 12-7
12-9 CABIN ALT Gauge............................................................................................ 12-7
12-10 Annunciators ....................................................................................................... 12-7
12-11 Pressurization Controller Setting for Landing ................................................ 12-9
12-12 Situation 1 .......................................................................................................... 12-10
12-13 Situation 2 .......................................................................................................... 12-11
12-14 Situation 3 .......................................................................................................... 12-12
12-15 Situation 4 .......................................................................................................... 12-13
12-16 Situation 5 .......................................................................................................... 12-14
TABLE
Table Title Page
12-1 Descent and Landing.......................................................................................... 12-8
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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INTRODUCTION
This chapter describes the pressurization system on the King Air 350 aircraft. The
pressurization system provides a normal working pressure differential of 6.5 0.1
psi for cabin pressure altitudes of 2,800 feet at 20,000 feet, 8,600 feet at 31,000 feet,
and 10,380 feet at 35,000 feet. The pressurization inflow system also provides
fresh air ventilation.
GENERAL
Bleed air from each engine pressurizes the
cabin and cockpit areas. Pressurization is
regul at ed t hrough a pres s ur i zat i on
controller, monitored by a cabin altime-
ter/ psi d i ndi cator, and a rate-of-cl i mb
indicator. Pressurization can be dumped
with the CABIN PRESS DUMP switch.
The system includes a flow control unit as
well as a vacuum line drain and outflow
and safety valves (Figure 12-1).
CHAPTER 12
PRESSURIZATION
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COMPONENTS
FLOW CONTROL UNIT
An electronic flow control unit (FCU) in
each engine nacelle controls the volume
of the bleed air. It combines ambient air
with the bleed air to provide a suitable air
dens i t y f or pres s ur i zat i on. The FCU
controls the mass flow of both ambient and
bleed air into the cabin (Figure 12-2).
Each unit consists of an ambient tempera-
ture sensor, an electronic controller, and an
environmental air control valve assembly
interconnected by a wire harness. The control
valve assembly consists of the following:
Mass flow transducer
Ambient flow motor and modulating
valve
Check valve that prevents bleed air from
escaping through ambient air intake
BLEED AIR
FLOW TRANSDUCER
POWER
SQUAT
SWITCH
AMBIENT
AIR
INLET
AMBIENT
FLOW CONTROL
MOTOR
AMBIENT
FLOW TRANSDUCER
(MASS FLOW
SENSOR)
CHECK
VALVE
ENGINE
BLEED AIR
ELECTRONIC
CONTROLLER
BLEED AIR
FLOW CONTROL
MOTOR
SOLENOID (N.C.)
ENVIRONMENTAL
SHUTOFF
VALVE (N.C.)
AIR
EJECTOR
BLEED AIR
(HIGH FLOW)
BYPASS
TO DUCT
DISTRIBUTION
SYSTEM
COCKPIT BLEED AIR
VALVE SWITCH
AMBIENT
TEMPERATURE
SENSOR
LEGEND
HP BLEED AIR
CONTROL PRESSURE NO. 2
VENT AIR
FIRESEAL
Figure 12-2. Electronic Flow Control Unit
VAC/PNEU
MANIFOLD
NO. 1 DUAL-FED BUS 5A
PRESS
CONTROL
DUMP
PRESR
TEST
SQUAT
SWITCH
LEFT BLEED
AIR VALVE
OUTFLOW
VALVE DRAIN
DUMP SOLENOID (N.C.)
PRESET SOLENOID (N.C.)
SAFETY VALVE PRESSURIZATION
CONTROLLER
OUTFLOW VALVE
Figure 12-1. Pressurization Controls
Bleed air flow transducer
Bleed air flow motor and modulat-
ing valve (including bypass line)
Air ejector
Flow control solenoid valve
Environmental shutoff valve
When the FCU is energized after engine
start up, the bleed air modulating valve
closes. When it is fully closed, it actuates the
bl eed ai r shaft swi tch. Thi s si gnal s the
electronic controller to open the solenoid
valve to enable P3 bleed air to pressurize
the environmental shutoff valve open.
The bleed air shaft continues to open until
the desired bleed-air flow rate to the cabin
is reached. The bleed-air flow transducer
s ens es t he f l ow rat e. The el ect roni c
controller controls the input of the ambient
temperature sensor.
As the aircraft enters a cooler environment,
ambient airflow is gradually reduced. Bleed-
air flow gradually increases to maintain a
constant inflow and to provide sufficient
heat for the cabin. At approximately 0C
(32F) ambient temperature, ambient airflow
is completely closed off. The bleed air valve
bypass section opens as necessary to allow
more bl eed ai r fl ow past the fi xed fl ow
passage of the air ejector.
The FCUs regulate the rate of airflow to the
pressure vessel. The bleed air portion is
variable from approximately 5 to 14 pounds
per minute (ppm) depending upon ambient
temperature. On the ground, since ambient
air is not available, cabin inflow is variable
and limited by ambient temperature. In
flight, ambient air provides the balance of
the constant airflow volume of 12 to 14 ppm.
From here, t he ai r f or pressuri zat i on,
cooling, and heating flows into the pressure
vessel to create differential, and then out
through the outflow valve (Figure 12-3) on
the aft pressure bulkhead.
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SCHRADER
VALVE
PLUG
STATIC AIR
MAXIMUM
DIFFERENTIAL
DIAPHRAGM
TO CONTROLLER
CONNECTION
UPPER
(CONTROL)
DIAPHRAGM
NEGATIVE
RELIEF
DIAPHRAGM
REAR
PRESSURE
BULKHEAD
LEGEND
CONTROL PRESSURE NO. 2
VENT AIR
CONTROL PRESSURE NO. 3
Figure 12-3. Outflow Valve
To the left of the outflow valve (looking
forward) is a safety valve (Figure 12-4). This
valve provides pressure relief if the outflow
val ve f ai l s, depressuri zes t he ai rcraf t
whenever the CABIN PRESS DUMP switch
is in DUMP, and keeps the aircraft unpres-
surized while it is on the ground with the left
landing gear safety switch compressed.
A negative pressure relief function that
prevents outside atmospheric pressure from
exceeding cabin pressure by more than
0.1 psi during rapid descents with or without
bleed air flow is also incorporated into
both valves.
When the BLEED AIR VALVES switches
are positioned to OPEN, the air mixture
(bleed air and ambient air) from the FCU
enters the aircraft. When the aircraft is on
the ground, only bleed air enters the cabin
because the safety switch causes the FCU
to close a valve that allows ambient air to
mix with the bleed air.
At liftoff, the safety valve closes and, except
for cold temperatures, ambient air begins
to enter the FCU, and then the pressure
vessel. As the left FCU ambient air valve
opens, in approximately 6 to 8 seconds, the
right FCU ambient air valve opens. By
increasing airflow volume gradually (left
first, then right), excessive pressure bumps
are avoided during takeoff.
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SCHRADER
VALVE
STATIC AIR
MAXIMUM
DIFFERENTIAL
DIAPHRAGM
SAFETY VALVE DUMP SOLENOID
UPPER CONTROL
DIAPHRAGM
NEGATIVE RELIEF
DIAPHRAGM
REAR
PRESSURE
BULKHEAD
CABIN
AIR
LEGEND
CONTROL PRESSURE NO. 2
CONTROL PRESSURE NO. 3
Figure 12-4. Safety Valve
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CONTROLS
AND INDICATIONS
PRESSURIZATION
CONTROLLER
An adj us t abl e cabi n pres s ur i zat i on
cont rol l er near t he t hrott l e quadrant
modulates the outflow valve (Figure 12-5).
A dual - scal e di al i n t he cent er of t he
controller indicates the cabin pressure
altitude on the outer scale (CABIN ALT)
and maximum aircraft altitude on the inner
scale (ACFT ALT) at which the aircraft
can fly without causing the cabin pressure
t o exceed maxi mum di ff erent i al . The
engines maintain a 6.5 0.1 psi differential
that provides a nominal cabin pressure
altitude of 10,380 feet at an aircraft altitude
of 35,000 feet.
The RATE control knob controls the rate
at which cabin pressure altitude changes
from the current value to the selected value.
The selected rate of change can be from
approxi mat el y 20 0 t o 2, 0 0 0 f eet per
minute (fpm).
FILTER
FLOW CONTROL
PRESSURE
MOISTURE
ACCUMULATION
DRAIN
ORIFICE
ORIFICE
ALTITUDE LIMIT
CONTROLLER
ALTITUDE
LIMIT
CONTROLLER
350
ONLY
350 ONLY
PLUG
STATIC
STATIC
OUT-
FLOW
VALVE
SAFETY
VALVE
RATE
ALTITUDE
RESTRICTOR
VACUUM SOURCE
FROM
PNEUMATIC
MANIFOLD
CONTROL SWITCH
CABIN PRESSURE
DUMP SOLENOID
NC
CABIN PRESET
SOLENOID
NO LG
SAFETY
SWITCH
LEGEND
CABIN AIR
VACUUM SOURCE
STATIC AIR
CONTROL PRESSURE
INTERNAL PRESSURE
Figure 12-5. Pressurization System Schematic
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SWITCHES
BLEED AIR VALVES Switches
The LEFTRIGHT BLEED AIR VALVES
switches are in the ENVIRONMENTAL
group of the copilot subpanel (Figure 12-
6). When either switch is positioned to
ENVIR OFF or PNEU & ENVIR OFF, the
environmental air valve is closed.
When either switch is in OPEN, the air
mixture flows through the environmental
air valve toward the cabin.
ENVIR BLEED AIR Switch
The ENVIR BLEED AIR switch on the
copilot left subpanel controls the volume
of bleed air (Figure 12-7).
The LOW pos i t i on reduces bl eed ai r
extracted from the engines for environ-
mental purposes to approximately half the
normal amount. This position is normally
used during operations in ambient temper-
atures above 10C to ensure takeoff power
is available. For maximum engine perfor-
mance and/or high altitude takeoff require-
ments, the switch should be in LOW.
The NORMAL position increases heating or
increases pressurization airflow; it is usually
selected during climb to ensure optimum
performance of the system at higher altitudes.
The AUTO position is the recommended
position because it allows the environ-
mental system controller to automatically
sel ect t he f l ow sett i ng based on heat
required to maintain temperature or cabin
pressure requirements.
In order for the AUTO position to function
properly in response to the heating/cooling
requirements, the environmental MODE
cont rol mus t be i n AUTO ( s ee Ai r
Conditioning chapter).
Always monitor cabin pressuriza-
tion requirements if the environ-
mental MODE switch is in MAN
COOL because manual adjust-
ment s may be requi red t o t he
ENVIR BLEED AIR setting.
CABIN PRESS Switch
The CABIN PRESS swi tch l eft of the
pressurization controller (Figure 12-8) has
DUMP-PRESS-and TEST positions.
The DUMP (forward lever locked) position
opens the safety valve so the cabin can
depressurize to approximately 13,500 feet.
Above t hat al t i t ude, i t mai nt ai ns t he
13,500 feet.
CAUTION
Figure 12-6. BLEED AIR VALVES Switches
Figure 12-7. ENVIR BLEED AIR Switch
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The PRESS (center) position pressurizes
t he cabi n i n f l i ght dependi ng on t he
controller setting. It closes the safety valve
so the controller can take command of the
outflow valve.
The TEST (aft) position holds the safety
valve closed, bypassing the landing gear
safety switch, to allow cabin pressurization
tests on the ground.
GAUGES
CABIN ALT Gauge
The CABIN ALT gauge is on the right side
of the control panel with the annunciator
panel. It continuously monitors actual cabin
pressure altitude (outer scale) and cabin
differential (inner scale) (Figure 12-9).
CABIN CLIMB Gauge
The CABIN CLIMB (cabin vertical speed)
gauge is left of the CABIN ALT indicator.
It continuously monitors the rate at which
cabin pressure altitude is changing in feet
per minute.
ANNUNCIATORS
Annunciators for the pressurization system
are on t he war ni ng panel and t he
caution/advisory panel (Figure 12-10):
Whi t e CABI N ALTI TUDE
Illuminates to indicate cabin altitude
exceeds 10,000 feet
Amber L- R BL AI R OFF
Illuminates to indicates flow control
unit closed
Red CABIN ALT HIIlluminates to
i ndi cates cabi n pressure al ti tude
exceeds 12,000 feet
Red CABIN DIFF HIIlluminates
to indicate cabin differential pressure
exceeds 6.9 psi
Figure 12-9. CABIN ALT Gauge
Figure 12-10. Annunciators
Figure 12-8. CABIN PRESS Switch
OPERATION
PREFLIGHT OPERATION
Prior to takeoff, adjust the CABIN ALT
selector knob until the ACFT ALT (inner)
scale on the dial reads an altitude of approx-
imately 1,000 feet above the planned cruise
pressure altitude or at least 500 feet above
the takeoff field pressure altitude. Adjust
the RATE control knob as desired. When
the index mark is set at 12 oclock position,
the most comfortabl e rate of cl i mb i s
maintained. Position the CABIN PRESS
DUMP switch to PRESS.
IN-FLIGHT OPERATION
As the aircraft climbs, the cabin pressure
al ti tude cl i mbs at the sel ected rate of
change until the cabin reaches the selected
pres s ure al t i t ude. The s ys t em t hen
maintains cabin pressure altitude at the
selected value.
If the aircraft climbs to an altitude higher than
the value indexed on the ACFT ALT scale, the
cabin-to-ambient pressure differential reaches
the pressure relief settings of the outflow valve
and the safety valve (6.5 psi cabin-to-ambient
differential). The red CABIN DIFF HI
annunciator illuminates at 6.9 3 psi cabin-to-
ambient differential pressure.
If the flight plan requires an altitude change
of 1,000 feet or more during cruise, the
CABIN ALT dial must be readjusted.
DESCENT AND LANDING
OPERATION
During descent and in preparation for
l andi ng, set the CABIN ALT gauge to
indicate a cabin altitude of approximately
500 feet above the landing field pressure
altitude (Table 12-1). Adjust the RATE
control knob as requi red to provi de a
comfortable cabin altitude rate of descent.
The aircraft rate of descent is controlled so
the aircraft altitude does not catch up with
the cabin pressure altitude until the cabin
pressure altitude reaches the selected value
and stabilizes. As the aircraft descends to
and reaches the cabin pressure altitude, the
outflow valve remains open. This keeps the
vessel depressurized. As the aircraft contin-
ues to descend below the preselected cabin
pressure altitude, the cabin remains depres-
surized and follows the aircraft rate of
descent to touchdown.
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28.00 +2,400
28.10 +2,300
28.20 +2,200
28.30 +2,100
28.40 +2,000
28.50 +1,900
28.60 +1,800
28.70 +1,700
28.80 +1,600
28.90 +1,500
29.00 +1,400
29.10 +1,300
29.20 +1,200
29.30 +1,100
29.40 +1,000
29.50 +900
29.60 +800
29.70 +700
29.80 +600
29.90 +500
30.00 +400
30.10 +300
30.20 +200
30.30 +100
30.40 0
30.50 100
30.60 200
30.70 300
30.80 400
30.90 500
CLOSEST
ALTIMETER SETTING
ADD TO
AIRPORT ELEVATION
Table 12-1. DESCENT AND LANDING
ABNORMAL OPERATION
If cabin pressure altitude reaches a value of
10,000 feet, the white CABIN ALTITUDE
annunciator illuminates. An aural warning
al so sounds. Depress the CABIN ALT
WARN SILENCE button on the copilot
sub-panel to cancel the warning tone.
If cabin pressure altitude reaches a value
of 12,000 feet, the red CABIN ALT HI
annunciator illuminates. In addition, the
MASTER WARNING flashes illuminate
and an aural warning sounds. At 12,500
feet, the oxygen masks drop.
The aural warning can be cancelled, but
the CABIN ALTITUDE and CABIN ALT
HI annunciator remain illuminated as long
as the cabi n pressure al ti tude remai ns
above their respective actuation altitudes.
LIMITATIONS
CABIN DIFFERENTIAL
PRESSURE GAUGE
The cabin differential pressure gauge has
the following limitation markings:
Green arc (normal operating range
0 to 6.6 psi
Red arc ( unapproved operat i ng
range)6.6 psi to end of scale
Maximum cabin pressure differential is
6.6 psi.
Descent
During enroute descents and in preparation
for l andi ng, the CABIN ALT sel ector
should be set as appropriate for the lower
altitude. For enroute descents, set the ACFT
ALT to 5001000 feet above the level-off
flight altitude unless it results in a CABIN
ALT less than destination field pressure
altitude. On normal descents, the CABIN
ALT shoul d be set to i ndi cate a cabi n
altitude of approximately 500 feet above
the landing field pressure altitude (Figure
12-11), and the rate control selector should
be adj us t ed as requi red t o provi de a
comfortable rate of descent for the cabin.
The airplane rate of descent should be
controlled so that the airplane altitude does
not catch up with the cabin pressure altitude
until the cabin pressure altitude reaches
the selected value and stabilizes.
As the airplane descends to and reaches the
cabi n pressure al t i t ude, t he negat i ve-
pressure relief function modulates the
outflow and safety valves toward the full
open position, thereby equalizing the differ-
ence between ambient and cabin pressures.
When the airplane continues to descend
bel ow t he presel ect ed cabi n pressure
altitude, the cabin will be unpressurized
and will follow the airplane rate of descent
to touchdown.
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Figure 12-11. Pressurization Controller
Setting for Landing
PRESSURIZATION PROFILES
The following pressurization situations are
described in order to illustrate operation of
the system using normal flight situations.
In each case, the given conditions will be
outlined on the profile diagram.
Situation 1
Cl i mb f rom s ea l evel t o FL310, t hen
descend to a field pressure altitude of 1500
feet (Figure 12-12).
Conditions:
Ai rcraf t cl i mbs at 20 0 0 / mi n t o
FL200, then 1000/min to FL310
Cabin climbs at 500/min
Aircraft descends at 1500/min
Cabin descends at 500/min
Controller setup before takeoffPrior to
takeoff, set the inner dial (ACFT ALT) on
the pressurization controller to FL315 (500
feet above cruise altitude) which will provide
a 9000-foot al ti tude on the outer di al
(CABIN ALT). Set the rate knob between
the twelve and one oclock positions.
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Figure 12-12. Situation 1
Operat i onAs t he ai rcraf t cl i mbs t o
FL310, which will take approximately 21
minutes, the cabin climbs to 9000 feet in
approximately 18 minutes, thus the cabin
always stays ahead of the aircraft during
t he cl i mb. (St ayi ng ahead means t hat
maximum differential is never achieved
since the cabin climb rate is sufficient to
make the final altitude on its own.)
Cont rol l er set up f or descent As t he
aircraft starts to descend, set the outer dial
( CABI N ALT) t o 20 0 0 f eet pres s ure
altitude (500 feet above field pressure
altitude). The rate knob should stay in the
12 to 1 oclock position.
OperationAs the aircraft descends to the
field, which will take approximately 19
minutes, the cabin descends to 2000 feet,
which takes approximately 14 minutes. As
the aircraft passes 2000 feet, the cabin
descends unpressurized to 1500 feet with
the aircraft.
RemarksAll settings are normal and the
system reacts properly.
Situation 2
Cl i mb f rom s ea l evel t o FL310, t hen
descend to a field pressure altitude of 1500
feet (Figure 12-13).
Conditions:
Ai rcraf t cl i mbs at 20 0 0 / mi n t o
FL200, then 1000/min to FL310
Cabin climbs at 500/min
Aircraft descends at 1500/min
Cabin descends at 500/min
Controller setupSame as Situation 1
except set ACFT ALT dial to FL310 (same
as cruise altitude) which will put cabin at
max. differential when aircraft gets to final
al t i t ude. Set i t as i n Si t uat i on #1 f or
the descent.
OperationEverything is normal until the
cabin gets to max. differential which then
causes pressure bumps in the cabin. The
condition normalizes on descent.
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Figure 12-13. Situation 2
RemarksBy not setting the pressurization
controller properly, cabin pressure bumps
are likely with resultant discomfort for
passengers. The ACFT ALT dial should
be set to at least 500 feet above aircraft
cruise altitude.
Situation 3
Cl i mb f rom s ea l evel t o FL310, t hen
descend to a field pressure altitude of 1500
feet (Figure 12-14).
Conditions:
Ai rcraf t cl i mbs at 20 0 0 / mi n t o
FL200, then 1000/min to FL310
Cabin climbs at 500/min
Aircraft descends at 1500/min
Cabin descends at 500/min
Control l er setupSame si tuati on as 1
except set CABIN ALT dial to landing field
pressure al t i t ude pri or t o t akeoff. No
readjustment required for descent.
OperationEverything is normal until
max. differential is reached as the aircraft
passes approximately FL190. As the aircraft
continues to climb, the cabin climbs at a rate
proportional to but less than the aircrafts
rate since it remains on max. differential.
The cabin will be subject to pressure bumps
while on max. differential. Once the aircraft
starts to descend, the condition normal-
izes.
RemarksBy setting the controller for
landing prior to takeoff, a similar problem
t o t hat i n Si t uat i on 2 occur red wi t h
resultant passenger discomfort.
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Figure 12-14. Situation 3
Situation 4
The aircraft was held to 5000 feet for 15
mi nutes duri ng cl i mb, then cl eared to
FL310. The aircraft was given a segmented
descent to FL250 before given final descent
for landing (Figure 12-15).
Conditions:
Aircraft climbs at 2000/min to 5000,
l evel s of f f or 15 mi nut es t hen
continues to FL310.
Cabin climbs at 500/min to 4500,
levels off until reset, then climbs at
500/min to 9000.
Aircraft descends at 1500/min with
a 10min level off at FL250 before
continuing down for landing.
Cabin descends at 500/min with a
brief level off at 5900 until being
reset for landing, then descends at
500/min.
Cont rol l er set up bef ore t akeof f Set
CABIN ALT dial to 500 feet below (4500)
the aircraft intermediate level off altitude
(5000 feet). This prevents the cabin altitude
from catching up to the aircraft altitude
during climb.
When finally cleared to FL310Set the
ACFT ALT di al to 500 feet above the
assigned flight level as in Situation 1.
When cleared down to FL250Set the
ACFT ALT dial to 500 feet above the newly
assigned flight level.
When cleared for final descentSet the
CABIN ALT dial to 500 feet above field
pressure altitude.
OperationAs the aircraft climbs to 5000
feet, the cabin climbs to 4500 feet, thereby
maintaining a slight pressurization differ-
ential. When the aircraft climbs to FL310,
the controller is reset as in Situation 1 and
the cabin will climb accordingly. When the
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Figure 12-15. Situation 4
aircraft starts to descend to FL250, the
cabin starts down and levels at approxi-
mately 5900 feet. This allows the cabin
pressurization to stay on the controller and
not go to max. differential which avoids
bumps as in Situation 2. Once commencing
final descent, everything will proceed as
normal in Situation 1.
RemarksAn alternate method in this
situation is to set the rate knob to minimum
until cleared to the final altitude or for
final descent, at which time the rate knob
is reset for normal situations as in Situation
1. One problem with this alternate method
i s t hat i t di srupt s t he normal bal ance
between the outflow and safety valves on
takeoff and will result in a pressure bump
shortl y after takeoff. In addi ti on, i t i s
possible, although unlikely, that the cabin
pressurization could still catch up to the
ai rcraf t . Us i ng ei t her met hod i n t hi s
situation, forgetting to reset the controller
will result in problems similar to those
discussed in Situations 2 and 3.
Situation 5
Depart from an airport at a higher elevation
(in this case 6000 feet), fly at an altitude of
16,000 feet, and land at a sea level airport
20 minutes later (Figure 12-16).
Conditions:
Aircraft climbs at 2000/min to 16,000
Aircraft levels off for approx 5 min
Cabi n cl i mbs and des cends at
500/min
Controller setting before takeoffSet the
CABIN ALT dial to 500 feet above takeoff
field elevation (6000 feet).
OperationOnce the aircraft is stable in
the climb and cabin altitude stabilizes at
6500 feet, reset controller for landing,
usually within a few minutes after takeoff.
Controller setting in flightSet the CABIN
ALT dial to 500 feet above landing field
pressure altitude.
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Figure 12-16. Situation 5
OperationThe aircraft will continue to
climb to altitude while the cabin starts to
descend to 500 feet pressure al ti tude.
Aircraft levels at cruise, then descends for
landing. By the time the aircraft is ready for
landing, the cabin altitude is level at 500
feet (this assumes aircraft altitude vs. cabin
altitude does not exceed 6.6 psid).
RemarksIt is important to set the cabin
pressuri zat i on cont rol l er f or a cabi n
al t i t ude above t akeoff f i el d pressure
altitude. If it is set lower, a pressure bump
will be experienced shortly after liftoff
since the balance between the outflow and
safety valves will be disrupted. Once cabin
pressurization is stabilized after takeoff,
the controller may be reset for landing,
provided cruise altitude does not exceed the
altitude in the ACFT ALT window. If it
does, nor mal cont rol l er procedures
described earlier apply.
MALFUNCTIONS AND
TROUBLESHOOTING
The pressurization system in the Super
King Air 300 and 350 is derived from the
proven and highly reliable system used in
other King Airs. It is well engineered for
safety, comfort, rel i abi l i ty and ease of
operation. Pilot controls are simple and
straight-forward and workload is minimal.
The pilot has sufficient controls readily
avai l abl e t o ei t her regai n cont rol or
minimize the effect of most problems.
With loss of pressurization in flight, follow
the procedures outlined in the Emergency
Procedures section of the POH. Once the
situation in the aircraft has stabilized, and
if extreme care and good judgement are
utilized, other corrective action may be
taken using the techniques and procedures
discussed in this section as a guide.
For crew and passenger safety, pressuriza-
tion troubleshooting should be accom -
plished below an aircraft altitude of 10,000
feet MSL whenever possible. In addition,
only minimal troubleshooting should be
attempted with passengers onboard.
It should also be noted that as the cabin
climbs past 12,500 feet pressure altitude, the
passenger oxygen masks should deploy. If
they do not, the passenger manual dropout
handle should be pulled. See the Oxygen
section of this workbook for more details
about the oxygen system.
Most pressurization malfunctions will show
up shortly after takeoff. They will show three
general symptoms: rapid pressurization
toward maximum differential, lack of pressur-
ization (i.e., the cabin climbs at the same rate
as the aircraft), and cabin leakdown (i.e., the
cabin leaks pressurization slowly500
feet/minute at low-pressure differentials and
faster at high-pressure differentials.) The
first two symptoms are generally caused by
controller, control system, or outflow/safety
valve malfunctions. The third is normally
caused by air inflow problems.
Air inflow problems could be caused by a
malfunction within the flow control units.
Since it is unusual for both flow control
units to fail simultaneously, one probably
failed earlier and went undetected.
A second cause of air inflow problems on
takeoff can be the BLEED AIR VALVE
switches. They could have been left in the
ENVIR OFF or PNEU & ENVIR OFF. If
they are OPEN, an electrical failure to the
switches would cause these normally closed
valves to close (Figure 127). In this case,
the pilot should check the bleed air control
circuit breakers on the copilots circuit-
breaker panel.
If cabin altitude descends rapidly shortly
after takeoff, it is caused by closed outflow
and safety valves (Figures 128 and 129).
The safety valve normally closes shortly
after takeoff, but the outflow valve should
modulate open as directed by controller
pressure. The problem lies somewhere in
the plumbing and/or components in the
outflow system.
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Possible sources of this problem include: a
stuck preset solenoid, a cracked pressur-
ization controller, a diaphragm failure in
the pressuri zati on control l er, an open
moisture drain, disconnected or leaking
plumbing, a cracked outflow valve, or a
failed diaphragm in the outflow valve.
In this situation, the pilot should turn off
both bleed air valves, which will stop the P3
bleed air inflow and depressurize the cabin
at its leak rate. Once the cabin is stabilized,
cycling the CABIN PRESS switch to TEST
may free a stuck preset sol enoi d. The
moisture drain can be checked through its
access panel on the lower right sidewall of
the baggage compartment. Any additional
troubleshooting should be accomplished
on the ground.
Failure of the cabin to pressurize shortly
after takeoff is indicative of inflow and/or
outflow malfunctions. If the cabin altitude
climbs with the airplane, it indicates an
out f l ow probl em caus ed by an open
outflow and/or safety valve. The outflow
valve may have prematurely opened due to
the preset solenoid opening on the ground.
In this situation, the controller prematurely
thought the aircraft took off. Controller
pressure will hold the outflow valve wide
open until the aircraft catches up to the
controller pressure. This may not occur
unt i l t he ai rcraf t cl i mbs t hrough t he
altitude in the CABIN ALT window on
t he pres s ur i zat i on cont rol l er. I f t hi s
condition is suspected, the pilot can turn
the rate knob full counterclockwise to the
minimum position, which will minimize
any addi t i onal change i n cont rol l er
pressure. An alternative action would be
to select a lower cabin altitude with the
s el ect or ; however, i t i s i mpor t ant t o
remember to reselect the proper setting
once the cabin pressurizes normally.
If the safety valve remained open after
takeoff, cabin altitude would climb together
with the aircraft. This could be caused by:
the CABIN PRESS switch in DUMP, failure
of the left main squat switch, failure of the
dump solenoid, or a stuck safety valve
(Figure 12-9). The pilot should first check
to ensure the CABIN PRESS switch is in
PRESS (Figure 12-15). If it is already in
PRESS, move the switch to TEST, which
will override the squat switch which may
have malfunctioned. If the cabin begins to
pressurize, hold the switch in TEST until the
cabin differential pressure exceeds 0.5 psid,
then pull the PRESS CONTROL circuit
breaker on the copilots circuit breaker
panel. Normal pressurization control will
be res umed, but t he el ect r i cal dump
functions will not be available.
Wi t h t he PRESS CONTROL ci rcui t
breaker pulled out, the electrical functions
related to cabin dump are deenergized.
Therefore, pressurization dump with the
CABIN PRESS switch or upon landing
touchdown will be disabled until the circuit
breaker is reset.
If the cabin does not pressurize with the
CABIN PRESS switch in TEST, then the
problem is beyond the capability of in-
flight troubleshooting and must be repaired
when the aircraft lands.
Symptoms such as unusual or excessive
pressure bumps on takeoff or any time the
cont rol l er i s res et i ndi cat e s t i cki ng
outfl ow/ safety val ves, possi bl y due to
buildup of tars and nicotine. The filters
associated with this system may also be
dirty. A symptom of dirty filters is a large
difference (over 200 feet/minute) in the
cabin climb vs. the cabin descent with the
rate knob in the same position. These valves
and filters should be checked at regular
maintenance inspections; however, inspec-
tion intervals of these components may be
shortened when unusual conditions (heavy
smoking, dusty atmosphere) exist.
1. The CABIN ALT gauge indicates cabin
_______ and cabin _______ altitude.
A. Differential pressure; pressure
B. Differential pressure; density
C. Rate of climb; pressure
D. Rate of climb; density
2. The cabin _______ pressurize on the
ground by selecting the _______position
of the CABIN PRESS switch.
A. Will; DUMP
B. Will; TEST
C. Will not; DUMP
D. Will not; RELIEF
3. The whi t e [ CABI N ALTI TUDE]
status annunciator illuminates when
cabi n pressure al t i t ude i ndi cat es
_______ feet.
A. 10,000
B. 10,500
C. 12,000
D. 12,500
4. The red [CABIN ALT HI] warning
annunciator illuminates when cabin
pressure altitude exceeds _______ feet.
A. 10,000
B. 10,500
C. 12,000
D. 12,500
5. The f i r s t i mmedi at e i t em f or
PRESSURIZATION LOSS is:
A. Descend ...............AS REQUIRED
B. Bleed Air Valves.......ENVIR OFF
C. Mic Switch(es) .........................OXY
D. Oxygen Mask(s) ......................DON
6. The first immediate action item for the
EMERGENCY DESCENT is:
A. Power Levers ..........................FULL
FORWARD
B. Prop Levers ....FULL FORWARD
C. Power Levers ..........................IDLE
D. Prop Levers ...................LOW RPM
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QUESTIONS
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See Chapter 14, Landing Gear and Brakes, for information
on the hydraulic power systems.
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CHAPTER 14
LANDING GEAR AND BRAKES
CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................. 14-1
GENERAL......................................................................................................................... 14-1
LANDING GEAR DESCRIPTION.............................................................................. 14-2
Landing Gear Assemblies.......................................................................................... 14-2
Wheel Well Doors....................................................................................................... 14-4
Hydraulic Pack ............................................................................................................ 14-4
Controls and Indicators.............................................................................................. 14-7
Warning System......................................................................................................... 14-12
EXTENSION ................................................................................................................... 14-12
RETRACTION................................................................................................................ 14-16
MANUAL OPERATION .............................................................................................. 14-19
Extension................................................................................................................... 14-19
Retraction .................................................................................................................. 14-21
NOSEWHEEL STEERING.......................................................................................... 14-22
BRAKE SYSTEM........................................................................................................... 14-23
Normal Use of Brakes.............................................................................................. 14-23
Parking Brake............................................................................................................ 14-25
LIMITATIONS................................................................................................................. 14-26
Gear Operating Limits............................................................................................. 14-26
SERVICING..................................................................................................................... 14-26
Shock Struts............................................................................................................... 14-26
Brake Service ............................................................................................................ 14-26
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Hydraulic Service...................................................................................................... 14-27
Brake Wear Limits.................................................................................................... 14-27
QUESTIONS.................................................................................................................... 14-29
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ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Title Page
14-1 Main Landing Gear Assembly........................................................................... 14-2
14-2 Nose Landing Gear Assembly........................................................................... 14-2
14-3 Bulkhead for ER Model..................................................................................... 14-3
14-4 Wheel Well Mechanism....................................................................................... 14-4
14-5 Hydraulic Pack..................................................................................................... 14-4
14-6 Hydraulic Landing Gear Plumbing Schematic................................................ 14-5
14-7 Hydraulic Fluid Low Caution Annunciator..................................................... 14-6
14-8 SENSOR TEST Button...................................................................................... 14-6
14-9 Safety Switches .................................................................................................... 14-7
14-10 Landing Gear Controls....................................................................................... 14-7
14-11 Gear Position Indicator ...................................................................................... 14-8
14-12 Landing Gear Position IndicationGear Extended...................................... 14-9
14-13 Landing Gear Position IndicationGear in Transit..................................... 14-10
14-14 Landing Gear Position IndicationGear Up............................................... 14-11
14-15 Silence Buttons ................................................................................................. 14-12
14-16 Hydraulic Landing Gear Schematic ............................................................... 14-13
14-17 Landing Gear Extension Schematic ............................................................... 14-14
14-18 Landing Gear Extended Schematic................................................................ 14-15
14-19 Landing Gear Retraction Schematic .............................................................. 14-17
14-20 Landing Gear Retracted Schematic................................................................ 14-18
14-21 Landing Gear Alternate Extension Placard.................................................. 14-19
14-22 Landing Gear Circuit Breaker ........................................................................ 14-19
14-23 Hand Pump Extension ..................................................................................... 14-20
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14-24 Maintenance Hand Pump Retraction............................................................. 14-21
14-25 Nosewheel Steering Mechanism..................................................................... 14-22
14-26 Nosewheel Limits.............................................................................................. 14-23
14-27 Brake System Schematic .................................................................................. 14-24
14-28 Parking Brake.................................................................................................... 14-25
14-29 Brake Fluid Reservoir ...................................................................................... 14-26
14-30 Hydraulic Fluid Reservoir ............................................................................... 14-27
14-31 Brake Wear Diagram........................................................................................ 14-27
TABLES
Table Title Page
14-1 Landing Gear Warning Horn Operation........................................................ 14-12
14-2 King Air 350 Airspeeds .................................................................................... 14-26
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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INTRODUCTION
This chapter describes the landing gear and brake systems. A thorough understand-
ing of these systems enables the crew to operate the brakes safely with minimum
wear and handle any landing gear abnormal situations that may arise. Operating
tips, inspection points, and servicing procedures are also included. Operation of
the hydraulic system and nosewheel steering are also part of this chapter.
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GENERAL
The King Air 350 has a retractable tricycle
l andi ng gear syst em t hat i ncl udes an
emergency manual extensi on pump. A
hydraulic power pack powers the extension
and retraction cycle.
The brake system with four hydraulically
operated brake assemblies includes a brake
deice system (refer to Chapter 10).
CHAPTER 14
LANDING GEAR AND BRAKES
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LANDING GEAR
DESCRIPTION
The landing gear system is a retractable,
el ect r i cal l y powered, hydraul i cal l y
actuated, tricycle gear system. When the
gear is fully retracted, it is completely
enclosed by the gear door assemblies. An
alternate means of extension is a manually-
operated hand pump.
LANDING GEAR ASSEMBLIES
The main and nose landing gear assembly
consists of a drag leg, shock strut, torque
knee (scissors), actuator, wheels, and tires.
In addition, the main gear assemblies house
the brake assemblies (Figure 14-1).
The nose gear includes the shimmy damper
(Figure 14-2).
Drag Leg
The upper end of the drag legs and two
points on the shock strut assemblies attach
to the aircraft structure. When the gear is
extended, the drag braces become rigid.
Shock Strut
The air/oil shock struts are filled with both
compressed air and hydraulic fluid. The air
charge i n the shock struts carri es the
aircraft weight.
At touchdown, the lower portion of each
strut is forced into the upper cylinder. This
action moves fluid through an orifice to
further compress the air charge and absorb-
i ng l andi ng shock. Ori fi ce acti on al so
reduces bounce during landing.
At takeoff, the lower portion of the strut
extends until an internal stop engages on
the main gear. On the nose gear, the lower
portion of the strut extends until the torque
knee prevents further extension.
Torque Knee
A torque knee connects the upper and
lower portion of the shock strut. It allows
strut compression and extension but resists
rotational forces. This keeps the wheels
aligned with the aircraft longitudinal axis.
Figure 14-1. Main Landing Gear Assembly
Figure 14-2. Nose Landing Gear Assembly
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On the nose gear assembly, the torque knee
al so t ransmi t s st eeri ng mot i on t o t he
nosewheel and nosewheel shimmy motion
to the shimmy damper.
Actuator
One hydraulic actuator is on each landing
gear. The actuators extend and retract the
landing gear.
Wheels and Tires
Each main landing gear and nose gear has
a wheel. The main wheels are two forged
aluminum 6.50 x 8 wheels. The nose gear has
an aluminum 6.50 x 10 wheel.
Each wheel consists of an inner and outer
wheel half held together with bolts and nuts.
The wheels are sealed against air leakage.
The wheel rotates on tapered roller bearings.
The nose landing gear wheel is equipped
with a 22 x 6.75 x 10, 8-ply-rated tubeless tire.
Each main landing gear wheel is equipped
with a 19.5 x 6.75 x 8, 10-ply-rated, tubeless
tire. On the King Air 350ER model, the
main gear tires are 22 x 6.75 x 10, 10-ply
rated tubeless. Check the Pilots Operating
Handbook for correct tire pressure.
Shimmy Damper
The shimmy damper mounted on the right
side of the nose gear strut is a balanced
hydraulic cylinder. It bleeds fluid through
an or i f i ce t o dampen t he nos ewheel
shimmy.
Bulkhead
On the King Air 350ER, a bulkhead has
been added to the wheel well to prevent
i ci ng on t he drag brace st rut rel ease
(Figure 14-3).
Figure 14-3. Bulkhead for ER Model
WHEEL WELL DOORS
The nose gear door and two sets of main
gear doors are mechani cal l y actuated
by gear movement dur i ng ext ens i on
and retraction.
The doors are hi nged at the si des and
spring-loaded to the open position. As the
landing gear is retracted, a roller on each
s i de of t he nos e gear engages a cam
assembly to draw the doors closed behind
the gear (Figure 14-4).
For extension, a reverse action occurs as the
spring-loading takes effect. When the cam
has left the roller, springs pull the linkage
over-center to hold the doors open.
HYDRAULIC PACK
A hydraulic power pack (Figure 14-5) in
conj unct i on wi t h hydraul i c act uat ors
extend and retract the nose and mai n
landing gear assemblies. Each landing gear
has one hydraulic actuator. The pack is in
the middle of the left wing center section
just forward of the main spar.
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Figure 14-5. Hydraulic Pack
CAN ASSEMBLY
ROLLERS
Figure 14-4. Wheel Well Mechanism
The power pack consists of a hydraulic
pump with 28VDC motor, a two-section
fluid reservoir, filter screens, gear selector
valve, up selector solenoid, down selector
solenoid, fluid level sensor, and an uplock
pressure switch.
The reservoir has a dipstick to provide a
visual check of fluid level.
Three hydraulic lines are routed to the nose
and main gear actuators (Figure 14-6). One
line is for normal extension and one is for
ret ract i on. Thes e or i gi nat e f rom t he
power pack.
The third line is for manual extension. It
originates from the hand pump.
The normal extension lines and manual
extension lines connect to the upper end of
each hydraulic actuator. The hydraulic lines
for retraction are fitted to the lower ends
of the actuators.
The power pack pump generates hydraulic
fluid under pressure in the accumulator
that acts on the piston faces of the actuators
attached to the folding drag braces.
Power for the pump motor is through the
landing gear motor relay and a 60 ampere
relay circuit breaker. Both are next to the
pump motor in the middle of the left wing
center section, just forward of the main
spar. The 2-ampere circuit breaker for the
l andi ng gear control ci rcui t (see next
section) energizes the motor relay.
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Figure 14-6. Hydraulic Landing Gear Plumbing Schematic
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If the pump motor fails to shut off after 13
to 15 seconds, a timer activates the logic
relay to open the pump motor relay. This
stops the motor, but it also shorts out the
2-ampere control ci rcui t and tri ps the
LANDING GEAR RELAY circuit breaker
on the pilot right subpanel.
Hydraulic Fluid Level Indication
System
A yel l ow caut i on HYD FLUID LOW
annunciator in the caution/advisory panel
illuminates whenever hydraulic fluid level
in the landing gear power pack reservoir is
low (Figure 14-7). A fiber-optic sensing
unit mounted on the motor end of the
power pack provi des t he neces s ar y
switching circuitry to illuminate the low
fluid light.
Tes t t he annunci at or and as s oci at ed
circuitry by pressing the HYD FLUID
SENSOR TEST button on the pilot right
subpanel (Figure 14-8). The test button
sends a signal to the fiber-optic sensor in
the reservoir that causes the sensor to
sense a low fluid level.
The sensor then sends a low fluid signal to
the annunciator panel. A five-second delay
can be expected before the annunciator
light illuminates during the test. Release
the button to extinguish the annunciator.
Expect another five-second delay.
Figure 14-7. Hydraulic Fluid Low Caution Annunciator
Figure 14-8. SENSOR TEST Button
CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
Safety Switches
Safety switches (Figure 14-9) called squat
switches are on the main gear torque knees.
These switches open control circuits when
the oleo strut is compressed to prevent
gear retraction on the ground.
When the l eft squat swi tch senses the
ai rcraft i s on the ground, i t opens the
control circuit to the landing gear selector
valve up solenoid to help prevent inadver-
tent retraction.
When the right squat switch senses the
ai rcraft i s on the ground, i t opens the
control circuit to the landing gear selector
valve up solenoid, the landing gear motor
control relay, and the landing gear handle
lock solenoid.
LDG GEAR CONTROL Handle
The LDG GEAR CONTROL handle on
t he pi l ot ri ght subpl anel cont rol s t he
hydraulic power pack motor (Figure 14-10).
The handle must be pulled out of a detent
before it can be moved from either the UP
or DN position.
When the LDG GEAR is moved to the UP
pos i t i on i n f l i ght , a cont rol ci rcui t
completes to the gear up selector solenoid.
This moves the gear selector valve so fluid
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Figure 14-10. Landing Gear Controls
1. Actuator Rod
2. Retaining Nut
3. Switch Arm
4. Locking Screw
5. Adjusting Screw
LEFT MAIN
Landing Gear Selector Valve Up Solenoid
Ambient Air Modulating Valves
Preset Solenoid
Dump Solenoid
Door Seal Solenoid
Stall Warning Heat Control
RIGHT MAIN
Landing Gear Selector Valve Up Solenoid
Landing Gear Motor Control Relay
Landing Gear Handle Lock Solenoid
Ground Low Pitch Stop System
Electric Heat Control
Flight Hour Meter
1
2
3
4
5
Figure 14-9. Safety Switches
flows to the retraction side of the system.
A control circuit is also completed to the
pump motor relay to signal the pump motor
(or hydraulic power pack) to operate.
When the LDG GEAR control is moved to
the DN position in flight, a control circuit
completes to the gear down selector. The
gear selector valve moves so fluid flows to
the extension side. A control circuit also
compl et es t o s i gnal t he pump mot or
to operate.
A 2 ampere circuit breaker on the pilot
right subpanel protects the landing gear
control circuit.
Control Lock
The handle lock prevents the LDG GEAR
CONTROL handle from being placed in
the UP position when the aircraft is on the
ground. It automatically unlocks when the
aircraft leaves the ground because the right
squat switch closes and completes a circuit
through the solenoid that moves the lock.
If a malfunction occurs in the solenoid or
squat switch circuit, the DOWN LOCK
REL button overrides the lock.
Position Indicators
An assembly of three lights in a single unit
next t o t he LDG GEAR CONTROL
indicate landing gear position (Figure 14-11).
One light in each main segment (L and R)
and two i n the nose segment (NOSE)
illuminate green to indicate gear is down
and l ocked. Absence of i l l umi nat i on
indicates gear is not down and locked.
In-Transit Light
Two red indicator lights in the LDG GEAR
CONTROL handle illuminate to indicate
gear is in transit, unsafe, or unlocked. Gear
up is indicated when the red lights go out
and the gear is obviously retracted.
Gear DOWN is indicated when all three
green gear position indicators illuminate
and the red lights in the handle extinguish.
The red lights in the handle also illumi-
nate when the landing gear warning horn
is actuated.
The landing gear in-transit light can indicate
one or all of the following conditions:
Landi ng gear handl e up and t he
aircraft on ground with weight on
gear; warning horn also sounds
One or both power levers retarded
below approximately 86 1% N
1
and
one or more gear not down and
locked; warning horn also sounds
Any one or al l gear not i n f ul l y
retracted or i n down-and-l ocked
position.
Warning horn has been silenced and
does not operate.
Figures 14-12 through 14-14 illustrate the
various configurations.
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Figure 14-11. Gear Position Indicator
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Figure 14-12. Landing Gear Position IndicationGear Extended
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Figure 14-13. Landing Gear Position IndicationGear in Transit
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Figure 14-14. Landing Gear Position IndicationGear Up
Indicator Lights Check
Check the green position indicator bulbs
by depressing on the light housing.
Check the red control handle lights by
pressing HDL LT TEST button adjacent to
the LDG GEAR CONTROL handle (see
Figure 14-6). They may also be tested in
conjunction with the gear warning horn
with the STALL WARN TEST-OFF LDG
GEAR WARN TEST switch on the copilot
left subpanel.
WARNING SYSTEM
The landing gear warning system warns
the pilot of an unsafe condition within the
landing gear system.
If the LDG GEAR CONTROL handle is
not in the DN position when the aircraft is
on the ground, the landing gear warning
horn sounds and the red gear-in-transit
lights illuminate. Place the LDG GEAR
handl e DN t o s i l ence t he hor n and
extinguish the handle light.
The landing gear does not retract on the
ground because the squat switches prevent
activation of the gear selector valve and
power pack motor.
In flight, warning modes depend upon the
position of the flaps. With the flaps in the
UP or APPROACH position and either or
both power levers retarded below approx-
imately 86% N1, the warning horn sounds
and the LDG GEAR CONTROL handle
lights illuminate. The horn can be silenced.
With the FLAPS beyond the APPROACH
position, the warning horn sounds and in-
transit lights illuminate regardless of power
settings. The horn cannot be silenced.
Landing gear warning horn operational
data is shown in Table 14-1.
Silencing Warning Horn
Pressi ng the GEAR WARN SILENCE
but t on adj acent t o t he LDG GEAR
CONTROL handle (and/or the silence
button on the left power lever) silences
the horn (Figure 14-15).
The warning horn rearms if power levers
are sufficiently advanced.
EXTENSION
The landing gear is electrically controlled and
hydraulically actuated. Folding (drag) braces
lock in place when gear is fully extended.
An electrically actuated selector valve
controls the flow of hydraulic fluid to the
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Figure 14-15. Silence Buttons
GEAR
POSITION
FLAPS POWER HORN
SILENCE
MODE
Not down Up Above 86% N
1
No N/A
Not down Up Below 86% N
1
Yes Silence button
Not down Approach Below 86% N
1
Yes Silence button
Not down Beyond
approach
Any Yes Lower gear
Table 14-1. LANDING GEAR WARNING HORN OPERATION
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individual gear actuators (Figure 14-16). The
selector valve receives electrical power
through the LDG GEAR CONTROL handle.
When t he LDG GEAR CONTROL i s
moved to the DN posi ti on i n fl i ght, a
cont rol ci rcui t compl et es t o t he gear
selector valve down solenoid and energizes
the pump motor. The top portion of Figure
14-17 depicts this electrical control circuit.
This action moves the gear selector valve
so that fluid can flow to the extension side
of the system. After approximately six
seconds, the extension cycle is complete.
When the actuator pistons are positioned
to fully extend the landing gear, an internal
mechanical lock in the nose gear actuator
and the nose gear drag brace lock the nose
gear in the down position. In this position,
the internal downlock mechanism in the
nose gear actuator positions the actuator
downlock switch to interrupt current to
the nose gear part of the pump motor
control circuit. A notched J-hook, lock link,
and lock link guide attachments fitted to
each mai n gear drag brace provi de a
positive downlock action for the main gear.
A downl ock s wi t ch on each J- hook
assembly interrupts its part of the pump
motor control circuit when the respective
main gear is down and locked. The motor
continues to run until all three landing gear
are down and locked.
Fi gure 14- 18 i s af t er a nor mal gear
extension. Electrical power flows from the
2-amp LDG GEAR CONTROL circuit
breaker through the control switch and on
Figure 14-16. Hydraulic Landing Gear Schematic
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Figure 14-17. Landing Gear Extension Schematic
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Figure 14-18. Landing Gear Extended Schematic
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to the three downlock switches. Each gear
is down and locked so these three switches
are open. No el ect ri cal power passes
through them. However, power i s sti l l
provided to the hydraulic selector valve to
hold it in the down position.
RETRACTION
When the LDG GEAR control is moved to
the UP position in flight, a control circuit
completes to the gear selector valve up
solenoid. This moves the gear selector valve
so fluid can flow to the retraction side of
the system. A control circuit also energizes
the pump motor.
The nose gear actuator unlocks and begins
to retract the nose gear when 200 to 400 psi
of hydraulic pressure is applied to the
retract port of the nose gear actuator. The
main gear begins to retract after the main
gear actuators unlock the respective J-
hooks on the main gear drag braces (Figure
14-19).
After approximately six seconds, the retrac-
tion cycle is complete. Once the landing
gear reaches full-up travel, each actuator
physically bottoms out.
The pressure on the retract line builds
rapidly until pressure reaches approxi-
matel y 2, 775 psi . The upl ock pressure
switch opens to break the power circuit to
the pump motor; the hydraulic pump stops.
The pressure switch then closes periodi-
cally as pressure drops to approximately
2,375 psi (normal system pressure leak-
down) to reenergize the pump and restore
needed upl ock pres s ure. Pres s ure i s
maintained between approximately 2,375
to 2,775 psi to keep gear retracted.
Figure 14-20 depicts the system after retrac-
tion with pressure being maintained.
An accumulator in the left wing inboard
of the nacelle is precharged to 800 psi to
aid in maintaining system pressure when
the gear is up.
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Figure 14-19. Landing Gear Retraction Schematic
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Figure 14-20. Landing Gear Retracted Schematic
MANUAL OPERATION
A hand- pump handl e, pl acarded
LANDI NG GEAR ALTERNATE
EXTENSION (Figure 14-21), is on the floor
between the pilot seat and the pedestal.
The pump under the floor below the handle
is for emergency extension when normal
extension of the gear is incomplete.
EXTENSION
To engage the system, pull the LANDING
GEAR RELAY circuit breaker (Figure 14-
22) bel ow and to the l eft of the LDG
GEAR CONTROL handle. Ensure the
LDG GEAR CONTROL handle is in the
DN position.
Remove the pump handle from the securing
clip. Pump the handle up and down until the
green NOSE - L -R gear down indicator lights
illuminate. Further resistance should be felt.
Stow the pump handle back in the retain-
ing clip when the gear is down and locked.
Figure 14-23 illustrates a manual extension.
If for any reason the green GEAR
DOWN lights do not illuminate
(e.g., in case of an electrical system
failure, or in the event an actuator
i s not l ocked down), conti nue
pumping until sufficient resistance
is felt to ensure that the gear is down
and locked. Do not stow pump
handle. The landing gear cannot be
manually retracted in flight.
After an emergency landing gear
extension has been made, do not
move any landing gear controls
or reset any switches or circuit
breakers until the aircraft is on
jacks. The failure may be in the
gear-up circuitry or the hydraulic
system and the gear might retract
on the ground. The landing gear
cannot be retracted manually.
WARNING
WARNING
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Figure 14-22. Landing Gear Circuit Breaker
Figure 14-21. Landing Gear Alternate
Extension Placard
Refer to the Normal Procedures section
of the POH for information pertaining to
practice manual landing gear extensions.
If the manual extension handle is properly
stowed after a practice manual extension,
the gear may be retracted hydraulically.
Pus h t he LANDI NG GEAR RELAY
ci rcui t breaker i n and move the LDG
GEAR CONTROL handl e t o t he UP
position.
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Figure 14-23. Hand Pump Extension
RETRACTION
A service valve forward of the power pack
assembly may be used in conjunction with
the hand pump to raise the gear for mainte-
nance purposes (Figure 14-24).
With the aircraft on jacks and an external
electrical power source attached, unlatch
the hinged retainer and pull up on the red
knob located on top of the service valve.
The hand pump can then be used to raise
the gear to the desired position. After the
required maintenance has been performed,
push the red knob down. Use the hand
pump to lower the gear.
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Figure 14-24. Maintenance Hand Pump Retraction
If the red knob on the service
valve is pushed down while the
l andi ng gear i s retracted wi th
el ect r i cal power on and t he
landing gear control handle DN,
t he l andi ng gear wi l l ext end
immediately.
The service valve must be down for electro-
hydraulic action (up or down) and for
manual extension of the landing gear.
NOSEWHEEL STEERING
Direct linkage to the rudder pedals permits
nosewheel steering when the nose gear is
down (Figure 14-25).
One spri ng- l oaded l i nk i n t he syst em
absorbs some of the force applied to the
interconnected rudder pedals until the
nosewheel is rolling. At this time, the resist-
ing force is less; more pedal motion results
in more nosewheel deflection.
Because motion of the pedals is transmitted
via cables and linkage to the rudder, rudder
deflection occurs when force is applied to the
rudder pedals. With the nose landing gear
retracted, some of the force applied to the
rudder pedals is absorbed by the spring-
loaded link in the steering system. There is
no motion at the nosewheel, but rudder
deflection still occurs.
The nos ewheel i s s el f - cent er i ng
upon retraction.
When f orce on t he r udder pedal
is augmented by a main wheel braking
action, the nosewheel deflection can be
considerably increased.
CAUTION
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Figure 14-25. Nosewheel Steering Mechanism
Nosewheel steering provides 12 to the left
and right of center. Castering provides an
additional 36, for a total possible deflec-
tion of 48 left and right (Figure 14-26).
BRAKE SYSTEM
The Ki ng Ai r 350 uses a non- assi st ed
hydraulic brake system (Figure 14-27). The
main landing gear wheels are equipped
with multi-disc dual hydraulic brakes.
Toe pressure on the rudder pedals by either
pilot actuates the brakes. Depression of
either set of pedals compresses the piston
rod in the master cylinder attached to
each pedal.
Hydraulic pressure that results from the
piston movement is transmitted through
flexible hoses and fixed aluminum tubing
to the disc brake assemblies on the main
landing gear. This pressure forces the brake
pistons to press against the linings and
discs of the brake assembly.
Each rudder pedal is attached to its own
master cylinder. The pilot and copilot right
rudder pedals control the brake in the right
main landing gear. Similarly, the left rudder
pedals control braking in the left main gear.
Thi s arrangement al l ows di ff erent i al
braking for taxiing and maneuvering on
the ground.
The dual brakes are plumbed in series. The
pilot master cylinders are plumbed through
the copilot master cylinders. This allows
either set of pedals to perform the braking
action and eliminates need for shuttle
valves. Neither set of brake pedals can
override the other.
Proper traction and braking control cannot
be expect ed unt i l t he l andi ng gear i s
carrying the full weight of the aircraft. Use
extreme care when braking to prevent
skidding. Braking should be smooth and
even all the way to the end of ground roll.
Three automatic brake adjuster assemblies
in each brake piston housing maintain the
proper brake clearance and compensate
for brake lining wear. The automatic brake
adj ust ers reduce brake drag, t hereby
allowing unhampered roll. They also tend
to exhibit a softer pedal and a somewhat
longer pedal stroke.
NORMAL USE OF BRAKES
The wheel brakes can be highly effective in
stopping the aircraft when the situation
requi res. Normal operati on, however,
usually requires minimal brake use.
The propellers are more effective than the
brakes immediately after touchdown during
the landing rollout. As the aircraft deceler-
ates, the brakes become most effective.
Si nce most l andi ng si tuati ons are not
runway length critical, a smooth, comfort-
able deceleration can be achieved with
almost exclusive use of the propellers until
passing approximately 40 knots ground
speed. At that ti me, l i ght wheel brake
pressure provides sufficient deceleration
for a comfortable transition to taxiing clear
of the runway.
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Figure 14-26. Nosewheel Limits
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1 4 L A N D I N G G E A R
A N D B R A K E S
PILOT'S
MASTER
CYLINDERS
LH PARK
BRAKE
RH PARK
BRAKE
COPILOT'S
MASTER
CYLINDER
RESERVOIR
LH WHEEL
CYLINDER
RH WHEEL
CYLINDER
PILOT'S
MASTER
CYLINDERS
LH PARK
BRAKE
LH WHEEL
CYLINDER
RH WHEEL
CYLINDER
RH PARK
BRAKE
COPILOT'S
MASTER
CYLINDER
RESERVOIR
LEGEND
FLUID UNDER PRESSURE
SUPPLY FLUID
STATIC FLUID
LEFT BRAKE APPLIED PARKING BRAKES SET
Figure 14-27. Brake System Schematic
When runway length is critical
during landing, maximum braking
techniques should be employed.
Consult the Performance section
of the POHfor requirements and
landing distances.
Speed can nor mal l y be cont rol l ed
primarily with the the propellers in the
GROUND FINE range during taxi. The
brakes should be used when necessary for
supplemental control.
Nosewheel steering can accomplish turning
with an occasional assist by tapping on one
brake to hel p i ni ti ate turns of shorter
radius. When minimum radius turns are
required, intermittent heavy pressure may
be necessary on the inboard brake.
Do not hold steady pressure on
the inboard brake while turning.
It may induce a twisting action on
the strut, inflicting serious damage
to the strut assembly.
PARKING BRAKE
The parking brake uses the regular brakes
and a set of valves. Dual parking brake
valves are adjacent to the rudder pedals
between the master cylinders of the copilot
rudder pedals and the wheel brakes.
The control for the parking brake valves is
on the lower left-hand corner of the pilot left
subpanel (Figure 14-28). To set the parking
brake, depress and hold the brake pedals to
maintain pressure in the brake system. Then
depress the button in the center of the
parking brake control and pull out the
control handle. This procedure closes both
parking brake valves simultaneously.
NOTE
When prepar i ng t o us e t he
parking brake, ensure the aircraft
has come to a complete stop.
The parking brake valves should retain the
pressure previ ousl y pumped i nt o t he
system. To rel ease the parki ng brake,
depress the brake pedals on either pilot or
copilot side to equalize the pressure on
both sides of the valves. Simultaneously
push the parking brake handle in to allow
the parking brake valves to open.
To avoid damage to the parking brake
system, tires, and landing gear, release the
parking brake and install wheel chocks if
t he ai rcraf t i s t o be l ef t unatt ended.
Ambient temperature changes can expand
or cont ract t he brake f l ui d t o caus e
excessive brake pressure or brake release.
CAUTION
CAUTION
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Figure 14-28. Parking Brake
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LIMITATIONS
GEAR OPERATING LIMITS
Landing gear cycles (one up/one down)
are limited to one every five minutes for a
total of six cycles followed by a 15 minute
cool-down period.
Airspeed limits for the landing gear are
summarized in Table 14-2.
SERVICING
SHOCK STRUTS
Shock struts should always be properly
inflated. Do not over- or under-inflate, and
never tow or taxi an aircraft when any strut
is flat. Correct inflation is placarded on
the main and nose struts or refer to the
Maintenance Manual.
BRAKE SERVICE
Brake f l ui d i s suppl i ed t o t he mast er
cylinders from a reservoir accessible through
the nose avionics compartment door (Figure
14-29). The brake fluid reservoir is located
on the upper corner of the left side of the
nose avionics compartment.
Brake system servicing is limited primarily
to maintaining the hydraulic fluid level in
the reservoir. A dipstick is provided for
meas ur i ng t he f l ui d l evel . When t he
reservoir is low on fluid, add a sufficient
quantity of MIL-H-5606 hydraulic fluid
to fill the reservoir to the full mark on the
dipstick. Check all hydraulic connections
f or s i gns of s eepage and cor rect
if necessary.
Figure 14-29. Brake Fluid Reservoir
AIRSPEED KIAS REMARKS
Maximum gear
operating
speed (V
LO
)
Extension
Retraction
184
166
Do not extend or retract the
landing gear above these
speeds.
Maximum gear
extended
speed (V
LE
)
184 Do not exceed this speed
with the landing gear
extended.
Table 14-2. KING AIR 350 AIRSPEEDS
HYDRAULIC SERVICE
The hydraulic fill reservoir is just inboard
of the left nacelle and forward of the front
spar (Figure 14-30). It contains a cap and
dipstick assembly to facilitate maintenance
of the system fluid level.
A line plumbed to the upper portion of the
fill reservoir is routed overboard to act as
a vent.
BRAKE WEAR LIMITS
To cheek the brakes for wear, measure the
distance between the segmented carrier
and lining assembly and the piston housing
(Figure 14-31). When this distance (with
the parking brake set) measures 0.200 inch
or more, the brake is ready for a lining
inspection per the manufacturers mainte-
nance manual.
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Figure 14-30. Hydraulic Fluid Reservoir
Figure 14-31. Brake Wear Diagram
INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
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1. The landing gear handle is designed to
work airborne:
A. Weight off wheels.
B. And on the ground.
C. If the cabin is pressurized.
D. And on the ground if the cabin is
pressurized.
2. The green GEAR DOWN annuncia-
tors indicate the gear:
A. Handle is in the DOWN position.
B. Handle is in the UP position.
C. Is down and locked.
D. Is up and locked.
3. The LDG GEAR CONTROL red light
illuminates when the gear position
may be unsafe and:
A. Can be dimmed.
B. Can be extinguished.
C. Can be dimmed if low level cabin
ambient light is sensed.
D. Cannot be dimmed.
4. The alternate landing gear extension
system is available for gear:
A. Retraction.
B. Extension.
C. Extension and retraction.
D. Extension or retraction.
5. The maximum permitted landing gear
extended speed is _______ KIAS.
A. 158
B. 184
C. 194
D. 263
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QUESTIONS
15-i
CHAPTER 15
FLIGHT CONTROLS
CONTENTS
Page
INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................. 15-1
GENERAL......................................................................................................................... 15-1
PRIMARY FLIGHT CONTROLS................................................................................. 15-2
Trim Tabs...................................................................................................................... 15-2
Electric Elevator Trim ............................................................................................... 15-4
Yaw Damp/Rudder Boost System............................................................................ 15-4
Stall Warning System.................................................................................................. 15-6
FLAP SYSTEM.................................................................................................................. 15-6
Components................................................................................................................. 15-6
Controls and Indicators.............................................................................................. 15-7
Operation..................................................................................................................... 15-7
Abnormal Conditions................................................................................................. 15-7
LIMITATIONS................................................................................................................... 15-8
CONTROL LOCKS ......................................................................................................... 15-8
Removal ...................................................................................................................... 15-8
Installation .................................................................................................................. 15-8
QUESTIONS...................................................................................................................... 15-9
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15-iii
ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Title Page
15-1 Elevator and Rudder .......................................................................................... 15-2
15-2 Rudder Pedals...................................................................................................... 15-2
15-3 RUDDER TAB, AILERON TRIM, and ELEVATOR TRIM.................... 15-3
15-4 Electric Elevator Trim........................................................................................ 15-4
15-5 Yaw Damp/Rudder Boost System..................................................................... 15-5
15-6 RUDDER BOOST Switch ................................................................................ 15-5
15-7 Flap System Components................................................................................... 15-6
15-8 FLAPS Lever ....................................................................................................... 15-7
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INTRODUCTION
The flight controls allow the pilot to control the aircraft about the three axes of
pitch, roll, and yaw. The flap system helps provide optimum performance in takeoff,
approach, and landing modes. This chapter discusses these flight controls.
GENERAL
All flight controls, with the exception of the
fl aps, are cabl e-operated conventi onal
surfaces that require no power assistance
for normal control by the crew.
The flaps and electric elevator trim are
el ect ri cal l y powered. An el ect ri cal l y
powered rudder boost/ yaw dampeni ng
system connects directly to the autopilot to
ai d t he pi l ot dur i ng an engi ne- out
condition. It functions automatically when
activated as torquemeter oil pressure drops
during an engine failure.
CHAPTER 15
FLIGHT CONTROLS
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PRIMARY FLIGHT
CONTROLS
The primary flight controls are a three-
axes control system. The aileron surfaces
on each wing provide lateral (roll) control.
The elevator provides longitudinal (pitch)
control. The rudder provides directional
(yaw) control (Figure 15-1).
All primary flight control surfaces are
manually controlled through cable/bellcrank
systems. Surface travel stops and linkage
adj ust ment s are i n each syst em. Dual
controls are available for either the pilot or
the copilot.
Conventional push-pull control wheels
i nterconnected by a T shaped control
column operate the ailerons and elevators.
A linkage below the crew compartment
fl oor i nterconnects the rudder pedal s
(Fi gure 15- 2). Rudder bel l crank arms
adjustable to two positions move the pedals
approximately one inch forward or aft.
Control locks in the cockpit secure the
ailerons, elevators, and rudder when the
aircraft is on the ground and out of service.
TRIM TABS
Tr i m t abs are i ns t al l ed on t he l ef t
aileron, rudder and each elevator. The pilot
manual l y cont rol s t he t abs t hrough
dr um- cabl e s ys t ems t hat us e dual
jackscrew actuators.
The dual actuators drive adjustable double-
end cl evi s rod assembl i es capabl e of
removing joint free play. Positive stops on
the primary flight control surfaces limit
their travel while traveling stops secured to
the cables limit trim tab movement.
All trim tab actuators are of a dual config-
uration to provide additional safety control
of trim and tab free play.
Tabs are positioned with controls on the
pedestal (Figure 15-3). These include the
RUDDER TAB knob, t he AILERON
TRIM knob, and the ELEVATOR TRIM
wheel.Each knob also contains directional
arrows as well as marked settings.
Figure 15-1. Elevator and Rudder
Figure 15-2. Rudder Pedals
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Figure 15-3. RUDDER TAB, AILERON TRIM, and ELEVATOR TRIM
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ELECTRIC ELEVATOR TRIM
The electric elevator trim system is installed
in conjunction with the autopilot system.
A dual - el ement t humb swi t ch on t he
outboard handle of each control wheel
(Figure 15-4) activates the electric motor-
driven elevator trim tabs. Both elements of
the switch must be simultaneously moved
forward to achieve a nose-down trim; aft for
nose-up trim.
When the el ements are rel eased, they
return to the center off position. The pilot
switch overrides the copilot switch.
A bi-level, pushbutton switch is inboard of
the thumb switch on the outboard grip of
each control wheel. The momentary-on,
trim-disconnect switch disconnects the
elevator trim system when either of these
switches is depressed.
Depressing either trim-disconnect switch
to the first of the two levels disconnects the
autopilot, yaw damp, and rudder boost
systems. Depressi ng the swi tch to the
second l evel di sconnect s t he el ect ri c
elevator trim system.
The manual trim control wheel interrupts
and resets the electric trim system. Use
it anytime the autopilot is off whether or
not t he el ect ri c t ri m syst em i s i n t he
operative mode.
The PITCH TRIM circuit breaker in the
FLIGHT group on the ri ght CB panel
protects the system.
YAW DAMP/RUDDER BOOST
SYSTEM
The yaw damp/rudder boost system aids
the pilot in directional control associated
with asymmetrical thrust in the event of
an engine loss or large power difference
(Figure 15-5).
The yaw damp portion senses changes in
heading (or yaw rate information) from
the rate gyro and uses an electric servo to
drive the rudder control cables. Heading
changes due to turns are sensed usi ng
information from the attitude gyro to allow
for turn coordination.
On the 350 models, rudder boost senses
engi ne t or que f rom bot h engi nes, as
measured by a torque transducer tapped off
of the torque manifold. It is separate from
the normal engine torque system. When
the difference in these torques exceeds
approximately 30%, rudder boost activa-
tion begins. An electric servo activates to
deflect the rudder, assisting pilot effort.
The servo contribution is proportional to
the engine torque differential. The pilot
trims the rudder.
Figure 15-4. Electric Elevator Trim
The RUDDER BOOST switch is on the
pedestal (Figure 15-6). To enable the system,
place the switch in RUDDER BOOST and
the AP/YD DISC bar on the flight guidance
panel up.
The rudder boost system is disabled if the
switch is in the OFF position. If the DISC
TRIM/AP YD switch is depressed, the
system is interrupted.
An amber RUD BOOST OFF on t he
caution/ advisory/status annunciator panel
indicates the switch is inoperative because
the switch is in off or the trim disconnect
switch on either yoke has been used.
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Figure 15-6. RUDDER BOOST Switch
LEFT ENGINE
TORQUE
TRANSDUCER
YAW RATE
INFORMATION
RIGHT ENGINE
TORQUE
TRANSDUCER
YAW DAMP/
RUDDER BOOST
COMPUTER
YAW DAMP
SWITCH
RUDDER
BOOST SWITCH
RUDDER
SERVO
RUDDER
LEGEND
KING AIR 350
SYSTEM INPUTS
SYSTEM CONTROLS
SYSTEM OUTPUTS
Figure 15-5. Yaw Damp/Rudder Boost System
STALL WARNING SYSTEM
Angle of attack is sensed by aerodynamic
pressure on the lift transducer vane on the
l eft wi ng l eadi ng edge. When a stal l i s
imminent, an aural stall warning sounds.
The system can be tested during peflight
with the STALL WARN TEST switch on
the copilot left subpanel. The switch is
spring-loaded to the center OFF position.
Hol d the swi tch i n the STALL WARN
TEST pos i t i on t o act i vat e t he s t al l
warning system.
FLAP SYSTEM
The aircraft has a four-segment, Fowler-
type flap system. The flaps may be selected
t o t he UP, APPROACH, or DOWN
position. They cannot be stopped at an
intermediate point between these positions.
Whenever one of the three positions is
selected, the flaps move to the selected
position. A safety mechanism disconnects
power t o t he el ect r i c f l ap mot or i f a
malfunction occurs that could cause any
flaps to be 3 to 6 out of phase with the
other flaps.
COMPONENTS
The flaps are two segments on each wing.
An electric motor drives the flaps through
a gearbox mounted on the forward side of
the rear spar (Figure 15-7).
The gearbox drives four flexible driveshafts
that connect to jackscrew actuators at each
flap segment.
The motor incorporates a dynamic braking
system. Two sets of motor windings help
prevent overtravel of the flaps.
Protection
A 20-amp FLAP MOTOR circuit breaker
on the right CB panel protects the flap
mot or ci rcui t . A 5- amp FLAP IND &
CONTROL circuit breaker protects the
control circuit.
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20A
L GEN BUS
LIMIT SWITCHES
FLAP
ASYMMETRY
SWITCHES
FLAP INDICATOR
TRANSDUCER
Figure 15-7. Flap System Components
CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
A s l i di ng FLAPS l ever i s j us t bel ow
t he condi t i on l ever s on t he pedes t al
(Figure 15-8).
The control lever has a position detent
TAKEOFF AND APPROACH to select
40% flaps for takeoff or approach. Full flap
deflection, or 100%, is equal to approxi-
mately 35 of flap travel. Detents also are
marked for UP and DOWN positions.
Flap deflection from 0% (up) to 100%
(down) displays on an electric indicator on
t op of t he pedes t al bel ow t he
caution/advisory annunciator panel. A
potentiometer driven by the right inboard
flap segment operates the indicator. The
ri ght i nboard fl ap al so dri ves the fl ap
position limit switches.
Airspeed Indicator Display
The solid red bar at the bottom of the
airspeed scale on the display is the impend-
ing stall speed low speed cue (ISS LSC)
marker. The top of the marker changes with
flap position to reflect the following stall
speed:
81 KIAS (82 KIAS for 350ER)
Stal l i ng speed (V
S0
) at maxi mum
weight with flaps down and idle power
89 KIAS (91 KIAS for 350ER)
Stal l i ng speed (V
S1
) at maxi mum
wei ght wi t h f l aps approach and
idle power
96 KIAS (99 KIAS for 350ER)
Stal l i ng speed (V
S1
) at maxi mum
weight with flaps up and idle power
The white DN arrow marks maximum speed
permissible with flaps extended beyond
approach: 158 KIAS.
The white APP arrow marks maximum
speed permissible with flaps in approach
position: 202 KIAS.
OPERATION
Lowering the flaps produces these results:
AttitudeSlight nose up
AirspeedReduced
Stall speedLowered
TrimInput required based on the
amount of airspeed change
ABNORMAL CONDITIONS
Landing Gear Warning System
The landing gear warning system is affected
by the position of the flaps. Anytime the
flaps are in the approach position and the
landing gear is not extended, a warning
horn sounds until the gear is extended or
the flaps retracted with the torque below
40% or 86% N
1
.
The landing gear warning system warns the
pilot the landing gear is not down and
locked during specific flight regimes. The
warning horn sounds continuously when
t he f l aps are l owered beyond t he
APPROACH (40%) position regardless of
the power lever setting until the landing
gear is extended or the flaps retracted.
Refer to Chapter 14 for details.
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Figure 15-8. FLAPS Lever
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Asymmetrical Flap Protection
An as ymmet r i cal f l ap s wi t ch s ys t em
provides split-flap protection. The switch
shuts off the flap motor for any out-of-
phase condition of approximately 3 to 6
between the adjacent flap segments on
each wing.
The switch is spring-loaded to the normally-
open position, but it is rigged so that the
roller cam holds the switch in its momentary
(closed) position. This provides electrical
conti nui ty to the fl ap motor when the
outboard and inboard flap segments on
both sides are parallel and in phase with
one another.
Invalid Lever Input
If the FLAPS lever input becomes invalid,
a default ISS LSC marker displays. This is
a checkerboard bar with a yellow bar on
top. The junction of the checkerboard bar
represents the flaps-down ISS LSC value.
The top of the yellow bar represents the
flaps-up ISS LSC value.
LIMITATIONS
Do not extend flaps or operate with flaps
extended above these speeds.
Maximum flap extension/extended speeds
(V
FE
):
Approach202 KIAS
Full down158 KIAS
CONTROL LOCKS
The control locks consist of a U-shaped
clamp and two pins connected by a chain.
The pins lock the primary flight controls.
The U-shaped clamp fits around the engine
power control levers and serves to warn
the pi l ot not to start the engi nes wi th
control locks installed.
It is important that the locks be installed
or removed t oget her t o precl ude t he
possibility of an attempt to taxi or fly the
aircraft with the power levers released and
the pins still installed in the flight controls.
REMOVAL
Before starting engines, remove
control locks.
1. Remove rudder pin
2. Remove control column pin
3. Remove U-shaped power control
clamp
Remove cont rol l ocks bef ore
towing the aircraft. If towed with
a tug whi l e the rudder l ock i s
intalled, serious damage to the
steering linkage can result.
INSTALLATION
1. Posi ti on U-shaped cl amp around
engine power controls
2. Move control column as necessary to
align holes in the control column
3. Insert the L-shaped pin attached to
the middle of the chain; holes are
aligned when control wheel is full
forward and rotated approximately
15 to the left
4. Insert the L-shaped pin attached to
the end of the chain through the hole
provided in the floor aft of the rudder
pedals; rudder pedals must be centered
to align the hole in the rudder bellcrank
with the hole in the floor
5. I ns er t pi n unt i l t he f l ange res t s
against the floor; this prevents any
rudder movement
WARNING
WARNING
1. Secondary flight controls surfaces are:
A. Manually-controlled.
B. Hydraulically-controlled.
C. El ect ri cal l y and hydraul i cal l y
controlled.
D. Manual l y and el ect r i cal l y
controlled.
2. Rudder boost aids the pilot in rudder
def l ect i on dur i ng engi ne f ai l ure
operation by sensing:
A. Yaw rate.
B. Roll rate.
C. Torque differential.
D. Bleed air differential.
3. Electric pitch trim is available when:
A. Either trim switch is activated.
B. Both trim switches are activated
simultaneously.
C. Oppos i t e t r i m s wi t ches are
activated.
D. Indicated airspeed is greater than
140 knots.
4. The mechanical aileron trim is located
_______ of the power quadrant on the
_______ side.
A. Aft; left
B. Aft; right
C. Forward; left
D. Forward; right
5. The maximum speed permissible with
flaps in the approach position is _______
KIAS.
A. 160
B. 174
C. 194
D. 202
6. Rudder boost:
A. Is not required when operating at
weights less than 12,500 lbs.
B. Is off for takeoff and landing.
C. Must be on for takeoff and cruise.
D. Must be on and operational for
t akeof f, cl i mb, approach and
landing.
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QUESTIONS
16-i FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
CHAPTER 16
AVIONICS
INTRODUCTION................................................................................................................... 16-1
FLIGHT INSTRUMENTS...................................................................................................... 16-1
Adaptive Flight Displays (AFD)..................................................................................... 16-2
Multifunction Display (MFD) ....................................................................................... 16-12
DISPLAY CONTROL PANELS (DCP) ............................................................................. 16-17
INTEGRATED AVIONICS PROCESSOR SYSTEM (IAPS) ....................................... 16-24
AIR DATA COMPUTERS (ADC)..................................................................................... 16-24
ATTITUDE AND HEADING REFERENCE SYSTEM (AHRS)................................ 16-25
REVERSIONARY OPERATIONS.................................................................................... 16-26
OUTSIDE AIR TEMPERATURE .................................................................................... 16-31
STALL WARNING SYSTEM.............................................................................................. 16-33
FLIGHT GUIDANCE SYSTEM (FGS)............................................................................. 16-34
Flight Guidance Computers (FGC).............................................................................. 16-35
Flight Guidance Panel (FGP) ....................................................................................... 16-35
Control Wheel Switches.................................................................................................. 16-43
CONTROL DISPLAY UNIT (CDU).................................................................................. 16-45
FLIGHT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (FMS) .................................................................... 16-50
Vertical Navigation ......................................................................................................... 16-52
Global Positioning System (GPS) ................................................................................. 16-54
INTEGRATED FLIGHT INFORMATION SYSTEM (IFIS)........................................ 16-56
Cursor Control Panel (CCP).......................................................................................... 16-58
COMMUNICATION/NAVIGATION SYSTEMS ............................................................ 16-71
Audio System................................................................................................................... 16-75
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Radio Tuning Unit (RTU).............................................................................................. 16-78
CDU Tuning..................................................................................................................... 16-83
ELECTRONIC STANDBY INSTRUMENT SYSTEM (ESIS) ...................................... 16-88
WEATHER RADAR SYSTEM........................................................................................... 16-91
COCKPIT VOICE RECORDER (CVR)........................................................................... 16-96
EMERGENCY LOCATOR TRANSMITTER (ELT)...................................................... 16-96
ENHANCED GROUND PROXIMITY WARNING SYSTEM (EGPWS).................. 16-97
Basic Ground Proximity Warning System (GPWS).................................................... 16-97
Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System (GPWS)............................................ 16-99
TRAFFIC COLLISION AND AVOIDANCE SYSTEM (TCAS I) ............................. 16-102
TRAFFIC COLLISION AND AVOIDANCE SYSTEM (TCAS II) (OPTIONAL).. 16-104
APPENDIX A AVIONICS EQUIPMENT LOCATIONS ......................................... 16-111
APPENDIX B FLIGHT GUIDANCE MODES.......................................................... 16-113
APPENDIX C AVIONICS ACRONYMS..................................................................... 16-117
QUESTIONS ........................................................................................................................ 16-121
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-ii
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ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure Title Page
16-1. Adaptive Flight Displays (AFD)..................................................................... 16-2
16-2. Primary Flight Display...................................................................................... 16-3
16-3. Attitude Display................................................................................................ 16-4
16-4. Airspeed Display .............................................................................................. 16-4
16-5. Trend Vector....................................................................................................... 16-4
16-6. Low Speed Cue.................................................................................................. 16-5
16-7. High Speed Cue................................................................................................. 16-5
16-8. Airspeed Speed Bug ......................................................................................... 16-5
16-9. Acceleration Display......................................................................................... 16-6
16-10. Altimeter Display.............................................................................................. 16-6
16-11. Altitude Negative.............................................................................................. 16-6
16-12. Baro Switch ........................................................................................................ 16-7
16-13. Vertical Speed Indicator (VSI)........................................................................ 16-7
16-14. Altitude Preselect Bugs .................................................................................... 16-8
16-15. Metric Altitude .................................................................................................. 16-8
16-16. BARO ALT Switch ........................................................................................... 16-8
16-17. Heading and Navigation Display ................................................................... 16-9
16-18. DME hold .......................................................................................................... 16-9
16-19. PFD Compass Rose Format........................................................................... 16-10
16-20. PFD Arc Format.............................................................................................. 16-10
16-21. PFD Map Format ............................................................................................ 16-11
16-22. Terrain and Radar Overlay Section .............................................................. 16-11
16-23. PFD TCAS Message Area (Non-IFIS)......................................................... 16-11
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Figure Title Page
16-24. PFD Lower Display Information.................................................................. 16-12
16-25. Pilot's MFD Display ....................................................................................... 16-12
16-26. Non-IFIS MFD Checklist............................................................................... 16-14
16-27. MFD Upper Format (IFIS)............................................................................ 16-14
16-28. MFD Plan Format ........................................................................................... 16-15
16-29. MFD TCAS only ............................................................................................. 16-16
16-30. TCAS ............................................................................................................... 16-16
16-31. MFD Lower Display Information................................................................. 16-17
16-32. Display Control Panels ................................................................................... 16-17
16-33. Display Control Panel (DCP)........................................................................ 16-18
16-34. Barometric Setting with Yellow Underline.................................................. 16-18
16-35. IN/hPa Switch .................................................................................................. 16-18
16-36. Barometric Setting with STD........................................................................ 16-19
16-37. PFD REFS Menu Page 1 of 2........................................................................ 16-19
16-38. PFD V-Speeds.................................................................................................. 16-20
16-39. Radio Altitude Minimum............................................................................... 16-20
16-40. Barometric Minimum..................................................................................... 16-21
16-41. Minimums Annunciator ................................................................................. 16-21
16-42. PFD REFS Menu Page 2 of 2........................................................................ 16-21
16-43. Metric Altitude................................................................................................ 16-22
16-44. Flight Director Formats.................................................................................. 16-22
16-45. PFD NAV BRG Menu .................................................................................. 16-23
16-46. Bearing Pointer Information ......................................................................... 16-23
16-47. IAPS ................................................................................................................. 16-24
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Figure Title Page
16-48. ADC ................................................................................................................. 16-25
16-49. AHRS............................................................................................................... 16-25
16-50. Heading Slave and Slew................................................................................. 16-26
16-51. AFD Reversions ............................................................................................. 16-26
16-52. Reversionary Modes....................................................................................... 16-27
16-53. ADC1 Failure ................................................................................................. 16-28
16-54. ADC Miscompares ......................................................................................... 16-28
16-55. ADC Switch - ADC2 Selected....................................................................... 16-29
16-56. AHRS1 Failure................................................................................................ 16-29
16-57. AHRS Miscompares ....................................................................................... 16-30
16-58. Pitot Tubes........................................................................................................ 16-30
16-59. Static Ports ..................................................................................................... 16-30
16-60. Alternate Static Source Selection ................................................................. 16-31
16-61. System Integration .......................................................................................... 16-32
16-62. OAT Gauge...................................................................................................... 16-33
16-63. Rosemont Probe.............................................................................................. 16-33
16-64. Transducer Vane.............................................................................................. 16-33
16-65. Stall Warning Test Switch ............................................................................... 16-34
16-66. Stall Warning Heat .......................................................................................... 16-34
16-67. Flight Guidance Panel (FGP)........................................................................ 16-35
16-68. Flight Guidance System Display ................................................................... 16-35
16-69. Flight Guidance Panel (FGP)........................................................................ 16-36
16-70. Flight Guidance Couple Arrow..................................................................... 16-36
16-71. Independent Flight Director Operation....................................................... 16-36
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Figure Title Page
16-72. YD/AP Disconnect Bar.................................................................................. 16-37
16-73. Heading Vector Line....................................................................................... 16-38
16-74. Half Bank Mode.............................................................................................. 16-38
16-75. APPR Mode Selection ................................................................................... 16-39
16-76. Localizer Nav-to-Nav Capture ...................................................................... 16-40
16-77. VNAV Glidepath (GP) Mode ....................................................................... 16-40
16-78. Vertical Speed (VS) Mode............................................................................. 16-41
16-79. Flight Level Change (FLC) Mode ................................................................ 16-42
16-80. Left Yoke.......................................................................................................... 16-43
16-81. Pilot's PFD with SYNC.................................................................................. 16-44
16-82. Go-Around Button ......................................................................................... 16-44
16-83. PFD Go-Around (GA) Mode ....................................................................... 16-45
16-84. Control Display Unit (CDU)......................................................................... 16-45
16-85. Active Flight Plan Page .................................................................................. 16-47
16-86. Active Legs Page............................................................................................. 16-47
16-87. Direct to Pages................................................................................................. 16-47
16-88. Hold FPLN Mode ........................................................................................... 16-48
16-89. MFD Menu Key (CDU)................................................................................. 16-49
16-90. MFD Advance Key (CDU)............................................................................ 16-50
16-91. MFD Text Page................................................................................................ 16-50
16-92. Database Units ................................................................................................ 16-51
16-93. Active Legs Page with VNAV Altitudes....................................................... 16-53
16-94. VNAV Top of Descent.................................................................................... 16-54
16-95. VNAV Modes .................................................................................................. 16-54
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Figure Title Page
16-96. GPS CONTROL............................................................................................. 16-55
16-97. PROGRESS .................................................................................................... 16-55
16-98. IFIS Block Diagram........................................................................................ 16-57
16-99. Ethernet Database Unit ................................................................................. 16-58
16-100. USB Database Unit (DBU-5000)................................................................. 16-58
16-101. MCDU Menu. ................................................................................................. 16-58
16-102. IFIS Dataload Block Diagram....................................................................... 16-59
16-103. CCP................................................................................................................... 16-60
16-104. MFD Store Complete..................................................................................... 16-60
16-105. Geo-Politcal Overlay ...................................................................................... 16-60
16-106. Airspace Overlay ........................................................................................... 16-61
16-107. Airways Overlay.............................................................................................. 16-61
16-108. Database Effectivity (STAT Key) ................................................................. 16-62
16-109. STAT Menu...................................................................................................... 16-62
16-110. Chart Subscription (STAT Key).................................................................... 16-62
16-111. MFD Chart Display ........................................................................................ 16-63
16-112. MFD Chart Menu ........................................................................................... 16-63
16-113. MFD Chart Approach Index ......................................................................... 16-64
16-114. MFD Chart Zoom Box................................................................................... 16-64
16-115. MFD Chart Geo-Reference Symbols ........................................................... 16-65
16-116. MFD Chart Menu .......................................................................................... 16-65
16-117. MFD PLAN Map Weather Overlay ............................................................. 16-66
16-118. MFD Dedicated Graphical Weather Format (XM Weather) .................... 16-66
16-119. MFD XM Weather Menu .............................................................................. 16-67
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Figure Title Page
16-120. MFD Metar Display ....................................................................................... 16-67
16-121. Overlay Legends ............................................................................................. 16-68
16-122. MFD Graphical Weather Time Stamps ....................................................... 16-68
16-123. MCDU Datalink Pages (Universal Weather) .............................................. 16-69
16-124. Datalink Weather Selections (Universal Weather)..................................... 16-70
16-125. MFD_Plan Map Weather Overlay................................................................ 16-70
16-126. MFD Dedicated Graphical Weather Format(Universal Weather) ........... 16-71
16-127. Universal Weather Menu ............................................................................... 16-71
16-128. RTU / CDU TUNE Switch ............................................................................ 16-72
16-129. Emergency Frequency Button....................................................................... 16-72
16-130. Antennas .......................................................................................................... 16-73
16-131. RMT Tune Switch............................................................................................ 16-73
16-132. PFD DME Displays........................................................................................ 16-74
16-133. DME Hold Selection and Images ................................................................. 16-74
16-134. ATC Transponder Switch ............................................................................... 16-75
16-135. Flight ID Selection ......................................................................................... 16-75
16-136. Audio Panels .................................................................................................... 16-76
16-137. Audio System Components............................................................................ 16-76
16-138. Control Wheel (PTT) Switches...................................................................... 16-78
16-139. Radio Tuning Unit (RTU).............................................................................. 16-79
16-140. RTU in Preset Tuning Mode.......................................................................... 16-79
16-141. RTU COMM Pages ........................................................................................ 16-80
16-142. RTU NAV Pages ............................................................................................ 16-80
16-143. RTU ADF Pages ............................................................................................. 16-81
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Figure Title Page
16-144. RTU ATC Page ............................................................................................... 16-81
16-145. RTU HF Pages ................................................................................................ 16-82
16-146. RTU TCAS II Pages ....................................................................................... 16-83
16-147. CDU Tune with TCAS I ................................................................................. 16-83
16-148. CDU Frequency Data..................................................................................... 16-84
16-149. CDU COMM Page ......................................................................................... 16-84
16-150. CDU NAV Page .............................................................................................. 16-85
16-151. CDU ATC Page............................................................................................... 16-85
16-152. CDU ADF Page .............................................................................................. 16-86
16-153. CDU TUNE With TCAS II............................................................................ 16-86
16-154. MFD TCAS Display ....................................................................................... 16-87
16-155. CDU TCAS II Control ................................................................................... 16-87
16-156. CDU HF Control ............................................................................................ 16-87
16-157. GND COMM Button ..................................................................................... 16-88
16-158. Static Wicks...................................................................................................... 16-88
16-159. ESIS Display ................................................................................................... 16-89
16-160. ESIS Power Switch.......................................................................................... 16-89
16-161. ESIS Menu....................................................................................................... 16-91
16-162. PFD Radar Menu............................................................................................ 16-92
16-163. Test Mode......................................................................................................... 16-92
16-164. Radar Ground Map Mode ............................................................................. 16-92
16-165. Radar Display with Path Attenuation Bar ................................................... 16-93
16-166. Radar Display Turbulence Mode .................................................................. 16-93
16-167. Turbulence Only Display ............................................................................... 16-94
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Figure Title Page
16-168. Radar Gain Display ........................................................................................ 16-94
16-169. Pilot's PFD with TGT..................................................................................... 16-94
16-170. Radar Ground Clutter Supression ................................................................ 16-95
16-171. Radar Tilt Display........................................................................................... 16-96
16-172. CVR Controllers ............................................................................................. 16-96
16-173. ELT Manual Switch ........................................................................................ 16-97
16-174. PFD GND PROX and PULL UP Annunciators ........................................ 16-97
16-175. GPWS Failure Annunciators ......................................................................... 16-97
16-176. EGPWS Buttons ............................................................................................. 16-99
16-177. Terrain Display.............................................................................................. 16-100
16-178. Terrain Fail and TERR Annunciators ........................................................ 16-101
16-179. TCAS I TEST................................................................................................ 16-102
16-180. Operating Mode Button............................................................................... 16-103
16-181. TCAS II Test.................................................................................................. 16-105
16-182. Overview of Avionics Units......................................................................... 16-111
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Table Title Page
16-1. GPWS Cautions and Warnings...................................................................... 16-98
16-2. EGPWS Buttons ............................................................................................. 16-99
16-3. EPGWS Cautions and Warnings................................................................. 16-101
16-4. TCAS Messages ............................................................................................ 16-106
16-5. TCAS II Annunciators ................................................................................. 16-107
16-6. TCAS II Trafc Advisory ............................................................................. 16-108
16-7. TCAS II Resolution Advisories .................................................................. 16-109
16-8. Flight Guidance Modes................................................................................ 16-113
CHAPTER 16
AVIONICS
INTRODUCTION
The Super King Air B350 utilizes the Collins Pro Line 21 avionics system. The Pro Line
21 Avionics System is an integrated ight instrument, autopilot, and navigation system.
All functions have been combined into a compact, highly reliable system designed for ease
of operation, seamless communication between systems, and reduced pilot workload.
FLIGHT INSTRUMENTS
ELECTRONIC FLIGHT
INSTRUMENT SYSTEM (EFIS)
The Electronic Flight Instrument System
(EFIS) consists of computers and data collec-
tors that, when coupled with other subsystems,
result in the display of ight, navigation, and
engine indicating on liquid crystal displays
(LCD) these are called Adaptive Flight Dis-
plays (AFD). Compared to conventional in-
strumentation, an EFIS system permits much
more information to be presented to the pilot
with a minimum of operating complexity,
maintenance, and weight.
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
16-1 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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ADAPTIVE FLIGHT DISPLAYS
(AFD)
The liquid crystal (LCD) Adaptive Flight Dis-
plays (AFD) contain all the ight and naviga-
tion information previously indicated on
separate round dial instruments. Three
AFDs are installed in the King Air B350 and
are all interchangeable . When the IFIS system
is installed, the MFD is modied to receive ad-
ditional information. It is no longer inter-
changeable and carries a different part
number. The left AFD functions as the pilots
Primary Flight Display (PFD 1) on which air-
plane attitude, heading, altitude, vertical speed,
etc., are shown. The center AFD functions as
the multifunction display (MFD) on which en-
gine indications, diagnostic pages, checklists,
navigation data, etc., are shown. The MFD re-
ceives much of the same data as PFD 1. The
right AFD functions as the copilots Primary
Flight Display (PFD 2) and operates inde-
pendent of PFD 1.
The temperature of LCD displays must stay
within appropriate limits to provide normal
operation. Should these temperature extremes
be exceeded each AFD has its own tempera-
ture monitor. Depending on what is needed
this monitor has control of integral heaters
and cooling fans.
In the event of a display failure on PFD 1 the
MFD can display PFD 1 images in whats called
a reversionary composite mode. However,
there is no reversionary backup to PFD 2.
Primary Flight Display (PFD)
The PFD displays airplane attitude and dy-
namic ight data. Flight Director indications,
autopilot annunciations, and navigation infor-
mation are also shown in a centralized loca-
tion, including during reversionary format. A
typical PFD display is shown (Figure 16-2)
The PFD has the following controls and indi-
cations:
Bright/Dim Rocker Switch
The PILOT DISPLAYS rheostat, on the over-
head panel, provides primary intensity con-
trol.The Bright/Dim Rocker Switch on the
Figure 16-1. Adaptive Flight Displays (AFD)
RADIO CALL
N350KA
ON
+
+
DOWN
LOCK
REL
HD LT
TEST
HYD FLUID
SENSOR
STROBE
TAIL
FLOOD
OFF
BEACON
GEAR
DOWN
TEST
LANDING
GEAR
RELAY
FUEL VENT MANUAL AUTO
PROP WSHLD ANTI-ICE
NORMAL
HI
SURFACE
BRAKE
DEICE
ENG
AUTO
IGN
GEN
RESET
ON
OFF
AVIONICS
MASTER
POWER
EXT
PWR
DEICE
SINGLE
MANUAL LEFT RIGHT
STALL
WARN PITOT
RIGHT LEFT PILOT
ARM
OFF
LEFT
LEFT RIGHT
ENGINE ANTI-ICE
AUTOFEATHER PROP TEST
ON
OFF
OFF OFF
ON LEFT RIGHT
STARTER ONLY OFF
ARM GOV
GND IDLE
STOP
TEST
ON
OFF
ON
TEST
OFF
EMER
OFF
NORM
OFFRESET
ACTUATORS
STANDBY
BUS SENSE
RESET
GEN TIES
MAN CLOSE
MAIN
TEST
BAT L GEN R GEN
OPEN
RIGHT
COPILOT
LDG GEAR CONTROL
UP
DN
OFF
ICE PROTECTION
OFF
+
IGNITION AND
ENGINE START
PARKING BRAKE
ESIS
BAT BUS
2 1 DME
2 PA
XMIT
PA
T S
2
1
NORM
MIC
OXY
1 NAV
2 1 COMM
2 1 ADF AUTO
COMM
SPKR
VOICE
IDENT NORM
AUDIO
ALTN B
O
T
H
MKR
INPH
2 1 DME
2 PA
XMIT
PA
S T
2
1
NORM
MIC
OXY
1 NAV
2 1 COMM
2 1 ADF AUTO
COMM
SPKR
VOICE
IDENT NORM
AUDIO
ALTN B
O
T
H
MKR
INPH
Collins Collins
Collins Collins
M
1/2
DME-H
IDENT
Collins BRT MENU
ADV
DATA MENU
ADV
DATA
V O L
VOL
F
PRESET
TERM
TERR
RDR
FORMAT
TERRAIN
TA ONLY
0.8NM
HDG 329
(8215)
100
ACC.03
V1
103 VR
107 V2
29.92IN
MIN 10200 BARO
16000
8215
FMS
ET
COM1 118.85 COM2 121.90 ATC1 0511 UTC 20:03
12.5
25
RAT 1 C
V
DBL
13.6NM
VOR1
1
1
2
4
2
4
HDG PTCH
FMS ALTS
20
10
10
8000
60
80
800
0
138
082
7820
40
00
BRT
DIM
BRT
DIM
700
900
600
170
30
W
N
3
329
BARO
RANGE TILT
S T D
PUSH
GCS
REFS
NAV/BRG
RADAR
T I L T
AUTO PUSH
NOSE
L R
PROP
SYNC
EMER
FREQ
GND
COM
NORM
DG
FREE
NORM
DG
FREE
LDG GEAR
WARN TEST
OFF
STALL
WARN TEST
OVERSPEED
WARN TEST
OFF
WINDOW
DEFOG
LOW
MAN COOL
ENVIRONMENTAL
COCKPIT
AUTO INCR INCR
BLOWER TEMP
MODE
MAN
HEAT AUTO
OFF ELEC
HEAT
ENVIR
BLEED AIR
NORMAL
DECR
MAN TEMP
INCR
PNEU & ENVIR OFF
ENVIR
OFF
BLEED AIR VALVES
LEFT OPEN RIGHT
CABIN DIFF
WARN TEST
CABIN ALT WARN
TEST SILENCE
OFF
OFF
EXT
DET
ENG FIRE TEST
NORM
AHRS SLEW
+ 2 1
NORM NORM
ADC
2 1
NORM 2
PILOT
DISPLAY
MFD PFD STBY
SLEW
+
TUNE
RTU CDU
DISABLE
RMT TUNE
NORM
ATC
1
G/S
INHIB
ACTIVE
TERR
INHIB
ACTIVE
STEEP
APPR
ACTIVE
FLAP
OVRD
ACTIVE
BARO
RANGE TILT
S T D
PUSH
GCS
REFS
NAV/BRG
RADAR
T I L T
AUTO PUSH
29.92 in 13.6NM VOR1
057CRS
0KTS 0MIN
7500
8000
80
60
10 10
10 10
33 N 30
20
00 78
1
40
9
COM1
118. 85 123. 80
113. 00
NAV1
ATC 1 ADF
108. 50
0511 350. 0
ENG FIRE
F/W VALVE PUSH
CLOSED
ENG FIRE
F/W VALVE PUSH
CLOSED
DISCHARGED
EXTINGUISHER
PUSH
DISCHARGED
EXTINGUISHER
PUSH
L FUEL PRES LO CABIN ALT HI CABIN DIFF HI
DOOR UNLOCKED
L OIL PRES LO
R FUEL PRES LO
R OIL PRES LO
L BLEED FAIL R BLEED FAIL
CRS1
DI RECT
PUSH
CRS2
DI RECT
PUSH
SPEED
I A S / MACH
PUSH
FD VS DOWN
UP
VNAV
NAV HDG
HDG
APPR ALT FLC
1/2 BANK
YD AP
YD/AP DISC
FD
CPL
Collins
ALT
CA N C E L
P U S H SYNC
PUSH
O
F
F
A
U
T
O
O
F
F
CABIN
AUTO INCR INCR
BLOWER TEMP
DOWN
UP
20 2
1 4
2
1 4
6 0
.5
.5
80
60
FLAPS TAKEOFF AND APPROACH
CABIN CLIMB THDS FT PER MIN
0
5
10
15 20
25
30
35
40
1
2
3
4 5
6
7
ALT 1000 FT
L PROP PITCH CABIN ALTITUDE LDG/TAXI LIGHT PASS OXYGEN ON AIR COND N1 LOW R PROP PITCH
L ENG ICE FAIL L FUEL QTY ELEC HEAT ON EXT PWR R FUEL QTY R ENG ICE FAIL
L CHIP DETECT L NO FUEL XFR BAT TIE OPEN DUCT OVERTEMP R NO FUEL XFR R CHIP DETECT
L DC GEN L GEN TIE OPEN HYD FLUID LOW RVS NOT READY R GEN TIE OPEN R DC GEN
L IGNITION ON L ENG ANTI-ICE FUEL CROSSFEED R ENG ANTI-ICE R IGNITION ON
WING DEICE L BK DEICE ON MAN TIES CLOSE R BK DEICE ON TAIL DEICE
L BL AIR OFF AUTOFTHER OFF OXY NOT ARMED RUD BOOST OFF R BL AIR OFF
PROP GND SOL L PITOT HEAT R PITOT HEAT
L
I
G
H
T
S
L
I
G
H
T
S
O
F
F
N
O
R
M
O
F
F
2
LANDING TAXI ICE NAV RECOG
LEFT RIGHT
50
0 100
80 FLIGHT
HOURS 1/10
VACUUM
INCHES OF MERCURY
0
500 10001500
2000
PSI
OXYGEN SUPPLY PRESSURE MADE IN USA
USE NO OIL
PNEUMATIC
PRESSURE
0 20
10
PSI 3 4 5
6
35k
15k
MASTER CAUTION MASTER WARNING PRESS TO RESET
MASTER
CAUTION MASTER
WARNING
ACC .
PRESS
T O T E S T
Collins
BRT
DIM
1.4NM
HDG 329
(8215)
TTG
FMS
GS 0 ISA TAS 0 SAT 12 C +13 C
TERR
RDR
TA ONLY
TFC F
12.5
50
30
W
N
3
329
--:--
0.6NM KASE
CLIMB
(8215) 8215A
-:--/ 1.4NM
-:-- : 1.4NM (8215)
-:-- : 2.6NM (8700)
-:-- : 169NM KCOS
PRESS TO RESET PRESS TO RESET
PRESS TO RESET
FF 130 750
PRESS
TORQ FIRE
ITT PROP
OIL
122 80
TEMPC 49
110.0
830
112
TORQ
ITT
3.4
516
N1 106.0
1050
62.2
ON ON 121.5
CABIN AIR
SELECT
PUSH
SELECT
PUSH
DBL LINDZ
J206
J10-1
(8215)
/8215A
(INTC)
KASE (8700) JNETT
GLENO
/16000A
1740
< PRESET
CRS 057
FORMAT
ATC UTC RAT COM1 COM2 oC
< <
RDR
TERR
TERR < ET
F
2 1
2 4
w
30
33 N
3
6
E
1 2
1 5 S
ALT
ATT
IAS
AHS2
ADC2
VS
FD
RA
DCP TCAS FAIL
GPWS
FMS
PULL UP
GND PROX
LOC1
TRIM
XTLK
XAHS
XADC
ENG1
ENG2
HDG
GS LOC
HDG
IAS
V
N
V
ATT
ALT
AP
A
29.88IN
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8215
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INHIB IB
G/S
A
TERR
ACTIVE
INHIBB
TERR
AC ACTIVE
APPR PR
STEEP
AACTIVE
OVRDD
FLAP
CRS1
FD
H S U P
T EC EEC RR I R I R DDDI
UP
DOWN VS
V VNAAV
TT
FMS
TTG
(8215) (
TTG
329 HDG
.4NM 1
W
30
KCOS
329 3 9
169NM : -:--
(8700)
(8215)
2.6NM : -:--
( )
(8700)
1.4NM : -:--
-:--/
8215A (8215)
CLIMB
KASE 0.6NM
--:--
830
10.0 1
PROP ITT
FIRE ORQ T
516
3.4
ITT
ORQ T
62.2
1050
106.0 N1
1740
H
S
SH U P
T CCT E L EEL SSE
















<
N350KA
RADIO CALL
ADV
M
IDENT
DME-H
Collins B
123. 80
BRT MENU
BARO
H S U P
D T D SS T
REFS
V/BRG NAAV/BRG
000
29.92 in
8
500 7
60
N
80
9
30 333 N 0
78000
20 40
18. 85 1
COM1
V1 NA
CRS2 SPEED
H US U P
T EC EEC RR I R I R DDDI
AV
H S U P
H CCCH A S AC M // M S /
AAA S
I
NNAV
HDG
HDG APPR LT A FLC
1/2 BANK
YD AP FD
DISC YD/AP
CPL
Collins
LT A
HSU S HUP
E LEE LCN C E
NA CA N
C
H
N
S U PPU
C NC Y S
S T SS T EE T O
Collins
3
N
1.4NM -:--/
8215A
2 11 49 TEMPC
80 122
OIL
FIRE
PRESS
750 130 FF
H S U P
T CCT E L EEL SSE
















<
1
1
OXY
C MI
NORM
1
2 PA
T XMI
PA
1
ns
.
Colli
ATA D
BARO
VOL
HH
DD
REFS
V/BRG
T
TT
SE SE O EE RR O TTT SS PRES ES PR
C AC
CRS 057
SE SE T RE R OO TTTO TO S S ES E RR PP
H
T CCT
P
LT VS
T
IAS
6
3
N 33
30
5
AT FD
A
LT IAS
AHS2
ADC2
RA
AIL TCAS F P DC
GND PROX
G
UP PULL
GPWS
XTLK
IM TR
LOC1
HS XA
DC XA
G1 EN
G2 EN
HDG
GS G LOC
G D H
V
N
V T T A
N
A
A
A
29.88I
















<
DME 2
AV N
T S
2
COMM 2
















<
ON
RIGHT
OPEN
R GEN GEN L AT B
TEST
MAIN
MAN CLOSE
TIES GEN
RESET
BUS SENSE
ANDBY ST
ORS T ACTUAT
NORM
OFF
EMER
OFF
TEST
ON
OFF
ON
TEST
OP ST
GND IDLE
GOV ARM
OFF Y ARTER ONL ST
RIGHT LEFT ON
OFF OFF
OFF
ON
TEST PROP THER OFEAT AUT
ANTI-ICE NE ENGI
RIGHT LEFT
LEFT
OFF
ARM
PWR
EXT
WER POOW
MASTER
VIONICS AV
OFF
ON
RESET
GEN
IGN
O AUT
ENG
ART NE ST ENGI
AND IGNITION
T BUS BAT
ESIS
ARKING BRAKE PPA
H
T
O
B N LT A
AUDIO
NORM IDENT
VOICE
O AUT ADF 1 2
INPH
MKR
PRESET
12 5 1112222 5555 1112222 5555 1112222..555
COMM
SPKR
F
20:03 UTC 1 051 TC1 AT 18.85 1 COM1
ET
VOR1
.6NM 13
DBL
V
M
R
O
N
OFFRESET
















<
LINDZ G O
(8215) KASE (870 (8215) (8700) 82 AS (8215) KASE
DN
UP
LDG GEAR CONTROL
LOT COPI PILOT LEFT RIGHT
T O PIT W
ALL ST
RIGHT LEFT MANUAL
LE NG SI
DEICE
DEICE
BRAKE
ACE SURFFACE
HI
NORMAL
ANTI-ICE WSHLD PROP
O AUT MANUAL
Y RELA
GEAR
LANDING
TEST
DOWN
GEAR
BEACON
OFF
D FLOO
AIL T
STROBE
SENSOR
HYD FLUID
TEST
T HD L
REL
LOCK
DOWN
+
OFF
PROTECTION ICE
OFF
Y
Collins
SYNC
T
ONL A T
TERRAIN
T FORMA AT
RDR
TERR
C 1 AT R 121.90 COM2
TIL LT RANGE
GCS
RADAR
H S U P O AUT
T L I TT I
ON ON
L R
PROP
FREE
L
NOSEE
DG
NORM
+
SLEW
STBY
FLAPS
UP
DOWN
F
F
O
F
F
O
S
T
H
G
I
L
S
T
H
G
I
L
2
RIGHT
AV
FUEL VENT
RIGHT LEFT LEFT
RECOG AV NN ICE AXI T NG LANDI
ARN
AT S 0 S TA 0 GS
F
50
12.5
W
J206
(
82
82 AS 82 87
NTC)
DBL /16000A 0A
(INTC) C)
(
82
87
(INTC)
/
)
/8215A
(8700)
0 /16000A
( 5)
000A
GGLENO LENO GLENO E NDZ
















<
O
LEFT
FREQ
T
1/2
13. 00
121.5 21.5
EMER
COM
OO
GND
FREE
BLEED
PNEU & ENVI
NORMAL
AIR BLEED
R ENVI
HEA HEAT
ELEC OFF
O AUT HEA HEAT
MAN
MODE
TEMP BLOWER
NCR I NCR I O AUT
T COCKPI
AL RONMENT ENVI
COOL MAN
LOW
O
DG
NORM
AHRS
NORM
ADC
NORM NORM
1 2
Y DISPLAY
PILOT
2 NORM
1 2 PFD MFD STBY +
SLEW
CDU RTU
TUNE NORM
RMT TUNE
SABLE DI
1
C T AAT
TIL
GCS
RADAR
H SSH U PPU
O UT A
T LL T I TT I
1
V1 NA
TC 1 TC 1 AA ADF ADF
350. 0 1 051
108. 50
T
U
A
TEMP BLOWER
NCR I NCR I O AUT
N CABI APPROACH
THDS FT PER MIN
T F 0 0 000 1 T LLT A
7
6
5 4
3
2
1
40
35
30
25
20 15
10
5
0
CABIN CLIMB
.5
ANDFF AKEO T
60
80
20
.5
0 6
4 1
2
4 1
2
UP
DOWN
Y ONL A T
RDR
TERR
C +13 C 12 ISA
TFC
3
J10-1
JNETT JNETT J
















<
+
+
H
T
O
B TN AL
O AUDI
NORM DENT I
CE VOI
O AUT 1
MKR
<
COM
Collins
RANGE
TEST
COMM
SPKR
OON
GND
FIRE ENG
DET
EXT
OFF
OFF
LENCE SI TEST
ARN W T AL N CABI
TEST ARN W
FF DI N CABI
RIGHT OPEN
VES AL AIR VA BLEED
OFF
R ENVI
OFF R PNEU & ENVI
NCR I
TEMP MAN
DECR T
ELEC
T
DEFOG
NDOW WI
OFF
TEST ARN W
OVERSPEED
ARN TEST W
ALL ST
OFF
ARN TEST W
GEAR LDG
GCS
RADAR
H
O
T
F
F
O
F
F
O
80
1/10 HOURS
FLIGHT 100 0
50
Y F MERCUR INCHES O
ACUUM VVACUUM
15k 5k
35k
66
5 4 3
AIR CABIN
C o COM2 COM1 AT RRAT UTC C AT
T FORMA
PRESET <
F
ET < RR TE
RR TE
R RD
FMS
S1 5
1 2
E
w
2 4
2 1
5
















<
O
ADF 2
NPH I
1/10 OIL
FLIGHT
USE NO
MADE IN USA PRESSURE Y SUPPLLY OXYGEN
PSI
2000
1500 1000 500
0
PSI
10
20 0
PRESSURE
TIC PNEUMA
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-2
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
1
6

A
V
I
O
N
I
C
S
PFD provides secondary intensity control of
the PFD. This PILOT DISPLAYS rheostat will
control three displays simultaneously; the
PFD, MFD and Control Display Unit (CDU)
on the pedestal. This allows all three displays
to be brightened together. The Bright/Dim
Rocker Switch will then allow each display to
be ne tuned to make its brightness even with
the surrounding displays.
Line Select Keys
Four line select keys (LSK) are located on
each side of the AFD. These keys are used in
conjunction with the information being
viewed on the AFD display. LSKs that are cur-
rently active are denoted by carets (< >) dis-
played adjacent to the LSK.
Attitude Display
The primary function of the PFD is to show
airplane attitude. The PFD additionally shows
the following: ight director steering com-
mands; ight guidance system status/mode an-
nunciations; vertical/lateral deviation; marker
beacon annunciations; and radio altitude.
A rectangular-shaped slip/skid indicator is lo-
cated at the base of the sky-pointer bank
Figure 16-2. Primary Flight Display
Collins
BRT
DIM
10
10
20
HDG PTCH
ALTS
14000
6
60
540
20

400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N
< PRESET
VOR1
FORMAT >
FMS1
DTK 251
(6935)
0.8NM
25
251
W

3
0

24
2
1

ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
C
<
140
80
60
6935
RDR
TERR
< ET 01:42
TERM
F
50
ACC-.02
TERRAIN
0
FMS
RADAR ON
144
069
TCAS OFF
TFC >
>
117
110
106
V2
VR
V1
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
16-3 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
1
6

A
V
I
O
N
I
C
S
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-4
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
index. This is used like the uid lled slip-skid
indicator used in other aircraft (e.g., half of the
rectangle to the right equals half ball to the
right). See Figure 16-3.
Figure 16-3. Attitude Display
Airspeed Display
The Airspeed Display on the PFD is of a mov-
ing tape design (Figure 16-4).
A large pointer at the center of the display is
the current aircraft airspeed. The digital read-
out at this pointer acts like a rolling drum
where each knot of airspeed increase or de-
crease will rollover to show the next digit. The
tape and rolling drum will begin indicating as
the airspeed is above 40 knots.
Figure 16-4. Airspeed Display
This display area can also show current Mach,
IAS markers (bugs), IAS trend vector,
low/high speed cues, and acceleration rates.
The trend vector is a magenta line that extends
either above or below the pointer to indicate
the rate of airspeed increase or decrease. The
end of the vector indicates expected airspeed
in 10 seconds. A trend vector moving into a
warning bar, in either the overspeed or
lowspeed area, will cause the airspeed number
to ash yellow (Figure 16-5).
Figure 16-5. Trend Vector



10

20
HDG PTCH
ALTS





























<
1











FMS







Collins


10
10
20
HDG PTCH
ALTS
14000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N








251
W


24


<
140
80
60
6935
R


TERM


ACC-.02
T
0
FMS




117
110
106
V2
VR
V1



10
1
20
HDG PTCH
ALTS





























<
1











FMS































V












< <
140
80
60




TERM


ACC-.02
T






117
110
106
V2
VR
V1



< <

200 RA
254
280
260
240
220
0
9
25
1
6

A
V
I
O
N
I
C
S
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
The Low Speed Cue / Impending Stall Speed
(LSC / ISS) bar is displayed at the AFM value
for stall at a maximum gross weight, power
idle and no bank condition (Figure 16-6).
Figure 16-6. Low Speed Cue
This speed is adjusted for ap position as listed
here:
0% Flaps 96kts
40% Flaps 89kts
100% Flaps 81kts
It is important to note that these speeds are
not adjusted for the current g-forces, power
settings or maneuvers. They should be used as
reference only and not as the primary indica-
tion of a stall. The true indication of a stall will
be in the form of a stall horn, or aerodynamic
buffet. The autopilot will not stop the aircraft
airspeed from getting into the low speed cue
but once the stall warning horn sounds the au-
topilot will disconnect. See the Stall Warning
section later in this chapter.
The high speed cue consists of a red bar start-
ing at the current Vmo or Mmo whichever is
appropriate (Figure 6-7). Should the aircraft
actual airspeed enter this red bar area an over-
speed warning horn will sound until the speed
is reduced to below the red overspeed bar. If
the autopilot is engaged during the overspeed,
it will begin to pitch the aircraft up until
achieving an airspeed just below the current
Vmo or Mmo.
Figure 16-7. High Speed Cue
Displayed above the airspeed tape, is a speed
reference that the pilot can set using the speed
knob on the Flight Guidance Panel. A bug will
appear on the tape next to the selected speed
(Figure 16-8).
Figure 16-8. Airspeed Speed Bug
Low Speed Pre-Warning Low Speed Warning



< <


160
140
120
100
80
11
1
0



< <

200 RA
160
120
100
80
60
9
1
0
Overpeed Pre-Warning Overspeed Warning



< <

200 RA
254
280
260
240
220
0
9
25



< <



254
300
280
260
240
27
0
9
135
160
140
100
80
1 1
9
8
Speed Bug
Setting
Speed
Bug
16-5 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
1
6

A
V
I
O
N
I
C
S
Below the airspeed tape two different digital
readouts may be displayed. While on the
ground the current acceleration rate is dis-
played in G's". This can indicate from .00 to
+ or - .99g. While airborne, the current Mach
number is displayed in lieu of the acceleration
display (Figure 16-9). The Mach indication
will appear only if the current speed is greater
than .450 Mach. The display is then removed
when the Mach is less than .400.
Figure 16-9. Acceleration Display
Altitude and Vertical Speed
Displays
The Altitude and Vertical Speed Displays in-
dicate the altitude and vertical speed. The alti-
tude data is a moving tape design with a
central pointer. This pointer contains a digi-
tal readout with a rolling drum appearance
just like the airspeed display. Each 20 feet of
altitude is on a single drum and the hundreds
and thousands follow when needed. At lower
altitudes, green striped shutters cover the ap-
propriate ten thousand and thousand digits
(Figure16-10).
Should a negative altitude exist, a vertically
positioned NEG legend will replace the ten
thousands position. (Figure 16-11).
Figure 16-10. Altimeter Display
Figure 16-11. Altitude Negative
The Altimeter setting is displayed below the
altitude tape . This can be changed between
inches and hectopascals. (For IFIS aircraft, see
the REFS section of the Display Control Panel
(DCP) to see how this is accomplished). For
non-IFIS aircraft, this is accomplished by mov-
On Ground In Flight



< <

200 RA
254
280
260
240
220
0
9
25
M .471










< <
R


TERM






























140
80
60

ACC-.02
0







117
110
106
V2
VR
V1







3000
6
60
540
20

400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N














<
4000


















1000










14000

400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N








<
1


6935
E



























60
540
20



KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
16-6 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
1
6

A
V
I
O
N
I
C
S
ing a BARO switch on the overhead panel to
the IN (inches) or hPA (hectopascals) position
(Figure 16-12). This will affect both pilots
PFDs and cannot be done independently.
Figure 16-12. Baro Switch
Additionally, this altimeter setting can ash as
an advisory of transition altitude / level pas-
sage. For IFIS aircraft see the REFS section of
the Display Control Panel (DCP) to see how
this is accomplished. For non-IFIS aircraft, this
is accomplished by moving the FL180 switch
on the overhead panel to the ENABLE or
DISABLE position depending on whether the
advisory ash is desired. This transition point
cannot be changed to an altitude other than
18,000.
The vertical speed display consists of a moving
green line that will angle up or down depending
on the current vertical speed (Figure 16-13).
The value of climb or descent will then read at
the top of the display for a climb or bottom of
the display for a descent,when the value is
greater that 300 ft/min. Once the climb or de-
scent decreases below 100 ft/min the digital
readout will be removed.
Figure 16-13. Vertical Speed Indicator (VSI)
Displayed above the altitude tape is the pres-
elect altitude shown in cyan. This altitude is se-
lected by the pilot using the ALT knob on the
Flight Guidance Panel. The selected altitude is
then marked with a Fine Preselect Altitude
bug that brackets the altitude window when
captured (Figure 16-14). A smaller Coarse Pre-
select Altitude bug will appear on the left side
of the tape when approximately 1000 from
the selected altitude to indicate proximity to
that altitude. An aural tone will sound and the
preselected altitude will ash further indicat-
ing proximity to the chosen altitude. Once
within 200 of the preselected altitude, the
ashing will stop. This ashing can be stopped
earlier by pressing the ALT knob on the ight
guidance panel. (See the Flight Guidance sec-
tion later in this chapter). Should the aircraft
go +- 200 from the altitude, an aural tone will
sound and the preselected altitude will change
to yellow and ash. This ashing will continue
until the altitude returns to within 200 of se-
lected. This ashing can be stopped by press-
ing the ALT knob on the ight guidance panel.
1
2
4
4
2
1
300
Current V ertica l
Speed
Flight Guidance
Selected Vertical
Speed
VN A V V ertica l
Speed Required
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
1
6

A
V
I
O
N
I
C
S
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-8
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
Figure 16-14. Altitude Preselect Bugs
This top display area can also contain the met-
ric altitude and metric altitude preselect (Fig-
ure 16-15). For IFIS aircraft see the REFS
section of the Display Control Panel (DCP) to
see how this is accomplished. For non-IFIS air-
craft this is accomplished by moving a BARO
ALT switch on the overhead panel to the FT
(feet) or meter (M) position (Figure 16-16) .
This action will affect both pilots and cannot
be done independently. This change does not
alter the actual altitude tape; that remains in
feet for all phases of ight.
Figure 16-15. Metric Altitude
Additionally, a magenta number can be dis-
played above the VSI (Figure 16-10). This
number is FMS generated and indicates the
crossing restriction altitude for the current leg
(this can come automatically from the FMS
database or manually by pilot input into the
FMS). If desired, this number, in addition to
the preselected altitude, allows the FMS to au-
tomatically y a vertical navigation (VNAV)
procedure and comply with all the known
step-down xes.
Figure 16-16. BARO ALT Switch
Heading and Navigation
Displays
The Heading and Navigation Displays at the
lower portion of the PFDs contain heading,
FMS navigation display, or ground based nav-
igation display, or radar and terrain imagery
(Figure 16-17).
At the top center of this area is the aircrafts
current heading. To the left of that display will
appear the cyan heading bugs current selec-
tion when the bug is moved with the Flight
Guidance Panel or the heading bug is out of
view. Additionally, an open-circle-shaped track
pointer will indicate the current aircraft
ground track. The difference between the cur-
rent heading and track pointer indicates drift
angle and is helpful in establishing the appro-
priate crab to maintain course. The track
pointer is generated from the FMS and will be
green if it is driven from the onside FMS or
yellow if it is driven from the cross-side FMS.
7
20
400
80

300
200
500
600
Fine Preselect
Altitude Bug
Coarse Preselect
Altitude Bug
7500 Preselect
Altitude








8
60
040
20

900
100
200
1
2
4
4
2
1
1018HPA
<













<



6935















4000M
2450M
METRIC

1
6

A
V
I
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N
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S
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
Figure 16-17. Heading and Navigation
Display
The upper left corner of the NAV display in-
dicates the active NAV source. This will display
in green when the onside unit is selected
(e.g., NAV1 and FMS1 are green on the pilots
side; NAV2 and FMS2 are green on the copi-
lots side). If the cross-side unit is selected, it
will display in yellow (e.g., NAV2 and FMS2
are yellow on the pilots side; NAV1 and FMS1
are yellow on the copilots side). In a single
FMS aircraft, the copilot will always have a
yellow FMS color and the pilot will have a
green FMS color.
Above the active NAV source label is an area
reserved for FMS messages and annunciations.
Selected messages can appear here. However,
the majority of the messages will be displayed
on the Control Display Unit (CDU) on the
pedestal. These will be prompted by the label
MSG to instruct the pilots to look down at
the CDU and retrieve the message.
Immediately below the active NAV source
label is a list of related navigation distances
and information. When FMS is chosen, this list
contains the Desired Track (DTK), name of
the next waypoint and distance to that way-
point (Figure 16-17). When LOC or VOR is
chosen this list contains the frequency and the
current selected course. If DME is collocated
with the VOR or LOC, the identier of the sta-
tion and DME distance to the station will be
displayed. However, if DME hold is selected
the identier of the station is removed and a
distance will appear with an H indicating it
is in DME hold (Figure 16-18).
VOR Active Navigation
VOR Active Navigation With DME Hold
Figure 16-18. DME hold
Below this list is a PRESET option (Figure 16-
17). The nav source inside the blue box is on
standby. Should the PRESET LSK be pressed,
the PRESET nav source will become the ac-
tive nav source and the active nav source will
now be the PRESET (This is the same as
course transfer used in other systems). This
PRESET option cannot display a secondary
CDI and remains in standby.
The last LSK on the left side is the Elapsed
Timer (ET) (Figure 16-17). Pressing this LSK
will start, stop and reset the timer that appears
next to the ET label. This is independent of the
other pilots timer and can only count up and
not down.























PRESET
FMS1

VOR1 114.30
CRS 251
SNX
0.8NM

<
1







2









1
2

1
5

S





<
<
1


BRT
DIM


















30. 16I N
< PRESET
VOR1
FORMAT >
FMS1
DTK 251
(6935)
0.8NM
25
251
W

3
0

24
2
1

ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
C
<
1



RDR
TERR
< ET 01:42
TERM
F
50
ACC .02
TERRAIN
0

RADAR ON
144
069
TCAS OFF
TFC >
>
HDG 010
























PRESET
FMS1

VOR1 113.80
CRS 251

20.8H

<
1







2









1
2

1
5

S





<
<
1

16-9 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
1
6

A
V
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S
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-10
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
On the right side of the display there is a FOR-
MAT LSK. This LSK changes the display for-
mat of the lower portion of the PFD. This will
select one of three options: full compass rose,
arc and map (Figure 16-17).
The full compass rose is a 360 presentation of
heading with the ability to display a CDI and
two bearing pointers (Figure 16-19). On IFIS
aircraft, TCAS trafc can also be displayed in
this format by pressing the TFC line select key.
When this option is chosen, the range is lim-
ited to 50nm. To get a further range, the TCAS
trafc must be deselected rst. This range is
controlled by the DCP and is discussed later.
Figure 16-19. PFD Compass Rose Format
The arc format can display the same items de-
scribed for the full compass rose but only pres-
ents a 120 portion of the compass (Figure
16-20) . In this mode, the display of TCAS traf-
c does not limit the range to 50nm. The dis-
play of any overlays (discussed later in this
section) will limit the range to 300nm. If a fur-
ther range is desired, all overlays must be re-
moved and the arc format can be extended to
a 600nm range. This mode cannot display the
FMS map.
The map format is similar to the arc format
but instead of a large CDI image it displays the
FMS map (Figure 16-21). This format is only
available when FMS is the active nav source.
This mode will be automatically deselected if
a non-FMS source is made active and it will re-
vert to the arc format. Additionally, when map
format is chosen on the left PFD it forces the
MFD into present position map mode (PPOS)
and other MFD map formats are not selec-
table. It is critical to remember that following
map lines is not an alternative to CDI displays.
For navigation, a lateral deviation display will
appear at the bottom of the attitude indicator
when map mode is chosen.
Figure 16-20. PFD Arc Format
The same range limitations apply in this mode
as they did with the arc format.
Additional options for display with the FMS
map are available through the Control Display
Unit on the pedestal (see the CDU section
later in this PTM).
Below the FORMAT LSK is the TERR/RDR
LSK. This key allows for the display of either
terrain or radar images. These cannot be dis-
played simultaneously on the same display or
when the compass rose format has been se-
lected. The chosen option will be displayed in
cyan and large font. The display of these items
does NOT indicate that the unit is active (Ter-
rain and Radar must be turned ON from a dif-
ferent location). Below these labels is an area

BRT
DIM


















30. 16I N
PRESET
VOR1
FORMAT >
FMS1
DTK 251
(6935)
0.8NM
ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
C
<
1



ET
TERM
V
ACC-.02
0

2
1

24
w
3
0

3
3

N

3

6
E
1
2

1
5

S

251
4.1NM
SXW
V ----NM
SXW
RDR
TERR
TCAS OFF
TFC >
<
<


BRT
DIM









9







1018HPA
< PRESET
VOR1
FORMAT >
FMS1
DTK 251
(6935)
0.8NM
25
251
W

3
0

24
2
1

ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
C
<
1



RDR
TERR
< ET 01:42
TERM
F
50
ACC-.02
TERRAIN
0

RADAR ON
144
069
TCAS OFF
TFC >
>


1
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reserved for detail about the selected option.
For instance, if RDR is selected, the display
will be cyan and the radar operating mode and
tilt would be displayed below RDR. If TERR
is selected, the display will be cyan and the ap-
propriate operating status for the terrain
would be displayed (e.g., TERRAIN, TER-
RAIN FAIL, TERRAIN TEST, etc.) (Fig-
ure 16-22).
Figure 16-21. PFD Map Format
Both can also be deselected from the display
and would change the respective label to
white.
For IFIS aircraft, a TFC line select key allows
the TCAS display to be turned ON or OFF on
any of the three formats. When the TCAS dis-
play is selected, TFC will be cyan. When dese-
lected, TFC will be white. Below the TFC line
is an area reserved for TCAS messages (e.g.,
TCAS TEST, TA ONLY, etc.) (Figure 16-22).
The display of cyan TFC does NOT indicate
that TCAS is actually active. TCAS is activated
with a different selection discussed later in the
TCAS section.
For non-IFIS aircraft a TCAS message-only
area exists below the TERR/RDR line select
key. This has no active caret next to it and
therefore has no control over the TCAS dis-
play (Figure 16-23). Neither of the PFDs are
able to display TCAS trafc unless they are
put into a reversionary mode as will be dis-
cussed later.
Figure 16-22. Terrain and Radar Overlay
Section
Figure 16-23. PFD TCAS Message Area
(Non-IFIS)
Lower Display Information
At the bottom of each PFD is a row of infor-
mation that continuously display these items:
COMM1, ATC squawk, UTC, RAT (ram air
temperature) and COMM2 (Figure 16-24).
Pressing the push-to-talk button on the yoke or
microphone will highlight the appropriate
COMM frequency label with a blue box. The

BRT
DIM















4


30. 16I N
< PRESET
VOR1
FORMAT >
FMS1
DTK 251
ONLOE
1.5NM
5
251
W

3
0

24
2
1

ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
C
<




RDR
TERR
< ET 01:42
TERM
10
ACC-.02
0

RADAR ON
TFC >
> KEGE
ONLOE
RALPE
JABAN
CUROT

106 V1

BRT
DIM






















FORMAT >
F









COM2 1 125.250 1
<
1



RDR
TERR





TERRAIN
0


44
69
TCAS OFF
TFC >
>


BRT
DIM






















FORMAT >
F









COM2 1 125.250 1
<
1



RDR
TERR
<




WX
T+4.5A
0


TCAS OFF
TFC >
>

BRT
DIM






















FORMAT
F









COM2 1 125.250 1
< <




RDR
<
TERR
<




TERRAIN
0


44
69
TCAS OFF
1

KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
16-11 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
1
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Figure 16-25. Pilot's MFD Display
Collins
BRT
DIM
FMS
DTK 251
( 6 9 3 5)
TTG
0.8NM
251
W

3
0

24
2
1

TAS SAT GS ISA 0 0 +13
o
C 15
o
C
< <
RDR
<
TERR
F
50
WX
0
0.0
ITT
26
TORQ
0
FF
PRESS
OIL
TEMP
o
C
0
0
46
430
120
73
N I
98.5
PROP 1980
TORQ
2000
ITT
734
AFX
RW25
( 6 9 3 5)
SXW152
KBJC
0 . 0NM
0 . 8NM
4 . 4NM
198NM
- : - -
- : - -
- : - -
CLI MB
( 6 9 3 5) 6 9 3 5 A
- : - - / 0 . 8NM :
:
:
:
25
T+5.7
SXW152
( 6 9 3 5)
/ 6 9 3 5 A
KEGE
RLG
/ 1 4 0 0 0 A
-- : --
FIRE
TFC <
ABOVE
<
FF 130 750
PRESS
TORQ FIRE
ITT PROP
OIL
122 80
TEMPC 49
110.0
830
112
TORQ
ITT
3.4
516
N1 106.0
1050
62.2
1740
ATC selection will show which transponder is
chosen and whether that transponder is on
STBY or active. It does not display the differ-
ence between ON and ALT. The RAT is de-
rived from the currently selected air data
computer.
Figure 16-24. PFD Lower Display
Information
MULTIFUNCTION DISPLAY
(MFD)
The MFD displays engine indications, diag-
nostic pages, weather radar, two formats of
navigation information, and terrain informa-
tion. A typical MFD display is shown in Fig-
ure 16-25.
The MFD has the following controls and indi-
cations:

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ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
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<
1




< ET 01:42








RADAR ON



FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-12
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
1
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Bright/Dim Rocker Switch
The Bright/Dim Rocker Switch provides sec-
ondary intensity control of the MFD. The
PILOT DISPLAYS rheostat, on the overhead
panel, provides primary intensity control. This
PILOT DISPLAYS rheostat will control all
three displays: the PFD; MFD; and Control
Display Unit (CDU) on the pedestal, simulta-
neously. Each display does not have to be in-
dividually dimmed or brightened but can be
operated together. The Bright/Dim Rocker
Switch will then allow each individual display
to be ne tuned to make its brightness com-
patible with the surrounding displays.
Line Select Keys
Four line select keys (LSK) are located on
each side of the AFD. The keys are used in co-
ordination with the information being viewed
on the individual AFD display. LSKs that are
currently active are denoted by carets (< >)
displayed adjacent to the LSK.
Engine Display
The engine instrument display is shown at the
top of the MFD. This is called the Engine In-
dicating System (EIS). The EIS is always visi-
ble with aircraft power on. Refer to Chapter 7,
Powerplant, of this Pilot Training Manual for
more information.
MFD Window
The MFD Window can display the following
items: specic FMS waypoint and/or Vertical
Navigation (VNAV) information; or a check-
list.
Non-IFIS equipped aircraft
The FMS waypoint information is turned ON
or OFF with the Control Display Unit (CDU)
on the pedestal (see the CDU section for more
information).
The checklist information is turned ON or
OFF using buttons mounted on the backside
of both yokes. Once the checklist appears, the
pages are advanced using the LSKs on the left
side and chosen with the SELECT LSK on the
right side of the MFD. Each individual item is
then checked off using LINE ADV buttons
on the back of either yoke, or the caret line se-
lect keys on the MFD. To return to a higher
level menu, press the INDEX key on the MFD
(Figure 16-26).
The checklist is reset when the avionics are
shut down. However, if there is a need to reset
the checklist without turning the avionics OFF,
there is a line item on the main checklist menu
page that will reset all previously checked
off items.
IFIS equipped aircraft
The FMS waypoint information must be
turned ON by the left LSK on the MFD. When
pressed, the UPPER FORMAT menu will ap-
pear that allows selection of the checklist,
FMS-TXT or OFF (Figure 16-27) . Each re-
peated press of the UPPER FORMAT LSK
will cycle through the options. Once the FMS-
TXT is chosen, the information presented is
changed with the Control Display Unit (CDU)
(see the CDU section for more information).
The checklist can be selected either by using
the UPPER FORMAT LSK described above
and choosing CHKLST, or by using the
checklist ON / OFF button on the back of ei-
ther yoke. The pages are advanced using the
Cursor Control Panel (CCP). For IFIS check-
list operation details see the CCP section in
this PTM.
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
16-13 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
1
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FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-14
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
MFD Checklist Index
MFD Cecklist Normal Menu
Figure 16-26. Non-IFIS MFD Checklist
Figure 16-27. MFD Upper Format (IFIS)
NAVIGATION Information
The following formats can be chosen for dis-
play on the MFD by pressing the top right line
select key (labeled FORMAT in non-IFIS air-
craft):
Plan Map Format
The Plan Map Format (MAP) is used for plan-
ning/verifying the entered FMS information.
It is displayed as a true north up, waypoint
centered display (Figure 16-28). The Plan Map
format is not intended to be used for primary
navigation nor for the duration of the ight. In
this mode the aircraft position may y off
the map since it is waypoint centered not air-
craft centered. Additionally the following
overlays cannot be displayed: terrain; radar; or
Collins
BRT
DIM
FORMAT
FMS
DTK 251
( 6 9 3 5)
TTG
0.8NM
251
W

3
0

24
2
1

TAS SAT GS ISA 0 0 +13
o
C 15
o
C
< <
RDR
<
TERR
F
50
WX
0
0.0
ITT
26
TORQ
0
FF
PRESS
OIL
TEMPoC
0
0
46
430
120
73 NI 98.5
PROP 1980
TORQ
2000
ITT
734
AFX
NORMAL CHECKLIST MENU 1/3
BEFORE ENGINE START
ENGINE STARTING (BATTERY)
BEFORE TAXI
BEFORE TAKEOFF (RUNUP)
BEFORE TAKEOFF (FINAL ITEMS)
TAKEOFF
CLIMB

-----------------------------------------------
25
T+5.7
SXW152
( 6 9 3 5)
/ 6 9 3 5 A
KEGE
RLG
/ 1 4 0 0 0 A
-- : --
FIRE
TFC <
ABOVE
>SELECT
>
>V
V
INDEX <
FF 130 750
PRESS
TORQ FIRE
ITT PROP
OIL
122 80
TEMPC 49
110.0
830
112
TORQ
ITT
3.4
516
N1 106.0
1050
62.2
1740
Checklist Line
Advance
Checklist ON/OFF
Collins
BRT
DIM
>
FMS
DTK 251
( 6 9 3 5)
TTG
0.8NM
251
W

3
0

24
2
1

TAS SAT GS ISA 0 0 +13
o
C 15
o
C
<
RDR
TERR
F
50
WX
CHECKLIST INDEX

NORMAL CHECKLIST MENU
ABNORMAL CHECKLIST MENU
EMERGENCY CHECKLIST MENU
USER CHECKLIST MENU

RESET CHECKLIST COMPLETE HISTORY - RESET
------------------------------------------
25
T+5.7
SXW152
( 6 9 3 5)
/ 6 9 3 5 A
KEGE
RLG
/ 1 4 0 0 0 A
-- : -- ABOVE
TFC >
<
>
0
0.0
ITT
26
TORQ
0
FF
PRESS
OIL
TEMPoC
0
0
46
430
120
73 N1 98.5
PROP
TORQ
2000
ITT
800
AFX FIRE
1900
FF 130 750
PRESS
TORQ FIRE
ITT PROP
OIL
122 80
TEMPC 49
110.0
830
112
TORQ
ITT
3.4
516
N1 106.0
1050
62.2
1740
Collins
BRT
DIM
FMS
DTK 251
( 6 9 3 5)
TTG
0.8NM
251
W

3
0

24
2
1

TAS SAT GS ISA 0 0 +13
o
C 15
o
C
<
RDR
<
TERR
F
50
WX
0
0.0
ITT
26
TORQ
0
FF
PRESS
OIL
TEMPoC
0
0
46
430
120
73 NI 98.5
PROP 1980
TORQ
2000
ITT
734
AFX
RW25
( 6 9 3 5)
SXW152
KBJC
0 . 0NM
0 . 8NM
4 . 4NM
198NM
- : - -
- : - -
- : - -
CLI MB
( 6 9 3 5) 6 9 3 5 A
- : - - / 0 . 8NM :
:
:
:
25
T+5.7
SXW152
( 6 9 3 5)
/ 6 9 3 5 A
KEGE
RLG
/ 1 4 0 0 0 A
-- : --
FIRE
TFC <
ABOVE
< UPPER FORMAT
CHKLIST
FMS-TXT
OFF
FORMAT
LOWER FORMAT >
PPOS
PLAN
TCAS
GWX
FORMAT
FF 130 750
PRESS
TORQ FIRE
ITT PROP
OIL
122 80
TEMPC 49
110.0
830
112
TORQ
ITT
3.4
516
N1 106.0
1050
62.2
1740
Checklist Line
Advance
Checklist ON/OFF
1
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KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
TCAS. For IFIS equipped aircraft with the XM
weather option, this format can also overlay
downloaded Nexrad radar for the 48 continu-
ous states.
MFD Window ON
MFD WIndow OFF
Figure 16-28. MFD Plan Format
To see an extended image beyond the range
arc on the MFD, the MFD window option pre-
viously discussed can be turned OFF by using
the UPPER FORMAT key (IFIS aircraft) or
the CDU (non-IFIS aircraft). This will provide
50% more range above the normal navigation
display.
The currently selected range is displayed on
the edge of the range circle. This is controlled
by the DCP and will be discussed later. This
range will always be equal to the range dis-
played on the left PFD. This will limit to the
following; 50nm if TCAS trafc has been se-
lected on the left PFD; 300nm if TCAS display
is OFF and overlays have been selected on the
left PFD or MFD; or 600nm if no overlays or
TCAS are selected on the left PFD or MFD.
Further display options for the FMS map dis-
play are controlled by the Control Display
Unit on the pedestal (see the CDU section
later in this PTM).
FMS Present Position Map
Format
The FMS Present Position (PPOS) map is a
moving pictorial of the ight. The map is cen-
tered on the airplane present position with the
current heading at the top of the display.
To see an extended image beyond the range
arc, the MFD window previously discussed can
be turned OFF, either by using the UPPER
FORMAT key (IFIS aircraft), or the CDU
(non-IFIS aircraft). This provides 50% more
range above the normal navigation display
similar to the Plan Map Format discussed ear-
lier.
The current range is displayed on the two con-
centric range arcs, controlled by the DCP. The
displayed range will always be equal to the
ranges displayed on the left PFD. This will be
limited to 50nm if TCAS trafc has been se-
lected on the left PFD; 300nm if TCAS display
is OFF and overlays have been selected on the
Collins
BRT
DIM
FMS
TAS SAT GS ISA 0 0 +13
o
C 15
o
C
< <
RDR
TERR
TERRAIN
0
0.0
ITT
26
TORQ
0
FF
PRESS
OIL
TEMP
o
C
0
0
46
430
120
73
NI 98.5
PROP 1980
TORQ
2000
ITT
734
AFX
RW25
ONLOE
RALPE
KLAS
0 . 0NM
1 . 5 NM
4 . 0NM
540NM
- : - -
- : - -
- : - -
1 6 : 2 4
KEGE
FIRE
TFC <
<
- - : - -
- - : - -
- - : - -
OBLOE
RALPE
JABAN
FATPO
CUROT
N
- - - - - - - . - LB GW
10
STORE
COMPLETE
FF 130 750
PRESS
TORQ FIRE
ITT PROP
OIL
122 80
TEMPC 49
110.0
830
112
TORQ
ITT
3.4
516
N1 106.0
1050
62.2
1740
Collins
BRT
DIM
FMS
TAS SAT GS ISA 0 0 +13
o
C 15
o
C
< <
RDR
TERR
TERRAIN
0
0.0
ITT
26
TORQ
0
FF
PRESS
OIL
TEMP
o
C
0
0
46
430
120
73
NI 98.5
PROP 1980
TORQ
2000
ITT
734
AFX
KEGE
FIRE
TFC <
<
OBLOE
RALPE
JABAN
FATPO
CUROT
N
10
JESIE
FF 130 750
PRESS
TORQ FIRE
ITT PROP
OIL
122 80
TEMPC 49
110.0
830
112
TORQ
ITT
3.4
516
N1 106.0
1050
62.2
1740
16-15 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
1
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FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-16
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
left PFD or MFD; or 600nm if no overlays or
TCAS are selected on the left PFD or MFD.
TCAS Information
TCAS trafc may be displayed on a TCAS-
only format, or overlayed on the PPOS format.
To overlay TCAS on the PPOS format, simply
press the TFC line select key to turn it cyan. A
TCAS message-only area will be present
below this TFC key (e.g., TCAS TEST, TA
ONLY, etc.).
The TCAS-only format can be selected by the
LOWER FORMAT key or by pressing and
holding the trafc (TFC) key for more than 2
seconds (Figure 16-29). The display is a 360 ,
heading up image that only shows trafc and
initially displays with a 10nm scale. It does not
show the weather radar, terrain, or FMS map.
Figure 16-29. MFD TCAS only
Either selection will depict nearby transpon-
der-equipped airplanes who are in close prox-
imity or who are predicted collision threats
(Figure 16-30). There can be up to 30 trafc in-
dications on the display at one time.
Figure 16-30. TCAS
The TFC line select key is only a display se-
lection and does not actually turn ON the
TCAS unit. This must be accomplished with a
separate procedure (see the TCAS section of
this PTM).
Collins
BRT
DIM
FMS
TAS SAT GS ISA 0 0 +13
o
C 15
o
C
< <
RDR
TERR
TERRAIN
0
0.0
ITT
26
TORQ
0
FF
PRESS
OIL
TEMP
o
C
0
0
46
430
120
73
NI 98.5
PROP 1980
TORQ
2000
ITT
734
AFX FIRE
TFC <
<
10
251
-10
+10
FF 130 750
PRESS
TORQ FIRE
ITT PROP
OIL
122 80
TEMPC 49
110.0
830
112
TORQ
ITT
3.4
516
N1 106.0
1050
62.2
1740
Collins
BRT
DIM
251
W

3
0

24
2
1

T AS S AT GS ISA 0 0 +13
o
C 15
o
C
< <
RDR
<
TERR
F
5
WX
2.5
T+5 .7
KEGE
0
0 .0
ITT
26
T OR Q
0
FF
PRESS
OIL
TEMP
o
C
0
0
46
430
120
73
NI 98.5
PROP 1980
T OR Q
2000
ITT
734
AFX FIRE
+10
-10
-02
TFC <
TCAS TEST
KEGE
SX W 152
( 6 9 3 5 )
/ 6 9 3 5 A
R W 25
( 6 9 3 5 )
SX W 152
KBJC
0 . 0NM
0 . 8NM
4 . 4NM
198 NM
- : - -
- : - -
- : - -
C L I MB
( 6 9 3 5 ) 6 9 3 5 A
- : - - / 0 . 8NM :
:
:
:
FM S
DTK 25 1
( 6 9 3 5)
TT G
0 .8N M
- - : - -
ABOVE
BELOW
<
FF 130 750
PRESS
TORQ FIRE
ITT PROP
OIL
122 80
TEMPC 49
110.0
830
112
TORQ
ITT
3.4
516
N1 106.0
1050
62.2
1740
Collins
BRT
DIM
251
W

3
0

24
2
1

T AS S AT GS ISA 0 0 +13
o
C 15
o
C
< <
RDR
<
TERR
F
5
WX
2.5
T+5 .7
KEGE
0
0 .0
ITT
26
T OR Q
0
FF
PRESS
OIL
TEMP
o
C
0
0
46
430
120
73
NI 98.5
PROP 1980
T OR Q
2000
ITT
734
AFX FIRE
+10
-10
-02
TFC <
TCAS TEST
+02
R W 25
( 6 9 3 5 )
SX W 152
KBJC
0 . 0NM
0 . 8NM
4 . 4NM
198 NM
- : - -
- : - -
- : - -
C L I MB
( 6 9 3 5 ) 6 9 3 5 A
- : - - / 0 . 8NM :
:
:
:
SX W 152
( 6 9 3 5 )
/ 6 9 3 5 A
FM S
DTK 25 1
( 6 9 3 5)
TT G
0 .8N M
- - : - -
ABOVE
BELOW
<
FF 130 750
PRESS
TORQ FIRE
ITT PROP
OIL
122 80
TEMPC 49
110.0
830
112
TORQ
ITT
3.4
516
N1 106.0
1050
62.2
1740
1
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I
C
S
Figure 16-32. Display Control Panels
RADIO CALL
N350KA
ON
+
+
DOWN
LOCK
REL
HD LT
TEST
HYD FLUID
SENSOR
STROBE
TAIL
FLOOD
OFF
BEACON
GEAR
DOWN
TEST
LANDING
GEAR
RELAY
FUEL VENT MANUAL AUTO
PROP WSHLD ANTI-ICE
NORMAL
HI
SURFACE
BRAKE
DEICE
ENG
AUTO
IGN
GEN
RESET
ON
OFF
AVIONICS
MASTER
POWER
EXT
PWR
DEICE
SINGLE
MANUAL LEFT RIGHT
STALL
WARN PITOT
RIGHT LEFT PILOT
ARM
OFF
LEFT
LEFT RIGHT
ENGINE ANTI-ICE
AUTOFEATHER PROP TEST
ON
OFF
OFF OFF
ON LEFT RIGHT
STARTER ONLY OFF
ARM GOV
GND IDLE
STOP
TEST
ON
OFF
ON
TEST
OFF
EMER
OFF
NORM
OFFRESET
ACTUATORS
STANDBY
BUS SENSE
RESET
GEN TIES
MAN CLOSE
MAIN
TEST
BAT L GEN R GEN
OPEN
RIGHT
COPILOT
LDG GEAR CONTROL
UP
DN
OFF
ICE PROTECTION
OFF
+
IGNITION AND
ENGINE START
PARKING BRAKE
ESIS
BAT BUS
2 1 DME
2 PA
XMIT
PA
T S
2
1
NORM
MIC
OXY
1 NAV
2 1 COMM
2 1 ADF AUTO
COMM
SPKR
VOICE
IDENT NORM
AUDIO
ALTN B
O
T
H
MKR
INPH
2 1 DME
2 PA
XMIT
PA
S T
2
1
NORM
MIC
OXY
1 NAV
2 1 COMM
2 1 ADF AUTO
COMM
SPKR
VOICE
IDENT NORM
AUDIO
ALTN B
O
T
H
MKR
INPH
Collins Collins
Collins Collins
M
1/2
DME-H
IDENT
Collins BRT MENU
ADV
DATA MENU
ADV
DATA
V O L
VOL
F
PRESET
TERM
TERR
RDR
FORMAT
TERRAIN
TA ONLY
0.8NM
HDG 329
(8215)
100
ACC.03
V1
103 VR
107 V2
29.92IN
MIN 10200 BARO
16000
8215
FMS
ET
COM1 118.85 COM2 121.90 ATC1 0511 UTC 20:03
12.5
25
RAT 1 C
V
DBL
13.6NM
VOR1
1
1
2
4
2
4
HDG PTCH
FMS ALTS
20
10
10
8000
60
80
800
0
138
082
7820
40
00
BRT
DIM
BRT
DIM
700
900
600
170
30
W
N
3
329
BARO
RANGE TILT
S T D
PUSH
GCS
REFS
NAV/BRG
RADAR
T I L T
AUTO PUSH
NOSE
L R
PROP
SYNC
EMER
FREQ
GND
COM
NORM
DG
FREE
NORM
DG
FREE
LDG GEAR
WARN TEST
OFF
STALL
WARN TEST
OVERSPEED
WARN TEST
OFF
WINDOW
DEFOG
LOW
MAN COOL
ENVIRONMENTAL
COCKPIT
AUTO INCR INCR
BLOWER TEMP
MODE
MAN
HEAT AUTO
OFF ELEC
HEAT
ENVIR
BLEED AIR
NORMAL
DECR
MAN TEMP
INCR
PNEU & ENVIR OFF
ENVIR
OFF
BLEED AIR VALVES
LEFT OPEN RIGHT
CABIN DIFF
WARN TEST
CABIN ALT WARN
TEST SILENCE
OFF
OFF
EXT
DET
ENG FIRE TEST
NORM
AHRS SLEW
+ 2 1
NORM NORM
ADC
2 1
NORM 2
PILOT
DISPLAY
MFD PFD STBY
SLEW
+
TUNE
RTU CDU
DISABLE
RMT TUNE
NORM
ATC
1
G/S
INHIB
ACTIVE
TERR
INHIB
ACTIVE
STEEP
APPR
ACTIVE
FLAP
OVRD
ACTIVE
BARO
RANGE TILT
S T D
PUSH
GCS
REFS
NAV/BRG
RADAR
T I L T
AUTO PUSH
29.92 in 13.6NM VOR1
057CRS
0KTS 0MIN
7500
8000
80
60
10 10
10 10
33 N 30
20
00 78
1
40
9
COM1
118. 85 123. 80
113. 00
NAV1
ATC 1 ADF
108. 50
0511 350. 0
ENG FIRE
F/W VALVE PUSH
CLOSED
ENG FIRE
F/W VALVE PUSH
CLOSED
DISCHARGED
EXTINGUISHER
PUSH
DISCHARGED
EXTINGUISHER
PUSH
L FUEL PRES LO CABIN ALT HI CABIN DIFF HI
DOOR UNLOCKED
L OIL PRES LO
R FUEL PRES LO
R OIL PRES LO
L BLEED FAIL R BLEED FAIL
CRS1
DI RECT
PUSH
CRS2
DI RECT
PUSH
SPEED
I A S / MACH
PUSH
FD VS DOWN
UP
VNAV
NAV HDG
HDG
APPR ALT FLC
1/2 BANK
YD AP
YD/AP DISC
FD
CPL
Collins
ALT
CA N C E L
P U S H SYNC
PUSH
O
F
F
A
U
T
O
O
F
F
CABIN
AUTO INCR INCR
BLOWER TEMP
DOWN
UP
20 2
1 4
2
1 4
6 0
.5
.5
80
60
FLAPS TAKEOFF AND APPROACH
CABIN CLIMB THDS FT PER MIN
0
5
10
15 20
25
30
35
40
1
2
3
4 5
6
7
ALT 1000 FT
L PROP PITCH CABIN ALTITUDE LDG/TAXI LIGHT PASS OXYGEN ON AIR COND N1 LOW R PROP PITCH
L ENG ICE FAIL L FUEL QTY ELEC HEAT ON EXT PWR R FUEL QTY R ENG ICE FAIL
L CHIP DETECT L NO FUEL XFR BAT TIE OPEN DUCT OVERTEMP R NO FUEL XFR R CHIP DETECT
L DC GEN L GEN TIE OPEN HYD FLUID LOW RVS NOT READY R GEN TIE OPEN R DC GEN
L IGNITION ON L ENG ANTI-ICE FUEL CROSSFEED R ENG ANTI-ICE R IGNITION ON
WING DEICE L BK DEICE ON MAN TIES CLOSE R BK DEICE ON TAIL DEICE
L BL AIR OFF AUTOFTHER OFF OXY NOT ARMED RUD BOOST OFF R BL AIR OFF
PROP GND SOL L PITOT HEAT R PITOT HEAT
L
I
G
H
T
S
L
I
G
H
T
S
O
F
F
N
O
R
M
O
F
F
2
LANDING TAXI ICE NAV RECOG
LEFT RIGHT
50
0 100
80 FLIGHT
HOURS 1/10
VACUUM
INCHES OF MERCURY
0
500 10001500
2000
PSI
OXYGEN SUPPLY PRESSURE MADE IN USA
USE NO OIL
PNEUMATIC
PRESSURE
0 20
10
PSI 3 4 5
6
35k
15k
MASTER CAUTION MASTER WARNING PRESS TO RESET
MASTER
CAUTION MASTER
WARNING
ACC .
PRESS
T O T E S T
Collins
BRT
DIM
1.4NM
HDG 329
(8215)
TTG
FMS
GS 0 ISA TAS 0 SAT 12 C +13 C
TERR
RDR
TA ONLY
TFC F
12.5
50
30
W
N
3
329
--:--
0.6NM KASE
CLIMB
(8215) 8215A
-:--/ 1.4NM
-:-- : 1.4NM (8215)
-:-- : 2.6NM (8700)
-:-- : 169NM KCOS
PRESS TO RESET PRESS TO RESET
PRESS TO RESET
FF 130 750
PRESS
TORQ FIRE
ITT PROP
OIL
122 80
TEMPC 49
110.0
830
112
TORQ
ITT
3.4
516
N1 106.0
1050
62.2
ON ON 121.5
CABIN AIR
SELECT
PUSH
SELECT
PUSH
DBL LINDZ
J206
J10-1
(8215)
/8215A
(INTC)
KASE (8700) JNETT
GLENO
/16000A
1740
< PRESET
CRS 057
FORMAT
ATC UTC RAT COM1 COM2 oC
< <
RDR
TERR
TERR < ET
F
2 1
2 4
w
30
33 N
3
6
E
1 2
1 5 S
ALT
ATT
IAS
AHS2
ADC2
VS
FD
RA
DCP TCAS FAIL
GPWS
FMS
PULL UP
GND PROX
LOC1
TRIM
XTLK
XAHS
XADC
ENG1
ENG2
HDG
GS LOC
HDG
IAS
V
N
V
ATT
ALT
AP
A
29.88IN
5
















<
R
T
S
T
S S E R PP
















<
















<
DME 1 2
AV N 1
OXY
MIC
NORM
1
2
S T
PA
XMIT
PA 2
COMM 1 2
FMS
5 25
30 30 00
WWWWWWW
2255 22555 2555
V O L
10
10
2
AL
107 V
R 103 V
1
03
V
80
. C AC
100
(8215)
329 HDG
.8NM 0
TERM
2
FMS
PTCH HDG
20
0
60
170 170
WW
30
329 329
EE S
EEE
SSSE RRRE RE OO T SSS SSS SS SS EE RR P TT SSS EEE RRRE OO TT SS SS SSS EE RRRRE RE RE PP
















<
Collins
8215
ATA D
ADV
MENU
BARO
38
NNN
2
TS
000 16
MIN 10200 BARO
29.92IN
4 000
2
4
2
1
1
PTCH
700
8
900
82
00 00
40 40
20 8 7
600
3
NN
HH S P H U P
DD TT D SS T
REFS
V/BRG NAAV/BRG
A
G/S
ACTIVE
INHIB IB
G/S
A
TERR
ACTIVE
INHIB B
TERR
AACTIVE
APPR PR
STEEP
AACTIVE
OVRDD
FLAP
CRS1
FD
H P S U P
T EC EEC RR I R I R DDDI
UP
DOWN VS
V VNAAV
TT
FMS
TTG
(8215) (
TTG
329 HDG
.4NM 1
W
30
KCOS
329 3 9
169NM : -:--
(8700)
(8215)
2.6NM : -:--
( )
(8700)
1.4NM : -:--
-:--/
8215A (8215)
CLIMB
KASE 0.6NM
--:--
830
10.0 1
PROP ITT
FIRE ORQ T
516
3.4
ITT
ORQ T
62.2
1050
106.0 N1
1740
H SH U P
T CCT E L EEL SSE
















<
N350KA
RADIO CALL
ADV
M
IDENT
DME-H
Collins B
123. 80
BRT MENU
BARO
H S U P
D T D SS T
REFS
V/BRG NAAV/BRG
000
29.92 in
8
500 7
60
N
80
9
30 333 N 0
78000
20 40
18. 85 1
COM1
V1 NA
CRS2 SPEED
H US U PP
T EC EEC RR I R I R DDDI
AV
H P S U P
H CCCH A S AC M // M S /
AAA S
I
NNAV
HDG
HDG APPR LT A FLC
1/2 BANK
YD AP FD
DISC YD/AP
CPL
Collins
LT A
HSU S HUP
E LEE LCN C E
NA CA N
C
H
N
S U PPU
C NC Y S
S T SS T EE T O
Collins
3
N
1.4NM -:--/
8215A
2 11 49 TEMPC
80 122
OIL
FIRE
PRESS
750 130 FF
H S U P
T CCT E L EEL SSE
















<
1
1
OXY
C MI
NORM
1
2 PA
T XMI
PA
1
ns
.
Colli
ATA D
BARO
VOL
HH
DD
REFS
V/BRG
T
TTT
SE SE O EE RR O TTT SS PRES ES PR
C AC
CRS 057
SE SE T RE R OO TTTO TO S S ES E RR PP
H
T CCT
P
LT VS
T
IAS
6
3
N 33
30
5
AT FD
A
LT IAS
AHS2
ADC2
RA
AIL TCAS F P DC
GND PROX
G
UP PULL
GPWS
XTLK
IM TR
LOC1
HS XA
DC XA
G1 EN
G2 EN
HDG
GS G LOC
G D H
V
N
V T T A
N
A
A
A
29.88I
















<
DME 2
AV N
T S
2
COMM 2
















<
ON
RIGHT
OPEN
R GEN GEN L AT B
TEST
MAIN
MAN CLOSE
TIES GEN
RESET
BUS SENSE
ANDBY ST
ORS T ACTUAT
NORM
OFF
EMER
OFF
TEST
ON
OFF
ON
TEST
OP ST
GND IDLE
GOV ARM
OFF Y ARTER ONL ST
RIGHT LEFT ON
OFF OFF
OFF
ON
TEST PROP THER OFEAT AUT
ANTI-ICE NE ENGI
RIGHT LEFT
LEFT
OFF
ARM
PWR
EXT
WER PO OW
MASTER
VIONICS AV
OFF
ON
RESET
GEN
IGN
O AUT
ENG
ART NE ST ENGI
AND IGNITION
T BUS BAT
ESIS
ARKING BRAKE PPARKING BRAKE
H
T
O
B N LT A
AUDIO
NORM IDENT
VOICE
O AUT ADF 1 2
INPH
MKR
PRESET
12.5 1112222 5555 1112222 5555 1112222..555
COMM
SPKR
F
20:03 UTC 1 051 TC1 AT 18.85 1 COM1
ET
VOR1
.6NM 13
DBL
V
M
R
O
N
OFFRESET
















<
LI O
(8215) KASE (8700) (8215) (8700) AS ( KASE
DN
UP
LDG GEAR CONTROL
LOT COPI PILOT LEFT RIGHT
T O PIT W
ALL ST
RIGHT LEFT MANUAL
LE NG SI
DEICE
DEICE
BRAKE
ACE SURF FACE
HI
NORMAL
ANTI-ICE WSHLD PROP
O AUT MANUAL
Y RELA
GEAR
LANDING
TEST
DOWN
GEAR
BEACON
OFF
D FLOO
AIL T
STROBE
SENSOR
HYD FLUID
TEST
T HD L
REL
LOCK
DOWN
+
OFF
PROTECTION ICE
OFF
Y
Collins
SYNC
T
ONL A T
TERRAIN
T FORMA AT
RDR
TERR
C 1 AT R 121.90 COM2
TIL LT RANGE
GCS
RADAR
H S U P O AUT
T L I TT I
ON ON
L R
PROP
FREE
L
NOSE E
DG
NORM
+
SLEW
STBY
FLAPS
UP
DOWN
F
F
O
F
F
O
S
T
H
G
I
L
S
T
H
G
I
L
2
RIGHT
AV
FUEL VENT
RIGHT LEFT LEFT
RECOG AV NN ICE AXI T NG LANDI
ARN
AT S 0 S TA 0 GS
F
50
12.5
W
J206
(
82
82 AS 82 87
NTC)
DBL /16000A 0A
(INTC) C)
(
82
87
(INTC)
/
)
/8215A
(8700)
0 /16000A
( )
000
GGLENO LENO GLENO E NDZ
















<
O
LEFT
FREQ
T
1/2
13. 00
121 21.5
EMER
COM
OO
GND
FREE
BLEED
PNEU & ENVI
NORMAL
AIR BLEED
R ENVI
HEA HEAT
ELEC OFF
O AUT HEA HEAT
MAN
MODE
TEMP BLOWER
NCR I NCR I O AUT
T COCKPI
AL RONMENT ENVI
COOL MAN
LOW
O
DG
NORM
AHRS
NORM
ADC
NORM NORM
1 2
Y DISPLAY
PILOT
2 NORM
1 2 PFD MFD STBY +
SLEW
CDU RTU
TUNE NORM
RMT TUNE
SABLE DI
1
C T AAT
TIL
GCS
RADAR
H SSH U PPU
O UT A
T LL T I TT I
1
V1 NA
TC 1 TC 1 AA ADF ADF
350. 0 1 051
108. 50
T
U
A
TEMP BLOWER
NCR I NCR I O AUT
N CABI APPROACH
THDS FT PER MIN
T F 0 0 000 1 T LLT A
7
6
5 4
3
2
1
40
35
30
25
20 15
10
5
0
CABIN CLIMB
.5
ANDFF AKEO T
60
80
20
.5
0 6
4 1
2
4 1
2
UP
DOWN
Y ONL A T
RDR
TERR
C +13 C 12 ISA
TFC
3
J10-1
JN JNETT J
















<
+
+
H
T
O
B TN AL
O AUDI
NORM DENT I
CE VOI
O AUT 1
MKR
<
COM
Collins
RANGE
TEST
COMM
SPKR
OON
GND
FIRE ENG
DET
EXT
OFF
OFF
LENCE SI TEST
ARN W T AL N CABI
TEST ARN W
FF DI N CABI
RIGHT OPEN
VES AL AIR VA BLEED
OFF
R ENVI
OFF R PNEU & ENVI
NCR I
TEMP MAN
DECR T
ELEC
T
DEFOG
NDOW WI
OFF
TEST ARN W
OVERSPEED
ARN TEST W
ALL ST
OFF
ARN TEST W
GEAR LDG
GCS
RADAR
H
O
T
F
F
O
F
F
O
80
1/10 HOURS
FLIGHT 100 0
50
Y F MERCUR INCHES O
ACUUM VVACUUM
15 5k
35k
66
5 4 3
AIR CABIN
C o COM2 COM1 AT RRAT UTC C AT
T FORMA
PRESET <
F
ET < RR TE
RR TE
R RD
FMS
S1 5
1 2
E
w
2 4
2 1
5
















<
O
ADF 2
NPH I
1/10 OIL
FLIGHT
USE NO
MADE IN USA PRESSURE Y SUPPLLY OXYGEN
PSI
2000
1500 1000 500
0
PSI
10
20 0
PRESSURE
TIC PNEUMA
Graphical Weather (IFIS
equipped aircraft only)
Another possible format is the dedicated
graphical weather page. The options available
here depend on the chosen weather provider.
See the aircraft documentation and the IFIS
section of this manual for more information.
Lower Display Information
At the bottom of the MFD is a line of infor-
mation that always contains the following
items: GS, TAS, SAT, ISA (Figure 16-31). The
Ground Speed (GS) indication is derived from
the FMS. Should the FMS fail, the GS indica-
tion will be removed. True Airspeed (TAS),
Static Air Temperature (SAT) and ISA devia-
tion (ISA) are all derived from the ADC.
Should the ADC fail, these indications will be
removed.
DISPLAY CONTROL
PANELS (DCP)
Display control panels are vertical panels lo-
cated adjacent to each PFD (Figure 16-32).
The DCP and the bezel mounted line select
keys on each PFD provide the primary pilot
interface to control the ight displays. The left
display control panel (DCP 1) provides con-
trol for PFD 1 and the MFD. DCP 2 controls
only PFD 2. All menus and pages controlled
by the DCP will time out after 10 seconds if
there is no activity. This will return the PFD to
the main display.
Figure 16-31. MFD Lower Display
Information

BRT
DIM










TAS SAT GS ISA 0 0 +13
o
C 15
o
C
< <

























RLG
/ 1 4 0 0 0 A




KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
16-17 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
1
6

A
V
I
O
N
I
C
S
The two versions of the DCP (IFIS and non-
IFIS) are shown in Figure 16-33. (Information
for Weather Radar controls are found in this
chapter).
Figure 16-33. Display Control Panel (DCP)
BARO Knob
Rotating the BARO knob adjusts the altime-
ter setting for the on-side altimeter. The cur-
rent altimeter setting is displayed below the
PFD altitude scale. Altimeter settings are in-
dependent for each side and a yellow under-
line will appear below the altimeter setting
when they are different by more than .02Hg
(Figure 16-34). Single pilot operations will re-
quire a manual setting of each DCP baromet-
ric knob. The altimeter setting has the range of
22.00 to 32.50Hg.
In ight regions where the barometric setting
is given in hPa this setting can be changed. For
IFIS aircraft, the DCP is used to change the
units for the barometric setting using the
REFS button. In non-IFIS aircraft a switch la-
beled IN/hPa located on the overhead panel,
and can select between inches of Hg and hPa
(Figure 16-35). When using hPa units, the yel-
low underline will appear when the altimeter
settings are different by more than 1 hPa. The
range for this mode is 745 to 1100hPa.
Figure 16-34. Barometric Setting with
Yellow Underline
Figure 16-35. IN/hPa Switch
BARO PUSH STD Button
When pushed, the standard altimeter setting
QNE is selected and STD will be displayed
in lieu of the pressure setting. The cyan prese-
lect altitude above the altitude display will dis-
play a ight level (FL) format when this button
is pushed (e.g., 22,000 will be displayed as
FL220; 8,000 will be FL80) (Figure 16-36 ) . To
return the setting to normal units, turn the
Baro Knob and select the new altimeter set-
ting.
non-IFIS IFIS








14000
6
60
540
20

400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N








<
1


6935
E




























FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-18
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
1
6

A
V
I
O
N
I
C
S
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
Figure 16-36. Barometric Setting with STD
REFS Button
The REFS button will bring up a menu on the
respective PFD (Figure 16-37).
Figure 16-37. PFD REFS Menu Page 1 of 2
REFS Page 1
With this menu, it is possible to control the dis-
play of selected V-speeds, radio altitude height
minimums (RA MINS), and MDA/DA mini-
mums (BARO MINS) shown on the PFD.
Menus are controlled with the knob at the cen-
ter of the DCP (Figure 16-33). For IFIS air-
craft, there are two concentric knobs labeled
MENU ADV and DATA. The PUSH SE-
LECT feature of the DATA knob will enter
data or choose items from the avionics selec-
tions.
For non-IFIS aircraft, there is a single knob la-
beled MENU ADV. This knob has a button la-
beled PUSH MENU SET that will enter data
or choose items from the avionics selections.
The left side of the menu contains V-speeds.
Beginning from the bottom, the pilots can set
V1, VR, V2 and VT. Speeds will show up on
both PFDs so only one pilot needs to set the
values. Additionally, the setting of one value
will affect the remaining values in this rela-
tionship:
V2 VR V1.
VT is a general purpose target speed that is
not affected by the takeoff related V-speeds.
For IFIS equipped aircraft, the values are set
by placing the cyan box cursor around the de-
sired label. This can be accomplished by press-
ing the adjacent line select key on the PFD or
by rotating the MENU ADV knob until the
cursor covers the desired value. Once the cur-
sor is set, rotate the DATA knob to set the de-
sired value. To move to the next item, repeat
the steps listed above.
For non-IFIS equipped aircraft, the values are
set by placing the cyan box cursor around the
desired value to be changed. This can be
moved by pressing the adjacent line select key
or by rotating the MENU ADV knob. This
cursor must ash to indicate the value is set-
table. If the cursor was moved by pressing the
adjacent line select key on the PFD the cursor
will automatically begin ashing. If the cursor
was moved with the MENU ADV knob then
the PUSH MENU SET button must be
Collins
BRT
DIM
10
10
20
HDG PTCH
ALTS
14000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N
FMS1
DTK 251
(6935)
0.8NM
25
251
W

3
0

24
2
1

ATC1 UTC RAT 4336 14:41 15
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<
140
80
60
6935
TERM
50
ACC-.02
0
FMS
RADAR ON
144
069
<
<
REFS1/2 REFS1/2
<
<
<
<
<
VT
V2
VR
V1
160
160
2980
VREF
BAROMIN
RAMIN
200
117
106
V2
V1
110
117
106








FL250
6
60
540
20

400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
STD








<
1































16-19 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-20
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
pressed to get the cursor to ash. Once it is
ashing, the MENU ADV knob can be used
to change the value inside the cursor instead
of moving the cursor. To move on to the next
V-speed press the line select key next to the
subsequent V-speed and rotate the MENU
ADV knob to change the value. Alternatively,
press the PUSH MENU SET button to stop
the cursor from ashing and move the cursor
to the desired value with the MENU ADV
knob.
For both aircraft installations, these speeds
must be cyan in order to be shown on the air-
speed display. They will turn white (dese-
lected) by pressing the PUSH SELECT
feature of the DATA knob (or by pressing and
holding the PUSH MENU SET button for
non-IFIS aircraft). Once they are cyan, a list
appears below the airspeed display while on
the ground. The display contains all but the VT
setting. V-speed settings will also appear as ref-
erence bugs on the airspeed display (Figure
16-38).
Figure 16-38. PFD V-Speeds
The right side of the menu contains the num-
bers used for landing. The barometric mini-
mum (BARO MIN) value and the radio al-
timeter minimum (RA MIN) value will be
identical on both pilots displays. Only one
pilot needs to set the values.
Setting RA MIN will create a hollow bar on
the altitude tape the length of the value cho-
sen. For instance, setting 200 feet will create a
bar starting from radio altitude Zero up 200
on the altitude tape. Radio altitude Zero is
the point where the altimeter changes from
blue to brown (Figure 16-39) .
Figure 16-39. Radio Altitude Minimum
The change of altimeter color is solely based
off of the radio altimeter. It is not dependent
on putting in the RA MIN number and will al-
ways display when the radio altimeter is oper-
ational. It would not display if the radio
altimeter were inoperative. The RA MIN ref-
erence is not used as a desired minimum ref-
erence since the King Air B350 is certied only
to CAT I minimums.
Setting BARO MIN is the desired minimum
reference altitude. This will create a cyan bar
across the altitude tape at the altitude selected
(Figure 16-40).





































<
140
80
60



TERM


ACC-.02
T








117
110
106
V2
VR
V1
14000
6
60
540
20

400
600
700
30. 16I N
Radio Altitude
Zero
MI N 200 RA
RAD
Minimum
Altitude
Radio Altitude
Minimum Setting
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KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
Figure 16-40. Barometric Minimum
An additional benet of setting BARO MIN
is that the altitude preselector can be set to the
exact BARO MIN value. For example, if
BARO MIN is set to 1830, the preselected al-
titude can now be set to 1830 to allow for au-
topilot capture at the desired MDA. The
BARO MIN can be set to the nearest ten feet
of altitude.
Both RA MIN and BARO MIN will generate
a MINIMUMS aural callout and ashing
MIN annunciator on the PFDs (Figure 16-41).
If the aircraft continues below the values, the
RA MIN hollow bar will turn yellow or the
BARO MIN altitude bar will turn yellow. The
minimum reference displayed is the last one
adjusted (e.g., if RA was set rst and then
BARO, the BARO minimums are the only
ones displayed). For non-IFIS equipped air-
craft each pilot can choose to display BARO
MIN or RA MIN independent of the other
pilot. However, if each pilot sets a different
reference (one shows BARO MIN and the
other RA MIN) the MINIMUMS aural call-
out will occur at the rst value achieved.
The last option on the right side of the menu is
VREF. This acts just like the V-speeds dis-
cussed earlier. Once one pilot adjusts the value
it will turn cyan for both pilots and will place
a bug on both airspeed tapes.
Figure 16-41. Minimums Annunciator
REFS Page 2 (IFIS-equipped aircraft)
For IFIS equipped aircraft, there is a second
page to the REFS menu (Figure 16-42). This is
accessed by pressing the REFS key a second
time.
Figure 16-42. PFD REFS Menu Page 2 of 2
6720
6
60
540
20

400
600
700
30. 16I N
MI N 6720 BARO
BARO
Minimum
Altitude
barometric
minimum
setting



10
10
20
GS
14000
6
60
540
20

400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N






<
6935
E

350

4
w










251








MIN
MI N 6600 BARO
1








Collins
BRT
DIM
10
10
20
HDG PTCH
ALTS
14000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N
FMS1
DTK 251
(6935)
0.8NM
25
251
W

3
0

24
2
1

ATC1 UTC RAT 4336 14:41 15
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<
140
80
60
6935
TERM
ACC-.02
0
FMS
RADAR ON
144
069
<
REFS2/2 REFS2/2
<
<
<
PRESSURE
METRICALT
FLALERT
FLTDIR
HPA IN
ON OFF
ON OFF
V-BAR X-PTR
50
117
106
V2
V1
16-21 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-22
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
The PRESSURE option allows the altimeter
setting units to change from HPA (hectopas-
cals) to IN (inches of mercury). This will affect
both pilots and cannot be set independently. It
does not affect the standby unit which will
have to be adjusted separately.
The METRIC ALT selects the display of met-
ric altitudes ON or OFF above the altimeter
display (Figure 16-43). This setting does not
change the feet presentation on the actual al-
timeter tape. This action will affect both pilots
displays and cannot be set independently.
Figure 16-43. Metric Altitude
The FL ALERT turns the advisory ashing of
altimeter setting ON or OFF. The setting will
ash when passing through transition altitude
18,000, or transition level FL180. A change of
the altimeter setting or pressing the center
STD button will stop the advisory ashing.
This transition level trigger cannot be changed
to a value other than 18,000.
Finally, the FLT DIR line will change the ight
director image changing it from a v-bar pres-
entation to a cross-pointer (X-PTR) presenta-
tion (Figure 16-44). This change will affect
both pilots and cannot be set independently.
Figure 16-44. Flight Director Formats
For non-IFIS equipped aircraft this page 2
does not exist but most of the features are ac-
cessed with external switches located on the
overhead panel. How they affect the PL21 sys-
tem is discussed in the altimeter section of the
PFD.
MENU ADV Knob (IFIS)
The MENU ADV knob moves the menu cur-
sor around the displays.
DATA Knob (IFIS)
The DATA knob will change the value inside
the menu cursor.
PUSH MENU SET (IFIS)
The PUSH MENU SET feature will enter or
accept selected items in the menu cursor.
MENU ADV Knob (non-IFIS)
The MENU ADV knob accomplishes two
tasks. When the menu cursor is ashing, this
knob is used to change the value inside. When
the menu cursor is not ashing, this knob is
used to move the cursor around the display to
position it on another item.
PUSH MENU SET (non-IFIS)
The PUSH MENU SET button will start the
menu cursor ashing on the rst press. The sec-








8
60
040
20

900
100
200
1
2
4
4
2
1
1018HPA
<













<
1


6935















4000M
2450M
METRIC

10
10
20
0
10
10
20
0
V-BAR X-PTR
1
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KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
ond press will enter the information and stop
the cursor from ashing. This will also change
the value of items where they are just two op-
tions inside the cursor (e.g., ON / OFF).
NAV/BRG Button
Pressing the NAV/BRG button displays the
NAV SOURCE and BRG SOURCE menus
on the PFD (Figure 16-45). The navigation
source (NAV SOURCE) section is on the left
side of the menu and allows selection of the
appropriate active navigation source. Each
press of the left line select key will cycle the
options. For IFIS aircraft the DATA knob on
the DCP will also cycle the options. On non-
IFIS aircraft the cursor can be placed with the
MENU ADV knob and then press the PUSH
MENU SET button to select the appropriate
navigation source. Caution must be used when
manipulating this NAV SOURCE because it
will immediately change the active navigation
display.
Figure 16-45. PFD NAV BRG Menu
The bearing source (BRG SOURCE) section
is on the right side of the menu and allows se-
lection of the appropriate bearing pointers.
Two pointers can be displayed; a magenta sin-
gle-needle pointer; and a cyan double-needle
pointer. The magenta needle will only point to
the #1 navigation systems (e.g., VOR1, ADF1,
FMS1). The cyan needle will only point to the
#2 navigation systems (e.g., VOR2, ADF2,
FMS2). The exception is when there is only
one FMS installed. In this case, both needles
can be selected to that single FMS. Selection
is accomplished by pressing the appropriate
line select keys. These selections are inde-
pendent for each pilot. For IFIS aircraft, the
DATA knob will also cycle the options. For
non-IFIS aircraft the cursor can be placed with
the MENU ADV knob and then press the
PUSH MENU SET button to select the ap-
propriate bearing source.
Once the bearing pointers are chosen, an in-
formation area will appear on the bottom left
corner of the PFD (Figure 16-46). The follow-
ing labels are possible: V (VOR); F (FMS); A
(ADF). Below the V will appear the fre-
quency of the VOR. If DME is available, the
station identier will replace the frequency
once the identication is received from the
DME. Additionally, the DME to the station
will appear next to the V.DME information
will not display if the radio is on DME hold or
the active navigation source is the same VOR.
In both cases the DME will appear up by the
active navigation source.
Figure 16-46. Bearing Pointer Information
Collins
BRT
DIM
10
10
20
FMS1 VPTCH AP
ALTS
5000
5
20
100
80
000
900
200
300
1
2
4
4
2
1
300
30.16IN
MIN 200 RA
FMS 1
DTK 301
ICT
4.1NM
25
301
3
3
N
W
2
4
ATC1 UTC RAT 1200 16:42 - 4
o
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< <
185
180
160
120
V
T
DN
100
14
1
0
3200
17
NAV
SOURCE
<
<
FMS1
FMS2
LOC1
VOR2
BRG
SOURCE
OFF
FMS
ADF1
OFF
FMS
VOR2
ADF2



















PRESET
VOR1
F




ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 1
<
1



ET

V











E

1
2

1
5

S


4.1NM
SXW
V ----NM
SXW



<
<





16-23 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-24
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
The active FMS x name and distance to that
x will appear next to the F. The ADF fre-
quency will appear next to the A.
RADAR Button
The RADAR button displays the weather
radar menus on the PFD. See the Weather sec-
tion of this manual.
GCS Button
The GCS button controls the ground clutter
suppression selection of the weather radar. See
the Weather section of this manual.
TILT Control
The TILT knob controls the weather radar an-
tenna tilt angle. See the Weather section of this
manual.
RANGE Knob
The RANGE knob controls the display range
shown on the PPOS map, North-up Planning
Map, and TCAS only Display. The selected
range annunciations are shown on the PFD
and MFD as discussed above.
INTEGRATED AVIONICS
PROCESSOR SYSTEM
(IAPS)
The Integrated Avionics Processor System
(IAPS) provides system integration and oper-
ating logic for most systems that make up the
ProLine 21 avionics. This unit is installed in the
nose of the aircraft in the avionics bay (Figure
16-47). It consists of two sections; the No. 1
(left) section monitors the No. 1 aircraft sys-
tems while the No. 2 (right) section monitors
the No. 2 systems. Each section is powered by
a dedicated power supply. Fans control the
temperature of each unit to eliminate sus-
tained overheating which would cause an au-
tomatic shutdown of the respective power
supply. Additionally, the power supply opera-
tion is inhibited in extreme cold temperatures
below -40C.
Each IAPS section contains the Flight Guid-
ance Computers (FGCs) and the Flight Man-
agement Computers (FMCs) for the
respective side.
Figure 16-47. IAPS
AIR DATA COMPUTERS
(ADC)
Two digital Air Data Computers (ADC 1 and
ADC 2) convert raw dynamic ight data into
electronic signals for use by various airplane
systems (Figure 16-48). The ADCs generate
independently and are supplied with the fol-
lowing inputs:
Ram air pressure from the onside pitot
mast
Static pressure from the static ports
Air tempe rature
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Figure 16-48. ADC
Each ADC supplies its onside systems (the
MFD is supplied from ADC 1). Reversionary
switching allows use of the cross-side ADC as
a backup. In the reversionary ADC mode, the
selected ADC supplies all systems.
Each ADC processes the data and provides
electronic signals to the following systems and
components:
EFIS
Displays the following information
Uncorrected Pressure Altitude
Baro-Corrected Altitude
Vertical Speed
Airspeed (KIAS & KCAS)
Indicated Airspeed Trend Vector
Mach Number
Maximum Airspeed (V
MO
/M
MO
)
True Airspeed
Ram Air Temperature (RAT)
Static Air Temperature (SAT)
ISA Deviation Temperature
Wind Direction and Speed Vector
Attitude and Heading Reference Sys-
tems (AHRS)
Integrated Avionics Processor Sys-
tem (IAPS)
ATTITUDE AND HEADING
REFERENCE SYSTEM
(AHRS)
The Attitude and Heading Reference System
(AHRS) provides pitch, bank, and magnetic
heading data to the onside displays (Figure 16-
49).
Figure 16-49. AHRS
Magnetic heading information is obtained
from separate magnetic sensors located in op-
posite sides of the horizontal stabilizer. Com-
pensator units automatically correct for
magnetic interference within the airplane or
due to sensor error.
Attitude information is obtained from two at-
titude and heading computers (AHC). Each
system includes an inertial measurement unit
(IMU) that monitors angular rates and accel-
erations about the airplane axes. The IMU
does not provide self generated navigation po-
sition. The AHC processes IMU data to de-
termine airplane pitch and bank attitude.
Each AHC is provided with a primary and sec-
ondary power supply for redundancy. If the
secondary power supply should fail, the pri-
mary power supply will continue powering the
AHC. After 10 minutes of operation on pri-
mary power only,the primary power supply
will cease operating. The power loss to the
AHC will result in a total failure of that AHC.
There will be no indication, except from a pos-
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
16-25 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
1
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sible tripped circuit breaker. This indicates a
failure of the secondary power supply. If the
primary power supply should fail, the AHC
will immediately fail. In either case, the cross-
side AHC may then be selected using the
AHRS reversionary switch to regain AHRS
information on the affected side.
The output of each AHRS is supplied to the
integrated avionics processor system (IAPS)
for distribution to the appropriate display or
component. AHRS 1 data is displayed on the
pilot displays while AHRS 2 data is displayed
on the copilot display. Each AHRS can pro-
vide reversionary support to the other. The
AHRS switch on the reversionary control
panel controls reversionary operation.
Compass controls are provided for control of
the slaving operations for the pilot and copi-
lot compass systems. The controls are labeled
DGFREENORM and SLEW + / (Figure
16-50) . The DG switch selects whether the re-
spective heading is slaved to the compass
(NORM) or acting as an unslaved, free unit
(FREE). When the FREE Mode is selected,
the pilot can manually adjust the heading by
moving the SLEW switch to either the + or
position.
Figure 16-50. Heading Slave and Slew
REVERSIONARY
OPERATIONS
AFD Reversion
The pilots PFD and the MFD are designed to
provide reversionary support to each other in
the event of a single display failure. Rever-
sionary display switching for the pilots PFD
or the MFD is accomplished via the PILOT
DISPLAY switch on the reversionary control
panel (Figure 16-51). Selecting the remaining
AFD will display a composite image.
When an AFD fails a XTLK annunciator will
appear on the remaining display. This indicates
that the other displays have lost communica-
tion with the failed display. This helps identify
Figure 16-51. AFD Reversions
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-26
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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PILOT DISPLAY Switch - PFD Selected
PILOT DISPLAY Switch - MFD Selected
Figure 16-52. Reversionary Modes
Collins
BRT
DIM
< PRESET
VOR1
FORMAT
FMS
DTK 251
(6935)
0.8NM
ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
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< <
RDR
<
TERR
< ET
TERM
F
TERRAIN
25
251
W

3
0

24
2
1

50
144
069
10
10
20
HDG PTCH
ALTS
14000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
140
80
60
6935
ACC-.02
0
FMS
30. 16I N
0
0.0
ITT
26
TORQ
0
FF
PRESS
OIL
TEMPoC
0
0
46
430
120
73 NI 98.5
PROP 1980
TORQ
2000
ITT
734
AFX FIRE
TFC <
SAT 15
o
C
ISA+15
o
C
ABOVE
FF 130 750
PRESS
TORQ FIRE
ITT PROP
OIL
122 80
TEMPC 49
110.0
830
112
TORQ
ITT
3.4
516
N1 106.0
1050
62.2
1740
117
110
106
V2
VR
V1
Collins
BRT
DIM
Collins
BRT
DIM
FMS
DTK 251
(6935)
0.8NM
ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
C
<
< ET
TERM
251
10
10
20
HDG PTCH
ALTS
14000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
140
80
60
6935
ACC-.02
0
FMS
30. 16I N
0
0.0
ITT
26
TORQ
0
FF
PRESS
OIL
TEMPoC
0
0
46
430
120
73 NI 98.5
PROP 1980
TORQ
2000
ITT
734
AFX FIRE
SAT 15
o
C
ISA+15
o
C
< PRESET
VOR1
FORMAT > < <
V
21
24
w
30
3
3

N

3
6
E
1 2
1
5

S

4.1NM
SXW
V ----NM
SXW
RDR
TERR
TFC >
FF 130 750
PRESS
TORQ FIRE
ITT PROP
OIL
122 80
TEMPC 49
110.0
830
112
TORQ
ITT
3.4
516
N1 106.0
1050
62.2
1740
117
110
106
V2
VR
V1
Collins
BRT
DIM
Collins
BRT
DIM
< PRESET
VOR1
FORMAT
FMS
DTK 251
(6935)
0.8NM
ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
C
< <
RDR
<
TERR
< ET
TERM
F
TERRAIN
25
251
W

3
0

24
2
1

50
144
069
10
10
20
HDG PTCH
ALTS
14000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
140
80
60
6935
ACC-.02
0
FMS
30. 16I N
0
0.0
ITT
26
TORQ
0
FF
PRESS
OIL
TEMPoC
0
0
46
430
120
73 NI 98.5
PROP 1980
TORQ
2000
ITT
734
AFX FIRE
TFC <
SAT 15
o
C
ISA+15
o
C
ABOVE
FF 130 750
PRESS
TORQ FIRE
ITT PROP
OIL
122 80
TEMPC 49
110.0
830
112
TORQ
ITT
3.4
516
N1 106.0
1050
62.2
1740
117
110
106
V2
VR
V1
Collins
BRT
DIM
10
10
20
HDG PTCH
ALTS
14000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N
< PRESET
VOR1
FORMAT
FMS
DTK 251
(6935)
0.8NM
ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
C
< <
140
80
60
6935
< ET
TERM
V
ACC-.02
0
FMS
2
1

24
w
3
0

3
3

N

3

6
E
1
2

1
5

S

251
4.1NM
SXW
V ----NM
SXW
RDR
TERR
117
110
106
V2
VR
V1
that an actual display failure has occurred, not
a brightness control problem.
The selection of PFD or MFD is always made
toward the unit that is still functional. (e.g., if
the PFD is still operating, select PFD) If the
PFD position of the PILOT DISPLAY switch
is selected, the composite display will appear
on both the pilot and copilot PFDs. Selecting
the MFD position of the switch will result in
the composite display appearing on only the
MFD (Figure 16-52). When selecting rever-
sionary modes, all ight director and autopilot
functions should remain normal and unaf-
fected.
ADC Reversion
The Air Data Computer (ADC) switch on the
reversionary control panel provides reversion
capabilities for the ADCs. If a single ADC
fails, the red IAS, ALT, and VS failure ags
will appear on the affected PFD and a white
XADC ag will appear on the cross-side PFD
(Figure 16-53). The ADC switch should be
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
16-27 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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Figure 16-53. ADC1 Failure
Collins
BRT
DIM
10
10
20
< PRESET
VOR1
FORMAT
FMS
DTK 251
(6935)
0.8NM
25
251
W

3
0

24
2
1

ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41
o
C
< <
RDR
<
TERR
< ET
TERM
F
50
ACC-.--
TERRAIN
0
RADAR ON
144
069
TCAS OFF
IAS ALT VS
FD
HDG PTCH
ALTS FMS
Collins
BRT
DIM
10
10
20
HDG PTCH
ALTS
14000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N
< PRESET
VOR1
FORMAT >
FMS
DTK 251
(6935)
0.8NM
ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
C
<
140
80
60
6935
< ET
TERM
V
ACC-.02
0
FMS
2
1

24
w
3
0

3
3

N

3

6
E
1
2

1
5

S

251
4.1NM
SXW
V ----NM
SXW
RDR
TERR
XADC
FD
TFC >
117
110
106
V2
VR
V1
Pilots PFD Copilots PFD
moved to the operating ADC (e.g., if ADC1 is
still working, choose ADC1).
Miscompare indications also require the use of
ADC reversion. This occurs when the pilot
and copilot systems are still functional but
have different values displayed on the PFDs.
Yellow IAS, ALT and VS ags will appear on
both PFDs (Figure 16-54). The pilots must de-
termine which system is correct and choose
the operating ADC.
Once the operative ADC has been selected, a
yellow-boxed ADC1 or ADC2 ag will appear
on both PFDs indicating they are both using
the same ADC. (Figure 16-55). When using the
reversionary mode, normal ight director and
autopilot functions will return when the ight
guidance computer is coupled to the operat-
ing ADC. See the Flight Guidance section of
this manual for the method of coupling to each
side.
Figure 16-54. ADC Miscompares
Collins


10
10
20
HDG PTCH
ALTS
14000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N








251
W


24


<
140
80
60
6935
R

TERM
F

ACC-.02
T
0
FMS






HDG 010
IAS ALT
V2
VR
V1
117
110
106
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-28
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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Figure 16-55. ADC Switch - ADC2 Selected
AHRS Reversion
The Attitude Heading Reference System
(AHRS) switch on the reversionary control
panel provides reversion capabilities for the
AHRS. If a single AHRS fails, the red HDG
and ATT ags will appear on the affected PFD
and a white XAHS ag will appear on the
cross-side PFD (Figure 16-56). The AHRS
switch should then be moved to the operating
AHRS (e.g., if AHRS2 is still working, choose
AHRS2).
Miscompare indications also require the use of
AHRS reversion. This occurs when the pilot
and copilot systems are still functional but
have different values displayed on the PFDs.
Yellow HDG and ATT ags will appear on
both PFDs (Figure 16-57). The pilots must de-





































< <
140
80
60




TERM


ACC-.02
T






ADC2
117
110
106
V2
VR
V1
Figure 16-56. AHRS1 Failure
Collins
BRT
DIM
14000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N
< PRESET
VOR1
FORMAT
FMS
DTK 251
(6935)
0.8NM
25
W

3
0

24
2
1

ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
C
< <
140
80
60
6935
RDR
<
TERR
< ET
TERM
F
50
ACC-.--
TERRAIN
0
RADAR ON
TCAS OFF
ATT
HDG
HDG PTCH
ALTS FMS
117
110
106
V2
VR
V1
Collins
BRT
DIM
10
10
20
HDG PTCH
ALTS
14000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N
< PRESET
VOR1
FORMAT >
FMS
DTK 251
(6935)
0.8NM
ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
C
<
140
80
60
6935
< ET
TERM
V
ACC-.02
0
FMS
2
1

24
w
3
0

3
3

N

3

6
E
1
2

1
5

S

251
4.1NM
SXW
V ----NM
SXW
RDR
TERR
XAHS
TFC >
FD
117
110
106
V2
VR
V1
Pilots PFD Copilots PFD
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
16-29 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
1
6

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KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
16-30 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
1
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Stermine which system is correct and choose
the operating AHRS.
Figure 16-57. AHRS Miscompares
Once the operating AHRS has been selected,
a yellow-boxed AHS1 or AHS2 ag will ap-
pear on both PFDs indicating they are both
using the same AHRS.
If the Attitude portion of the AHRS fails, then
the autopilot will automatically disengage and
cannot be reengaged until the AHRS is re-
paired by maintenance. If only the heading
portion has failed, the autopilot will remain
engaged. If the heading failed on the side that
is coupled to the ight director or autopilot,
there will be limited lateral control and it is
recommended to select the operating AHRS
or couple to the unaffected side. See the Flight
Guidance section of this manual for the
method of coupling to each side.
PITOT AND STATIC SYSTEM
Independent pitot and static systems are pro-
vided for the pilot and copilot ight indica-
tions.
The pilot and copilot pitot masts (Figure 16-
58) are located on the forward lower nose sec-
tion of the airplane.
Figure 16-58. Pitot Tubes
Each heated mast provides ram air pressure to
its respective Air Data Computer (ADC). The
copilots mast also provides ram air pressure
to the Electronic Standby Instrument System
(ESIS) ADC.
Dual static ports are located on each side of
the aft fuselage in a vertical arrangement (Fig-
ure 16-59). The top port on the left side is con-
nected to the bottom port on the right side and
the resulting average pressure is supplied to
the pilots static air source valve, located just
below the right side circuit breaker panel. The
other two static ports are also connected and
the resulting average pressure is supplied to
the copilots ADC. The copilot does not have
an alternate static source selection. The copi-
lots static source is also attached to the ESIS
ADC. The static ports are not heated as they
are in a position that does not accumulate ice.
Figure 16-59. Static Ports
In addition, an alternate static air source is
provided to the pilots static air source valve
from the aft side of the rear pressure bulkhead.
The output from the pilots static air source
valve is manually selected by the crew and
Collins


10
10
20
HDG PTCH
ALTS
14000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N



FMS1
DTK 251
(6935)
0.8NM

251
W

3
0

24
2
1


<
140
80
60
6935
R

TERM


ACC-.02
T
0
FMS

144
069



HDG
V2
VR
V1
117
110
106
ATT
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-31
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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provides either normal static air pressure or al-
ternate static air pressure to the pilots ADC.
During preight, the pilot should ensure the
PILOTS STATIC AIR SOURCE valve
switch is held in the NORMAL (forward) po-
sition by the spring-clip retainer (Figure 16-
60). See Figure 16-61 to see the connections
from pitot-static lines to the ADCs for pilot
and copilot and the ADC for the ESIS.
Figure 16-60. Alternate Static Source
Selection
Selecting the alternate static source will induce
errors in altitude and airspeed indications and
should only be selected when the normal static
source is blocked.
The pilots airspeed and altimeter nor-
mal indications are changed when the
alternate static air source is in use.
Refer to the Airspeed Calibration Al-
ternate System, and the Altimeter Cor-
rection Alternate System graphs in
the POH/AFM (PERFORMANCE
Section) for operations when the alter-
nate static air source is selected.
OUTSIDE AIR
TEMPERATURE
The digital outside air temperature (OAT)
gage is located on the left sidewall, and dis-
plays Indicated Outside Air Temperature
(IOAT) in Celsius (Figure 16-62). When the
adjacent button is depressed, Fahrenheit is dis-
played. The probe is located on the lower fuse-
lage under the pilots position. Indicated
Outside Air Temperature (IOAT) is a combi-
nation of Static Air Temperature (SAT) and
temperature due to air friction across the
probe. This is referred to as Ram Air Temper-
ature (RAT) or Total Air Temperature (TAT).
For determination of actual OAT, refer to the
Indicated Outside Air Temperature Correc-
tion ISA chart in the Performance section of
the POH/AFM. This sidewall OAT gage must
be used for performance computations.
The Ram Air Temperature (RAT) and Static
Air Temperature (SAT) indications are lo-
cated at the bottom of the PFD and MFD re-
spectively. Information is derived from the Air
Data Computers. This input comes from a
Rosemont probe located behind the nose gear
well area on the underside of the fuselage. This
is an unheated probe as is the OAT gauge
probe (Figure 16-62).
The term ambient temperature, when used for
Engine Anti-ice operations, refers to IOAT
corrected for ram air temperature as found in
the above listed correction chart in the POH.
WARNING
PILOT'S STATIC
AIR SOURCE
NORMAL ALTERNATE
SEE FLIGHT MANUAL PERFORM-
ANCE SECTION FOR
INSTR CAL ERROR
MASTER CIGAR DC DC
PNL
COOLING STBY ENG
ANTI ICE
FUEL
VENT COPILOT
PFD IEC
CONTROL LIGHTER CONV2 CONV2 RIGHT RIGHT
BRAKE
DEICE HEATER
RIGHT HIGH HIGH HEATER HEA
TEMP PRESS OXY LEFT NOSE WSHLD ADC2 HF
CONTROL RIGHT ANT COM
PROP
DEICE
CONTROL
P
ANTI ICE
I

MN ENG
ANTI
ICE












CABIN
DIFF
CABIN
ALT LEFT LEFT SURF
DEICE
PILOT
PFD M SELCAL
BUS
TIE
POWER
BUS
TIE
POWER
BLEED
AIR
CONTROL
EQMT
COOLING
FLT
INSTR
WIPER
ENVIRONMENTAL
FURNISHING
5 5 5 5 1 5 5 10 2

10 5 15 15 5 5 5 10
5 5 5 2 5 10 1







7
1
2
7
1
2

7
1
2
7
1
2

25 5
1 5 5
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-32
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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Figure 16-61. System Integration
ADC
NUMBER 2 UNITS
AHRS
IAPS
ADC
NUMBER 1 UNITS
AHRS
L PITOT
MAST
R PITOT
MAST
RAT
TEMPERATURE
PROBE
DRAIN
FWD
PRESSURE
BULKHEAD
PILOT
PFD
PILOT
MFD
STANDBY
UNIT
COPILOT
PFD
DRAIN
DRAIN
DRAIN
DRAIN
ALTERNATE
STATIC
SOURCE
PILOT'S
STATIC
SOURCE
SELECTOR
RIGHT
STATIC PORTS
LEFT
STATIC PORTS
TOP
BOTTOM
TOP
BOTTOM
CABIN DIFFERENTIAL
PRESSURE GAGE
PNEUMATIC
PRESSURE GAGE
CABIN
PRESSURE
PNEUMATIC
PRESSURE
FGC
FMC
IAPS
FGC
FMC
(Optional)
Figure 16-62. OAT Gauge
Figure 16-63. Rosemont Probe
STALL WARNING
SYSTEM
The stall warning system consists of a trans-
ducer, a lift computer, a warning horn, and a
test switch. Angle of attack is sensed by air
pressure on the transducer vane located on the
left wing leading edge (Figure 16-64).
When a stall is imminent, the transducer out-
put is sent to a lift computer. The Lift Com-
puter activates a stall warning horn at
approximately 5 to 12 knots above stall with
aps in the 40% (Approach) position, and at 8
to 14 knots above stall with the aps fully ex-
tended.
Figure 16-64. Transducer Vane
The left main-gear squat switch disconnects
the stall warning system when the aircraft is on
the ground.
The system has preight test capability
through the use of the STALL WARN TEST
switch mounted on the copilots left subpanel
(Figure 16-65). The STALL WARN TEST
switch, when held in the TEST position, raises
the transducer vane and actuates the warning
horn.
In the ICE group of switches on the pilots
right subpanel, a STALL WARN switch con-
trols electrical heating of the mounting plate
(Figure 16-66). With the squat switch in the
Ground Mode, power is limited on the mount-
ing plate to one-half the system voltage. Full
system voltage is applied to the plate with the
squat switch in the Airborne Mode. The trans-
ducer vane is heated to system voltage any-
time power is applied to the aircraft.
The formation of ice at the transducer
vane, or on the wing leading edge, re-
sults in erroneous indications in ight
WARNING
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
16-33 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
1
6

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The airspeed tape on the PFDs incorporates
an Impending Stall Speed/Low Speed Cue
(ISS/LSC) to visually indicate when the air-
speed is nearing AFM published stall speeds..
It has no connection or input from the stall
warning transducer vane. See the Airspeed
Display section of the PFD earlier in this chap-
ter.
B300 with Early Environmental System
B300 with New Environmental System
Figure 16-65. Stall Warning Test Switch
Figure 16-66. Stall Warning Heat
FLIGHT GUIDANCE
SYSTEM (FGS)
The Flight Guidance System (FGS) consists of
an integrated ight director (FD) and autopi-
lot (AP) system. It includes yaw damping and
pitch trim functions. The Flight Guidance
Panel (FGP), the SYNC and YD/AP DISC
buttons are on the control wheels, with the GA
button on the left power lever. These inputs
control the FGS (Figure 16-67).
The FGS consists of two ight guidance chan-
nels with independent computers, related
hardware, and control circuits. This provides
independent output for ight director and au-
topilot functions. AP/FD indications are dis-
played along the top of the PFDs (Figure 16-68
). Active modes are displayed in green and
armed modes are displayed in white, below the
active modes.
+
GND
COM
NORM
DG
FREE
LDG GEAR
WARN TEST
OFF
STALL
WARN TEST
OVERSPEED
WARN TEST
OFF
WINDOW
DEFOG
LOW
MAN COOL
MODE
MAN
HEAT
AUTO
OFF
ELEC
HEAT
ENVIR
BLEED AIR
NORMAL
DECR
MAN TEMP
INCR
PNEU & ENVIR OFF
ENVIR
OFF
BLEED AIR VALVES
LEFT OPEN RIGHT
CABIN DIFF
WARN TEST
CABIN ALT WARN
TEST SILENCE
OFF
OFF
EXT
DET
ENG FIRE TEST
+

ON
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-34
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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Figure 16-68. Flight Guidance System
Display
FLIGHT GUIDANCE
COMPUTERS (FGC)
Each FGC is supplied with input from the
AHRS, navigation data, FGP selections, servo,
and ADC computers. The coupled FGC pro-
duces control signals for yaw damping, AP/FD,
and pitch trim functions. Each FGC is supplied
data from the onside ADC, EFIS, and AHRS.
The autopilot and ight director require both
attitude portions of the AHRS to be opera-
tional.
Each FGC produces an independent AP con-
trol signal. Only one FGC may be coupled to
the autopilot at any time. AP control compu-
tations from the other FGC are continuously
compared with AP control signals from the
coupled FGC. The autopilot automatically dis-
engages when autopilot control discrepancies
are detected.
FLIGHT GUIDANCE PANEL
(FGP)
The Flight Guidance Panel (FGP) controls
both FGCs. The coupled FGC then controls
the Flight Guidance System (Figure 16-69. The
FGP is centered at the top of the instrument
panel. All AP/FD mode selections are made
on this panel.
The FGP has the following controls:
AP Button
The AP button controls autopilot engagement.
The autopilot engages if the following condi-
tions are met: (1) YD/AP DISC switch-bar is
raised; (2) no unusual attitudes/rates exist; (3)
and the ight guidance computer does not de-
tect any autopilot faults. The yaw damper is
automatically engaged when the AP button is
pushed.
Collins




20
HDG PTCH
ALTS
14000









4


















<
140
80

6935








FMS






AP
1

KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
16-35 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
1
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Figure 16-67. Flight Guidance Panel (FGP)
RADIO CALL
N350KA
ON
+
+
DOWN
LOCK
REL
HD LT
TEST
HYD FLUID
SENSOR
STROBE
TAIL
FLOOD
OFF
BEACON
GEAR
DOWN
TEST
LANDING
GEAR
RELAY
FUEL VENT MANUAL AUTO
PROP WSHLD ANTI-ICE
NORMAL
HI
SURFACE
BRAKE
DEICE
ENG
AUTO
IGN
GEN
RESET
ON
OFF
AVIONICS
MASTER
POWER
EXT
PWR
DEICE
SINGLE
MANUAL LEFT RIGHT
STALL
WARN PITOT
RIGHT LEFT PILOT
ARM
OFF
LEFT
LEFT RIGHT
ENGINE ANTI-ICE
AUTOFEATHER PROP TEST
ON
OFF
OFF OFF
ON LEFT RIGHT
STARTER ONLY OFF
ARM GOV
GND IDLE
STOP
TEST
ON
OFF
ON
TEST
OFF
EMER
OFF
NORM
OFFRESET
ACTUATORS
STANDBY
BUS SENSE
RESET
GEN TIES
MAN CLOSE
MAIN
TEST
BAT L GEN R GEN
OPEN
RIGHT
COPILOT
LDG GEAR CONTROL
UP
DN
OFF
ICE PROTECTION
OFF
+
IGNITION AND
ENGINE START
PARKING BRAKE
ESIS
BAT BUS
2 1 DME
2 PA
XMIT
PA
T S
2
1
NORM
MIC
OXY
1 NAV
2 1 COMM
2 1 ADF AUTO
COMM
SPKR
VOICE
IDENT NORM
AUDIO
ALTN B
O
T
H
MKR
INPH
2 1 DME
2 PA
XMIT
PA
S T
2
1
NORM
MIC
OXY
1 NAV
2 1 COMM
2 1 ADF AUTO
COMM
SPKR
VOICE
IDENT NORM
AUDIO
ALTN B
O
T
H
MKR
INPH
Collins Collins
Collins Collins
M
1/2
DME-H
IDENT
Collins BRT MENU
ADV
DATA MENU
ADV
DATA
V O L
VOL
F
PRESET
TERM
TERR
RDR
FORMAT
TERRAIN
TA ONLY
0.8NM
HDG 329
(8215)
100
ACC.03
V1
103 VR
107 V2
29.92IN
MIN 10200 BARO
16000
8215
FMS
ET
COM1 118.85 COM2 121.90 ATC1 0511 UTC 20:03
12.5
25
RAT 1 C
V
DBL
13.6NM
VOR1
1
1
2
4
2
4
HDG PTCH
FMS ALTS
20
10
10
8000
60
80
800
0
138
082
7820
40
00
BRT
DIM
BRT
DIM
700
900
600
170
30
W
N
3
329
BARO
RANGE TILT
S T D
PUSH
GCS
REFS
NAV/BRG
RADAR
T I L T
AUTO PUSH
NOSE
L R
PROP
SYNC
EMER
FREQ
GND
COM
NORM
DG
FREE
NORM
DG
FREE
LDG GEAR
WARN TEST
OFF
STALL
WARN TEST
OVERSPEED
WARN TEST
OFF
WINDOW
DEFOG
LOW
MAN COOL
ENVIRONMENTAL
COCKPIT
AUTO INCR INCR
BLOWER TEMP
MODE
MAN
HEAT AUTO
OFF ELEC
HEAT
ENVIR
BLEED AIR
NORMAL
DECR
MAN TEMP
INCR
PNEU & ENVIR OFF
ENVIR
OFF
BLEED AIR VALVES
LEFT OPEN RIGHT
CABIN DIFF
WARN TEST
CABIN ALT WARN
TEST SILENCE
OFF
OFF
EXT
DET
ENG FIRE TEST
NORM
AHRS SLEW
+ 2 1
NORM NORM
ADC
2 1
NORM 2
PILOT
DISPLAY
MFD PFD STBY
SLEW
+
TUNE
RTU CDU
DISABLE
RMT TUNE
NORM
ATC
1
G/S
INHIB
ACTIVE
TERR
INHIB
ACTIVE
STEEP
APPR
ACTIVE
FLAP
OVRD
ACTIVE
BARO
RANGE TILT
S T D
PUSH
GCS
REFS
NAV/BRG
RADAR
T I L T
AUTO PUSH
29.92 in 13.6NM VOR1
057CRS
0KTS 0MIN
7500
8000
80
60
10 10
10 10
33 N 30
20
00 78
1
40
9
COM1
118. 85 123. 80
113. 00
NAV1
ATC 1 ADF
108. 50
0511 350. 0
ENG FIRE
F/W VALVE PUSH
CLOSED
ENG FIRE
F/W VALVE PUSH
CLOSED
DISCHARGED
EXTINGUISHER
PUSH
DISCHARGED
EXTINGUISHER
PUSH
L FUEL PRES LO CABIN ALT HI CABIN DIFF HI
DOOR UNLOCKED
L OIL PRES LO
R FUEL PRES LO
R OIL PRES LO
L BLEED FAIL R BLEED FAIL
CRS1
DI RECT
PUSH
CRS2
DI RECT
PUSH
SPEED
I A S / MACH
PUSH
FD VS DOWN
UP
VNAV
NAV HDG
HDG
APPR ALT FLC
1/2 BANK
YD AP
YD/AP DISC
FD
CPL
Collins
ALT
CA N C E L
P U S H SYNC
PUSH
O
F
F
A
U
T
O
O
F
F
CABIN
AUTO INCR INCR
BLOWER TEMP
DOWN
UP
20 2
1 4
2
1 4
6 0
.5
.5
80
60
FLAPS TAKEOFF AND APPROACH
CABIN CLIMB THDS FT PER MIN
0
5
10
15 20
25
30
35
40
1
2
3
4 5
6
7
ALT 1000 FT
L PROP PITCH CABIN ALTITUDE LDG/TAXI LIGHT PASS OXYGEN ON AIR COND N1 LOW R PROP PITCH
L ENG ICE FAIL L FUEL QTY ELEC HEAT ON EXT PWR R FUEL QTY R ENG ICE FAIL
L CHIP DETECT L NO FUEL XFR BAT TIE OPEN DUCT OVERTEMP R NO FUEL XFR R CHIP DETECT
L DC GEN L GEN TIE OPEN HYD FLUID LOW RVS NOT READY R GEN TIE OPEN R DC GEN
L IGNITION ON L ENG ANTI-ICE FUEL CROSSFEED R ENG ANTI-ICE R IGNITION ON
WING DEICE L BK DEICE ON MAN TIES CLOSE R BK DEICE ON TAIL DEICE
L BL AIR OFF AUTOFTHER OFF OXY NOT ARMED RUD BOOST OFF R BL AIR OFF
PROP GND SOL L PITOT HEAT R PITOT HEAT
L
I
G
H
T
S
L
I
G
H
T
S
O
F
F
N
O
R
M
O
F
F
2
LANDING TAXI ICE NAV RECOG
LEFT RIGHT
50
0 100
80 FLIGHT
HOURS 1/10
VACUUM
INCHES OF MERCURY
0
500 10001500
2000
PSI
OXYGEN SUPPLY PRESSURE MADE IN USA
USE NO OIL
PNEUMATIC
PRESSURE
0 20
10
PSI 3 4 5
6
35k
15k
MASTER CAUTION MASTER WARNING PRESS TO RESET
MASTER
CAUTION MASTER
WARNING
ACC .
PRESS
T O T E S T
Collins
BRT
DIM
1.4NM
HDG 329
(8215)
TTG
FMS
GS 0 ISA TAS 0 SAT 12 C +13 C
TERR
RDR
TA ONLY
TFC F
12.5
50
30
W
N
3
329
--:--
0.6NM KASE
CLIMB
(8215) 8215A
-:--/ 1.4NM
-:-- : 1.4NM (8215)
-:-- : 2.6NM (8700)
-:-- : 169NM KCOS
PRESS TO RESET PRESS TO RESET
PRESS TO RESET
FF 130 750
PRESS
TORQ FIRE
ITT PROP
OIL
122 80
TEMPC 49
110.0
830
112
TORQ
ITT
3.4
516
N1 106.0
1050
62.2
ON ON 121.5
CABIN AIR
SELECT
PUSH
SELECT
PUSH
DBL LINDZ
J206
J10-1
(8215)
/8215A
(INTC)
KASE (8700) JNETT
GLENO
/16000A
1740
< PRESET
CRS 057
FORMAT
ATC UTC RAT COM1 COM2 oC
< <
RDR
TERR
TERR < ET
F
2 1
2 4
w
30
33 N
3
6
E
1 2
1 5 S
ALT
ATT
IAS
AHS2
ADC2
VS
FD
RA
DCP TCAS FAIL
GPWS
FMS
PULL UP
GND PROX
LOC1
TRIM
XTLK
XAHS
XADC
ENG1
ENG2
HDG
GS LOC
HDG
IAS
V
N
V
ATT
ALT
AP
A
29.88IN
5
















<
R
T
S
T
S S E R PP
















<
















<
DME 1 2
AV N 1
OXY
MIC
NORM
1
2
S T
PA
XMIT
PA 2
COMM 1 2
FMS
5 25
330
WWWWWWW
2255 22555 2555
V O L
10
10
2
AL
107 V
R 103 V
1
03
V
80
. C AC
100
(8215)
329 HDG
.8NM 0
TERM
2
FMS
PTCH HDG
20
0
60
170 170
WW
30
329 329
EE S
EE
SSSE RRE RE RE OO T SSS SSSSS SS SS EEE RR P TT SS EE RR O RE OO TT SS SS SSS EE RRRRE RE RE PPP
















<
Collins
8215
ATA D
ADV
MENU
BARO
38
NNN
2
TS
000 16
MIN 10200 BARO
29.92IN
4 000
2
4
2
1
1
PTCH
700
8
900
82
00 00
40 40
20 8 7
600
3
NN
HH S P H U P
DD TT D SS T
REFS
V/BRG NAAV/BRG
A
G/S
ACTIVE
INHIB IB
G/S
A
TERR
ACTIVE
INHIB B
TERR
ACTIVE ACTIVE
APPR PR
STEEP
AACTIVE
OVRDD
FLAP
CRS1
FD
H S U P
T EC EEC RR I R I R DDDI
UP
DOWN VS
V VNAAV
TT
FMS
TTG
(8215) (
TTG
329 HDG
.4NM 1
W
30
KCOS
329 3 9
169NM : -:--
(8700)
(8215)
2.6NM : -:--
( )
(8700)
1.4NM : -:--
-:--/
8215A (8215)
CLIMB
KASE 0.6NM
--:--
830
10.0 1
PROP ITT
FIRE ORQ T
516
3.4
ITT
ORQ T
62.2
1050
106.0 N1
1740
H
S
SH U P
T CCT E L EEL SSE
















<
N350KA
RADIO CALL
ADV
M
IDENT
DME-H
Collins B
123. 80
BRT MENU
BARO
H S U P
D T D SS T
REFS
V/BRG NAAV/BRG
000
29.92 in
8
500 7
60
N
80
9
30 333 N 0
78000
20 40
18. 85 1
COM1
V1 NA
CRS2 SPEED
H US U P
T EC EEC RR I R I R DDDI
AV
H S U P
H CCCH A S AC M // M S /
AAA S
I
NNAV
HDG
HDG APPR LT A FLC
1/2 BANK
YD AP FD
DISC YD/AP
CPL
Collins
LT A
HSU S HUP
E LEE LCN C E
NA CA N
C
H
N
S U PPU
C NC Y S
S T SS T EE T O
Collins
3
N
1.4NM -:--/
8215A
2 11 49 TEMPC
80 122
OIL
FIRE
PRESS
750 130 FF
H S U P
T CCT E L EEL SSE
















<
1
1
OXY
C MI
NORM
1
2 PA
T XMI
PA
1
ns
.
Colli
ATA D
BARO
VOL
HH
DD
REFS
V/BRG
T
TT
SE SE O EE RR O TTT SS PRES ES PR
C AC
CRS 057
SE SE T RE R OO TTTO TO S S ES E RR PP
H
T CCT
P
LT VS
T
IAS
6
3
N 33
30
5
AT FD
A
LT IAS
AHS2
ADC2
RA
AIL TCAS F P DC
GND PROX
G
UP PULL
GPWS
XTLK
IM TR
LOC1
HS XA
DC XA
G1 EN
G2 EN
HDG
GS G LOC
G D H
V
N
V T T A
N
A
A
A
29.88I
















<
DME 2
AV N
T S
2
COMM 2
















<
ON
RIGHT
OPEN
R GEN GEN L AT B
TEST
MAIN
MAN CLOSE
TIES GEN
RESET
BUS SENSE
ANDBY ST
ORS T ACTUAT
NORM
OFF
EMER
OFF
TEST
ON
OFF
ON
TEST
OP ST
GND IDLE
GOV ARM
OFF Y ARTER ONL ST
RIGHT LEFT ON
OFF OFF
OFF
ON
TEST PROP THER OFEAT AUT
ANTI-ICE NE ENGI
RIGHT LEFT
LEFT
OFF
ARM
PWR
EXT
WER PO OW
MASTER
VIONICS AV
OFF
ON
RESET
GEN
IGN
O AUT
ENG
ART NE ST ENGI
AND IGNITION
T BUS BAT
ESIS
ARKING BRAKE PPA
H
T
O
B N LT A
AUDIO
NORM IDENT
VOICE
O AUT ADF 1 2
INPH
MKR
PRESET
12.5 1112222 5555 1112222 5555 1112222..555
COMM
SPKR
F
20:03 UTC 1 051 TC1 AT 18.85 1 COM1
ET
VOR1
.6NM 13
DBL
V
M
R
O
N
OFFRESET
















<
LINDZ G O
(8215) KASE (8700) (8215) (8700) 82 AS (8215) KASE
DN
UP
LDG GEAR CONTROL
LOT COPI PILOT LEFT RIGHT
T O PIT W
ALL ST
RIGHT LEFT MANUAL
LE NG SI
DEICE
DEICE
BRAKE
ACE SURF FACE
HI
NORMAL
ANTI-ICE WSHLD PROP
O AUT MANUAL
Y RELA
GEAR
LANDING
TEST
DOWN
GEAR
BEACON
OFF
D FLOO
AIL T
STROBE
SENSOR
HYD FLUID
TEST
T HD L
REL
LOCK
DOWN
+
OFF
PROTECTION ICE
OFF
Y
Collins
SYNC
T
ONL A T
TERRAIN
T FORMA AT
RDR
TERR
C 1 AT R 121.90 COM2
TIL LT RANGE
GCS
RADAR
H S U P O AUT
T L I TT I
ON ON
L R
PROP
FREE
L
NOSE E
DG
NORM
+
SLEW
STBY
FLAPS
UP
DOWN
F
F
O
F
F
O
S
T
H
G
I
L
S
T
H
G
I
L
2
RIGHT
AV
FUEL VENT
RIGHT LEFT LEFT
RECOG AV NN ICE AXI T NG LANDI
ARN
AT S 0 S TA 0 GS
F
50
12.5
W
J206
(
82
82 AS 82 87
NTC)
DBL /16000A 0A
(INTC) C)
(
82
87
(INTC)
/
)
/8215A
(8700)
0 /16000A
( 5)
000
GGLENO LENO GLENO E NDZ
















<
O
LEFT
FREQ
T
1/2
13. 00
121 21.5
EMER
COM
OO
GND
FREE
BLEED
PNEU & ENVI
NORMAL
AIR BLEED
R ENVI
HEA HEAT
ELEC OFF
O AUT HEA HEAT
MAN
MODE
TEMP BLOWER
NCR I NCR I O AUT
T COCKPI
AL RONMENT ENVI
COOL MAN
LOW
O
DG
NORM
AHRS
NORM
ADC
NORM NORM
1 2
Y DISPLAY
PILOT
2 NORM
1 2 PFD MFD STBY +
SLEW
CDU RTU
TUNE NORM
RMT TUNE
SABLE DI
1
C T AAT
TIL
GCS
RADAR
H SSH U PPU
O UT A
T LL T I TT I
1
V1 NA
TC 1 TC 1 AA ADF ADF
350. 0 1 051
108. 50
T
U
A
TEMP BLOWER
NCR I NCR I O AUT
N CABI APPROACH
THDS FT PER MIN
T F 0 0 000 1 T LLT A
7
6
5 4
3
2
1
40
35
30
25
20 15
10
5
0
CABIN CLIMB
.5
ANDFF AKEO T
60
80
20
.5
0 6
4 1
2
4 1
2
UP
DOWN
Y ONL A T
RDR
TERR
C +13 C 12 ISA
TFC
3
J10-1
JN JNETT J
















<
+
+
H
T
O
B TN AL
O AUDI
NORM DENT I
CE VOI
O AUT 1
MKR
<
COM
Collins
RANGE
TEST
COMM
SPKR
OON
GND
FIRE ENG
DET
EXT
OFF
OFF
LENCE SI TEST
ARN W T AL N CABI
TEST ARN W
FF DI N CABI
RIGHT OPEN
VES AL AIR VA BLEED
OFF
R ENVI
OFF R PNEU & ENVI
NCR I
TEMP MAN
DECR T
ELEC
T
DEFOG
NDOW WI
OFF
TEST ARN W
OVERSPEED
ARN TEST W
ALL ST
OFF
ARN TEST W
GEAR LDG
GCS
RADAR
H
O
T
F
F
O
F
F
O
80
1/10 HOURS
FLIGHT 100 0
50
Y F MERCUR INCHES O
ACUUM VVACUUM
15 5k
35k
66
5 4 3
AIR CABIN
C o COM2 COM1 AT RRAT UTC C AT
T FORMA
PRESET <
F
ET < RR TE
RR TE
R RD
FMS
S1 5
1 2
E
w
2 4
2 1
5
















<
O
ADF 2
NPH I
1/10 OIL
FLIGHT
USE NO
MADE IN USA PRESSURE Y SUPPLLY OXYGEN
PSI
2000
1500 1000 500
0
PSI
10
20 0
PRESSURE
TIC PNEUMA
YD Button
The YD button controls yaw damper engage-
ment. The yaw damper may be engaged with-
out engaging the autopilot. Disengaging the
yaw damper with the autopilot ON will also
disengage the autopilot.
CPL Button
The CPL button controls which ight guidance
computer (FGC), right or left side, supplies
ight director commands and attitude data to
the autopilot. With the autopilot on, a green
arrow on the PFD indicates the coupled FGC
(Figure 16-70). With the autopilot off, a white
arrow on the PFD indicates which FGC is gen-
erating the ight director commands. The
cross-side ight director will be a duplicate of
coupled side. Flight director modes will default
to ROLL and PTCH modes each time the
CPL button is pushed.
Left Side Couple
RIght Side Couple
Figure 16-70. Flight Guidance Couple
Arrow
At power-up, the left side FGC is automati-
cally chosen as the computer to supply the
ight director. Autopilot commands and the
couple arrow will always point to the left after
avionics power-up.
Each PFD will display AP/FD commands
from the coupled side. They do not normally
operate independently. There are two excep-
tions: go-around mode; full-ILS approach
mode. When GA and full-ILS modes are ac-
tive, each Flight Guidance Computer (FGC)
provides independent guidance to the onside
PFD ight director. When either of these con-
ditions exist, the single pointer arrow adds an-
other barb to show that the ight directors are
now independent (Figure 16-71). For this con-
dition to exist in the full-ILS approach mode,
the same localizer frequency must be tuned on
both radios (e.g., LOC1 and LOC2) and the
glideslope must be captured. If independent
operation can not be accomplished an annun-
ciator will appear on the non-coupled side
showing that an independent mode was at-
tempted but unsuccessful.
Successful Independent Operation
Unuccessful Independent Operation
Figure 16-71. Independent Flight Director
Operation
The coupled FGC provides automatic pitch
trimming with the autopilot engaged. Pitch
Collins




20
HDG PTCH
ALTS
14000









4
4
2
















<
140
80

6935








FMS






AP
1

Collins




20
HDG PTCH
ALTS
14000









4
4
2
















<
140
80

6935








FMS







Collins




20
APPR LOC1 GS
14000




4

700

2
4


















<
140
80
6
6935
R













AP

Collins




20
APPR LOC1 GS
14000




4

700

2
4


















<
140
80
6
6935
R













AP
FD1
1

FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-36
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
1
6

A
V
I
O
N
I
C
S
Figure 16-69. Flight Guidance Panel (FGP)
CRS1
D
I REC
T
PUSH
CRS2
D
I REC
T
PUSH
SPEED
I
A
S
/ MA
C
H
PUSH
FD VS DOWN
UP
VNAV
NAV HDG
HDG
APPR ALT FLC
1/2 BANK
YD AP
YD/AP DISC
FD
CPL
Collins
ALT
C
A
N
C
E L
P U
S
H
S
YNC
PUSH
16-37 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
trimming is disabled if a pitch trim fault occurs.
If a pitch trim fault is detected before the au-
topilot is selected ON, the autopilot will be
prevented from engaging. A pitch trim fault
detected after autopilot engagement will not
disengage the autopilot. Failures are indicated
by the appearance of a red TRIM annuncia-
tion on the PFDs (see the Flight Controls sec-
tion of this PTM).
YD/AP Disconnect Switch-Bar
The YD/AP Disconnect switch-bar removes
power from the autopilot and yaw damper
causing both to disengage. When pulled down,
a red and white band is visible to indicate the
disengage position (Figure 16-72). Raise the
switch-bar to permit autopilot/yaw damper en-
gagement.
Figure 16-72. YD/AP Disconnect Bar
FD Mode Buttons
All mode buttons on the FGC are ON / OFF
buttons. Caution should be exercised when se-
lecting each mode, as the buttons do not indi-
cate which one is already engaged. A scan of
the mode selection area on each PFD is re-
quired rst to verify current mode. When a
mode is then selected, incompatible modes are
automatically removed. Lateral modes include
HDG, ROLL, BANK, APPR, and NAV.
Vertical modes include VS, ALT, VNAV,
PTCH, FLC (or IAS), and altitude select
(ALTS).
FD Buttons
The left and right side FD buttons control dis-
play of the ight director command bars on
the respective PFD. At power-up, both ight
directors are off. Both ight directors are au-
tomatically activated when the autopilot is en-
gaged or when a ight director mode is
selected. Pushing the FD button will initially
display both ight directors in the PTCH and
ROLL modes. Either pilot can independently
remove their command bars from view by
pressing the respective FD button. The com-
mand bars will be removed from view but the
mode selections and opposite pilots command
bars will remain in view. If both pilots remove
the command bars from view, the ight direc-
tor will be completely turned off. This includes
all mode selections.
For IFIS equipped aircraft the ight director
image can be a v-bar or cross pointer (x-ptr).
See the REFS section of the DCP in this chap-
ter.
UP/DOWN Pitch Wheel
The pitch wheel controls reference values used
to set the vertical speed in the VS mode, or
pitch angle in the pitch mode. Caution must be
taken when using this control because it will
override or change active vertical modes.
There are two exceptions: glideslope (GS)
captured; GPS Vertical Glidepath (VGP) cap-
tured. This override is active during altitude
capture so care should be taken not to manip-
ulate the pitch control wheel during the dis-
play of ALT CAP on the PFD.
ROLL Mode
The ROLL mode is the basic lateral mode and
is activated automatically if no other lateral
mode is selected when the ight director is on,
or when the CPL button is pressed. ROLL an-
nunciates on the PFD when the mode is se-
lected.
In the ROLL mode, the FGC maintains the
current bank angle at engagement if the bank
angle is more than 5 degrees. The current
heading is maintained, with a bank angle limit
of 5 degrees, if the bank angle is 5 degrees or
less when the ROLL mode is activated.
SH
CEL
P
U
D
IR
EC

LT
ALT
YD
CPL
AP
YD/AP DISC
FD
CR
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
1
6

A
V
I
O
N
I
C
S
HDG Button
The HDG button controls selection of head-
ing mode. HDG annunciates on the PFD when
active. The FGC maintains the heading se-
lected by the heading bug.
HDG Knob
The HDG knob simultaneously controls the
heading bugs shown on both PFDs and the
MFD. If the bug is out of view on a display, a
cyan dashed line will extend from the airplane
symbol to indicate its location. A digital read-
out of the selected heading will be displayed
to the left of the current heading display (Fig-
ure 16-73). The commanded turn will take the
shortest distance to the selected heading un-
less the heading bug was rotated beyond 180
from the current heading. When rotated be-
yond 180, the turn will continue in the direc-
tion the bug was moved.
Figure 16-73. Heading Vector Line
PUSH SYNC Button
The PUSH SYNC button within the HDG
knob resets the heading bugs to the current
heading.
1/2 BANK Button
The 1/2 BANK button limits the maximum
bank angle to 15. While in this mode, a white
arc appears bellow the roll scale that spans 15
degrees either side of level (Figure 16-74).
Figure 16-74. Half Bank Mode
The half-bank mode is automatically selected
when climbing through 18,500 feet and dese-
lected when descending through 18,500 feet.
This mode is also deselected with the follow-
ing; localizer capture; go-around mode selec-
tion; or onside FMS navigation capture.
APPR Button
The APPR button controls selection of the ap-
proach mode. The type of approach is deter-
mined by the active navigation source shown
on the PFD (APPR LOC1, APPR VOR2,
APPR FMS2, etc.). The mode also arms the
glideslope capture after the front course local-
izer has captured if GS is valid. At glideslope
capture, the FGC will descend on the glides-
lope and disregard any preselected altitudes.
The FGC will not capture an altitude after the
glideslope is captured.
The displayed position of the CDI course is
signicant when APPR is pressed. If the head
of the needle is more than 110 degrees from
the present heading, then the approach mode
will assume a localizer back-course is desired
and the annunciation APPR B/C1 or APPR
B/C2 will appear. This position of the CDI will
also suppress any glideslope indications. If the
course is less than 110 degrees from the pres-
ent heading the approach mode assumes a

BRT
DIM


















30. 16I N
< PRESET
VOR1
FORMAT >
FMS1
DTK 251
(6935)
0.8NM
25
251
W

3
0

24
2
1

ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
C
<
1



RDR
TERR
< ET 01:42
TERM
F
50

TERRAIN
0

RADAR ON
144
069
TCAS OFF
TFC >
>
HDG 010






20
HDG PTCH
ALTS
14000







700
1
2
4


















<
140
80
60
6








FMS







FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-38
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
1
6

A
V
I
O
N
I
C
S
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-39
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
normal localizer based approach and the an-
nunciation APPR LOC1 or APPR LOC2 will
appear and the GS will arm and capture nor-
mally (Figure 16-75).
Additionally, this mode will allow the FMS to
accomplish what is called a NAV-to-NAV cap-
ture. When FMS is the current active NAV
source and has been loaded with a localizer-
based procedure (ILS, LOC, LOC BC, LDA,
SDF) the FMS will automatically tune that lo-
calizer and set up a preselected course when
within 30nm of the airport. The preselected
course will appear as a cyan dual line, dashed
CDI on the PFD. This preselected course must
become the active navigation source when on
nal for the localizer procedure as it is re-
quired by limitation. This transfer will happen
automatically only if the APPR mode has
been pressed and the preselected course is
trending toward center (Figure 16-76) . This is
called NAV-to-NAV capture as the pilot does
not have to manually change navigation
sources or change ight guidance modes. It is
accomplished automatically.
The APPR button is also used when ying a
non-localizer-based approach to a DA (Deci-
sion Altitude). When established on nal for
an appropriate RNAV (GPS) approach, the
APPR button will activate the approach mode
(APPR FMS1 or APPR FMS2). When VNAV
is then pressed, it will arm the vertical glide-
path (GP) mode (Figure 16-77). This allows
the FMS to follow a glidepath down to a pub-
lished decision altitude (DA) minimum. This
approach descent is based on barometric alti-
tudes and does not consider a ground based
antenna. Like the ILS glideslope, however, the
GPS GP will disregard any preselected alti-
tudes. Reference the VNAV section of this
chapter for more information.
Figure 16-75. APPR Mode Selection
Collins


10

20
APPR B/C1 ALTS
14000

60



600
700
1
2
4












<
140
80
60
6935
E


























BRT
DIM

















30. 16I N
PRESET
VOR1
FORMAT >
LOC1 109.75
B/C 055
IESJ
0.8NM
ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
C
<
1



ET
TERM
V


2
1

24
w
3
0

3
3

N

3

6
E
1
2

1
5

S

251
4.1NM
SXW
RDR
TERR
TCAS OFF
TFC >
<
<

Localizer Back Course Localizer Front Course
Collins


10

20
APPR LOC1 GS
14000

60
5

4
600
700
1
2
4










<
6935
E























185
180
160
1
DN
1

1


BRT
DIM









4







30. 16I N
FORMAT >
LOC1 109.75
CRS 235
IEJC
0.8NM
ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
C
<
6
ET
V

2
1

24
w
3
0

3
3

N

3

6
E
1
2

1
5

S

251
4.1NM
SXW
RDR
TERR
TCAS OFF
TFC >
<
< PRESET
FMS1









1
6

A
V
I
O
N
I
C
S
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
16-40 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
1
6

A
V
I
O
N
I
C
S
Figure 16-76. Localizer Nav-to-Nav Capture
FMS with Localizer Preselect Localizer Capture
Collins
BRT
DIM
10
10
20
APPR FMS1 ALTS
GS
14000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N
LOC1
109.75 FORMAT >
FMS1
DTK 235
CHARL
0.8NM
ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
C
<
140
80
60
6935
ET
TERM
V
ACC-.02
0
APPR LOC1
2
1

24
w
3
0

3
3

N

3

6
E
1
2

1
5

S

251
4.1NM
SXW
RDR
TERR
TCAS OFF
TFC >
<
117
110
106
V2
VR
V1
Collins
BRT
DIM
10
10
20
APPR LOC1 GS
14000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N
FORMAT >
LOC1 109.75
CRS 235
IEJC
0.8NM
ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
C
<
6935
ET
V
850
2
1

24
w
3
0

3
3

N

3

6
E
1
2

1
5

S

251
4.1NM
SXW
RDR
TERR
TCAS OFF
TFC >
<
< PRESET
FMS1
185
180
160
120
DN
100
14
1
0
Figure 16-77. VNAV Glidepath (GP) Mode
Collins


10
10
20
APPR FMS VPTCH
3000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N








251
W


24


<
4000








TOD
185
180
160
120
DN
100
14
1
0
1000
GP
Collins


10
10
20
APPR FMS VGP
3000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N

V






251
W


24


<
4000








TOD
185
180
160
120
DN
100
14
1
0
1000
GP Armed GP Active
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-41
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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NAV Button
The NAV button controls selection of the nav-
igation mode. Heading mode remains active
until course intercept. After intercept, the
FGC maintains the selected course. The active
NAV identier annunciates on the PFD (FMS,
VOR1, LOC2, etc.). The NAV mode should be
used during the enroute phase of ight, for ap-
propriate terminal procedures and when y-
ing an approach to an MDA. This excludes an
FMS NAV-to-NAV capture as referenced in
the APPR section. Refer to the VNAV section
of this chapter for more information on how
this mode interacts with FMS vertical naviga-
tion.
CRS Knobs
The CRS knobs select the course to be own
on the respective PFD. This knob is not active
when FMS is the active navigational source.
PUSH DIRECT Button
The PUSH DIRECT button within the CRS
knob automatically selects a direct course to
the active VOR, and centers the CDI on the
respective PFD. This button is not active when
either FMS or LOC is the active navigational
source.
Pitch Mode
Pitch mode is a basic vertical operating mode.
It activates when no other vertical mode is ac-
tive and the ight director is on. The annunci-
ation PTCH displays on the PFD. When active,
the FGC maintains the pitch attitude which
existed when the pitch mode was engaged.
This will occur when the previously selected
vertical mode is pressed again (deselected) or
when the UP/DOWN Pitch Wheel is moved
and VS mode is not active.
Rotating the UP/DOWN pitch wheel changes
the pitch reference value. When the autopilot
is not engaged, pushing the SYNC button on
the control wheel synchronizes the pitch ref-
erence to the current attitude.
VS Button
The VS button controls selection of the verti-
cal speed mode. When VS is activated, the
FGC initially maintains the current aircraft
vertical speed when the mode is selected. Ro-
tating the UP/DOWN pitch wheel changes the
vertical speed reference value. When the au-
topilot is not engaged, pressing the SYNC but-
ton on the control wheel synchronizes the VS
reference to the current vertical speed.
VS and the vertical speed reference value ap-
pear on the PFD (Figure 16-78). An up arrow
appears for climbs and a down arrow appears
for descents. A reference arrow (bug) appears
on the vertical speed scale adjacent to the se-
lected vertical speed.
Figure 16-78. Vertical Speed (VS) Mode
VNAV Mode
The VNAV button controls Vertical Naviga-
tion mode selection and is annunciated on the
PFD as a V located in front of the active ver-
tical mode (e.g., VPTCH, VVS, VALTS, etc).
The ight management computer (FMC) de-
termines the VNAV capture point and pro-
vides vertical steering commands to waypoints
that contain altitude restraints in the FMS. See
the VNAV section and the Flight Guidance
Mode Annunciations table for more informa-
tion.
Collins


10
10
20
HDG VS
ALTS
14000
6
60
540
20
4
600
700
1
2
4
4

1
3














<
140
80
60
6935
R





FMS
R






1100
117
1
V2

KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
16-42 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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FLC Button
The FLC button controls the Flight Level
Change mode. The FLC mode will climb or de-
scend the airplane towards the preselected al-
titude at the IAS or Mach speed reference
located above the airspeed display. FLC indi-
cations are modied by the SPEED Knob
(Figure 16-79). It is important to note that
when the autopilot is engaged after the FLC
mode is selected, the present speed of the air-
craft will be indicated as the active speed, not
the one dialed in with the SPEED knob. The
pilot can reset the desired speed by rotating
the SPEED knob.
Figure 16-79. Flight Level Change (FLC)
Mode
The FLC mode controls the pitch of the air-
craft and requires pilot manipulation of power
to establish a climb or descent. If the power is
set inappropriately or the speed is unachiev-
able, the aircraft will not be allowed to devi-
ate further from the preselected altitude to
achieve the selected speed. As an example, if
an altitude of 5000 is preselected and FLC
mode is chosen for a 160kt climb and the
power is not increased, the aircraft will initially
begin to pitch up. If this results in a speed
below 160kts, the aircraft will then lower the
pitch until the VSI indicates a climb of ap-
proximately 100 ft/min and stay there regard-
less of what speed that generates. It will not
allow the aircraft to pitch down and deviate
away from the preselected altitude to achieve
the selected speed. This same procedure will
occur if a lower altitude is preselected but the
power is left too high. In this situation the air-
craft will initially pitch to achieve the selected
speed. If this results in a speed faster than se-
lected, the aircraft will begin to pitch back up
until it maintains a descent of approximately
100 ft/min, regardless of what speed that gen-
erates.
SPEED Knob
The SPEED knob selects the IAS or Mach ref-
erence value, as appropriate, to be used by the
FLC mode. This value displays at the top of the
Airspeed Tape. When the FLC mode is se-
lected, the selected speed will also be annun-
ciated adjacent to the FLC mode annunciation
at the top of the attitude display.
IAS/MACH Button
The IAS/MACH button within the SPEED
knob, when pushed, selects Mach mode or IAS
mode for the FLC Speed Bug and FLC refer-
ence. The system automatically changes from
IAS to Mach or Mach to IAS when climbing
or descending through 20,517 feet.
ALT Button
The ALT button is used to hold the aircraft at
the current barometric altitude. The ALT but-
ton is used to level at an altitude other than a
preselected altitude. ALT will annunciate on
the PFD when this is pressed. If the autopilot
is not engaged, pressing the SYNC button on
the control wheel synchronizes the altitude
reference to the current altitude. As with all
ight guidance modes, pressing the ALT but-
ton when ALT is already annunciated on the
PFD will remove the altitude capture.
Altitude Preselect Mode
The altitude preselect mode permits the pilot
to select a target altitude for automatic level
off by the autopilot or FD command. The
Collins




20
HDG FLC 160
ALTS
14000






700

2
4
4
2
















<
160
80

6935








FMS







Collins




20
HDG FLC M.31
ALTS
14000






700

2
4
4
2
















<
M.31
80

6935








FMS







FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-43
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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ALTS armed mode annunciates in white on
the PFD.
The altitude preselect mode is automatically
selected with the following: the ALT knob is
turned; go-around mode is cleared or the ight
director is turned on. Altitude preselect is au-
tomatically deselected when glideslope ap-
proach mode becomes active, the VNAV
glidepath approach mode (VGP) becomes ac-
tive, altitude hold mode is selected, or the al-
titude capture mode (ALT CAP) is
annunciated.
If a descent or climb is desired, a new altitude
must be preselected. The appropriate vertical
mode must then be selected to climb or de-
scend. Changing the altitude preselector alone
does not cause the aircraft to climb or descend.
If the ALT knob is turned while ALT CAP is
annunciated, the pitch mode is selected and
the altitude preselect mode rearms.
Altitude capture (ALT CAP) occurs when the
airplane altitude approaches the selected alti-
tude. The capture point depends on the closure
rate. When within 1000 of the selected alti-
tude a single aural tone will sound and the pre-
selected altitude will ash. The ashing will
stop when within 200 of the selected altitude.
Should the aircraft subsequently deviate by
more than 200 from the selected altitude the
single aural tone will sound and the prese-
lected altitude will ash yellow. The ashing
will stop with an input by the pilot (pressing
the altitude selector knob) or the aircraft re-
turns to within 200 of selected altitude. In ei-
ther case the number will stop ashing and
return cyan in color.
ALTS shows in yellow if the capture is inhib-
ited due to invalid data and ALTS CAP shows
in yellow if the capture is cleared without a
subsequent selection of altitude hold or glides-
lope/glidepath capture.
ALT Preselect Knob
The ALT knob selects the desired altitude for
level off (displayed on the PFD). Rotating the
knob while in its default position will select
thousands of feet. Pressing the knob IN while
rotating will select hundreds of feet. See the
Altitude Display section of the PFD for more
information on the bugs that appear on the al-
titude tape.
PUSH CANCEL Button
The PUSH CANCEL button within the ALT
knob cancels the ashing visual altitude alerts
on the Altitude Display section of the PFD as
described earlier.
CONTROL WHEEL SWITCHES
The following control wheel switches affect
FGS operation:
DISC TRIM AP/YD Button
The DISC TRIM AP/YD button is located on
the outboard horn of each control wheel. It is
used for disengagement of the autopilot and
yaw damper (Figure 16-80). Pushing the but-
ton to the rst detent will disconnect the au-
topilot and/or yaw damper. Pushing the button
to the second detent will interrupt electric trim
operation. Releasing the button will reset the
trim and allow continued operation.
Figure 16-80. Left Yoke
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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SSYNC Button
The SYNC button is located on the outboard
horn of each control wheel. It is used to syn-
chronize the PTCH, FLC, VS, ALT and ROLL
modes of the ight director to the current pa-
rameters if the autopilot is not engaged (Fig-
ure 16-81). Inputs known as Control Wheel
Steering (CWS) or Touch Control Steering
(TCS) features are not installed on this system.
Figure 16-81. Pilot's PFD with SYNC
Electric Pitch Trim Switches
The electric pitch trim switch is comprised of
two segments. The trim switch is located on the
outboard horn of each control wheel. The trim
switch applies electric pitch trim commands.
Both segments of the switch must be actuated
to operate the electric pitch trim. The seg-
mented pitch trim switch reduces the potential
of trim runaway or inadvertent activation.
When moved in either direction, the electric
pitch trim switches will disconnect the autopi-
lot while leaving the yaw damper engaged.
See the Flight Controls section of this PTM for
further discussion of electric pitch trim and its
annunciations.
GA Button
The GA button is located on the outboard
side, in the center, of the left power lever (Fig-
ure 16-82). The G/A button selects the go-
around (GA) mode of the ight director.
Selecting GA mode will disengage the autopi-
lot, but not yaw damper and clear all other
ight director modes. The ight director will
display approximately +7 degree pitch up atti-
tude. ROLL mode will be selected and head-
ing will be held if bank angle is less than 5
degrees. (Figure 16-83). The heading being
held is independent of the heading bug. This
mode will not follow any lateral or vertical
commands and will not capture the prese-
lected altitude. During go-around mode, the
ight directors are independent and the fail-
ure of one will not affect the other. This allows
for redundancy during a critical ight maneu-
ver. The independent ight director capability
also occurs during a full ILS and provides the
same redundancy.
Figure 16-82. Go-Around Button
Collins


10
10
20
HDG PTCH
ALTS
14000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N








251
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24


<
140
80
60
6935


TERM


ACC-.02
T
0
FMS






SYNC
117
110
106
V2
VR
V1
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-45
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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It is necessary to reselect a desired mode after
the aircraft is congured in the go-around to
regain full ight director control.
See the Flight Guidance Mode Annunciations
table at the end of this chapter.
Figure 16-83. PFD Go-Around (GA) Mode
CONTROL DISPLAY UNIT
(CDU)
The Control Display Unit (CDU-3000) serves
as a control of the communication and navi-
gation radios, Flight Management System
(FMS) and limited display control for the
PFDs and MFD (Figure 16-84). The pedestal
can contain either one or two CDUs. The sec-
ond CDU is an option. If two are installed,
each CDU will communicate only with the re-
spective FMS. In the optional two CDU in-
stallation, reversionary mode is not available
should one fail. The remaining CDU will be
capable of communicating with the on-side
FMS only.
The CDU has a normal operating temperature
range of -20C to +70C. Should the unit tem-
perature get below -20C the CDU will turn
ON but the LCD display will delay indications
Collins


10
10
20
GA GA
14000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N








251
W


24


<
140
80
60
6935


TERM


ACC-.02
T
0






117
110
106
V2
VR
V1
Figure 16-84. Control Display Unit (CDU)
EXEC
NEXT PREV
MFD
D A T A
MFD
A D V
CLR
DEL
B R T
DIM
DEP
ARR
PERF LEGS FPLN DIR
MSG
TUN
IDX
MFD
MENU
A B C D F G
H I J K L M
O P Q R T U
V X Y Z
SP
/
E
N
S
W
1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
+ -
/ 0 /
ACT FPLN
KICT
ORIGIN
1/4
DIST DEST
ROUTE ALTN
ORIG RWY
VIA TO
<COPY ACTIVE
<SEC FPLN
[ [
PERF INIT>
KDEN 452
KAPA PLANT2
ICT DIRECT
-------------------
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
16-46 FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY
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Sby a power-up timer. During this time the
CDU will monitor its internal temperature.
With extreme unit temperatures of -30C and
colder, this timer can take as much as 10 min-
utes to illuminate the display.
The CDU has the following controls and dis-
plays:
BRIGHT/DIM Button
This button provides secondary control of the
display intensity. The PILOT DISPLAYS rheo-
stat on the overhead panel provides primary
control.
Title Line
This line displays the page title and page num-
ber. The page number is formatted as the cur-
rent page number followed by a slash and the
total number of pages.
Line Select Keys
These keys activate functions displayed on the
CDU adjacent to the line select key. The line
functions depend on which page is displayed.
Label/Data Line Pairs
Two display lines are associated with each line
select key. The top line is normally a label for
the information that is shown on the data line
Displayed on the second (bottom) line.
The data line can display large or small char-
acters. When the system has entered informa-
tion the text will be in a smaller size. When the
operator has entered information the text will
be larger in size.
Scratchpad Line
The scratchpad line displays data entered by
the alphanumeric keys, or data selected for
transfer by a line key. Brackets identify this
line and it is the only place where the operator
can input information from the keypad. Once
input data is displayed on this line it should be
veried before transferring to a selected eld.
Should an entry occur that is not compatible
with the selected item, the scratchpad will mo-
mentarily display a message to indicate details
about the error. This message will time out and
the previously entered information will return,
so that it may be corrected.
Message Line
A single message line is reserved along the
bottom line of every page to annunciate con-
ditions requiring operator attention or simply
to provide information. If more than one mes-
sage is active the message key (MSG) may be
used to display additional messages as dis-
cussed later in this section.
Alphanumeric Keys
These keys enter data in the scratchpad line of
the display. The data entry keys are as follows;
the 0-9 number keys; the A-Z letter keys; the
period key; the +/- (plus/minus) key; the SP
(space) key; the / (slash) key; and the
CLR/DEL (clear/delete) key. The compass
cardinal headings of N, E, S, and W are high-
lighted with a white box to ease entry of items
requiring direction inputs. Care must be exer-
cised not to confuse the letter O with the
number 0 on the keypad.
IDX Key
The IDX (index) key controls display of items
that do not have a dedicated function key. It
also is a central location for setup and cong-
uration pages for FMS and GPS operations.
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-47
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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FPLN Key
The FPLN (ight plan) key controls display of
the active ight plan (Figure 16-85). This page
will give an overview of the entered ight plan,
not each individual waypoint.
Figure 16-85. Active Flight Plan Page
LEGS Key
The LEGS key controls display of the way-
point-to-waypoint detail contained in the ac-
tive ight plan. The display includes the lateral
information from waypoint-to-waypoint and
vertical information when applicable. Page 1
always contains the current FROM waypoint
in cyan at the top and the current TO waypoint
in green (Figure 16-86). Page 1 also contains
the selection of AUTO sequencing or IN-
HIBIT sequencing when the progression of
waypoints is desired (AUTO) or not desired
(INHIBIT).
Figure 16-86. Active Legs Page
DIR Key
The DIR (direct) key controls display of the
active direct-to page. Navigating backward
through these pages will lead to a HISTORY
page of all the previous waypoints in the ight
plan (Figure 16-87).
Figure 16-87. Direct to Pages
EXEC
NEXT PREV
MFD
D A T A
MFD
A D V
CLR
DEL
B R T
DIM
DEP
ARR
PERF LEGS FPLN DIR
MSG
TUN
IDX
MFD
MENU
A B C D F G
H I J K L M
O P Q R T U
V X Y Z
SP
/
E
N
S
W
1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
+ - / 0 /
ACT FPLN
KICT
ORIGIN
1/4
DIST DEST
ROUTE ALTN
ORIG RWY
VIA TO
<COPY ACTIVE
<SEC FPLN
[ [
PERF INIT>
KDEN 452
KAPA PLANT2
ICT DIRECT
-------------------
EXEC
NEXT PREV
MFD
DATA
MFD
ADV
CLR
DEL
BRT
DIM
DEP
ARR
PERF LEGS FPLN DIR
MSG
TUN
IDX
MFD
MENU
A B C D F G
H I J K L M
O P Q R T U
V X Y Z
SP
/
E
N
S
W
1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
+ - / 0 /
ACT LEGS
KICT
1/6
SEQUENCE
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
[ [
LEG WIND>
AUTO/INHIBIT
ICT
WUKOL
MUGER
WUKUS
309
o
12NM
307
o
9.2NM
307
o
3.3NM
307
o
0.5NM / /
/
/
/
---/-----
---/-----
---/-----
---/-----
EXEC
NEXT PREV
MFD
DATA
MFD
ADV
CLR
DEL
BRT
DIM
DEP
ARR
PERF LEGS FPLN DIR
MSG
TUN
IDX
MFD
MENU
A B C D F G
H I J K L M
O P Q R T U
V X Y Z
SP
/
E
N
S
W
1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
+ - / 0 /
ACT DIRECT-TO 1/1
[ [
<SXW152
<(6935)
<KIRLE
250
o

215
o

R322
o

/
------------------------
HISTORY
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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DEP ARR Key
The DEP ARR key controls display of the de-
parture/arrival pages. The selectable proce-
dures are those related to the current active
ight plan ORIGIN and DESTination airports
or the current secondary ight plan ORIGIN
and DESTination airports. If diversion to a dif-
ferent airport is desired, the identier for that
airport must be placed in the DEST slot on the
FPLN page to retrieve departures / arrivals for
that airport.
PERF Key
The PERF key controls display of the per-
formance menu page. These pages contain
manually entered loading data, fuel advisory
pages, and some VNAV advisory pages.
MSG Key
The MSG (message) key controls display of
the system message page. This is necessary
when more than one message is active. Should
multiple messages be active pressing the MSG
key will allow additional messages to be
viewed. To return to the last viewed page sim-
ply press the MSG key again.
TUN Key
The TUN (tune) key controls display of the
radio tuning page. These pages are used to
tune the communication, navigation and ATC
transponder equipment in conjunction with
the Radio Tuning Unit (RTU). If two CDUs
are installed, the right CDU will not have this
page active.
PREV Key
The PREV (previous) key is used to display
the previous page when the current CDU
function has more than one page.
NEXT Key
The NEXT key is used to display the next
page when the current CDU function has
more than one page.
EXEC Key
The EXEC (execute) key activates modica-
tions made to the active ight plan. The label
EXEC annunciates on the CDU when the ac-
tive ight plan has been modied and the
changes have not been activated (Figure 16-88).
Pushing the EXEC key activates the modied
ight plan. If this key is not pressed the changes
will not take effect. A CANCEL MOD option
is available when the modication to the ight
plan has not yet been executed. It will erase the
modication and return the FMS to the original
ight plan.
Figure 16-88. Hold FPLN Mode
MFD MENU Key
The MFD MENU key opens the display of the
MFD menu page on the CDU (Figure 16-89).
The MFD menu page displays a menu of the
EXEC
NEXT PREV
MFD
DATA
MFD
ADV
CLR
DEL
BRT
DIM
DEP
ARR
PERF LEGS FPLN DIR
MSG
TUN
IDX
MFD
MENU
A B C D F G
H I J K L M
O P Q R T U
V X Y Z
SP
/
E
N
S
W
1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
+ - / 0 /
MOD FLPN HOLD
WUKOL
FIX
1/1
ENTRY HOLD SPD
/
QUAD/RADIAL MAX KIAS
FIX ETA
LEG TIME EFC TIME
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

[ [
<CANCEL MOD
NEW HOLD>
INBD CRS/DIR
LEG DIST
FAA/ICAO
307
o
/R TURN
/
/
DIRECT
1.0 MIN /
3.0 NM /
14:16
EXEC
--/---
o
02:00 / //
200
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-49
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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possible MFD display options, or available text
pages for display on the MFD when the MFD
Data Key has been pressed. A L/R is dis-
played on the lower right corner of this page.
The left (L) selection will be all the options for
the left PFD and the MFD; the right (R) se-
lection will be all the options for the right PFD
only. For each menu the items in green are se-
lected and the items in white are not selected.
MFD ADV Key
The MFD ADV key controls display of the
MFD Advance page on the CDU (Figure 16-
90). The MFD advance page displays a menu
enabling a move to the next or previous way-
point on the FMS plan map display on the
MFD. It will also control advancing through
the pages within a selected MFD DATA text
page.
MFD DATA Key
The MFD DATA key controls the display of
text data pages on the MFD (Figure 16-91).
The text data page displayed is the last one se-
lected from the MFD menu page. Other pages
can be accessed through the MFD MENU
Key.
Figure 16-89. MFD Menu Key (CDU)
EXEC
NEXT PREV
MFD
DATA
MFD
ADV
CLR
DEL
BRT
DIM
DEP
ARR
PERF LEGS FPLN DIR
MSG
TUN
IDX
MFD
MENU
A B C D F G
H I J K L M
O P Q R T U
V X Y Z
SP /
E
N
S
W
1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
+ - / 0 /
LEFT DISPLAY MENU
NEAREST APTS

[ [
SPEED
ETA
HI NAVAIDS
LO NAVAIDS
INTERS
ALTITUDE
APTS
TERM WPTS MISS APPR
L/R>
1/2
MAP DISPLAY
OFF/ON/VNAV
WINDOW SIDE
EXEC
NEXT PREV
MFD
DATA
MFD
ADV
CLR
DEL
BRT
DIM
DEP
ARR
PERF LEGS FPLN DIR
MSG
TUN
IDX
MFD
MENU
A B C D F G
H I J K L M
O P Q R T U
V X Y Z
SP /
E
N
S
W
1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
+ - / 0 /
LEFT DISPLAY MENU
NDBS
[ [
RNG: ALT SEL
LRN POS
ALTN FPLN
L/R>
2/2
MAP DISPLAY
SIDE
EXEC
NEXT PREV
MFD
DATA
MFD
ADV
CLR
DEL
BRT
DIM
DEP
ARR
PERF LEGS FPLN DIR
MSG
TUN
IDX
MFD
MENU
A B C D F G
H I J K L M
O P Q R T U
V X Y Z
SP /
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1 2 3
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+ - / 0 /
LEFT DISPLAY MENU
FPLN PROG
[ [
NAV STATUS
POS SUMMARY
POS REPORT
VOR STATUS
L/R>
TEXT DISPLAY
LRN STATUS
SIDE
Page with Text on MFD Pages with Map on MFD
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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Figure 16-91. MFD Text Page
FLIGHT MANAGEMENT
SYSTEM (FMS)
The FMS provides multiple ight management
functions. These functions include lateral nav-
igation, (LNAV) using multiple navigation re-
ceivers, and vertical navigation (VNAV).
Navigation input includes GPS, DME and
VOR receivers. Vertical navigation (VNAV) is
provided by a computed vertical output from
the FMS using these receivers. The system also
provides course-tracking signals to the ight
guidance system. The Flight Management
Computers (FMCs) are housed in the IAPS
unit located in the nose avionics bay.
The FMS uses a blended combination of GPS
and VOR/DME data to construct a three di-
mensional position of the aircraft in space. To
achieve this blend, the NAV1 radio and NAV2
radio must be receiving a valid signal. This can
be accomplished by manually tuning the re-
ceiver or setting a feature called auto-tuning
which will be discussed later.
Collins
BRT
DIM
FORMAT
TAS SAT GS ISA 0 0 +13
o
C 15
o
C
< <
0
0.0
ITT
26
TORQ
0
FF
PRESS
OIL
TEMP
o
C
0
0
46
430
120
73
NI
98.5
PROP 1980
TORQ
2000
ITT
734
WPT DIST ETA FUEL (LB)
KICT 3.6NM 20:07 0

ICT 7.4NM 20:11 2450

MUGER 16.6NM 20:15 2390

WUKOL 19.8NM 20:16 2370

WUKUS 20.4NM 20:16 2370

HUT 29.8NM 20:20 2310

OATHE 218NM 21:32 1170

SELLS 283NM 21:56 760
TFC <
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
FMS ACT PROGRESS 1/3
DEST
KDEN 415NM 22:47 0
ALTN
KAPA 435NM 22:54 0
RESERVE 0
EXTRA 0
FF 130 750
PRESS
TORQ FIRE
ITT PROP
OIL
122 80
TEMPC 49
110.0
830
112
TORQ
ITT
3.4
516
N1 106.0
1050
62.2
1740
Figure 16-90. MFD Advance Key (CDU)
EXEC
NEXT PREV
MFD
DATA
MFD
ADV
CLR
DEL
BRT
DIM
DEP
ARR
PERF LEGS FPLN DIR
MSG
TUN
IDX
MFD
MENU
A B C D F G
H I J K L M
O P Q R T U
V X Y Z
SP
/
E
N
S
W
1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
+ -
/ 0 /
LEFT DISPLAY ADVANCE
<PREV WPT

[ [
<NEXT WPT
<TO WPT
ACT PLAN MAP CENTER
CTR WPT
<-----
SIDE
L/R>
EXEC
NEXT PREV
MFD
DATA
MFD
ADV
CLR
DEL
BRT
DIM
DEP
ARR
PERF LEGS FPLN DIR
MSG
TUN
IDX
MFD
MENU
A B C D F G
H I J K L M
O P Q R T U
V X Y Z
SP
/
E
N
S
W
1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
+ -
/ 0 /
LEFT DISPLAY ADVANCE
<PREV PAGE
[ [
<NEXT PAGE
L/R>
TEXT DISPLAY
SIDE
With Map Displayed on MFD With Text Displayed on MFD
FOR TRAINING PURPOSES ONLY 16-51
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The CDU is the primary interface with the
FMS. Each CDU will communicate with the
on-side FMS (e.g., Left CDU for No.1 FMS,
Right CDU for No.2 FMS). The FMSs can be
synchronized so that selected operations on
one CDU (and its related FMS) will automat-
ically be transferred to the cross-side CDU
(and its related FMS). (See FMS quick refer-
ence guides and other handouts for informa-
tion on how to synchronize the units).
The FMS database is updated using the Data-
base Unit (DBU). This system can consist of a
3.5-inch high-density oppy disk drive (DBU-
4100) located on the center pedestal and ei-
ther an additional computer port located on
the lower right sidewall of the center pedestal
or an Ethernet port on top of the pedestal on
IFIS equipped aircraft. Optionally, a unit
called the DBU-5000, which consists solely of
two USB ports on top of the pedestal may be
installed. The installed system is used to up-
load data to the aircraft or download data
from the aircraft. This can include avionics
malfunction reports (Figure 16-92).
All update methods require the aircraft bat-
tery and avionics to be ON. It is strongly rec-
ommended that a ground power unit be
applied to the aircraft for this operation. If a
laptop is required during the update, make
sure the battery has sufcient power to last the
whole process or have it connected to an ex-
ternal power supply.
To use the oppy disk drive, the FMS database
must rst be loaded onto a computer and then
written onto the disks. These disks are then in-
serted into the disk drive and prompts and the
CDU will provide the necessary prompts for
the update.
To use the computer port (PCD-3000) located
on the sidewall of the pedestal, the FMS data-
base must rst be loaded onto a laptop com-
puter. The laptop computer and a special cable
are then connected through this port to either
upload or download information. The use of
Rockwell Collins software titled PCD Soft-
ware is required for this operation.
Figure 16-92. Database Units
To use the Ethernet port located on top of the
pedestal, the FMS database must rst be
loaded onto a laptop computer. This port will
also accept IFIS information such as Jeppesen
charts, airways, airspace, etc. This information
must be on the laptop computer or in the lap-
top CD-ROM drive. The laptop computer and
standard Ethernet cable are then connected
through this port to either upload or download
information. The use of Rockwell Collins soft-
ware is required for this operation (CPAS-
3000).
To use the USB port (DBU-5000), the FMS
data and IFIS data must rst be loaded onto a
computer and then moved to a USB drive. The
USB device must not have preinstalled soft-
ware which manages passwords or security, as
this can interfere with the proper loading of
KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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Sthe database. If Jeppesen charts are involved,
it is recommended to have a device at least
1GB in size. This drive is then plugged into the
USB port in the aircraft. The generated
prompts are displayed on the CDU. In this
case the laptop does not need to be connected
to the aircraft.
FMS INITIALIZATION
The FMS must be initialized prior to each
ight. The initialization may be accomplished
using the following acronym:
V Verify FMS database coverage and
effective dates
I Initialize FMS position
P Plan the ight (build the ight plan)
P Performance initialization
For further explanation of these steps, refer to
the FMS quick reference guides and FMS
manuals.
VERIFY
Verify the coverage of the database and verify
the currency of the database. Flight with an
out of date database is allowed, but the use of
FMS / GPS dependent procedures are not au-
thorized.
INITIALIZE
Initialize the FMS position, or verify that the
current position is correct. This position needs
to be in a latitude / longitude format and can
be retrieved / veried using airport reference
point (ARP), a pilot dened point or the
GPS.The GPS should be able to update the
system quickly unless the aircraft was moved a
signicant distance (>40nm) with the FMS in-
operative or the FMS was removed and re-
placed. This step will consist primarily of
verifying the known position as opposed to ac-
tively entering the position.
PLAN
The ight plan will be loaded on the FPLN
page. ORIGIN, DESTination, and xes along
the route of ight may be entered. Instrument
Departures or Arrivals may be loaded as nec-
essary.
PERFORMANCE INITIALIZATION
Performance is initialized by entering the de-
sired weights for passengers, cargo, fuel, etc.
The CRZ ALT is an optional entry and helps
the unit forecast a descent point later in the
ight. CRZ ALT does not change any fuel cal-
culations when changed or updated.
VERTICAL NAVIGATION
The FMS-3000 is capable of creating and dis-
playing a descent prole or a glidepath to com-
ply with crossing altitude restrictions issued by
ATC, or an associated instrument procedure.
The Flight Guidance System is able to use this
information to capture and track the com-
puted glidepath.
VNAV altitude restrictions are displayed in
magenta along the right side of the LEGS
page (Figure 16-93). A VNAV altitude will be
automatically entered if it is part of a database
derived procedure. The pilot can manually in-
sert an altitude associated with any waypoint.
Once an altitude restriction is inserted either
automatically or manually, the FMS will gen-
erate the associated glidepath. The glidepath
will be displayed at the appropriate point. As
long as the proper conditions are met, the FGS
will capture and track the vertical glidepath.
The conditions are as follows:
The altitude must be entered into the
LEGS page
The VNAV mode of the FGS must be
selected (indicated by a V prior to the
active vertical mode)
The Preselected Altitude must be set at,
or beyond, the VNAV altitude
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Figure 16-93. Active Legs Page with
VNAV Altitudes
The default VNAV glidepath is a 3.0 descent
angle unless otherwise published in an instru-
ment procedure. The pilot has the ability to
modify this angle on every leg except for the
nal approach segment between the Final Ap-
proach Fix (FAF) and the Missed Approach
Point (MAP). The FMS may create an angle
other than 3.0, if required. The glidepath is
based on aircraft position relative to the asso-
ciated waypoint, a commanded vertical direct-
to, or the associated waypoints position relative
to a prior waypoint with an altitude restriction.
When two or more waypoints in a ight plan
have altitude restrictions, and they are suf-
ciently close in proximity to each other the
FMS will compute the best glidepath to meet
the requirements of all altitude restrictions. In-
stead of ying a 3.0 path to a waypoint, level-
ing off, and then ying another 3.0 path to the
next waypoint, the FMS will adjust the paths
to varying angles resulting in a continuous de-
scent. This is sometimes called smoothing
the descent.
A magenta Top Of Descent (TOD) circle will
appear on the display maps to indicate the
projected point where this descent will occur.
The TOD point will indicate when the vertical
deviation indicator nears the center position
on the vertical deviation scale (Figure 16-94).
This indicator is sometimes called the
snowake or star. As with Glideslope op-
erations, these GPS Glidepath operations will
only capture VNAV when initially below the
projected angle. If the aircraft is already
passed the descent point, manual intervention
is required to place the aircraft in a position
where the FGS can capture the glidepath.
When the FGS captures a glidepath, the verti-
cal mode will be annunciated as VPATH when
NAV is selected or VGP when APPR is se-
lected (Figure 16-95).
VPATH will allow the FGS to level at either
the preselected altitude or VNAV altitude,
whichever it encounters rst. It is necessary to
be aware of the armed altitude mode when ac-
complishing this maneuver. ALTS indicates
that VNAV will reach and level off at the pre-
selected altitude even though there may be
multiple step downs in between. This indicates
that smoothing the descent is possible and an
intermediate level off is not required. ALTV
indicates that VNAV will reach and level off
at the next VNAV altitude posted in magenta
above the VSI. This indicates that smoothing
the descent is not possible and the aircraft
must accomplish an intermediate level off. An-
other TOD will appear indicating where the
descent will begin if there is another altitude in
the FMS. The use of NAV and VNAV should
be used when ying enroute VNAV and when
ying an approach to MDA This selection
does not include localizer based procedures
which are own with a NAV-to-NAV capture
function of the FMS. These approaches re-
quire the APPR mode for the NAV-to-NAV
function to operate correctly.
EXEC
NEXT PREV
MFD
DATA
MFD
ADV
CLR
DEL
BRT
DIM
DEP
ARR
PERF LEGS FPLN DIR
MSG
TUN
IDX
MFD
MENU
A B C D F G
H I J K L M
O P Q R T U
V X Y Z
SP
/
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ACT LEGS
HUT
2/6
[ [
LEG WIND>
---/ 3100A
---/ 3600A CEPGA
FEBIT
FAXIM
THEN
054
o
6.0NM
144
o
6.0NM /
/ /
- DISCONTINUITY -
---/ 3600A
3.0
o

0.0
o

3.0
o

//
//
//
/
/ /
/
307
o
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---/-----
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KING AIR 350/350C PRO LINE 21 PILOT TRAINING MANUAL
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Figure 16-94. VNAV Top of Descent
Additionally, VNAV can be used during an al-
titude restricted climb. The FGS will be in
NAV and VNAV modes and never in APPR
mode. The same three conditions mentioned
for a VNAV descent apply here too. The initial
climb from the airport will be accomplished by
any manually chosen vertical mode (VS or
FLC). When VNAV is selected, the altitude
preselector is then placed at the highest au-
thorized altitude and the FGS will level off at
each intermediate VNAV altitude. Once lev-
eled off at the intermediate altitude, FLC will
arm indicating there is another climb. Passing
the altitude restricted x, FLC will become the
active vertical mode at the aircrafts current in-
dicated speed. The pilot must now change the
FLC speed and aircraft power for the climb.
The aircraft will level off at the next altitude
restricted x and FLC will arm again. This
process will be repeated until the aircraft lev-
els at the altitude shown on thepreselector.
The aircraft is not allowed to go beyond the
preselector setting.
NAV +VNAV
APPR + VNAV
Figure 16-95. VNAV Modes
GLOBAL POSITIONING
SYSTEM (GPS)
The global positioning system (GPS) provides
worldwide navigation via signals received
from orbiting satellites. The GPS receiver is lo-
cated in the nose avionics bay and is labeled
GPS-4000( ) (The parentheses will contain ei-
ther an A for standard GPS or an S for
WAAS GPS). Using an antenna mounted on
the top of the fuselage, it will track and moni-
tor up to 12 satellites to provide a three di-
mensional position for the FMS and the
Terrain Awareness and Warning System
(TAWS). The GPS 1 and optional GPS 2 sys-
tems are controlled by the CDU(s).
Collins
BRT
DIM
ALTS
10
10
20
FMS VPATH
3000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N
< PRESET
VOR1
FORMAT >
FMS1
DTK 251
RALPE
5.2NM
5
251
W

3
0

24
2
1

ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
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<
4000
RDR
TERR
< ET 01:42
10
TFC >
>
RALPE
JABAN
TOD
TOD
185
180
160
120
DN
100
14
1
0
Collins
BRT
DIM
10
10
20
FMS VPATH
3000
6
60
540
20
400
600
700
1
2
4
4
2
1
30. 16I N
< PRESET
VOR1
FORMAT >
FMS1
DTK 251
RALPE
2.5NM
5
251
W

3
0

24
2
1

ATC1 UTC RAT COM1 COM2 121.800 4336 125.250 14:41 15
o
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<
4000
RDR
TERR
< ET 01:42
10
TFC >
>
RALPE
JABAN
TOD
TOD
185
180
160
120
DN
100
14
1
0
1000
ALTS
Collins


ALTS



FMS VPATH
3000




4




4


















<
4000
R








185








Collins





APPR FMS VGP
3000




4