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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 • Vol XIII, Edition 276
OAKLAND
WINS IN 12
SPORTS PAGE 11
EBERT DOC GETS
TWO THUMBS UP
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 17
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Ira Ruskin, the former longtime Redwood
City councilman whose election race for
state Assembly was the most expensive in
state history at the time, died Thursday
night from complications of a brain tumor.
Ruskin, 70, was at home under hospice
care when he passed away around 8:30 p.m.
July 3, 2014, said former
council colleague and
friend Jim Hartnett.
Ruskin is survived by
his wife, Cheryl.
Ruskin underwent
emergency surgery in
May 2011 about two
weeks after first being
diagnosed with an incur-
able tumor. Surgeons were able to remove
about 95 percent of the malignant tumor
above his right ear and he battled the
remainder with medical interventions.
“He knew he was terminal. It was just a
matter of time,” Hartnett said.
But Hartnett preferred to focus not on how
Ruskin passed but how he lived and con-
tributed to Redwood City.
“He was the ultimate community servant.
I think that is how I would encapsulate his
life. He was devoted to the community. He
really cared and wanted to do the right
thing,” said Hartnett who served with
Ruskin the entirety of his 10-year council
service which included time as mayor.
State Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, also
recalled his friend as “a compassionate and
Ira Ruskin dead at 70
Former Redwood City mayor and assemblyman suffers complications with brain tumor
Ira Ruskin
Caviar employees Krysta and Hyuma show off one of their
startup’s delivery cars.
Food delivery
service kicks
off in Bay Area
Caviar aims to bring customers
the highest quality local foods
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Another food delivery option has hit the Peninsula and
this time it’s of the classy variety.
Caviar, despite the name that which may lead one to
believe it just brings customers the salt-cured fish-egg deli-
cacy, delivers from restaurants that have four or more stars
on the review site Yelp. The delivery service, which formal-
ly launched in Chicago, announced July 2 that it would be
delivering from Peninsula restaurants such as The Plant Cafe
Burlingame and Curry Up Now in San Mateo.
“Before covering the South Bay, we knew we needed to
cover Palo Alto,” said co-founder and CEO Jason Wang.
“There’s already demand in the area and we decided to open
By Andrew Dalton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — A California
chicken producer has issued its first
recall since being linked to an out-
break of an antibiotic-resistant strain
of salmonella that has been making
people sick for more than a year, com-
pany and federal food officials said
Thursday night.
The U.S. Department of Food and
Agriculture said it has found evidence
directly linking Foster Farms bone-
less-skinless chicken breast to a case
of Salmonella Heidelberg, an antibiot-
ic-resistant strain of the disease that
has sickened more than 500 people in
the past 16 months and led to pressure
from food safety advocates for federal
action against the company.
As a result, Foster Farms issued a
recall for 170 different chicken prod-
ucts that came from its Fresno facili-
ties in March.
The USDAsaid its investigators first
learned of the salmonella case on June
23, and the recall was issued as soon as
the direct link was confirmed. The
location of the case and identity of the
person were not released.
Foster Farms says the products have
“use or freeze by” dates from March 21
to March 29 and have been distributed
to California, Hawaii, Washington,
Arizona, Nevada, Idaho, Utah, Oregon
Foster Farms chicken recalled
California producer linked to outbreak strain of salmonella
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Girls shared their dreams on poster boards while participating in the Fourth of July parade in the San Mateo’s Highlands
neighborhood on Friday.
FUN ON THE FOURTH
See RUSKIN, Page 8
See CAVIAR, Page 20
See RECALL, Page 20
ROCKED BY VIOLENCE
WORLD PAGE 7
CLASHES BREAK OUT DURING PALESTINIAN FUNERAL
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Rapper Bizarre is
38.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1954
Elvis Presley’s first commercial
recording session took place at Sun
Records in Memphis, Tennessee; the
song he recorded was “That’s All
Right.”
“Without promotion
something terrible happens: Nothing!”
— P.T. Barnum, American showman
Rapper RZA is 45. Rapper Royce da
5’9”is 37.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Straws Milan of Cochrane, Alberta jumps off his horse to wrestle a steer in a steer wrestling event during day one of the
rodeo at the 102nd Calgary Stampede in Calgary, Alberta,Canada.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog in
the morning. Highs in the lower to mid
60s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly cloudy.
Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the
lower 50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in
the mid 60s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Sunday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becom-
ing mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the
lower 50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Monda: Cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny.
Patchy fog. Highs in the mid to upper 60s.
Monday night through Thursday: Partly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1687, Isaac Newton first published his Principia
Mathematica, a three-volume work setting out his mathe-
matical principles of natural philosophy.
In 1811 , Venezuela became the first South American coun-
try to declare independence from Spain.
I n 1865, William Booth founded the Salvation Army in
London.
I n 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the
National Labor Relations Act.
I n 1943, the Battle of Kursk began during World War II; in
the weeks that followed, the Soviets were able to repeatedly
repel the Germans, who eventually withdrew in defeat.
I n 1946, the bikini, created by Louis Reard, was modeled
by Micheline Bernardini during a poolside fashion show in
Paris.
I n 1947, Larry Doby made his debut with the Cleveland
Indians, becoming the first black player in the American
League.
I n 1962, independence took effect in Algeria; the same
day, civilians of European descent, mostly French, came
under attack by extremists in the port city of Oran.
I n 1975, Arthur Ashe became the first black man to win a
Wimbledon singles title as he defeated Jimmy Connors.
I n 1984, the Supreme Court weakened the 70-year-old
“exclusionary rule,” deciding that evidence seized in good
faith with defective court warrants could be used against
defendants in criminal trials.
I n 1989, “The Seinfeld Chronicles,” the pilot to the situa-
tion comedy “Seinfeld,” aired on NBC-TV.
I n 1991, a worldwide financial scandal erupted as regulators
in eight countries shut down the Bank of Credit and
Commerce International.
L
ucille Ball (1911-1989) became
a redhead at age 30, 10 years
before she starred in “I Love
Lucy” (1951-1957). She was a natural
brunette.
***
The ashes of Wisconsin born artist
Georgia O’Keeffe (1887-1986) are
scattered at Ghost Ranch, a retreat in
New Mexico where O’Keeffe had a
summer home. Some of her most
famous landscape paintings were
painted at the ranch.
***
Tiny Tim, born Herbert Khaury (1932-
1996), became famous when he
appeared on “Rowan and Martin’s
Laugh-In” (1968-1973) and sang “Tip-
Toe Through the Tulips” in a falsetto
voice while playing the ukulele. The
song became a hit single.
***
Sideburns are named after General
Ambrose Burnside (1824-1881), a
politician in Rhode Island and a Civil
War general who made the facial hair
style popular.
***
In a bout of Sumo wrestling, the first
wrestler to touch the ground with any
part of his body other than his feet
loses the bout. Or, the first wrestler to
touch the ground outside the circle
loses.
***
Do you know where a pistil, stamen
and receptacles can be found? See
answer at end.
***
Author Margaret Mitchell (1900-
1949) wrote the majority of her novel
“Gone With the Wind” (1936) while
living in apartment number 1 at 990
Peachtree St., Atlanta, Georgia. The
building is now a historic city land-
mark that pays homage to Mitchell.
***
When young Billy Batson shouts
“Shazam!” he gets struck by a magic
lightning bolt and becomes Captain
Marvel, an adult super hero.
***
The word platypus means “flat-footed”
in Greek.
***
Flourish and Blotts Bookstore, the
Leaky Cauldron and Quality Quidditch
Supplies are shops in Diagon Alley, a
shopping area for witches and wizards
in the Harry Potter series of books.
***
Ginsu knives were one of the first
products to be sold on infomercials.
The knives were demonstrated as a
kitchen cutting tool that could cut
through a nail, a tin can and a radiator
hose, yet still slice a tomato paper
thin!
***
American labor leader Jimmy Hoffa
(1913-1975?) was last seen at a restau-
rant in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan,
July 30, 1975. He was never found. It
was assumed that he was killed by the
Mafia. Hoffa was legally declared dead
in 1982.
***
The world’s largest single-pane win-
dow is at the Monterey Bay Aquarium.
The 13-inch thick acrylic window is
17 feet high and 56 feet long. It is the
window to the Outer Bay aquarium
exhibit, which holds 1.2 million gal-
lons of seawater.
***
Kathryn Beaumont (born 1938) was
the voice of Alice in Disney’s “Alice
in Wonderland” (1951) and the voice
of Wendy in “Peter Pan” (1953).
Kathryn had her schooling at the
Disney Studio lots so she could be on
call during production of the movies.
***
Marty McFly in “Back to the Future”
(1985) was originally played by Eric
Stoltz (born 1961). One-third of the
movie was filmed with Stoltz as the
lead role, however, the producers felt
he wasn’t right for the part and hired
Michael J. Fox (born 1961) instead.
***
Answer: They are all parts of a flower.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of
the Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
(Answers Monday)
APRON BRAVO LOCALE GLITZY
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When King George read the Declaration of Inde-
pendence, he found it to be — REVOLTING
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
HAALP
FNORT
RIVDET
DUNSED
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
C
h
e
c
k

o
u
t

t
h
e

n
e
w
,

f
r
e
e

J
U
S
T
J
U
M
B
L
E

a
p
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-
Ans.
here:
Actress Katherine Helmond is 85. Actress Shirley Knight is
78. Singer-musician Robbie Robertson is 71. Julie Nixon
Eisenhower is 66. Rock star Huey Lewis is 64. Baseball Hall-
of-Fame pitcher Rich “Goose” Gossage is 63. Country musi-
cian Charles Ventre is 62. Singer-songwriter Marc Cohn is 55.
Actor Dorien Wilson is 52. Actress Edie Falco is 51. Actress
Jillian Armenante is 50. Actress Kathryn Erbe is 49. Actor
Michael Stuhlbarg is 46. Country musician Brent Flynn
(Flynnville Train) is 45. Rhythm-and-blues singer Joe is 41.
Rock musician Bengt Lagerberg (The Cardigans) is 41. Actor
Dale Godboldo is 39.
Lotto
The July 3 Daily Derby race winners are Lucky
Charms, No. 12, in first place; Eureka, No. 7, in
second place; and Gorgeous George, No. 8, in
third place.The race time was clocked at 1:46.71.
3 3 3
9 22 38 47 49 15
Mega number
July 1 Mega Millions
8 18 45 53 58 35
Powerball
July 2 Powerball
4 13 25 30 35
Fantasy Five July 3
Daily 3 midday July 4
9 2 5 5
Daily Four July 3
2 9 6
Daily 3 evening July 3
16 34 42 44 46 9
Mega number
July 2 Super Lotto Plus
3
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
DUI arrests down
during holiday campaign
Arrests of drivers driving while intoxi-
cated are down so far this holiday weekend
compared to the same time last year,
according to local law enforcement.
From 12:01 a.m. through midnight
Thursday, July 3, officers in the Avoid the
23 San Mateo County DUI campaign
arrested only one individual for allegedly
driving while under the influence of drugs
or alcohol.
Last year, five people were arrested dur-
ing the same 24-hour stretch.
The California Highway Patrol and offi-
cers representing all county law enforce-
ment agencies will continue its increased
patrols of freeways and county roads
through Sunday, July 6. The CHP also
encourages all motorists to report drunk
drivers to 911 .
Brisbane bar’s liquor license
suspended for illegal gambling
ABrisbane bar had its liquor license sus-
pended Thursday after illegal gambling was
discovered on the premises during an inves-
tigation, according to the California
Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control.
ABC agents and local law enforcement
visiting the Historic 23 Club at 23
Visitacion Avenue saw customers gambling
online using computers owned by the bar,
according to ABC officials.
Customers bought Internet time from the
“Internet café” on site and then played gam-
bling-themed games and placed bets using
credits based on the amount they spent.
The computers qualify as illegal “slot
machines or devices,” ABC officials said.
The bar’s license has been suspended for
30 days.
SAN MATEO
Burglary. Acar window was smashed at the
Hillsdale Shopping Center before 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, July 1.
Fraud. Aman was reported for using some-
one else’s ID to cash a check on the 2900
block of South El Camino Real before 2:45
p.m. Thursday, June 26.
Found propert y. A baseball bat was
reported found in the garbage on the first
block of West Hillsdale Boulevard before
8:40 a.m. Thursday, June 26.
St ol en vehi cl e. Asilver Honda CRV was
reported stolen on the 1700 block of Echo
Avenue before 5:12 a.m. Thursday, June 26.
Burglary. Ablack Honda Pilot had its win-
dow smashed on the 1700 block of Coyote
Point Drive before 7:50 p.m. Tuesday, June
24.
MILLBRAE
Possess cont rol l ed substance. A man
was found to be in possession of a con-
trolled substance before 6:43 p.m. Monday,
June 30.
Burglary. Police responded to a report of
residential burglary on the 1000 block of
Springfield Drive before 10:08 a.m.
Wednesday, June 25.
Petty theft. Aman was cited when found in
possession of stolen items on the 500
block of El Camino Real before 1:20 p.m.
Tuesday, June 24.
Petty theft. ADaly City woman was found
in possession of stolen items at the 500
block of El Camino Real before 5:09 p.m.
Saturday, June 21.
Arre s t. APittsburg man was arrested for an
outstanding warrant at the 200 block of
Rollins Road before 2:14 a.m. Friday, June
20.
Arre s t. Atransient man with two outstand-
ing warrants out of San Mateo and Redwood
City was arrested on California Drive before
4:47 a.m. Friday, June 20.
BURLINGAME
Suspi ci ous person. Aman wearing a gray
top and black pants was reported for taking
pictures of shrubbery by the train tracks on
the 1000 block of Carolan Avenue before
4: 11 p.m. July 1.
Grand theft. Someone stole the motor to a
lift off of a truck on the 1500 block of
Rollins Road before 3:59 p.m. Tuesday,
July 1.
Animal probl em. Police responded to a
report of a cat stuck in a tree on Paloma
Avenue before 2:09 p.m. Friday, June 27.
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstances. A woman
reported a red laser being pointed in her win-
dow on the 700 block of El Camino Real
before 12:03 a.m. Friday, June 27.
BELMONT
Ci t i zen assi st. An man reported his sister
for calling him names on Carlmont Drive
before 7:33 p.m. Wednesday, June 2.
Suspi ci ous person. Aman with no teeth
was reported for being in someone’s back-
yard without permission on Sixth Avenue
before 2:14 p.m. Wednesday, July 2.
Burglary. An old computer and a VCR were
stolen from a home on Academy Avenue
before 8:40 p.m. Tuesday, July 1.
Police reports
It was all in fun
Police responded to a report of a mother
and her children playing too loudly on
Rollins Road in Burlingame before
1:22 a.m. Tuesday, July 1.
Local briefs
By Gillian Flaccus
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTAANA — Gov. Jerry Brown based his
recent overhaul of the state corrections sys-
tem in part on the idea that having those con-
victed of lower-level crimes supervised by
county probation officers instead of state
parole agents when they are released would
help them stay clean, find jobs and avoid
committing new crimes.
Acornerstone of the law’s success is hous-
ing, yet county probation officers through-
out the state say homelessness continues to
undermine their ability to help ex-cons reha-
bilitate, get drug treatment and find jobs.
Some California counties report that up to
one in five of the parolees they supervise
under the governor’s realignment law is
homeless.
“You’ve got somebody and ... they’re
gang-involved, you want to get them in
classes, but they live under a bridge,” said
Andrew Davis, an analyst with the Santa Cruz
County Probation Department. “They’re not
going to show up; they don’t know what day
of the week it is.”
Counties across the state are dealing with
the problem in different ways. Many are try-
ing a patchwork of solutions as they adapt.
In Marin County, probation officers some-
times pick homeless parolees up at the
prison gates and pay for motel rooms until
they can find a bed. Santa Cruz County has
contracted with local homeless shelters, a
move that stirred controversy last year.
Homeless parolees in Riverside County are
required to check in at an electronic kiosk and
have their photo taken daily. In San Diego
County, where nearly 400 former prison
inmates are reporting as homeless, there’s a
plan to spend $3 million to add 150 shelter
beds. Parolees who say they are homeless
must check in weekly with probation.
In Los Angeles County, where 758 con-
victs released under realignment say they
have no permanent address, county attorneys
are considering whether being homeless
could be classified as an automatic violation
of a parolee’s terms of release. That’s in part
because many counties are finding that for-
mer inmates will claim homelessness to
avoid close supervision.
Los Angeles has spent more than $6.5 mil-
lion on housing for convicts who would have
previously been the responsibility of state
parole.
Counties say the number of lower-level
offenders — defined as those who have com-
mitted crimes that are non-serious, non-sexu-
al and non-violent — who are homeless upon
their release has not necessarily changed
since the realignment law took effect in
2011. State officials are still tallying the
number.
The difference is that previously, these
felons were the state’s responsibility.
Counties are not strangers to dealing with
homeless probationers, but now the numbers
have increased.
Homeless parolees weigh
on many California counties
4
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Obama on Fourth:
Rights, equality fuel U.S. success
WASHINGTON — President Barack
Obama says the U.S. has only succeeded
because generations of
Americans have fought
to expand rights and
opportunity to more
people.
Obama is reflecting on
the meaning of the
Fourth of July in his
weekly radio and
Internet address. He says
there’s no nation on
earth that wouldn’t trade places with the
United States.
Obama says the Founding Fathers were
united by a belief that all are created equal
and have the right to life, liberty and the
pursuit of happiness. He says America’s
success has been made possible because
Americans never took those truths for
granted.
In the Republican address, Arkansas Rep.
Steve Womack says Washington has been
denying Americans the chance to seize
their economic destiny. He says
Republicans are working to restore oppor-
tunity.
Stockton man hailed
as hero for fire rescue
STOCKTON — AStockton man is being
hailed as a hero after he went into a smoke-
filled house and rescued a 14-year-old girl.
Fifty-eight-year-old Gordon Rupp tells
The Record of Stockton he was at home on
Thursday afternoon when he heard glass
breaking and saw smoke rising from the
garage of a neighboring home. He rushed
over, alerted the woman inside and took her
and a 3-year-old out.
Afew minutes later, he learned someone
else was inside — a girl who was in the
shower and didn’t know the house was on
fire. Rupp, a former assistant fire chief,
said he went back in, grabbed the girl as
she came out wrapped in a towel and ran
out.
Fire officials say the girl could have died.
The home was completely destroyed. The
cause of the fire is under investigation.
Around the nation
By Matt Hamilton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MURRIETA— Rumors had swirled among
anti-immigration activists near a U.S.
Border Patrol station in Southern California
that the agency would try again to bus in
some of the immigrants who have flooded
across the U.S.-Mexico border.
Instead, by late Friday afternoon, they got
dueling anti- and pro-immigration rallies.
The crowd of 200 outside the station in
Murrieta waved signs and sometimes shouted
at each other. One banner read: “Proud
LEGAL American. It doesn’t work any other
way.” Another countered: “Against illegal
immigration? Great! Go back to Europe!”
Law enforcement officers separated the two
sides, leaving enough space for a bus to
drive into the station.
It was not certain, however, that any buses
would arrive on Friday. Because of security
concerns, federal authorities have said, they
will not publicize immigrant transfers
among border patrol facilities.
Earlier this week, the city became the lat-
est flashpoint in the intensifying immigra-
tion debate when a crowd of protesters wav-
ing American flags blocked buses carrying
women and children who were flown from
overwhelmed Texas facilities.
Federal authorities had hoped to process
them at the station in Murrieta, about 55
miles north of downtown San Diego.
“This is a way of making our voices
heard,” said Steve Prime, a resident of near-
by Lake Elsinore. “The government’s main
job is to secure our borders and protect us —
and they’re doing neither. ”
Immigration supporters said the immi-
grants need to be treated as humans and that
migrating to survive is not a crime.
“We’re celebrating the Fourth of July
and what a melting pot America is,” said
Raquel Alvarado, a high school history
teacher and Murrieta resident who chalked
up the fear of migrants in the city of
roughly 106,000 to discrimination.
“They don’t want to have their kids share
the same classroom,” she said.
The city’s mayor, Alan Long, became a
hero to those seeking stronger immigration
policies with his criticism of the federal
government’s efforts to handle the influx of
thousands of immigrants, many of them
mothers and children.
Immigration fight continues
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — California regulators
have expanded water reporting requirements
for logging companies in response to the
state’s ongoing drought, a newspaper
reported.
The California Board of Forestry now
requires the companies to disclose how much
water they extract from any stream in the
state for dust control. The requirement previ-
ously applied only to streams where salmon
or steelhead fish were present, The
Sacramento Bee reported on Thursday.
The new, extended requirement took effect
on June 19.
The practice of spraying water for dust
control is known as water drafting. It is
intended to protect plants, animals and peo-
ple from dust generated by logging trucks.
Tanker trucks are filled with water from
streams that is then sprayed on dirt roads,
according to the Bee.
The forestry board’s executive director,
George Gentry, said officials don’t want to
see already low streams depleted further,
which could have a serious impact on fish
and users downstream.
“We have to be very cautious about how
much water we pull out right now,” Gentry
said.
The new requirement applies only to new
logging plans, Gentry said.
Water reporting requirements expanded for loggers
Barack Obama
REUTERS
Demonstrators picket before the possible arrival of undocumented migrants who may be
processed at the Murrieta Border Patrol Station in Murrieta.
6
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION
By Matthew Perrone
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The nation’s largest
pharmacy benefit manager, Express Scripts,
is dramatically scaling back its coverage of
compounded medications, saying most of
the custom-mixed medicines are ineffective
or overpriced.
The company, which manages prescrip-
tions for 90 million Americans, plans to
drop coverage for 1,000 drug ingredients
commonly found in compounded medica-
tions. Express Scripts executives say the
move is a cost-saver for employers that will
reduce their spending on compounded pre-
scriptions by 95 percent.
“What we are eliminating is, pure and
simple, wasteful spending,” said Senior
Vice President Glen Stettin, in an interview
with the Associated Press. “These drugs are
being used when there are other things
available that are already approved by the
FDAand are less expensive.”
But the coverage change has prompted a
swift pushback from compounding phar-
macists, who argue that such cuts deprive
patients of crucial medications that are
not available as manufactured drugs. A
compounding pharmacy industry
spokesman said similar efforts to curb
coverage are in the works from several
insurers and pharmacy benefit providers,
including UnitedHealthcare and some Blue
Cross Blue Shield plans.
“This is the first time we’ve seen a sys-
tematic approach to substantially, effec-
tively cut compounding coverage, which
ultimately is very detrimental to patients,”
said Jay McEniry, executive director of
Patients and Physicians for Rx Access, a
group recently launched by compounding
pharmacies.
The cuts by Express Scripts will take
effect Sept. 15, unless customers specifical-
ly ask to continue paying for the com-
pounded drugs. Companies who want to opt
out of the cuts must notify Express Scripts
by Thursday.
Express Scripts, CVS Caremark and other
pharmacy benefit managers are paid by
employers to manage pharmacy costs. They
do this by negotiating discounts and
rebates from drugmakers and wholesalers,
and by setting up tiered drug lists that steer
patients toward lower-cost drugs, which are
often generics.
In recent years pharmacy benefit compa-
nies have focused their cost-saving efforts
on new specialty drugs like Sovaldi, a hep-
atitis C treatment from Gilead Sciences that
costs about $1,000 per pill. Express
Scripts reported earlier this year that spe-
cialty drugs accounted for more than a quar-
ter of all U.S. drug spending, even though
they total less than 1 percent of prescrip-
tions. Compounded drugs occupy a different
niche in the pharmaceutical landscape.
Express Scripts cuts payments for customized drugs
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — More than half of pri-
vately insured women are getting free birth
control under President Barack Obama’s
health law, a major coverage shift that’s
likely to advance.
This week the Supreme Court allowed
some employers with religious scruples to
opt out, but most companies appear to be
going in the opposite direction.
Recent data from the IMS Institute docu-
ment a sharp change during 2013. The share
of privately insured women who got their
birth control pills without a copayment
jumped to 56 percent, from 14 percent in
2012. The law’s requirement that most
health plans cover birth control as preven-
tion, at no additional cost to women, took
full effect in 2013.
The average annual saving for women was
$269. “It’s a big number,” said institute
director Michael Kleinrock. The institute is
the research arm of IMS Health, a
Connecticut-based technology company
that uses pharmacy records to track pre-
scription drug sales.
The core of Obama’s law — taxpayer-sub-
sidized coverage for the uninsured — bene-
fits a relatively small share of Americans.
But free preventive care — from flu shots to
colonoscopies — is a dividend of sorts for
the majority with employer coverage.
Expanded preventive coverage hasn’t
gotten as much attention as another bonus
for the already insured: the provision that
allows young adults to remain on their par-
ents’ policy until they turn 26. That may
start to change with all the discussion of
birth control.
Business groups and employee benefit s
consultants say they see little chance that
employers will roll back contraceptive cov-
erage as a result of the Supreme Court rul-
ing. The court carved out a space for “close-
ly held” companies whose owners object on
religious grounds. Most companies don’t fit
that niche.
“I don’t think you will see a broad
impact,” said Neil Trautwein, the top
employee benefits expert for the National
Retail Federation. “It’s a commonly offered
benefit for many employers, including
retailers.”
The court decision involved “a very
unique set of facts,” Trautwein added.
“Intense religious beliefs, closely held
companies and the vehement objection to
contraceptive coverage.”
Before the Supreme Court ruling, some
“grandfathered” plans unchanged since the
health care law passed were already exempt
from covering prevention at no cost, but
that number is expected to shrink over time
as employers make coverage changes.
IMS says it is still too early to discern the
health care law’s ultimate impact on birth
control.
At least for now, it doesn’t seem like more
women are going on birth control because
it’s free. The number of prescriptions for
oral contraceptives that were filled grew in
2013, but at about the same rate as in recent
years.
There’s also not much evidence of a shift
to costlier long-acting contraceptives, such
as hormonal implants. More reliable than
the pill, they are gaining popularity in
other economically advanced countries.
“Awareness of the provisions of the law
has not been very clear sometimes,” said
Kleinrock. “Certainly this is something we
are going to be watching.”
Birth control use is virtually universal in
the United States, but about half of all preg-
nancies are still unplanned.
Free birth control is emerging standard for women
“I don’t think you will see a broad impact. ... It’s a
commonly offered benefit for many employers, including retailers.”
—Neil Trautwein, the top employee benefits expert for the National Retail Federation
WORLD 7
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Jewish Center of San Francisco –Room 209
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Thursday July 24th 10:00AM to 12:00PM
Mimi’s Café
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Thursday July 10th 10:00AM to 12:00PM
Hampton Inn & Suites – Skyline Room
2700 Junipero Serra Blvd.
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Thursday July 24th 3:00PM to 5:00PM
San Bruno Public Library – Community Room
701 Angus Avenue West
San Bruno, CA 94406
Ukraine claims winning
ground in rebellious east
By David McHugh
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KIEV, Ukraine — Fighting in eastern Ukraine left at least
nine Ukrainian soldiers dead Friday, as government troops
pressed their offensive against pro-Russian insurgents using
heavy artillery and combat jets and prospects of a truce
appeared dim.
Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko said Ukraine was
ready to conduct another round of talks between representa-
tives from Ukraine, Russia and the rebels on Saturday, but did-
n’t name their venue. Two previous rounds of such negotia-
tions held during a 10-day cease-fire have yielded no visible
progress, but they brought the warring parties together for the
first time.
Moscow strongly pushed for extending the truce and hold-
ing more talks in an apparent hope to negotiate a settlement
that would allow it to secure a degree of influence over the
neighbor. The continuing fighting is putting more pressure on
Russian President Vladimir Putin, who has been facing
increasingly angry nationalist demands to send troops to help
the insurgency — a move that would inevitably trigger crip-
pling Western sanctions.
Ukraine’s National Security Council chief Andriy Parubiy
said Friday that Russia was massing troops near the Ukrainian
border and claimed that it let insurgents attack the Ukrainian
border posts from its side. The statements could not be inde-
pendently verified.
The two neighbors, who share a 2,000-kilometer (1,250-
mile) border that is unmarked and unguarded outside of a few
checkpoints, have been trading claims and counterclaims ever
since Ukraine began fighting pro-Russia separatists in April.
By Yousur Alhlou
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM — Israeli police clashed
with rock-throwing Palestinian protesters
in Jerusalem on Friday as thousands
mourned at the funeral for an Arab teen who
Palestinians say was killed by Israeli
extremists in a revenge attack.
Palestinian militants, meanwhile, fired
rockets and mortars from the Gaza Strip into
Israel, and the Jewish state later carried out
several airstrikes on what it described as
“Hamas terror targets” in Gaza. There were
no immediate reports of casualties.
Also, the Israeli military said its troops
opened fire after spotting two Palestinians
planting explosives near the Gaza border
fence.
An ambulance carried the body of 16-year-
old Mohammed Abu Khdeir, wrapped in a
Palestinian flag and traditional headscarf, to
a mosque in the east Jerusalem neighbor-
hood where he lived. Then mourners carried
the open casket through the crowd to a
cemetery.
During the procession, scores of masked
Palestinians threw rocks at Israeli police on
duty nearby, and they responded with stun
grenades, spokesman Micky Rosenfeld
said. He said more than 2,000 people
attended the funeral.
Rosenfeld said police also clashed with
hundreds of Palestinian protesters in other
neighborhoods in the eastern part of the
city, which has been rocked by violence
since Abu Khdeir’s burned body was found
Wednesday in a forest after he was seized
near his home.
At least 13 Israeli officers were injured by
rock-throwers, with six taken to the hospi-
tal, police spokeswoman Luba Samri said.
The Red Crescent said about 30
Palestinians were hurt by rubber bullets
fired by Israeli forces. Dozens of others were
treated for tear gas inhalation.
Clashes break out during Palestinian funeral
REUTERS
Palestinian protesters run away from tear gas fired by Israeli soldiers during clashes after Friday
prayers in the Ras al-Amud neighborhood.
LOCAL/WORLD 8
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm
www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
4:30 a.m.at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and
2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Lutheran
GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)
2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
By Ryan Lucas and Qassim Abdul-Zahra
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD — Despite mounting pressure
to step aside, Iraq’s Nouri al-Maliki vowed
Friday not to abandon his bid for another
term as prime minister and pledged to stay
on until the Sunni militants who have over-
run much of the country are defeated.
The sharp words are certain to prolong the
political impasse gripping Iraq, which is
facing urgent demands for a new govern-
ment that can hold the nation together in
the face of an onslaught that threatens to
cleave it in three along ethnic and sectarian
lines.
The offensive by militants who have
swept across much of northern and western
Iraq since last month has been fueled in part
by grievances among the country’s Sunni
Muslim minority with al-Maliki and his
Shiite-led government.
Al-Maliki, a Shiite who has been prime
minister since 2006, has been accused by
former allies and others of monopolizing
power and contributing to the crisis by fail-
ing to promote reconciliation with Sunnis.
The U.S. has urged the formation of a
more inclusive government but has not
explicitly called for al-Maliki to bow out.
In what has been seen as a rebuke of al-
Maliki, Iraq’s top Shiite cleric, Ayatollah
Ali al-Sistani, has pressed lawmakers to
quickly form a new government that can
confront the militant threat and unite the
country. Lawmakers failed in their first ses-
sion of parliament on Tuesday to make any
progress.
On Friday, al-Sistani lamented the inabil-
ity of political leaders to agree on a new
prime minister and urged them to redouble
their efforts, a cleric who represents him
told worshippers in a sermon in the holy
city of Karbala.
Al-Maliki’s State of law bloc won the
most parliamentary seats in April elec-
tions, which would traditionally make him
the leading candidate to head a new govern-
ment. But al-Maliki failed to gain a majori-
ty in the legislature, meaning he needs
allies to form a government.
That has set the stage for intense wran-
gling over the makeup of a coalition — and,
above all, who will be prime minister.
Al-Maliki made clear on Friday his deter-
mination to stay on for a third consecutive
term — or at least until he has crushed the
insurgency
“I will never give up the nomination for
the post of prime minister,” he said in a
statement issued by his office.
He framed the debate over his future in
democratic terms, reminding Iraqis that the
voters handed his bloc the most seats in
parliament, and declaring that he must
“stand by them during this crisis that Iraq is
passing through.”
Al-Maliki said that to pull out now “while
facing terrorist organizations that are
against Islam and humanity would show
weakness instead of carrying out my legiti-
mate, national and moral responsibility.”
“I have vowed to God that I will continue
to fight by the side of our armed forces and
volunteers until we defeat the enemies of
Iraq and its people,” he said.
Iraq’s military claimed progress in that
fight Friday, saying troops backed by tanks
and helicopter gunships captured the vil-
lage of Awja — the birthplace of former dic-
tator Saddam Hussein — south of Tikrit. The
push through Awja is part of an offensive
whose ultimate aim is to retake Tikrit.
Military spokesman Lt. Gen. Qassim al-
Moussawi said 50 militants were killed in
the fighting. The toll could not be inde-
pendently verified.
North of Tikrit, government airstrikes hit
around eight vehicles carrying militants
trying to capture Iraq’s largest oil refinery,
said Sabah al-Nuaman, the spokesman for
Iraq’s counterterrorism services. He report-
ed as many as 30 insurgents were killed.
Fighters from the Islamic State group
have been trying for weeks to capture the
Beiji facility, some 250 kilometers (155
miles) north of Baghdad. The group
appeared on the verge of taking the refinery
last month, but military troops managed to
hold on and have since received reinforce-
ments.
Al-Nuaman also said a helicopter gunship
attacked a house in the town of Qaim near
the Syrian border where a gathering of the
Islamic State group’s local leaders was tak-
ing place. He said there were several casual-
ties.
The militants seized Qaim, which con-
trols a border crossing with Syria, last
month. They now hold a vast stretch of ter-
ritory straddling the border between the two
countries.
Iraq’s al-Maliki signals his intent to stay in job
dedicated public servant in the truest sense
of the word.”
At the time of his diagnoses, Ruskin had
been termed out of the Assembly for the seat
currently held by Assemblyman Rich
Gordon, D-Menlo Park, and was biding his
time until former state senator Joe
Simitian’s seat was to open in 2012. His
diagnosis sidelined those plans.
At the time, Ruskin told the Daily Journal
he planned to look inside himself to “see
what I want to do now and how to contribute
to the community in a different way. ”
Ruskin, a Democrat, was first elected to
the Assembly in 2004, beating out
Republican candidate Steve Poizner who
spent approximately $6 million of his own
money on the general election and made
history as being the most expensive state
race at the time. While Ruskin had statewide
consultants that election, Hartnett recalled
the earlier primary as the little campaign
that could. Ruskin’s staff was himself, his
wife, Hartnett and “one other guy,” Hartnett
recalled. On Election night, Ruskin was los-
ing and the Palo Alto restaurant where they
were waiting kicked them out. By the time
the group arrived at Hartnett’s Redwood
City office, he remembers “we were winning
and hadn’t even known.”
In his first term in the Assembly, Ruskin
was one of five freshmen members to chair a
standing committee, the Assembly
Committee on Environmental Safety and
Toxic Materials. He established himself as a
leader on environmental issues and pro-
pelled legislation on water and air quality
improvements, California greenhouse gas
emission reduction targets and the use of
alternative fuel vehicles. He also co-chaired
the Joint Legislative Committee on the
Master Plan for Higher Education. Ruskin
was re-elected to the 21st District seat in
both 2006 and 2008 before being termed
out in 2010.
Ruskin was generous with his time,
knowledge and experience for constituents
and colleagues alike, Hill said.
Prior to joining the state Legislature, for-
mer communications consultant Ruskin had
a long career in Redwood City politics. He
lost his first run for council but was elected
in 1995 and twice after. He served as mayor
from 1999 to 2001. He also served on
numerous regional committees, task forces
and foundations focused on transportation,
education, criminal justice and the environ-
ment.
Hartnett believes Ruskin’s public service
was exemplified more by his local activities
than those at the state because they had
more of a dramatic impact on the communi-
t y. Those in office now agree.
When people look around the city’s reno-
vated downtown, they have Ruskin to
thank, said Mayor Jeff Gee.
“He was here in the beginning when the
council said we need a new vision, we need
to transform our downtown. One of his pri-
orities downtown were the theater and court-
house renovation and he helped lay the
foundation and was there when those two
pieces came together,” Gee said.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
RUSKIN
“I have vowed to God that I will continue to fight
by the side of our armed forces and volunteers
until we defeat the enemies of Iraq and its people.”
— Nouri al-Maliki, Iraq’s prime minister
OPINION 9
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Cheneys blame Obama
Editor,
In an op-ed in the June 18 edition
of The Wall Street Journal, the father
and daughter team of Dick and Liz
Cheney attacked the president of the
United States, blaming him for an
Iraqi government now under siege by
surging Sunni militants.
Paraphrasing Winston Churchill,
Cheney said, “Rarely has a U.S.
president been so wrong about so
much at the expense of so many. ”
President Obama is blamed for with-
drawing the troops out of Iraq pre-
maturely.
They forget that all American
forces were mandated to withdraw
from Iraq territory by Dec. 31, 2011 ,
under the terms of a bilateral agree-
ment between former President Bush
and Iraq Prime Minister al-Maliki,
signed by Ryan Crocker, ambassador
to Iraq, on Dec. 14, 2008.
What is now clear is that we were
led into a war under false pretenses.
We went to war based on a mountain
of lies, chief among those were that
Saddam Hussein was in possession
of weapons of mass destruction.
Cheney told the American public in
2002 that, “simply stated, there is
no doubt that Saddam Hussein now
has weapons of mass destruction.
There is no doubt he is amassing
them to use against our friends,
against our allies and against us.”
In a 1994 C-SPAN interview,
Cheney defended the decision by
President George H. W. Bush at the
end of the first Gulf War not to
march on to Baghdad because it
would ultimately lead to a sectarian
violence and splintering of Iraq we
are now witnessing.
Guy Guerrero
Burlingame
Letter to the editor
By Art Kiesel
I
recently focused on the water
shortage problems we face in
California. This piece will focus
on some of the strategies the state is
taking to combat our drought dilem-
ma. Make no mistake, without a
long-term water plan, California as a
whole will be facing continued
drought conditions. We at the local
level will be implementing green
(now turning to brown) grass alterna-
tives, the problem is much larger for
the state. We boast, and deservedly
so, of our park system to be among
the best on the Peninsula and maybe
the state. Although we have done a
stellar job of water conservation over
the past several years, it is not the
entire answer as we cannot conserve
to zero water usage.
As the chair of the Housing,
Community and Economic
Development Policy Committee for
the League of California Cities repre-
senting members of all 58 counties,
one of the more recent topics for dis-
cussion was the California Water
Action Plan. The comments and per-
spectives from the various committee
members were most enlightening.
Each showed a passion for the need to
address the water shortage issue but
from various points of view from
agriculture needs to bedroom commu-
nities and industrial needs.
On the first page of the document is
a quote from Gov. Jerry Brown’s State
of the State speech from Jan. 22,
2014, as follows “Among all our
uncertainties, weather is one of the
most basic. We can’t control it. We
can only live with it, and now we
have to live with a very serious
drought of uncertain duration.” The
phrase that really caught my atten-
tion was “drought of uncertain dura-
tion” which got me
into thinking about
our long-term water
issues.
The plan does a
reasonably good
job of presenting
the issues in the
introduction which
fits my style of
fully defining the problem before
developing solutions. The major
areas of issues to be addressed that are
outlined in the plan is uncertain water
supplies, drought, declining ground-
water supplies, poor water quality,
declining native fish species and loss
of wildlife habitat, floods, supply
disruptions, population growth and
climate change.
There are many California residents
who either lived in another state or
some of our youth were not born yet
when we experienced a flood in 1995
when 48 of California’s 58 counties
had to declare a state of emergency or
when the Bay Area experienced mud-
slides from the heavy rains of the
early 1980s. Using water sparingly
is one aspect but surviving a deluge
is another. Mother Nature works on
her own timetable and we need to be
prepared for both extremes.
The plan addresses more water stor-
age. When it does rain, and hopefully
sooner rather than never, we will need
to employ a more comprehensive and
complex water management system
so that the ecosystem is not impact-
ed. Implementation of the plan will
take money — lots of money starting
with an $11 billion bond expected to
be on the November 2014 ballot.
The California Water Action Plan is
an easy read but its implications will
be the basis for how we go about our
lives in the future with much more
restrictions on our water usage. The
plan can be obtained at
http://resources.ca.gov/california_w
ater_action_plan/.
There is currently proposed legisla-
tion in Sacramento to ease some of
the environmental requirements for
the installation of recycled water pip-
ing. We fully expect that a lot more
legislation will be introduced as
needed and as the plan progresses
through rollout. Water will become a
more expensive commodity in the
future and we will need to pay more
attention to budgeting water as we do
money in our checkbooks. We citi-
zens will be faced with making water
conservation a way of life. Growing
up in San Francisco as I have, if I
needed water, a turn of the tap satis-
fied that need. Green grass in our
parks will in some cases be a thing of
the past as we have been replacing
the grass in our parks with synthetic
turf sports fields. Currently, we have
one pipe reaching our homes provid-
ing us with water. In the future, we
will have two pipes attached to our
homes the second of which will pro-
vide recycled water for our irrigation
needs.
There is some serious talk of El
Niño weather conditions making mat-
ters even worse. And should our next
winter provide us with increased lev-
els of rainfall, I hope we as a society
do not revert back into complacency
as we have in the past.
Art Kiesel is the vice mayor of Foster
City. He can be reached at
akiesel@fostercity.org or 573-7359.
California Water Action Plan
Why we celebrate
Independence Day
T
he fireworks are over, the parade is past, the beer is
drunk and the potato salad is in the refrigerator. We’re
tired, we’re sunburned and a few of us are nursing a
hangover. However, it’s a three-day weekend so we can con-
tinue boating on the lake, hiking in the mountains or relax-
ing at the beach with the kids. Independence Day is a truly an
American holiday, with something for everyone.
But why? What is it that we celebrate on Independence
Day?
On July 4, 1776, the 13
colonies did not receive independ-
ence from Great Britain, which
wouldn’t occur until the signing
of the Treaty of Paris, a year after
the British defeat at Yorktown. It
wasn’t the beginning of the
Revolutionary War either, as that
happened a year earlier with the
battles of Lexington and
Concord. It wasn’t even when the
Second Continental Congress
voted to approve a resolution for
independence from Britain. That
was July 2.
On July 4, 1776, the Second Continental Congress adopted
the Declaration of Independence and with it the great princi-
ples, applicable to all people for all time, which became the
American Idea. Those principles are what we celebrate; those
principles are what we hold dear.
The Declaration of Independence is the foundation of the
American order. It boldly and unapologetically proclaims the
Founders’ fundamental understanding of humanity — we are
all created equal, and that our God endows us with certain
rights that are inherent in our very being, those of life, of lib-
erty and of the pursuit of happiness.
The promise of universal political equality was something
new in the world. Although debated by political philoso-
phers, no nation had ever dared to believe this. America was
the exception.
The principle of political equality means that in Thomas
Jefferson’s words, “the mass of mankind has not been born
with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and
spurred, ready to ride them legitimately, by the grace of God.”
No one whether by virtue heredity (a king), ideology (a com-
munist Politburo), religion (a caliphate), technocratic compe-
tence (an administrative state) or wealth and connections
(cronyism) has a natural right to rule over others.
As a result, political legitimacy rests with the people and
the “consent of the governed,” and that the just powers of
government flow from the people to the government and not
the other way around. The declaration argues that government
exists to secure and defend rights, rather than to grant them.
This was, and is, an exceptional argument that has animated
the struggle for liberty around the world.
America’s founding rejected the old ideas of blood, soil and
permanent cultural traditions as the basis of a nation. Instead,
we are founded on the ideas contained in the Declaration, ideas
that all can understand and that all can swear allegiance to. As
a nation founded on an idea, America is again exceptional.
No one can turn Han, German, Pashtun or Fang if they are
not already. Yet all of these peoples can and do become
Americans through an acceptance of the founding ideas and a
rejection of the old notions of immutable social hierarchy. It
happens every day, as immigrants from around the world are
sworn in as citizens. Just like that they are every bit as
American as those born here — who themselves must be
taught our founding ideas and principles.
As proclaimed in the Declaration of Independence,
Americans (and all people everywhere) answer to a higher law
and truths that are “self-evident.” That is, the American Idea
is grounded both in reason — “self-evident” — and in revela-
tion, as the declaration’s four references to God as Creator,
Lawgiver, Judge and Providence attest.
These foundational principles, while proclaimed in the dec-
laration and finding their political expression in the
Constitution through a representative republic, separation of
powers and federalism, have been opposed by some including
those who precipitated the Civil War.
The outcome of that war settled, as Abraham Lincoln made
clear in the Gettysburg Address, the understanding that, “our
fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, con-
ceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men
are created equal.”
Today, as you recover from your sunburn and excessive cele-
bration, take time to think about what it is that you’ve cele-
brated and why we celebrate on Independence Day. The
Declaration of Independence and the liberties it proclaims are
America’s gift to the world. Don’t let that gift go unopened
and unused.
For more information on the Declaration of Independence
and its meaning for our lives visit
http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2001/06/the-
225th-anniversary-of-the-4th-of-july.
John McDowell is a longtime county resident having first
moved to San Carlos in 1963. In the intervening years, he
has worked as a political volunteer and staff member in local,
state and federal government, including time spent as a press
secretary on Capitol Hill and in the George W. Bush adminis-
tration.
John McDowell
Guest
perspective
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
BURLINGAME º SAN FRANCISCO
CAMPBELL º OAKLAND
By Nancy Benac
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — There may be
more to that “we the people” notion
than you thought.
These are boom times for the con-
cept of “corporate personhood.”
Corporations are people?
Mitt Romney got mocked during
the 2012 presidential campaign for
the very idea.
But it turns out the principle has
been lurking in U.S. law for more
than a century, and the Supreme Court,
in a 5-4 ruling, gave it more oomph
this week when it ruled that certain
businesses are entitled to exercise
religious rights, just as do people.
Justice Samuel Alito, writing for
the court’s majority, said protecting
the religious rights of closely held
corporations, which are often small,
family-run businesses, “protects the
religious liberty of the humans who
own and control them.”
In its ruling, the court said closely
held corporations with religious
objections cannot be forced to pay for
their employees’ insurance coverage
for contraception, as required under
President Barack Obama’s health care
law.
Four years earlier, the corpora-
tions-as-people idea got another big
boost when the court voted 5-4 to
expand the free speech rights of busi-
nesses and labor unions by striking
down limits on their political spend-
ing. That unleashed a massive flood
of private money into political cam-
paigns.
The rulings have triggered renewed
debate over the idea of corporations
as people, which surfaces in legal
cases stretching back to the 1880s.
There are wonky legal discussions
about the differences between “artifi-
cial persons” (corporations) and “nat-
ural persons” (the kind with flesh and
blood).
TV comics riff on the notion that
fake people have more rights than
real people.
There’s a petition drive to amend
the Constitution to ensure that
“inalienable rights belong to human
beings only. ”
All of this calls for a brief reality
check: Corporations really aren’t
people.
Everyone knows this.
Even Romney, who was criticized
for being out of touch when he
famously told a protester that “corpo-
rations are people, my friend.”
Corporations are people?
It’s a real legal concept
By Tom Raum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Unions represent-
ing government workers are expand-
ing while organized labor has been
shedding private sector members over
the past half-century.
Amajority of union members today
now have ties to a government entity,
at the federal, state or local levels.
Roughly 1-in-3 public sector work-
ers is a union member, compared with
about 1-in-15 for the private sector
workforce last year, according to the
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Overall,
11.3 percent of wage and salary work-
ers in the United States are unionized,
down from a peak of 35 percent during
the mid-1950s in the strong post-
World War II recovery.
The typical union worker now is
more likely to be an educator, office
worker or food or service industry
employee rather than a construction
worker, autoworker, electrician or
mechanic. Far more women than men
are among the union-label ranks.
In a blow to public sector unions, the
Supreme Court ruled this week that thou-
sands of health care workers in Illinois
who are paid by the state cannot be
required to pay fees that help cover a
union’s cost of collective bargaining.
The justices said the practice vio-
lates the First Amendment rights of
nonmembers who disagree with
stances taken by unions.
The ruling was narrowly drawn, but it
could reverberate through the universe
of unions that represent government
workers. The case involved home-care
workers for disabled people who are
paid with Medicaid funds administered
by the state.
Unions representing government workers are gaining
By Anick Jesdanun
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — New Android wristwatch-
es from Samsung and LG make a few evolu-
tionary advances, though I won’t be rush-
ing out to buy either.
Samsung’s Gear Live and LG’s G Watch
are good products and will appeal to those
who like to be among the first to own new
gadgets.
The watches serve as pedometers and let
you catch up on email, texts and Facebook
notifications while your phone is in your
pocket or charging in the bedroom. Even
with the phone in your hand, you can
check messages on the watch and keep
playing video on the phone.
Both smartwatches try to keep things
simple through voice commands rather
than touch. They use Google’s Android
Wear system, which I reviewed earlier.
Android Wear has a lot of potential but
still lacks the functionality of even last
year’s smartwatches. Your ability to reply
is limited, and there’s not much you can do
yet without a companion phone nearby.
The companion phone must run Android
4.3 or later, which covers about a quarter of
the Android devices in use. It doesn’t have
to be a Samsung or LG phone. Vi si t
http://g.co/WearCheck from your phone to
check compatibility. Don’t even bother if
you have an iPhone.
Even with its release of the Gear Live,
Samsung will continue to sell the Gear 2
line of smartwatches, so I’ll start there.
• Samsung’s Gear 2 ($299, released in
April):
I find the Gear 2 most useful for its fit-
ness features. The watch counts the steps
you take each day. It estimates distance and
calories burned and measures heart rate on
your runs, hikes and bike rides. The fea-
tures are rather basic, so active users might
prefer a gadget dedicated to a specific task,
such as measuring distance and pace using
GPS. But the Gear 2 does offer a good
introduction to newcomers.
Shots from the watch’s 2-megapixel
camera are mediocre, but that beats miss-
ing the shot entirely because your better
camera is in your pocket or handbag. If you
don’t need the camera, you can save $100
with the Gear 2 Neo, which has similar fea-
tures otherwise. Both have speakerphones
for making phone calls.
The Gear 2 line doesn’t use Android Wear,
but a fledging system called Tizen.
Samsung says that helps extend battery
life to two or three days, instead of the sin-
gle day on the original, Android-based
Galaxy Gear. Unlike the Android Wear
watches, the Gear 2 and the Gear 2 Neo
both require a Samsung phone.
• Samsung’s Gear Live ($199, starts
shipping next week):
Out of the box, the Gear Live looks much
like the Gear 2. But once you turn it on, it
stays on. The watch face doesn’t go dark as
the one on the Gear 2 does after inactivity.
Unfortunately, the promised battery life
is back down to a single day, though actual
performance varied depending on use. The
best I got was a day and a half on a full
charge. In the worst case, about half the
charge was gone in just five hours.
The Gear Live doesn’t have as many fit-
ness features. You can count steps and
measure heart rate, but you can’t measure
distance or calories with built-in apps.
In addition, there’s no camera or speak-
erphone. To make calls, you need a
Bluetooth headset paired to your phone.
Because the Gear Live and the G Watch
both use Android Wear, they have similar
functionality. You control both mostly by
voice. There aren’t many icons or buttons
on the screen, as you’d find on previous
smartwatches.
You do have to get used to swiping left
(for more information) or right (to dismiss
a notification). But otherwise, the inter-
face is clean and simple. One thing I wish
for: a central place to view notifications,
including ones I’ve dismissed.
• LG’s G Watch ($229, starts shipping
Thursday):
LG is hoping to make its watch easier to
use by making it without a physical but-
ton. It’s not really needed when voice con-
trol is so prominent, and I’ve used the Gear
Live’s physical button only as a fallback
for when I couldn’t figure out how to do
something.
The LG watch has about a third more bat-
tery capacity than Samsung’s, but both
watches lasted about the same amount of
time in my tests.
The resolution and colors on LG’s
always-on screen aren’t as good as they are
on Samsung’s, though LG’s notifications
use larger type and are easier to read.
The G Watch can count steps but doesn’t
have a heart rate sensor — the biggest way
it differs from the Gear Live. The G Watch
doesn’t have a camera or speakerphone
either.
The G Watch’s strap feels rubbery, but
it’s replaceable with any standard 22-mil-
limeter watch strap. The hard-plastic feel
on Samsung’s watches isn’t much better,
but you can replace their straps, too.
Motorola plans to come out with the
round-faced Moto 360 this summer, while
the ones out so far have had square dis-
plays. And Apple is widely expected to
have its own smartwatch this fall.
I recommend waiting to see what they
do. You might still gravitate toward
Samsung’s or LG’s watch, but you risk
regret if you buy one now.
Evolutionary advances in new smartwatches
REUTERS
A Google employee demonstrates the features of the Moto smartwatch at the Google I/O
developers conference in San Francisco.
<<< Page 12, Federer to meet
Djokovic in Wimbledon final
ONE SEMIFINAL SET: GERMANY BEATS FRANCE, BRAZIL TOPS COLOMBIA, WILL MEET IN WORLD CUP FINAL FOUR >> PAGE 12
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In a game where offense was an
afterthought, the scoreless stale-
mate ended in fitting fashion: a
walk-off error.
Melky Cabrera couldn’t corral
Nick Punto’s double with one out
in the 12th inning, sending the
Oakland Athletics to a 1-0 victory
over the Toronto Blue Jays on
Friday in front of an announced
crowd of 22,322 at the Coliseum.
“I’m sure they were ready to go
home and get the barbecues start-
ed,” Punto said.
Derek Norris led off the rally
with a walk by Chad Jenkins (0-1),
who tossed two innings of relief.
After Jed Lowrie lined out, Punto
poked a slicing double down the
line in left.
Cabrera moved to his right to cut
off the ball, which squirted by his
glove for an error. Norris, who
runs well for a catcher, hustled
from first for an odd ending to a
game highlighted by stellar pitch-
ing performances by Oakland’s
Tommy Milone, Toronto’s Marcus
Stroman and both bullpens.
“That’s the definition of a pitch-
ing duel,” Milone said. “It’s excit-
ing. It’s fun to watch. But it was
about that time.”
Dan Otero (7-1), the fifth
Oakland reliever to toss a score-
less inning, earned the win.
Cabrera never surfaced in the club-
house during the time reporters
were allowed in after the game.
“That’s not the game,” Blue Jays
manager John Gibbons said of
Cabrera’s misplay. “It was great
pitching on both sides.”
Stroman gave up seven hits in
seven innings. He struck out
seven and walked three.
A’s walk off with win
REUTERS
SanJose’s Joey Chestnut ran continued his dominance in the annual Nathan’s Famous Hot Dog Eating Contest at Coney Island Friday
afternoon, winning his eighth straight title.Chestnut finished the 10-minute constest by eating 61 hot dogs and buns —off his previous
record of 69 set last year. Chestnut was pushed by 22-year-old Matt Stonie, who went bite for bite with Chestnut for much of the contest
before settling for second place with 54.
CHESTNUT DEFENDS TITLE
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO — Eric Stults pitched seven
strong innings to win for the first time in
nearly two months and Alexi Amarista
homered to lead the San Diego Padres to a 2-
0 win over the San Francisco Giants on
Friday.
Stults (3-11), winless in his last nine
starts, was victorious for the first time since
a 9-3 victory over Miami on May 10. The
lefty held the Giants to four hits with six
strikeouts and two walks as he snapped a
six-start losing streak.
The Padres won their season-high fifth
straight game as they faced the Giants for
the first time since they were no-hit by Tim
Lincecum on June 25 in San Francisco.
Lincecum is scheduled to start on Sunday.
Although Stults had lost eight of his nine
starts during his winless streak, he had
pitched well in his last two. He continued
that trend against San Francisco as he
allowed just one runner to reach third base.
Joaquin Benoit pitched a perfect eight
inning and Huston Street got the final three
outs for his 23rd save in as many chances to
secure the four-hitter.
It was San Diego’s second straight shutout
following Tyson Ross’ three-hit gem in
Wednesday’s 3-0 win over Cincinnati, and
its third in four games.
San Francisco continued to freefall with
its 18th loss in 23 games. The Giants’ 5-18
Offense
still MIA
for Giants
By Jamey Keaten
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LEEDS, England — So your national team
is out of the World Cup in Brazil,
Wimbledon doesn’t seem the same without
Serena Williams or Rafael Nadal and your
baseball team is slumping.
This weekend, fans of many stripes could
join die-hard cycling buffs and tune in to the
start of the 101st Tour de France for that
much needed sports fix.
Cycling’s big event gets going Saturday
through bucolic countryside in northern
England, where officials have paid for the
right to host it, hoping to draw tourists,
capture media attention and feed the recent
cycling craze among Britons.
It could first require getting over a nag-
ging belief that, after Lance Armstrong’s
doping exposure, the sport may still be
dogged by drugs cheats. Cycling chiefs and
experts generally agree that the era of wide-
spread doping is over, but few would claim
to know that today’s pack is fully clean.
Drugs testers will conduct hundreds of blood
and urine checks during the race.
Bookmakers’ odds foresee a victory either
by defending champion
Chris Froome, a 29-year-
old Kenyan-born Briton
who leads Team Sky, or
two-time champ Alberto
Contador — a 31-year-
old Spaniard with
Tinkoff-Saxo Bank — to
take home the yellow jer-
sey when the race finish-
es on Paris’ Champs-
Elysees on July 26.
Few of the 198 riders on the 22 teams
stand a realistic chance of winning, based
on recent performances, skill sets and team
priorities. Most are “domestiques” who race
above all to help their team leaders win.
Vincenzo Nibali of Italy, plus Spaniards
Alejandro Valverde and Joaquin Rodriguez,
stand an outside chance.
Conceding home-road advantage,
Contador said Friday that “local hero”
Froome remains the favorite. The Briton,
who succeeded Sky teammate and compatri-
ot Bradley Wiggins as Tour winner, said: “I
don’t think many Tour champions get to
The 2014 Tour de France kicks off in the UK
Chris Froome
See TDF, Page 16
CARY EDMONDSON/USA TODAY SPORTS
Oakland starter Tommy Milone worked six innings, giving up just six hits
and no runs against Toronto, but walked away with a no-decision. See ATHLETICS, Page 14
See GIANTS, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: July 31, 2014
JACK’S RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
iLoveJacks.com
By Steve Douglas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RIO DE JANEIRO — It just would-
n’t be the World Cup without
Germany in the semifinals.
Harnessing all their big-game
experience, the Germans delivered a
performance of maturity and effi-
ciency to hold off France 1-0 on
Friday and become the first team to
reach four straight semifinals in the
sport’s marquee tournament.
Defender Mats Hummels scored
the winning goal in the 13th
minute, outmuscling his marker at a
free kick to glance a header in off the
underside of the crossbar.
Criticized for poor defending in
earlier matches, Germany selected a
more robust lineup and restricted a
flat France team to only a handful of
clear-cut opportunities in muggy
conditions.
“There was not much in it,” France
coach Didier Deschamps said. But,
“we don’t have the international
experience Germany has.”
While France’s young players
slumped to the ground and some
shed tears after the final whistle, the
Germans soberly saluted all corners
of the Maracana Stadium.
One job done, nothing more.
And next up for Germany is a
meeting with host nation Brazil,
which beat Colombia 2-1 later
Friday. It will be Germany’s 13th
appearance in the semifinals in 20
editions of the World Cup.
“I guess we’re playing the kind of
football which will give us a chance
to win,” said Hummels, who pro-
duced a couple of decisive blocks to
snuff out two good chances for
France striker Karim Benzema.
“We defended well today . I think
we deserve to carry on.”
France struggled to impose the
kind of attacking game that made
the team one of the most exciting in
Brazil during the group stage,
although Benzema — the team’s
chief attacking threat — squandered
chances in both halves.
Late in the first half, the Real
Madrid striker seized on a rebound
following Manuel Neuer’s save from
Mathieu Valbuena’s shot but his
close-range effort was deflected wide
by Hummels. Then, in stoppage
time, he created space for himself
about eight yards out at an angle,
but a fierce shot was swatted away by
Neuer.
“We played like a team again,”
said Germany captain Philipp
Lahm, who returned to right back in
one of a string of tactically astute
changes made by coach Joachim
Loew. “Overall it was a good per-
formance from us.”
One goal enough for Germany over France
By Tales Azzoni
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FORTALEZA, Brazil — Brazil
made its way into the World Cup
semifinals for the first time in 12
years, with goals coming from
defenders Thiago Silva and David
Luiz in a 2-1 win over Colombia on
Friday.
Brazil, which had been eliminat-
ed in the quarterfinals at the last two
World Cups, will next play
Germany on Tuesday in Belo
Horizonte.
Silva gave Brazil the lead in the
seventh minute, scoring with his
left knee after a corner from Neymar
passed through the Colombian
defense. He celebrated the goal by
pointing to the emblem on his jer-
sey and shouting, “This is Brazil,
this is Brazil.”
Luiz added the second from a free
kick in the 69th, sending a swerv-
ing long-range shot off the side of
his foot into the top of the net.
Colombia got one back in the
80th. James Rodriguez scored his
tournament-leading sixth goal from
the penalty spot after Brazil goal-
keeper Julio Cesar brought down
substitute Carlos Bacca inside the
area.
Rodriguez tried to control the
pace of the match at the Arena
Castelao, but it was Brazil that cre-
ated most of the scoring chances as
Colombia goalkeeper David Ospina
had to make a series of saves in the
first half alone.
The Colombians tried to pressure
in the end after Rodriguez’s penalty,
but Brazil held on with tough
defending.
“This is a very tough moment for
us,” Colombia coach Jose
Pekerman said. “We always had the
dream of winning this match even
though we knew Brazil would be a
very tough opponent. We knew
how decisive this was, and that any
mistake would cost us.”
Col ombi a was comi ng off
four st rai ght wi ns, pl ayi ng
some of the most impressive
football of the tournament.
And the Colombians, playing in
the quarterfinals for the first time,
had entered the match with an offen-
sive team that had scored 11 goals,
second only to the Netherlands.
“After not playing in the World
Cup for so long, we were able to
show the value of the Colombian
football and the talent of some of
our players,” said Pekerman, an
Argentine. “They showed great
spirit and presence of mind. They
came to play a great World Cup, not
just to participate.”
There was a lot of talk about
Rodriguez and Neymar before the
match, but the 22-year-old forwards
didn’t really live up to expecta-
tions. Rodriguez scored the late
penalty but was otherwise mostly
ineffective, as was Neymar before
he left on a stretcher after being hit
on the back late in the match.
The Brazilian star was apparently
crying in pain as he was carried out
of the field.
Silva was the crucial player for
Brazil, but he will miss the match
against Germany after getting his
second yellow card of the tourna-
ment for trying to keep Ospina
from putting the ball back in play.
Colombia had a goal disallowed
in the 66th minute for offside.
Veteran defender Mario Yepes found
the net from close range after a
scramble inside the penalty area but
the linesman had already stopped
play.
Brazil is trying to become the
first host to win the World Cup
since France in 1998.
At the last two World Cups, Brazil
lost to the Netherlands in the quar-
terfinals in 2010 and to France in
2006. The team hadn’t made it to
the semifinals since it won its fifth
world title in South Korea and Japan
in 2002.
David Luiz’s rocket sends Brazil into semis
REUTERS
Germany's Mats Hummels controls the ball near France's Mathieu Valbuena
during Germany’s 1-0 quarterfinal win Friday. Hummels scored the game
winner.
REUTERS
Brazil's David Luiz celebrates his goal
during a 2-1 win over Colombia.
SPORTS 13
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Larson

MILLBRAE – I
recently read an
article in the trade
journal “American
Funeral Director”
about the famous
quote by the late
“Sir William Ewart
Gladstone”, the celebrated English four term
Prime Minister who was known for his
colorful oratories and speeches on the floor
of Parliament. This 19
th
century statesman
was renowned for many unique sayings, but
he is most noted among Funeral Directors
for saying this: “Show me the manner in
which a nation cares for its dead, and I will
measure with mathematical exactness the
tender mercies of its people, their respect for
the laws of the land and their loyalty to high
ideals.” This quote is very lyrical and well
thought out. It has become a long time
custom for many Funeral Homes to display
this quote on a plaque for all to see. The
meaning is obvious and is a direct
comparison between caring for our fallen
loved ones and the way we care for
ourselves, our community and our society.
To many observers it may appear that
we’ve lost the motivation to care for our
loved ones in a proper way, and that our
society has become misguided. Taking into
consideration the way our government
leaders sometimes act, without the maturity
to function unselfishly, is disturbing, and the
reasons they got elected can be alarming.
Also, in the eyes of logical people violence
should be against our nature, but seemingly
is embedded in our way of life. It is topsy-
turvy for a culture to view cruelty and tribal
brutality as a form of normality, and for love
to be viewed as an obscenity.
Yes, some say our society is falling apart,
but looking at the overall big picture I see
most people yearning to live a peaceful and
courteous life with those around them. Most
people are not violent. Most people want to
be accepted. Most people want to be happy.
Remember that “hate” is taught.
Wouldn’t it make more sense for “love” to
be taught? Teaching youngsters to be
curious and to enjoy the “differences” of
those around them would be a good start.
They say that it’s hard to teach old dogs new
tricks. But old dogs will not be here forever,
and with effort every young dog could be
cultivated with ideals for supporting others
with respect. Putting this into practice may
seem daunting, but it’s not impossible and
over time could be valuable for our future.
Humanity has always been burdened with
a good percentage of bad guys. But, all in
all, the ideals that the majority of us value
and strive to promote, life, liberty and the
pursuit of happiness, are shared in our core.
Going back to Gladstone’s quote, I see
the vast majority of the families we serve at
the CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS
deeply committed to doing the right thing
for their loved ones. They come to us with a
desire for closure and to enact final tributes
for those they’ve cherished. Whether public
or private their feelings are similar, and
showing one last bit of proper care is their
goal. For me this is a sign of hope, showing
that overall we are a society of good people
with a nature to live in harmony and peace.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Who Or What Is Gladstone And
Why This Is Important
advertisement
By Howard Fendrich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — Roger Federer was
on the decline — or so the think-
ing went.
He was past 30. Had back prob-
lems. Tried experimenting with a
larger racket. Was a family man, a
father to two sets of twins now.
Slid down the rankings. Reached
zero Grand Slam finals over the
past two years. Started losing
before the quarterfinals at majors,
including in 2013’s second round
at the All England Club, of all
places, to a guy ranked 116th.
Look at him now. Federer moved
one victory away from a record
eighth Wimbledon championship
and 18th Grand Slam title overall
by reaching Sunday’s final, where
he will face Novak Djokovic.
Federer was asked how much it
would mean to add to his trophy
collection.
“A lot,” said Federer, who turns
33 next month and would be the
oldest Wimbledon winner in at
least a half-century. “I know I
don’t have 10 left, so I’ll try to
enjoy it as much as I can.”
Could he have imagined 12
months ago, after his startlingly
early exit, being back in this
year’s final?
“I wasn’t sure,” Federer replied.
“I hoped.”
After so much buzz about the rise
of a new generation to challenge
the supremacy of tennis’ “Big 4,”
— a quartet, including Rafael
Nadal and Andy Murray, that will
have won 36 of the past 38 Slams
— Federer and Djokovic turned
aside up-and-comers in Friday’s
semifinals.
Djokovic, the 2011 champion,
went first on Centre Court, over-
coming dips in his play to beat
11th-seeded Grigor Dimitrov of
Bulgaria 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (7)
and reach his third final at
Wimbledon and 12th in the past
16 majors.
Federer, tied with Pete Sampras
and William Renshaw with seven
Wimbledon titles, followed with a
6-4, 6-4, 6-4 victory over 11th-
seeded Milos Raonic of Canada.
Returning serves that topped 130
mph (210 kph), Federer broke
Raonic once in each set and took
61 of 80 points on his own serve.
“Just seeing Roger around, see-
ing his persona, his aura — you
know that a lot of people could
have, and have, written him off in
a lot of ways,” Raonic said, “(but)
you knew this was very (possible)
for him.”
Dimitrov (who beat defending
champion Murray in the quarterfi-
nals) and Raonic (who beat the
man who beat Nadal in the fourth
round) are 23 and were making
their debuts in a Slam semifinal.
Federer was in his 35th; six-time
major champion Djokovic was in
his 23rd.
It was sunny, 77 degrees (25
Celsius) and windy, and Djokovic
and Dimitrov found themselves
slip-sliding around the worn court,
especially along swaths of brown
dirt. One of their many lengthy,
entertaining exchanges ended
with both face-down on the turf.
Djokovic appeared ready to run
away with a win, one point from
leading by a set and two breaks.
But Dimitrov, cheered on by girl-
friend Maria Sharapova, hit an ace
to erase a break point and reeled
off five consecutive games to grab
the second set.
For Djokovic was volleying
poorly — something that surely
bothered one of his coaches,
three-time Wimbledon champion
Boris Becker — and generally
struggling to find his strokes.
After one botched forehand,
Djokovic threw his racket end-
over-end in the air and caught it.
“It was a roller coaster,” Becker
said of his man’s up-and-down per-
formance. “It doesn’t have to be
pretty and perfect all the time. You
have to play perfect when it mat-
ters most.”
Djokovic did. Dimitrov did not,
faltering at the end of the last two
sets. In the third, his one-handed
backhand accounted for three mis-
takes in the tiebreaker, and he also
double-faulted.
In the fourth, Dimitrov wasted
four set points, including three in
the tiebreaker, which he led 6-3,
before losing six of the last seven
points.
“I probably won’t get an hour of
sleep,” Dimitrov said.
What keeps Djokovic awake at
night is that he lost his past three
major finals, and five of his past
si x.
Sunday’s final will be his 35th
match against Federer, who leads
18-16. But it’s only their second
major final; the other was at the
2007 U.S. Open, won by Federer.
“My game’s back where I hoped
it would be,” said Federer, who lost
in the fourth round or earlier at four
of the previous five majors but has
dropped one set this fortnight.
“Things were difficult all of last
year, most of the year, so I’m
happy I worked hard off the court
to get myself back into shape and
back into contention.”
Federer, Djokovic in Wimbledon final
REUTERS
Roger Federer hits a return during his straight-set win over Milos Raonic
in the semifinals of Wimbledon. Federer will go for his eighth Wimbledon
title Sunday when he takes on Novak Djokovic.
SPORTS 14
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Athletics 1, Blue Jays 0, 12 inn.
Toronto ab r h bi Oakland ab r h bi
Reyes ss 6 0 1 0 Crisp cf 3 0 1 0
MeCarr lf 5 0 1 0 Jaso dh 2 0 0 0
Bautist dh5 0 1 0 Freimnph-dh2 0 1 0
Encrnc 1b3 0 0 0 Cespds lf 4 0 0 0
DNavrr c 5 0 1 0 Moss 1b 4 0 0 0
Glenn rf 4 0 0 0 Callasp 1b 1 0 0 0
ClRsms ph-cf1 0 0 0 Dnldsn 3b 5 0 1 0
StTllsn 3b4 0 2 0 Vogt rf 3 0 1 0
Lind ph 1 0 0 0 Gentry pr-rf2 0 0 0
JFrncs 3b 0 0 0 0 DNorrs c 3 1 0 0
Mstrnn cf-rf5 0 1 0 Lowrie ss 4 0 0 0
Kawsk 2b 4 0 2 0 Punto 2b 5 0 1 0
Totals 43 0 9 0 Totals 38 1 5 0
Toronto 000 000 000 000 — 0
Oakland 000 000 000 001 — 1
Oneout whenwinningrunscored.
E—Me.Cabrera (2), Lowrie (9). DP—Toronto 1, Oak-
land 2. LOB—Toronto 10, Oakland 10.
2B—St.Tolleson (6), Freiman (2), Donaldson (13),
Punto (6). SB—Reyes (17), St.Tolleson (2), Crisp (14).
S—Kawasaki.
Toronto IP H R ER BB SO
Stroman 7 3 0 0 3 7
Loup 1 1 0 0 1 1
McGowan 1 0 0 0 1 2
Cecil 1-3 0 0 0 1 0
Jenkins L,0-1 2 1 1 0 1 0
SanFrancisco IP H R ER BB SO
Milone 6 4 0 0 1 6
O’Flaherty 1 1 0 0 0 0
Gregerson 1 1 0 0 0 0
Doolittle 1 1 0 0 0 1
Abad 1 1 0 0 0 0
Cook 1 0 0 0 1 0
Otero W,7-1 1 1 0 0 0 0
Padres 2, Giants 0
Padres ab r h bi Giants ab r h bi
Pence rf 4 0 1 0 S.Smith rf 3 1 1 0
Belt 1b 4 0 0 0 Denorfi ph-rf-lf1 0 0 0
Posey c 4 0 1 0 Headly 3b 4 0 4 1
Sandovl 3b4 0 0 0 Quentin lf 4 0 0 0
Morse lf 4 0 1 0 Street p 0 0 0 0
Arias 2b 3 0 1 0 Grandl c 3 0 0 0
BCrwfr ss 2 0 0 0 Medica 1b 4 0 0 0
J.Perez cf 2 0 0 0 Maybin cf 3 0 1 0
Machi p 0 0 0 0 Conrad 2b 3 0 0 0
M.Cain p 2 0 0 0 Falu 2b 0 0 0 0
Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 Amarst ss 2 1 2 1
GBlanc ph-cf10 0 0 Stults p 2 0 0 0
Goeert ph 0 0 0 0
Benoit p 0 0 0 0
Venale rf 0 0 0 0
Totals 30 0 4 0 Totals 29 2 8 2
SanFrancisco 000 000 000 — 0
SanDiego 002 000 00x — 2
DP—San Francisco 2, San Diego 1. LOB—San Fran-
cisco5,SanDiego6. 2B—Morse(21),Arias(1),S.Smith
(19), Amarista (8). HR—Amarista (2).
MIami IP H R ER BB SO
M.Cain L,1-7 6 1-37 2 2 3 6
Affeldt 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Machi 1 1 0 0 0 0
SanFrancisco IP H R ER BB SO
Stults W,3-11 7 4 0 0 2 6
Benoit H,14 1 0 0 0 0 1
Street S,23-23 1 0 0 0 0 0
PB—Grandal.
Umpires—Home, Bob Davidson; First, John Tumpane;
Second, James Hoye;Third, Bill Welke.
T—2:31. A—31,126(42,302).
Milone allowed four hits in six innings,
striking out six and walking one intention-
ally. The left-hander is 6-0 in his last 11
starts and hasn’t lost since May 3 at
Boston.
The pitchers quickly erased the few
chances both offenses had.
Jose Reyes singled on the game’s first
pitch, but Milone didn’t allow another hit
until Steve Tolleson doubled on a pop fly
leading off the fifth that landed between
three players battling the bright sky, which
caused problems all day. Tolleson advanced
to third on the second of two groundouts
before Milone struck out Reyes.
Lowrie’s fielding error at shortstop
extended the sixth for Toronto. But Milone
rebounded the way he had all afternoon,
striking out Brad Glenn to strand two.
“It the same thing he’s been doing all sea-
son. He changes speed and locates so well,”
said Blue Jays center fielder Darin
Mastroianni, who singled with one out in
the 12th for his only hit.
Stroman kept the A’s off-balance and out
of sync in similar fashion. He got some
help from his defense, too, including
Cabrera.
With two on and two outs in the third,
Cabrera made a diving catch on Yoenis
Cespedes’ liner to left. Cabrera grabbed his
midsection and jogged gingerly backed to
the dugout afterward.
Josh Donaldson started a double play by
fielding Edwin Encarnacion’s grounder at
third and threw from his backside to Punto,
whose relay from second to first ended
Toronto’s eighth.
Toronto caught its own defensive break
when Brandon Moss sprained his left ankle
coming out of the box, and the Blue Jays
easily turned a double play to end the bot-
tom of the inning. Moss said the ankle is
sore but hopes to play Saturday, though A’s
manager Bob Melvin said Moss will likely
get a day off.
Oakland’s Ryan Cook, Fernando Abad,
Sean Doolittle, Eric O’Flaherty and Luke
Gregerson all pitched a scoreless inning.
Jenkins, Brett Cecil, Dustin McGowan and
Aaron Loup combined to throw four score-
less innings before the A’s broke through in
the 12th.
record since June 9 is the worst in the
majors as they have fallen out of first place
in the NL West.
It was the third time in five games the
Giants have been shutout.
Matt Cain (1-7) pitched well but had little
to show for it as he lost his fourth consecu-
tive decision and is winless in seven starts.
He allowed two runs on seven hits in 6 1-3
innings. Cain struck out six to become the
fourth San Francisco pitcher to reach the
1,500-strikeout mark.
Amarista led off the third inning with his
second homer that barely cleared the right-
field fence. Seth Smith doubled with one out
and scored on Chase Headley’s single for a
2-0 lead. Headley went 4 for 4.
Giants first baseman Brandon Belt was 0
for 4 in his return to the Giants lineup after
missing 50 games with a broken thumb.
Not es: The last time the Padres won five
straight was last season when they had a
seven-game streak in June. ... The Giants
have scored two or fewer runs in eight of
their last 11 games. ... Juan Marichal,
Gaylord Perry and Lincecum are the other
San Francisco pitchers with 1,500 strike-
outs. Cain is the eighth pitcher in Giants
franchise to reach the mark . ... Giants RHP
Tim Hudson (7-5, 2.59 ERA) will face Padres
RHP Odrisamer Despaigne (2-0, 0.66) on
Saturday.
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
Continued from page 11
ATHLETICS
SPORTS 15
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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East Division
W L Pct GB
Baltimore 46 39 .541 —
Toronto 47 41 .534 1/2
New York 43 42 .506 3
Boston 38 47 .447 8
Tampa Bay 38 50 .432 9 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 48 34 .585 —
Kansas City 44 40 .524 5
Cleveland 41 43 .488 8
Chicago 40 46 .465 10
Minnesota 38 47 .447 11 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
A’s 53 33 .616 —
Los Angeles 48 36 .571 4
Seattle 47 38 .553 5 1/2
Texas 37 48 .435 15 1/2
Houston 36 51 .414 17 1/2
Friday’sGames
Oakland 1,Toronto 0, 12 innings
Saturday’sGames
Baltimore (Mi.Gonzalez 4-5) at Boston (Lester 9-7),
10:05 a.m., 1st game
N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 3-4) at Minnesota (Pino 0-2),
11:10 a.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 10-2) at Chicago White Sox
(Quintana 5-7), 11:10 a.m.
Tampa Bay (Archer 4-5) at Detroit (A.Sanchez 5-2),
1:08 p.m.
Kansas City (Guthrie 5-6) at Cleveland (House 0-2),
4:05 p.m.
Baltimore (U.Jimenez 3-8) at Boston (Lackey 9-5),
4:15 p.m., 2nd game
Texas (Lewis 5-5) at N.Y. Mets (B.Colon 8-6), 4:15
p.m.
Houston (Feldman 4-5) at L.A. Angels (H.Santiago
0-7), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Buehrle 10-5) at Oakland (Kazmir 9-3),
7:05 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 47 38 .553 —
Washington 46 39 .541 1
Miami 41 44 .482 6
New York 37 48 .435 10
Philadelphia 37 49 .430 10 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 51 35 .593 —
St. Louis 46 40 .535 5
Pittsburgh 45 41 .523 6
Cincinnati 43 41 .512 7
Chicago 38 46 .452 12
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 49 39 .557 —
Giants 47 39 .547 1
San Diego 39 47 .453 9
Colorado 36 50 .419 12
Arizona 36 51 .414 12 1/2
Friday’sGames
SanDiego 2, Giants 0
Saturday’sGames
Miami (Heaney 0-3) at St. Louis (S.Miller 7-7), 11:15
a.m.
Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 2-7) at Washington
(G.Gonzalez 5-4), 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (D.Buchanan 4-4) at Pittsburgh
(Volquez 6-6), 1:05 p.m.
Arizona (Bolsinger 1-4) at Atlanta (Harang 7-6),1:10
p.m.
L.A.Dodgers (Haren 8-4) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa
8-6), 1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Garza 5-5) at Cincinnati (Bailey 8-4),
1:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Hudson 7-5) at San Diego (De-
spaigne 2-0), 1:15 p.m.
Texas (Lewis 5-5) at N.Y. Mets (B.Colon 8-6), 1:15
p.m.
NL GLANCE AL GLANCE
By Greg Beacham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — While the rest
of Lyoto Machida’s lunch party digs
into steaks and cheesecake, he eats
from a small plastic container of
vegetables and pasta.
Machida doesn’t mind. It’s no
small thing to drop 20 pounds as a
mixed martial artist, and the
Brazilian veteran believes he’ll get
the payoff for his sacrifices at UFC
175.
Machida has won and lost a UFC
championship belt during his
lengthy career, and he moved down
from light heavyweight to mid-
dleweight in his quest to win another
title.
“I feel good and strong,” Machida
said through a translator. “I knew I
could do it, and I did it the right way.
Now I’m going to show everybody
that I can win at any weight.”
Machida (21-4) takes on mid-
dleweight champion Chris Weidman
in the main event at UFC 175 in Las
Vegas on Saturday night, headlining
the promotion’s biggest event of the
summer. Bantamweight champion
Ronda Rousey
also faces Alexis
Davis on the card
in the UFC’s
hometown.
M a c h i d a
changed his
body last year to
move down from
the 205-pound
light heavy-
weight limit to the 185-pound mid-
dleweight class, but he didn’t change
his approach. Machida’s slippery,
unorthodox, karate-based fighting
style is still a puzzle for his oppo-
nents, and respected middleweights
Mark Munoz and Gegard Mousasi
failed to solve it in his first two 185-
pound bouts.
Machida believes his agility and
power haven’t suffered in the
change. He feels quicker than most
of his opponents, and his highly
technical fighting style has worked
well against the smaller men.
Yet nobody has ever figured out
how to take on Weidman (11-0), the
former Hofstra wrestler with remark-
able punching power.
Weidman is back in the cage for
the first time
since his second
victory over
Anderson Silva
in devastating
fashion. The for-
mer mid-
dleweight king
broke his shin
while kicking
Weidman’s knee
in the second round of their
December bout, sending him howl-
ing to the Vegas canvas in pain.
Weidman first beat Silva a year
ago, stunning the long-reigning
champion with a second-round
knockout. He was slated to defend
his title against Brazil’s Vitor
Belfort in March, but Belfort missed
the bout after the Nevada Athletic
Commission banned testosterone
replacement therapy.
Weidman then was scheduled to
face Machida at UFC 173 on May
24, but sustained a minor knee injury
that required surgery. He is back at
full strength for his second title
defense, eager to prove his two
strange victories over Silva weren’t
flukes.
Machida faces Weidman at UFC 175
Lyoto Machida Chris Weidman
16
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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come back as defending champions
and can start in front of their home
crowd.”
Five of the 21 stages end in sum-
mit finishes, which usually promise
drama as the cream of the climbers
rises to the top first. In all, the riders
will cover 3,664 kilometers (2,277
miles) of roads in England, France,
Belgium and Spain.
Aside from cobblestone treachery
in Stage 5, the mountains mostly
matter this year. For the first time in
61 years, this Tour has only one
long time trial — a race-against-the-
clock, where racers set off one-by-
one down a starter’s ramp. It comes
in Stage 20. Contador and Froome
are among the best in both climbing
and time-trialing.
This year marks the second time
that the Tour de France is starting in
Britain, after a successful time in
London in 2007. Local officials use
municipal funds to pay for the right
to host the race in their cities, hop-
ing for short-term tourism revenues
plus a longer-term return from the
international media spotlight.
The Tour’s route changes every
year. After three stages in England,
this 101st edition enters France on
Tuesday. The riders will cover many
of the same roads their forebears
covered since the race was first run
in 1903. Among novelties this
year: the first-ever Chinese rider in
the race, Cheng Ji, and 11 climbs in
the eastern Vosges mountains —
though long, steep ascents await in
the Alps and Pyrenees too.
If turnout on English roads during
the 2007 Tour de France is any
precedent — when millions lined up
two- to three-people deep to watch
the pack zip by — expect big
crowds again this year.
Saturday’s 190.5-kilometer (118-
mile) rolling Stage 1 from Leeds to
Harrogate is likely to favor sprint-
ers. The Tour’s green jersey goes to
the best overall sprinter, one of
many subplots to the overall title
chase which includes pure climbers
seeking the polka-dot jersey to be
the best man in the mountains.
Many of the Union Jack-waving
spectators will want Britain’s Mark
Cavendish, perhaps the best sprint-
er of his generation, to get his 26th
career Tour stage victory in
Harrogate, his mother’s hometown.
If he does, he’ll wear the race
leader’s yellow jersey for the first
time in his career — a coveted
honor.
Kate, the Duchess of Cornwall,
will do the honors in bestowing the
prized shirt at the awards ceremony
on Saturday, joining her husband
Prince William and Prince Harry for
a royal welcome for the French
Republic’s best-known annual
sporting event.
Continued from page 11
TDF
Neymar to miss
rest of World Cup
FORTALEZA, Brazil — Brazil’s
team doctor says Neymar will miss
the rest of the World Cup after
breaking a vertebrae during the
team’s quarterfinal win over
Colombia.
Neymar was kneed in the back
by Colombia defender Juan
Camilo Zuniga in the second half
of Brazil’s 2-1 win, and was in
tears when he was carried off the
field on a stretcher.
He was taken to a local clinic
and team doctor Rodrigo Lasmar
said after the match that the star
striker had broken his third verte-
brae.
Neymar is the Brazil’s biggest
star and has scored four goals for
the team so far in the tournament.
Brazil plays Germany in the
semifinals on Tuesday.
American tennis player Duval
has Hodgkins’ lymphoma
LONDON — American tennis
player Victoria Duval, who lost in
the second round at Wimbledon
last week, has been diagnosed
with Hodgkin’s lymphoma and
will undergo immediate treatment
for the cancer.
The player’s management team
said Friday the 18-year-old Duval
was diagnosed after a biopsy was
taken in England before
Wimbledon and further tests in the
United States confirmed the
results.
The statement said Hodgkin’s ,
the most common form of cancer
in adolescents, “was caught in a
very early stage.”
It says Duval “will undergo treat-
ment right away and due to her
overall good health and isolation
of the cancer, the prognosis is a
full recovery in a few months.”
Sports briefs
By Annika Ulrich
O
ver the last few weeks, I have
found that there is one song con-
stantly playing in my head. It’s
not one of this summer’s pop radio hits —
although several of those have proved to
be quite catchy — but “Seasons of Love,”
written and composed by Jonathan Larson
for the musical “Rent.”
Although I have never
had the pleasure of see-
ing “Rent” performed,
the song moves me
every time I hear it. My
favorite part is the
bridge which proclaims,
“Five-hundred-twenty-
five-thousand-six-hun-
dred minutes. How do you measure, measure
a year?”
It’s a powerful question and one that I
have been pondering now that my time at
the Daily Journal is coming to a close and
I’m preparing to start college. How do we
measure our time and what makes it mean-
ingful?
Reflecting on the last 12 months, I real-
ize that the best way for me to measure the
last year is through the Daily Journal.
In addition to serving as a contributor to
the weekly Student News column, I come to
the Daily Journal office every Friday and
assist the staff with various office tasks.
One of those tasks is managing and organ-
izing the community calendar.
When I started working as an intern at
the Daily Journal last July, the entries I was
assigned to enter into the calendar can be
best described as summery: concerts in the
park, wine festivals, barbecues. I got the
hang of the formatting and the summer
events gave way to the pumpkin carving
contests and back-to-school specials of
autumn. Winter and spring followed, and
now I find the entries are much like those I
was inputting when I first started: summer
gatherings celebrating being together as a
community.
Like many good experiences, my time at
the Daily Journal has come full circle. Now,
it’s time to take what I’ve learned with me
How do you
measure a year?
‘Valiant Hearts’
A grim WWI tribute
SEE PAGE 18
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
“The Comedy of Errors,” William
Shakespeare’s shortest play and one of his
earliest, is also one of his funniest, espe-
cially in the California Shakespeare
Theater production.
This story of two sets of twins separated
in infancy results in one hilarious case of
mistaken identity after another when they
all wind up in the same town as adults.
Director Aaron Posner ups the ante by cast-
ing one actor to play one pair of twins and
one to play the other. Then he uses only
five more actors to play everyone else.
The action is set in the ancient Greek
city of Ephesus, where Egeon (Ron
Campbell), a merchant from Syracuse,
comes in search of his son, Antipholus
(Adrian Danzig) and his son’s servant,
Dromio, (Danny Scheie), who in turn are
searching for their long-lost brothers,
also named Antipholus and Dromio.
When the two younger men arrive in
Ephesus, they are mistaken for their twins,
who have lived there for some time, long
enough for Antipholus of Ephesus to be
married to Adriana (Nemuna Ceesay).
The resulting confusion leads to plenty
of laughs. Scheie is especially hilarious in
the scene in which the two Dromios talk to
each other supposedly with a closed gate
between them. Merely by turning his cap
and pivoting a few steps, Scheie becomes
one or the other.
In the meantime, Danzig’s Antipholus of
Syracuse is attracted to Adriana’s younger
sister, Luciana (Tristan Cunningham), who
is torn between her attraction to him and,
believing he’s her brother-in-law, her loy-
alty to Adriana. Both prove to be graceful
dancers (movement directed by Erika
Chong Shuch). Danzig shows considerable
physical skills elsewhere, too.
Besides the actors already named, the
cast features Patty Gallagher and Liam
Vincent, who, like Campbell, create
varied characters thanks to their own
acting skills and Beaver Bauer’s i nven-
tive costumes.
Before the show starts, the actors mingle
with the audience. When they go onto the
stage, they make the pre-show announce-
ments that artistic director Jonathan
Moscone and managing director Susie Falk
usually make on opening nights.
All of this takes place in a dramatic out-
door setting of rolling golden hills and
eucalyptus groves, adding up to a highly
enjoyable experience.
“The Comedy of Errors” will continue at
the Bruns Memorial Amphitheater, 100
California Shakespeare Way (off Highway
24), Orinda, through July 20. For tickets
and information, call (510) 548-9666 or
visit www.calshakes.org.
Cal Shakes stages hilarious ‘Comedy of Errors’
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
If Roger Ebert had never writ-
ten a film review or dramatically
articulated his thumb, he would
have still been a man to admire.
Steve James’ new documen-
tary on the late critic has plenty
on Ebert’s Chicago rise to
Pulitzer-winning reporter, his
unique position as the world’s
most famous film critic and his
robustly populist cinephilia. But
what comes through most in
“Life Itself,” a film named after
Ebert’s 2011 memoir, is his
great, open-minded vigor.
His undying movie love. His
passionate embrace of the
Internet late in life. His bravery
in the face of cancer. His cham-
pioning of overlooked filmmak-
ers. His generous support of
younger critics.
Ebert’s voice grew only
stronger after he lost it. His life
seemed to only swell in integrity
with age. For someone who
made a living in criticism, he
was an unusually positive force,
largely free of the cynicism that
often plagues the profession.
Capturing that is the essence of
“Life Itself,” which, at its best,
has the glow of a wake in an old
Chicago bar, the kind Ebert used
to haunt with regularity and the
kind some of his old newspaper
pals speak from in the documen-
Thumbs up for Ebert doc
See EBERT, Page 18
See STUDENT, Page 18
18
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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tary. Before giving up drinking, Ebert
lived as fast as he wrote.
James has often documented Windy
City tales, including “Hoop Dreams”
and “The Interrupters” — films Ebert
hailed. “Hoop Dreams,” Ebert wrote
with typical directness, “is what the
movies are for. It takes us, shakes us
and makes us think in new ways about
the world around us. It gives us the
impression of having touched life
itself.”
Ebert was defined, perhaps, by that
eagerness to see outside himself. In a
taped speech at the start of the docu-
mentary, he calls the movies “a
machine that generates empathy.”
Of course, he wasn’t a saint. Ebert
could be snippy and egotistical, par-
ticularly when prodded by his “At the
Movies” co-host, Gene Siskel. Some
of the most entertaining clips in “Life
Itself” are familiar videos that have
long been on YouTube of the two bick-
ering in outtakes.
Ebert’s voluminous reviews and sim-
ple, up-or-down judgments, too, were
sometimes derided as “junk food,” as
Time’s Richard Corliss once levied.
Either way, most writers today would
gladly welcome a return to the days
when any single critic held such sway,
regardless of its nutritional value.
Time, in the end, has been kind to
Ebert’s achievement. Corliss sounds
regretful in the documentary, and direc-
tor Werner Herzog’s label of Ebert —
“a soldier of cinema” — has won out.
James began the documentary before
Ebert’s passing at the age of 70 in
April 2013. So the film is full of
footage of Ebert battling his cancer of
the thyroid and salivary glands, and
conspiring with his longtime wife,
Chaz, to sneak out of the hospital to
go to the movies. He even sneaks
information on his medical status to
James that he shields from Chaz. (She,
it should be noted, is in many ways the
hero of the film: an astoundingly
steadfast companion to her husband
through his pain.)
Despite surgeries that removed his
lower jaw and left him unable to speak,
Ebert kept typing away up to the end.
He died a day after announcing his
retirement. Shortly before his death,
he wrote of his life, “You can’t say it
wasn’t interesting.” Thumbs up to
that.
“Life Itself,” a Magnolia Pictures
release, is rated R by the Motion
Picture Association of America “for
brief sexual images/nudity and lan-
guage.” Running time: 118 minutes.
Three stars out of four.
Continued from page 17
EBERT
to college and beyond. Over the last
year I’ve written about Sheryl
Sandberg, thank you cards, my par-
ents and food, among other topics,
for Daily Journal readers. Through
this, I’ve come to understand a power-
ful idea: No matter how old we are or
what background we come from, we
can always find ways to relate to and
connect with each other.
When I was working at the Outlook,
Aragon High School’s student news-
paper, we were constantly asking our-
selves what is relevant to high school
students — even more specifically,
Aragon Dons. While I love writing
for my peers, it was a special chal-
lenge to write for a broader audience,
such as Daily Journal readers.
It was difficult at first but with time I
found that there are so many things
happening in our community and in
the world that are worth talking
about. I learned an incredible amount
both in and out of the Daily Journal
office, and writing these columns
pushed me to really reflect on those
experiences and practice explaining
my ideas in writing. I hope that my
columns sparked thoughts, reactions
or discussions for readers of all ages
and interests.
While the word “grateful” does not
really do my emotions justice, I must
say that I am very grateful for the
experiences being a Daily Journal
intern has given me. These experi-
ences have been especially enriching
because of some very special mentors
and friends. To my Aragon teachers,
thank you for helping me develop the
confidence and skills to share my
thoughts through words. I would also
like to acknowledge my friends and
family for being a part of many of the
memories that would inspire my
columns and for supporting me over
the last 18 years.
To the Daily Journal staff, thank
you for making me laugh, pushing me
to think and creating such a positive
first-job atmosphere.
And of course, my sincere apprecia-
tion to readers. Please know that the
time you have spent reading my
columns, however small, means a
great deal to me.
The seasons never stop changing
and we never stop growing. Use every
single one of those 525,600 minutes
this year and the years after that.
Annika Ulrich is a recent graduate of Aragon
High School in San Mateo. Student News
appears in the weekend edition. You can
email Student News at news@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
Continued from page 17
STUDENT
ABC’s ‘This Week’ 8 a.m.
Gov. Rick Perry, R-Texas; Roman Catholic Bishop Mark
Seitz of El Paso, Texas.
NBC’s ‘Meet the Press’ 8 a.m.
Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson; Rep. Raul
Labrador, R-Idaho; former British Prime Minister Tony
Blair.
CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ 8:30 a.m.
Sens. John McCain, R-Ariz., Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and
Dick Durbin, D-Ill.
CNN’s ‘State of the Union’ 3 p.m.
Rep. Henry Cuellar, D-Texas; Alan Long, mayor of
Murrieta, California; Michelle Howard, the Navy’s first
female four-star admiral.
‘Fox News Sunday’ 8 a.m.
Sens. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., and Bob Casey, D-Pa.; Rep.
Darrell Issa, R-Calif.; Ron Dermer, Israel’s ambassador to
the U.S.
Sunday news shows
By Lou Kesten
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The 100th anniversary of the begin-
ning of World War I has been relative-
ly subdued, without much of the cere-
mony one would expect around such a
historic date. Oddly enough, the most
stirring tribute I’ve seen has come in
the form of a video game — one that
fully appreciates the grim ironies of
“the war to end all wars.”
“Valiant Hearts: The Great War”
(Ubisoft, for the PlayStation 4,
Xbox One, PlayStation 3, Xbox
360, PC, $14.99) is a bracing anti-
dote to the gung-ho violence of
popular combat games like “Call
of Duty.” There’s little joy to be
found in its depiction of the destruc-
tion that overwhelmed Europe from
1914 to 1919. Instead, it follows the
struggles of four ordinary people to
simply survive.
The protagonists are Emile, a
French farmer called up to
fight shortly after the war
begins; Karl, Emile’s
German son-in-law, who is
forced to leave France;
Anna, a Belgian student
who becomes a battlefield
medic; and Freddie, an
American expatriate with a
personal grudge against the
German army.
‘Valiant Hearts’ a grim WWI tribute
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
HELLO GORGEOUS! CHEYENNE
JACKSON GOES TO THE MOVIES
WITH THE SAN FRANCISCO SYM-
PHONY. Broadway and television star
Cheyenne Jackson and the San Francisco
Symphony celebrate famous film music,
beloved musicals and the great leading
men and women of the cinema. Special
guest vocalists Tony Award-winning
Broadway actress Faith Prince, star of
Guys and Dolls and Australia’s most glam-
orous diva and RuPaul’s Drag Race star,
Courtney Act, join Jackson on stage. 7:30
p.m. on Thursday, July 24 and Friday, July
25. Tickets at sfsymphony. org, by phone
at (415) 864-6000, or at Davies
Symphony Hall, 201 Van Ness Ave. San
Francisco. Please note: No film clips will
be shown during this concert.
***
ONCE. FALLING SLOWLY IN
LOVE. Based on the wildly popular film
of the same name, Once is the musical tale
of a Dublin street musician about to give
up on his dream when a beautiful young
woman takes an interest in his haunting
love songs. Adozen performers play their
own instruments onstage, creating a
wealth of music and songs, including the
Academy Award-winning “Falling
Slowly.” Fun fact: The on-stage bar is used
before the show and at intermission as a
working bar for theater patrons. So get
there early and have a pint. SHN Curran
Theatre. 445 Geary St. San Francisco.
(888) 746-1799 and shnsf.com. Through
July 13.
***
FORBIDDEN BROADWAY: ALIVE
AND KICKING! Satirical vignettes of
recent Broadway hits, including The Book
of Mormon, Once, Newsies and Les
Misérables, along with send-ups of
Catherine Zeta Jones, Matthew Broderick,
Patti LuPone, Mandy Patinkin and others.
Feinstein’s at the Nikko, 222 Mason St.
Near Union Square in Downtown San
Francisco. Intimate 140-seat cabaret set-
ting. July 10-27. 8 p.m. Thursday and
Friday; 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday (866)
663-1063 or www.ticketweb.com.
***
SONGS OF THE SEA ON BOARD
THE BALCLUTHA AT FISHERMAN’S
WHARF. We Players, in partnership with
the San Francisco Maritime National
Historical Park, presents a music concert
aboard the tall ship Balclutha on Saturday,
July 19. Canciones del Mar: Songs of the
Sea features a trio of vocalists who per-
form songs about the sea, boats, love and
life, drawn from the folkloric and popular
music traditions of Latin America and the
Caribbean. (415) 547-0189 or
www.weplayers.org .
***
BRIAN COPELAND’S THE SCION
RETURNS TO THE MARSH SF. Actor
and KGO Talk Show Host Brian Copeland
examines the uneasy relationship between
the law and those who believe they are
above it. Copeland recounts the story of
Stuart Alexander, scion of the Santos
Linguisa Factory dynasty in San Leandro,
who gunned down three meat inspectors as
they attempted to enter the facility for an
inspection. Copeland’s fascinating and
observant narrative follows this dark
story from its innocuous start to its twist
ending. 70 minutes without intermission.
July 19 through Aug. 23. Marsh San
Francisco Main Stage. 1062 Valencia St.
(near 22nd Street). (415) 282-3055 or
www.themarsh.org .
***
MELISSA ETHERIDGE WITH THE
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY. Oscar
and two-time Grammy award winning
singer, songwriter and guitarist Melissa
Etheridge performs her classic hits such as
“Come to my Window” and “I’m the Only
One,” as well as material from her latest
studio album and new material from her
next release. With the San Francisco
Symphony. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 30
and Thursday, July 31. Davies Symphony
Hall, 201 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco.
sfsymphony. org or (415) 864-6000.
***
KATYA ON A HOT TIN ROOF.
Celebrated performer Katya Smirnoff-
Skyy brings an all-new cabaret evening,
Katya On a Hot Tin Roof, to New
Conservatory Theatre Center, for two
nights only, Aug. 1 and 2, as a benefit for
NCTC. San Mateo native J. Conrad Frank,
who created and performs as Katya
Smirnoff-Skyy, is a longtime NCTC col-
laborator and alumnus of NCTC’s
Emerging Artist Program. Frank has been
performing as Katya Smirnoff-Skyy for
nine years, including sold-out shows in
New York and Provincetown and locally at
Feinstein’s at The Nikko, the former Rrazz
Room, Eureka Theater and Z Below; he
also appears in a monthly show at
Martuni’s piano bar, and hosts Broadway
Bingo at Feinstein’s at the Nikko. Katya’s
limited engagement kicks off with Friday
Night Fun 8 p.m. Aug. 1. $35. Aug. 2 is
Saturday Night Spectacular, featuring a
complimentary light fare and champagne
reception, in-performance cocktail serv-
ice and a live auction. Show at 8 p.m. is
followed by a live auction. $85. (415)
871-8972 or nctcsf.org. New
Conservatory Theatre Center is located at
25 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco, near
Civic Center.
Susan Cohn is a member of the San Francisco
Bay Area Theatre Critics Circle and the
American Theatre Critics Association. She may
be reached at susan@smdailyjournal.com.
HOT TIME, SUMMER IN THE CITY. Actor, singer and songwriter Cheyenne Jackson appears at
Davies Symphony Hall July 24 and 25 as part of the SFS Summer and The Symphony concert
lineup.
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Adam Levine knows pop
stars-turned-actors are greeted suspiciously.
And he’s hesitant to make any grandiose
declarations about suddenly transforming
into an actor. But he also can’t help himself.
Following his movie debut in the recently
released “Begin Again,” the Maroon 5 front-
man is exuberant about a potentially bud-
ding movie career.
“It really made me fall in love,” said
Levine about “Begin Again” in a recent
interview. “It’s the very beginning of some-
thing really cool.”
The transition is unusually seamless for
Levine in “Begin Again,” a naturalistic
indie about musicians in New York by
“Once” director John Carney. Levine plays
an aspiring musician, the boyfriend to a
singer-songwriter played by Keira
Knightley. But it’s his breakthrough that’s
brought them to New York, and his fast-
growing fame pulls the couple apart.
“I had been through that before, maybe
not the same version,” says Levine of the
tumult of sudden fame. “That’s what con-
nected me to this guy. I immediately under-
stood exactly what needed to be done with
this character just based on my life’s experi-
ence.”
The 35-year-old Levine grew up in Los
Angeles, so acting in movies was, he says,
always “somewhere in the back of my
mind.”
Adam Levine changes
his tune in ‘Begin Again’
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, JULY 5
Red Cross Blood Drive. 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints, 975 Sneath Lane,
San Bruno. For more information
call (800) REDCROSS.
‘Where I Live’ Reception. 5 p.m. to
7 p.m. The Main Gallery, 1018 Main
St., Redwood City. Free. For more
information email
tmgginger@gmail.com.
The 2014 Annual Kellicut
International Juried
Photography Show Reception. 5
p.m. to 8 p.m. The Coastal Arts
League Museum, 300 Main St., Half
Moon Bay. For more information
call 726-6335.
Stanford Jazz Festival: Pacific
Mambo Orchestra. 8 p.m.
Dinkelspiel Auditorium, 471
Lagunita Drive, Stanford. Pre-con-
cert talk by KCSM Jazz 91.1 DJ Chuy
Varela starts at 7 p.m. Ticket prices
vary and can be purchased at
www.stanfordjazztickets.org or by
calling 725-2787. For more informa-
tion call 725-2787.
SUNDAY, JULY 6
First Sunday Line Dance with
Tina Beare and Jeanette
Feinberg. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Carlos. $5. For
more information call 616-7150.
Concerts in the Park. 1 p.m. to 4
p.m. Twin Pines Meadow, Belmont.
Free. For more information call
Andrea De Lara at 637-2976.
Vets to Vets Blues Festival. 1 p.m.
to 6 p.m. American Legion
Coastside Post 474, 470 Capistrano
Road, Princeton. Food and drink
available for purchase. Bring blan-
kets and arm chairs. Free. For more
information call 728-9224.
Jeff Denson’s Secret World. 4:30
p.m. The Bach Dancing and
Dynamite Society at the Douglas
Beach House, 307 Mirada Road, Half
Moon Bay. Denson’s music is
steeped in the jazz tradition and
inventively mixes composed and
improvised music. Doors open at 3
p.m. Tickets are $35 ($30 for youth)
and can be purchased at
www.bachddsoc.org.
Dad and Me at the Pool. 4 p.m. to
6 p.m. La Petite Baleen, 775 Main
St., Half Moon Bay. Free. For more
information call 802-5090.
Lifetree Cafe Conversations:
When Anxiety Strikes. 7 p.m.
Bethany Lutheran Church, 1095
Cloud Ave., Menlo Park.
Complimentary snacks and bever-
ages will be served. For more infor-
mation call 854-5897.
Stanford Jazz Festival: Jim Nadel
and Friends. 7:30 p.m to 9 p.m.
Campbell Recital Hall, 541 Lasuen
Mall, Stanford. Ticket are $10 if
bought in advance, $15 at the door
and free for children under 17 and
can be purchased at www.stanford-
jazztickets.org or by calling 725-
2787. For more information call
725-2787.
MONDAY, JULY 7
Financial Literacy and
Entrepreneurship. 8:30 a.m. to
noon. Silicon Valley Community
Foundation 1300 S. El Camino Real,
No. 100 San Mateo. Free. Continues
through July 11. For more informa-
tion call 401-4662.
TV Studio Production Summer
Camp. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Media
Center, 900 San Antonio Road, Palo
Alto. Camp continues through July
11. For more information and to
register call 494-8686.
Lifetree Cafe Conversations:
When Anxiety Strikes. 9:15 a.m.
Bethany Lutheran Church, 1095
Cloud Ave., Menlo Park.
Complimentary snacks and bever-
ages will be served. For more infor-
mation call 854-5897.
Author Talk: Sean Davis: The Wax
Bullet War. 6:30 p.m. Municipal
Services Building, 33 Arroyo Drive,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information call Adam Elsholz at
829-3867.
TUESDAY, JULY 8
Red Cross Blood Drive. Hillsdale
Garden Apartments, 3500 Edison
St., San Mateo. For more informa-
tion call (800) REDCROSS.
Coventry and Kaluza Clowns. 5
p.m. and 7 p.m. Burlingame Public
Library, 480 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. Free tickets are avail-
able in the Main Library. For more
information contact John Piche at
piche@plsinfo.org.
Puppet Art Theater show. 6:30
p.m. San Mateo Public Library, 55 W.
Third Ave., San Mateo. Part of the
Paws to Read summer reading pro-
gram for children. For more infor-
mation call 522-7818.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 9
Community Health Screening. 9
a.m. to 11 a.m. Senior Focus, 1720 El
Camino Real, Suite 10, Burlingame
(across from Mills-Peninsula). Pre-
registration is required. To pre-reg-
ister, call 696-3660. $25 for seniors
62 plus; $30 for those under 62.
‘Living Well with Chronic
Conditions.’ 9:30 a.m. to noon. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. Six week
program. Free. For more informa-
tion call 616-7150.
Free Job Search Assistance. 10
a.m. Peninsula JCC, 800 Foster City
Blvd., Foster City. Take advantage of
our free workshops as well as indi-
vidual support from a professional
job coach. Free. Go to
www.jvs.org/jeanine to register.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admis-
sion, but lunch is $17. For more
information call 430-6500 or email
Mike Foor at mike@mikefoor.com.
San Mateo County Registration
and Elections Division Seminars
for Candidates. 2 p.m. 40 Tower
Road, San Mateo. Register at
www. shapethefuture. org/el ec-
tions/2014/november or by con-
tact Jamie Kuryllo at 312-5202 or at
jkuryllo@smcare.org. All seminars
are open to the public. For more
information contact Mark Church
at 312-5222 or email
registrar@smcare.org.
What’s On Wednesday Game Day.
3 p.m. Burlingame Public Library,
480 Primrose Road, Burlingame. All
programs for students sixth-grade
and up. For more information con-
tact John Piche at
piche@plsinfo.org.
Chair yoga. 7 p.m. Millbrae Library,
1 Library Ave., Millbrae. Flexibility,
strength, concentration and health.
For more information call 697-
7607.
Rock Steady Juggling with Doug
Nolan. 7p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Innovative blend of environmental
education and variety entertain-
ment for children. For more infor-
mation call 591-8286 or email bel-
mont@smcl.org.
THURSDAY, JULY 10
Physics lesson for kids. 2 p.m. San
Mateo Main Public Library, 55 W.
Third Ave., San Mateo. Part of the
library’s Paws to Read summer pro-
gram for children. For more infor-
mation call 522-7818.
San Mateo Central Park Music
Series: California Cowboys. 6 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Central Park on East Fifth
Avenue, San Mateo. Free. Continues
every Thursday evening until Aug.
14. For more information go to
www.cityofsanmateo.org.
Bay Area Street Art with Author
Steve Rotman. 6 p.m. South San
Francisco Main Library, 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco.
Free. For more information call 829-
3867.
Theatre/S.F. Mime Troupe — 55th
Summer Season Announcement.
6:30 p.m. Mitchell Park, 600 E.
Meadow Drive, Palo Alto. For more
information email lhelman@sbc-
global.net.
Public Meeting. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Montara Room, Oceano Hotel, 280
Capistrano Road, Half Moon Bay.
The meeting concerns the San
Mateo Harbor District Strategic
Business Plan. Free. For more infor-
mation call 726-5727.
Movies on the square, E.T. 8:45
p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 787-7311.
FRIDAY, JULY 11
Summer Socials: Ballroom Dance
Party! Dance Vita Ballroom, 85 W.
43 Ave., San Mateo. $15. For more
information call 571-0836.
Twentieth Century History and
Music Class. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. $2 drop-in
fee. For more information call 616-
7150.
Start and Grow Smart Workshop:
Starting a Business. 1 p.m. to 4
p.m. Silicon Valley Community
Foundation, 1300 S. El Camino Real,
San Mateo. $25 for those unem-
ployed, $60 for employed. To regis-
ter go to www.phase2careers.org.
For more information email Ron
Visconti at ronvisconti@sbcglob-
al.net.
Calendar
For more events visit
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and Alaska.
The long list of products in the
recall include drumsticks, thighs,
chicken tenders and livers. Most are
sold with the Foster Farms label but
some have the labels FoodMaxx,
Kroger, Safeway, Savemart, Valbest
and Sunland. No fresh products cur-
rently in grocery stores are involved.
The USDA said it was working with
the company to determine the total
amount of chicken affected by the
recall.
The company emphasized that the
recall was based on a single case and a
single product but the broad recall is
being issued in an abundance of cau-
t i on.
“Our first concern is always the
health and safety of the people who
enjoy our products, and we stand com-
mitted to doing our part to enhance the
safety of our nation’s food supply, ”
Foster Farms said in a statement.
The federal Centers for Disease
Control says 574 people from 27
states and Puerto Rico have been sick-
ened since the outbreak began in
2013, leading to increasing pressure
from food safety advocates for a recall
or even an outright shutdown of
Foster Farms facilities.
Bill Marler, a Seattle attorney who
specializes in class-action food-safe-
ty lawsuits, commended both Foster
Farms and the USDA for “doing the
right thing for food safety. ”
“Recalling product is both embar-
rassing and hard, but is the right
thing to do for your customers,”
Marler said.
The company was linked to previ-
ous salmonella illnesses in 2004 and
in 2012.
Recalls of poultry contaminated
with salmonella are tricky because the
law allows raw chicken to have a cer-
tain amount of salmonella — a rule
that consumer advocates have long
lobbied to change. Because salmonel-
la is so prevalent in poultry and is
killed if consumers cook it properly,
the government has not declared it to
be an “adulterant,” or illegal, in meat,
as is E. coli.
In a letter from USDA to Foster
Farms last October, the department
said inspectors had documented “fecal
material on carcasses” along with
“poor sanitary dressing practices,
insanitary food contact surfaces,
insanitary nonfood contact surfaces
and direct product contamination.”
Foster Farms said in May that it had
put new measures in place, including
tighter screening of birds, improved
safety on the farms where the birds are
raised and better sanitation in its
plants.
Continued from page 1
RECALL
in the area to better serve our cus-
tomers.”
Most of the restaurants, selected by
the San Francisco-based company
which has raised $13 million in fund-
ing, are places that are pretty well
known and sometimes have another
location in another market, Wang said.
Other restaurants in the region span-
ning from northern Burlingame to
Palo Alto include Jeffery’s
Hamburgers, Pampas, Aly’s on Main
and Tacolicious.
Caviar’s differentiation points
include high-quality photos, a wide
delivery zone and very varied food.
Another factor that makes them stand
out from Seamless, GrubHub and Eat24
is that the company is one of the few
food delivery services that does the
delivery for the restaurants, Wang said.
Fluc, based in Palo Alto, does the
same.
“A lot of good restaurants out there
don’t deliver,” said Wang, who helped
begin the startup in the summer of
2012.
With a new website just launched,
there are other developments on the
horizon for the company. It’s working
on native apps along with adding more
restaurants to the Peninsula. The com-
pany is looking at adding one or two
eateries along the Peninsula each
week. There’s also no minimum order-
ing requirements and the company
promises food to arrive within an hour.
Why go with Caviar?
“One frustration of delivery today is
you never know where the food is when
you order it,” Wang said. “We give you
tracking each step of the way. ”
For now, about 70 percent of volume
is actually individuals, but the revenue
is equally split between individuals
and companies that order food.
The first delivery is free for those
who live or work between Burlingame
and Palo Alto. The company also
delivers in the East Bay and San
Francisco markets, along with the
Manhattan, Chicago, Boston, Seattle
and Uptown Manhattan regions.
Visit trycaviar.com for more infor-
mation.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
CAVIAR
By Lou Kesten
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Japanese imports have a mixed
record of success in the United States.
Sure, Americans love karaoke and
Hello Kitty. Sumo wrestling and fugu,
not so much.
So while Nintendo has made a for-
tune selling Mario, Pokemon and
dozens of other video-game heroes to
us, not everything makes it safely
across the Pacific. “Tomodachi Life”
(Nintendo, for the 3DS, $39.99) has
been a huge hit in Japan since its
release last year — but something got
lost in translation.
“Tomodachi” (which means “friend”)
is a simplified version of a “life simu-
lator” like Electronic Arts’ “The
Sims.” All your Miis — cartoon
avatars that represent yourself, friends
and family members in the Nintendo
universe — live in an apartment build-
ing on a festive island.
You can build new islanders from
scratch and give them a handful of per-
sonality quirks. You can trade Miis
with pals and download celebrities like
Christina Aguilera and Shaquille
O’Neal. The Miis can play games, go
on dates, even get married and have
children, although some U.S. players
have protested the inability to build
same-sex relationships.
You don’t have any direct control of
your virtual friends. They may ask you
for advice on, say, whether to ask a
friendly neighbor out on a date.
Occasionally they’ll invite you to take
simple quizzes or solve rudimentary
puzzles.
Usually, they just want you to buy
them stuff, generally clothes, hats,
food or furniture. These Miis are a shal-
low bunch indeed, and they don’t show
much ambition beyond acquiring new
goodies. You can teach them songs and
catchphrases, but most of the time it’s
“gimme, gimme, gimme.”
In that regard, it’s a lot like
Nintendo’s own “Animal Crossing,”
whose quirky critters are just as acquis-
itive. But somehow it’s less charming
when other people, rather than mon-
keys and penguins and elephants, are
sponging off you.Perhaps talking
ducks and hippos are just inherently
funnier, but I found the people in
“Tomodachi” relatively dull.
‘Tomodachi’ colorful but dull
COMICS/GAMES
7-5-14
FRIDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Idle away time
5 Impose
10 Dome
12 Mind teaser
13 Customer
14 Win over
15 Reddish-brown color
16 Campground initials
18 Mineral spring
19 Plane part
23 Elevator buttons
26 German article
27 Part of SWAK
30 Capitalist’s goal
32 Royal residence
34 Orchestral instruments
35 Scavenging animals
36 Give the impression
37 Unhatched fish
38 AARP members
39 Scales
42 Physique
45 Kimono sash
46 Franklin’s flier
50 They have pseudopods
53 Manuscript fixer
55 Dirge
56 Finds a new tenant
57 Wry humor
58 Shade trees
DOWN
1 Kauai feast
2 — out (withdraws)
3 Ventricle neighbor
4 Andy Capp’s wife
5 Fish’s rudder
6 Peculiar
7 Fateful day
8 High-five
9 Prefix for “trillion”
10 EMT technique
11 Short socks
12 Be a parent
17 Above, to Tennyson
20 Common phrases
21 Approved
22 World’s longest river
23 Checkout ID
24 U.S. leader
25 Type of survivor
28 Minus
29 Wound remnant
31 Tiny insect
32 Less sincere
33 Slalom run
37 CSA defender
40 Price tag
41 Know-how
42 Romantic island
43 Bradley or Sharif
44 Audition tape
47 Part of an agenda
48 Little kids
49 Hesitant sounds
51 Dr. Casey of ‘60s TV
52 — day now
54 Fiddle-de- —
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
SATURDAY, JULY 5, 2014
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Feel free to make
suggestions, but remember that others aren’t obliged
to do as you say. Don’t be grumpy if you can’t get what
you want. Accept the inevitable.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — You can form a gratifying
partnership with someone who shares your values and
your high standards. Good communication and mutual
respect will help you to meet your financial target.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Don’t be overwhelmed
by your agenda. Take one step at a time until you reach
your destination. Learn from experience and savor the
moments that bring you joy.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — You need to face up to
the issues that you’ve been avoiding. It’s quite possible
that you have blown things out of proportion. Stop
procrastinating, and do what needs to be done.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Don’t be too quick
to sign on the dotted line. Your time and money are
precious and shouldn’t be taken lightly. Get all the
facts before you consider a new project.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — You have a knack
for commanding attention. Your entertaining way of
speaking will make you an impressive leader at any
event or function. Have fun and enjoy the moment.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Keep your finances
and legal documents stored securely away. Don’t trust
anyone who is prying into your personal affairs. Listen
and observe, and you will avoid meddling.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — You can
accomplish plenty if you let your inhibitions go
and your imagination run wild. Your plans will fall
effortlessly into place. Romance and love will play a
big part in your day.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Reduce the drudgery
of your domestic chores by enlisting the help of
friends. By spreading the work around, you will have
time left over to enjoy a meal together.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Be agreeable and
adaptable today. You may end up heading in a different
direction, but going along with the crowd for now will
take the pressure off of you to make thing happen.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — To decide the best
course of action, different viewpoints are essential.
Discussions with others in your chosen field will
help you to make the right decisions. Network with
others and learn.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Lighthearted
entertainment is exactly what you need. Your friends
will be delighted if you take part in an event or activity
that requires someone with skills like yours.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
BUS DRIVER JOBS
AVAILABLE TODAY
AT MV TRANSPORTATION
Join us in providing safe, reliable and professional community
transportation in San Mateo County.
Please call:
Redwood City 934 Brewster Ave (650) 482-9370
CDLDrivers
needed immediately for Passenger Vehicle and
Small Bus routes.
Paid classroom and behind-the-wheel training from exception-
al instructors and trainers. The future is bright for Bus Drivers
with an expected 12.5% growth in positions over the next ten
years!
MV Transportation, Inc. provides equal employment and affir-
mative action opportunities to minorities, females, veterans,
and disabled individuals, as well as other protected groups.
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
For assisted living facility
in South San Francisco
On the Job Training Available.
All Shifts Available
Apply in person
Westborough Royale,
89 Westborough Blvd, South SF
CAREGIVERS
WANTED
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
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104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
106 Tutoring
TUTORING SERVICE
Math & English
1st to 8th grade
$25/hour +
$10 for home visits
Call Andrew
(415)279-3453
Employment Services
PROJECT ENGINEER -
Ivalua seeks Project Engineer to devel-
op/direct softw. development projects.
MS in Com.Sci. or Com.Eng.& 6 month
exp. req. Worksite: Redwood City, CA.
Mail résumé to Ms. Lelievre. Ivalua,
Inc, 702 Marshall St. #520, Redwood
City, CA 94063.
110 Employment
BAKERY-
HIRING PT cashier/sandwich maker.
Email resume: vco06@yahoo.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS WANTED -- Home Care
for Elderly - Hourly or Live-in, Day or
Night Shifts, Top Pay, Immediate Place-
ment. Required: Two years paid experi-
ence with elderly or current CNA certifi-
cation; Pass background, drug and other
tests; Drive Car; Speak and write English
Email resume to: jobs@starlightcaregiv-
ers.com Call: (650) 600-8108
Website: www.starlightcaregivers.com
110 Employment
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Customer Service
Are you…..Dependable, friendly,
detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English
skills, a desire for steady
employment and employment
benefits?
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: 650-342-6978
DRIVERS FOR TAXIS
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed per Month. Taxi Permit
required Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS,
HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 200
San Mateo, CA 94401
Please Call
650-206-5200
Or Toll Free:
800-380-7988
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or apply
online at www.assistainhomecare.com
RESTAURANT -
Downtown restaurant seeking servers,
minimum one year experience.
Call (650)343-9292 or email
johnkang28@gmail.com
KITCHEN-
PREP/COOKS needed FT/PT
Redwood City Call (650)678-8886
23 Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
Limo Driver and Taxi Driver, Wanted,
full time, paid weekly, between $500 and
$700, (650)921-2071
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RETAIL -
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
EXPERIENCED DIAMOND
SALES ASSOC& ASST MGR
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
NOW HIRING
Kitchen Staff
$9.00 per hr.
Apply in Person at or
email resume to
info@greenhillsretirement.com
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
DOJ/FBI Clearance required
RESTAURANT -
Line Cooks
at Jacks Prime Burgers
-Thursday-Monday evenings 4:30-
10pm
- 20 hrs a week
-.Read tickets in English
- 2 days off together
- Kitchen Bonus Pool (extra $2 hour)
-$11-$15/hr depending on experience.
Call Grace 650-458-0021
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261139
The following person is doing business
as: Kathryn Ullrich Associates, 17 Oak
Valley Rd., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Kathryn Ullrich, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Kathryn Ullrich /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/10/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/14/14, 06/21/14, 06/28/14, 07/05/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261184
The following person is doing business
as: Pho Do, 1230 El Camino Real, Ste.
D, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Pho
Do Inc., CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Tan Vinh Huynh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/12/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/14/14, 06/21/14, 06/28/14, 07/05/14).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 528722
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Larisa Marie Naples &
Peter Meng-Chai White
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner: Larisa Marie Naples & Peter
Meng-Chai White filed a petition with this
court for a decree changing name as fol-
lows:
Present name: a) Larisa Marie Naples, b)
Estifanos Naples White,
Propsed Name: a) Larisa Ananda White,
b) Estifanos White
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on July 22,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/10/14
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/09/2014
(Published, 06/14/14, 06/21/2014,
06/28/2014, 07/05/2014)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260865
The following person is doing business
as: Instaglam Hair Studio, 136 School
St., DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Karen
Leonor Howay, 275 Rio Verde St., DALY
CITY, CA 94014. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on .
/s/ Karen Howay/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/19/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/14/14, 06/21/14, 06/28/14, 07/05/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261212
The following person is doing business
as: Bayhill Spa, 851 Cherry Ave #29
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Bayhill Spa,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
N/A.
/s/ Xiang Li Hao /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/14/14, 06/21/14, 06/28/14, 07/05/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261208
The following person is doing business
as: Co-Op Insurance Services, 113 Bay
View Dr., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Anthony Chi Tak Cheung,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on July 1, 2014.
/s/ Anthony Chi Cheung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/14/14, 06/21/14, 06/28/14, 07/05/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261204
The following person is doing business
as: AMP Janitorial Services, 121 S.
Humboldt St., SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Mardoqueo Francisco Perez and
Angelica Ororzco Vasquez, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by a
Married Couple. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Mardoqueo Perez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/12/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/21/14, 06/28/14, 07/05/14, 07/12/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261136
The following person is doing business
as: Pacific Sky Dental, 6433 Mission St.,
DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Raymond
Jone, DDS, Professional Corporatio, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tio. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Raymond Jone /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/09/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/21/14, 06/28/14, 07/05/14, 07/12/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261059
The following person is doing business
as: San Mateo Dental, 320 N. San Mateo
Dr., Ste 3, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Paul Diercks, 631 Hayne Rd., Hillsbor-
ough, CA 9010. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on May 01, 2014.
/s/ Paul Diercks /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/28/14, 07/05/14, 07/12/14, 07/19/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261354
The following person is doing business
as: E. g. Story Arts, 434 D St., DALY
CITY, CA 94014 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Eric Grivas same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 06/25/2014.
/s/ Eric Grivas /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/25/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/28/14, 07/05/14, 07/12/14, 07/19/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261368
The following person is doing business
as: Tantalized, 387 Grand Ave., SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Geni-
ana M. Neto, 1 Devonshire Blvd. #9, San
Carlos, CA 94070 . The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Gieniana M. Neto /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/26/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/28/14, 07/05/14, 07/12/14, 07/19/14).
STATEMENT OF WITHDRAWAL FROM
A PARTNERSHIP OPERATING UNDER
A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255826
The following person Mailin C. Zoll has
withdrwan as a general partner from the
partnership operating under the Fictitious
Business Name of GMG Delivery Serv-
ices, 399 Sequoia Ave, REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94061. The fictitious business
name for the partnership was filed on
5/9/13 in the county of San Mateo. The
full name and residence of the person
withdrawing as a partner: Mailin C. Zoll,
399 Sequoia Ave, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94061.
/s/ Mailin Zoll /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 06/06/2014. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 06/14/2014,
06/21/2014, 06/28/2014, 07/05/2014).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - silver locket on May 6, Crest-
view and Club Dr. Call to describe:
(650)598-0823
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
210 Lost & Found
FOUND: KEYS (3) on ring with 49'ers
belt clip. One is car key to a Honda.
Found in Home Depot parking lot in San
Carlos on Sunday 2/23/14.
Call 650 490-0921 - Leave message if no
answer.
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST HEARING AID
Inside a silver color case. Lost around
May 15 in Burlingame possibly near
Lunardi’s or Our Lady of Angels
Church. Please let me know if you’ve
found it! Call FOUND!
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
50 SHADES of Grey Trilogy, Excellent
Condition $25. (650)615-0256
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOKS, PAPERBACK/HARD cover,
Coonts, Higgins, Thor, Follet, Brown,
more $20.00 for 60 books, (650)578-
9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
295 Art
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest
Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169
296 Appliances
OMELETTE MAKER $10. also hot pock-
ets, etc. EZ clean 650-595-3933
PONDEROSA WOOD STOVE, like
new, used one load for only 14 hours.
$1,200. Call (650)333-4400
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SANYO REFRIGERATOR with size 33”
high & 20" wide in very good condition
$85. 650-756-9516.
SEARS KENMORE sewing machine in a
good cabinet style, running smoothly
$99. 650-756-9516.
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
MAGNA 26” Female Bike, like brand
new cond $80. (650)756-9516. Daly City
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all
(650)365-3987
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FRANKLIN MINT Thimble collection with
display rack. $55. 650-291-4779
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
24
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
298 Collectibles
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
299 Computers
1982 TEXAS Instruments TI-99/4A com-
puter, new condition, complete accesso-
ries, original box. $75. (650)676-0974
300 Toys
K'NEX BUILDING ideas $30. (650)622-
6695
LEGO DUPLO Set ages 1 to 5. $30
(650)622-6695
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
SMALL WOOD dollhouse 4 furnished
rooms. $35 650-558-8142
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $700. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BLUE NINTENDO DS Lite. Hardly used.
$70 OBO. (760) 996-0767
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
COMBO COLOR T.V. 24in. Toshiba with
DVD VHS Flat Screen Remote. $95. Cell
number: (650)580-6324
COMBO COLOR T.V. Panasonic with
VHS and Radio - Color: White - 2001
$25. Cell number: (650)580-6324
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
303 Electronics
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
OLD STYLE 32 inch Samsung TV. Free
with pickup. Call 650-871-5078.
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
SONY TRINITRON 21” Color TV. Great
Picture and Sound. $39. (650)302-2143
TUNER-AMPLIFER, for home use. $35
(650)591-8062
WESTINGHOUSE 32” Flatscreen TV,
model#SK32H240S, with HDMI plug in
and remote, excellent condition. Two
available, $175 each. (650)400-4174
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
3 PIECE cocktail table with 2 end tables,
glass tops. good condition, $99.
(650)574-4021l
BED RAIL, Adjustable. For adult safety
like new $45 SOLD!
BURGUNDY VELVET reupholstered vin-
tage chair. $75. Excellent condition.
650-861-0088
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549
COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for key-
board, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465
COUCH - Drexel 3 piece sectional, neu-
tral color, good condition. $275 OBO.
Call (650)369-7896
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER with
shelves for books, pure oak. Purchased
for $750. Sell for $99. (650)348-5169
FREE SOFA and love seat set. good
condtion (650)630-2329
FULL SIZE mattress & box in very good
condition $80.(650)756-9516. Daly City
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LIVING & Dining Room Sets. Mission
Style, Trestle Table w/ 2 leafs & 6
Chairs, Like new $600 obo
(831)768-1680
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
NICHOLS AND Stone antique brown
spindle wood rocking chair. $99
650 302 2143
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OCCASIONAL, END or Sofa Table. $25.
Solid wood in excellent condition. 20" x
22". 650-861-0088.
304 Furniture
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $80
OBO RETAIL $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PIANO AND various furniture pieces,
golf bag. $100-$300 Please call for info
(650)740-0687
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
RECLINER LA-Z-BOY Dark green print
fabric, medium size. 27” wide $45.
SOLD!
ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condi-
tion with pads, $85.OBO 650 369 9762
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR, decorative wood /
armrest, it swivels rocks & rolls
$99.00.650-592-2648
SOFA - excelleNT condition. 8 ft neutral
color $99 OBO (650)345-5644
SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33” x 78”
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STURDY OAK TV or End Table. $35.
Very good condition. 30" x 24". 650-861-
0088
TEA/ UTILITY Cart, $15. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for ster-
eo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS (2) stainless steel,
temperature resistent handles, 21/2 & 4
gal. $5. (650) 574-3229.
COOLER/WARMER, UNOPENED, Wor-
thy Mini Fridge/warmer, portable, handle,
plug, white $30.00 (650) 578 9208
ELECTRIC FAN Wind Machine 20in.
Portable Round Plastic Adjustable $35
Cell number: (650)580-6324
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
KING BEDSPREAD/SHAMS, mint con-
dition, white/slight blue trim, $20.
(650)578-9208
NEW FLOURESCENT lights, ten T-12
tubes, only $2.50 ea 650-595-3933
306 Housewares
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
SINGER ELECTRONIC sewing machine
model #9022. Cord, foot controller
included. $99 O.B.O. (650)274-9601 or
(650)468-6884
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUUM EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WUSTHOF HENCKLES Sabatier Chica-
go professional cooking knives. 7 knives
of assorted styles. $99. 650-654-9252
307 Jewelry & Clothing
COSTUME JEWELRY Earrings $25.00
Call: 650-368-0748
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
308 Tools
27 TON Hydraulic Log Splitter 6.5 hp.
Vertical & horizontal. Less than 40hrs
w/trailer dolly & cover. ** SOLD **
AIR COMPRESSOR M#EX600200
Campbell Hausfield 3 Gal 1 HP made
USA $40.00 used, (650)367-8146
AIR COMPRESSOR, 60 gallon, 2-stage
DeVilbiss. Very heavy. $390. Call
(650)591-8062
BLACK & DECKER 17” electric hedge
trimmer, New, $25 (650)345-5502
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6" bench grinder $40.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
WHEELBARROW. BRAND new, never
used. Wood handles. $50 or best offer.
(650) 595-4617
309 Office Equipment
CANON ALL in One Photo Printer PIX-
MA MP620 Never used. In original box
$150 (650)477-2177
310 Misc. For Sale
50” FRESNEL lens $99 (650)591-8062
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55.
(650)269-3712
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER selectric II
good condition, needs ribbon (type
needed attached) $35 San Bruno
(650)588-1946
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
FLOWER POT w/ 10 Different cute
succulents, $5.(650)952-4354
310 Misc. For Sale
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LEATHER BRIEFCASE Stylish Black
Business Portfolio Briefcase. $20. Call
(650)888-0129
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10"x10",
cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NEW SONICARE Toothbrush in box 3e
series, rechargeable, $49 650-595-3933
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208
311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, ex-
cellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, ex-
cellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
KAMAKA CONCERT sized Ukelele,
w/friction tuners, solid Koa wood body,
made in Hawaii, 2007 great tone, excel-
lent condition, w/ normal wear & tear.
$850. (650)342-5004
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337
312 Pets & Animals
AQUARIUM,” MARINA Cool 10”, 2.65
gallons, new pump. $20. (650)591-1500
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500
315 Wanted to Buy
WE BUY
Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
ALPINESTAR JEANS - Tags Attached.
Twin Stitched. Knee Protection. Never
Used! Blue/Grey Sz34 $65.
(650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
DAINESE BOOTS - Zipper/Velcro Clo-
sure. Cushioned Ankle. Reflective Strip.
Excellent Condition! Unisex EU40 $65.
(650)357-7484
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
317 Building Materials
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
318 Sports Equipment
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.
(650)637-0930
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DIGITAL PEDOMETER, distance, calo-
ries etc. $7.50 650-595-3933
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840
HJC MOTORCYCLE Helmet, size large,
perfect cond $29 650-595-3933
IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiber-
glass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
NORDIC TRACK 505, Excellent condi-
tion but missing speed dial (not nec. for
use) $35. 650-861-0088.
NORDIC TRACK Pro, $95. Call
(650)333-4400
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
SOCCER BALL, unopened, unused,
Yellow, pear shaped, unique. $5.
(650)578 9208
STATIONARY BIKE $25. Cell number:
(650)580-6324
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
25 Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Harassed, in a
way
10 Lenox brand
15 Busy state to go
into
16 Boiling
17 Made for the
tube
18 Decalogue
delivery site
19 They may hook
you up, briefly
20 Ranks achieved
by Armstrong
and Lovell
22 Los __, city
near San Luis
Obispo
24 Greenland
capital
25 Flanged bit of
hardware
26 Powder holder
28 Added a little to
the pot
30 Took in takeout
31 First lady after
Bess
33 Kind
35 Kind of support
38 “Tritsch-Tratsch-
Polka”
composer
39 “The Fox and
the Hound”
hound
40 Stops running?
41 Beluga output
42 Arabian capital
44 “__ luego”
48 Bald eagle
cousins
50 Settles
52 Start of many a
prayer
53 Events after
shootings
56 Crib cry
57 Gugino of
“Night at the
Museum”
58 Exterminator’s
target
60 Hindu principle
of life
61 “The Raven”
feature
62 Pains
63 Pump house?
DOWN
1 Zoom
2 Yet
3 Hold on a mat
4 Start to date?
5 It’s
uncomfortable to
be on it
6 Sign of age
7 Large, long-
billed marsh bird
8 Satan
9 Respectable
10 Round snow toy
11 “That’s __!”:
“Funny!”
12 Otherworldly
greeting?
13 Former bills
14 Bums’ American
counterparts
21 Look that way
23 Recap
27 Stuns in an
arrest
29 Sith title
32 Rumba shaker
34 Cavity opening?
35 Cork alternative
36 Elizabethan
property tax to
benefit the
disadvantaged
37 Title words
before “Nothing
to hide,” in a
Journey hit
38 Collide with
40 MIT rival,
despite the
distance
43 Some agents
45 Site of a 1976
anti-apartheid
uprising
46 Broker’s
customer
47 Hold tight
49 Fall sound
51 Spiders’
sensors, e.g.
54 Sweeps the
set
55 Virtual people,
in a popular
game series
59 Ferret, for one
By Melanie Miller
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
07/05/14
07/05/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $79
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER WITH basket $30. Invacare
Excellent condition (650)622-6695
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WHEEL CHAIR, heavy duty, wide, excel-
lent condition. $99.(650)704-7025
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT – Large Renovated 1BR,
2BR & 3BR’s in Clean & Quiet Bldgs
and Great Neighborhoods Views, Pa-
tio/Balcony, Carport, Storage, Pool.
No Surcharges. No Pets, No Smok-
ing, No Section 8. (650) 595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.- $59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1996 TACOMA Toyota, $7,300.00,
72,000 miles, New tires, & battery, bed
liner, camper shell, always serviced, air
conditioner. (650)341-2031
Ruth Ann Schmidt
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $42!
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
DODGE ‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$4,500 OBO (650)481-5296
HONDA ‘96 LX SD Parts Car, all power,
complete, runs. $1000 OBO, Jimmie
Cassey (650)271-1056 or
(650)481-5296 - Joe Fusilier
HONDA ‘02 Civic LX, 4 door, stick shift
cruise control, am/fm cassette, runs well.
1 owner. $2,000. SOLD!
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LARADO
‘03, 2WD, V-6, 89K, original owner,
$3900 SOLD!
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
1973 FXE Harley Shovel Head 1400cc
stroked & balanced motor. Runs perfect.
Low milage, $6,600 Call (650)369-8013
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘04 Heritage Soft
Tail ONLY 5,400 miles. $12,300. Call
(650)342-6342.
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS and
other parts and sales, $35.
(650)670-2888
650 RVs
COLEMAN LARAMIE pop-up camper,
Excellent Condition, $2750. Call
(415)515-6072
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
YAO'S AUTO SERVICES
(650)598-2801
Oil Change Special $24.99
most cars
San Carlos Smog Check
(650)593-8200
Cash special $26.75 plus cert.
96 & newer
1098 El Camino Real San Carlos
670 Auto Parts
AUTO REFRIGERATION gauges. R12
and R132 new, professional quality $50.
(650)591-6283
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
670 Auto Parts
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
SNOW CHAIN cables made by Shur
Grip - brand new-never used. In the
original case. $25 650-654-9252.
SNOW CHAINS metal cambell brand
never used 2 sets multi sizes $20 each
obo (650)591-6842
680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Draperies
MARLA’S DRAPERIES
& ALTERATIONS
Custom made drapes & pillows
Alterations for men & women
Free Estimates
(650)703-6112
(650)389-6290
2140A S. El Camino, SM
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
INSIDE OUT ELECTRIC INC
Service Upgrades
Remodels / Repairs
The tradesman you will
trust and recommend
Lic# 808182
(650)515-1123
Gardening
KEEP YOUR LAWN
LOOKING GREEN
Time to Aerate your lawn
We also do seed/sod of lawns
Spring planting
Sprinklers and irrigation
Pressure washing
Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831 Lic #751832
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Housecleaning
CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING & WINDOWS
Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business
Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit
(650)278-0157
Lic#1211534
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Free Gutter & Roof Inspections
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
CALL TODAY
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CAMACHO TILE
& MARBLE
• Bathrooms & Kitchens
• Slab Fabrication & Installation
• Interior & Exterior Painting
(650)455-4114
Lic# 838898
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
by Greenstarr
&
Chris’s Hauling
• Yard clean up - attic,
basement
• Junk metal removal
including cars, trucks and
motorcycles
• Demolition
• Concrete removal
• Excavation
• Swimming pool removal
Tom 650. 834. 2365
Chri s 415. 999. 1223
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
Yard Boss
º 0omp|ete |andscape
construct|on and remova|
º Fu|| tree care |nc|ud|ng
hazard eva|uat|on,
tr|mm|ng, shap|ng,
remova| and stump
gr|nd|ng
º 8eta|n|ng wa||s
º 0rnamenta| concrete
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
Tom 650. 834. 2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
Painting
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plaster/Stucco
MENA PLASTERING
Interior and Exterior
Lath and Plaster
All kinds of textures
35+ years experience
(415)420-6362
CA Lic #625577
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
SEWER PIPES
Installation of Water Heaters,
Faucets, Toilets, Sinks, Gas,
Water & Sewer Lines.
Trenchless Replacement.
(650)461-0326
Lic., Bonded, Insured
Roofing
NATE’S ROOFING
Roof Maintaince • Raingutters
• Water proofing coating •
Repairing • Experieced
Excellent Referances
Free Estimates
(650)353-6554
Lic# 973081
by Greenstarr
Rambo
Concrete
Works
• Walkways
• Driveways
• Patios
• Colored
• Aggregate
• Block Walls
• Retaining walls
• Stamped Concrete
• Ornamental concrete
• Swimming pool removal
Tom 650.834.2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Building
Customer
Satisfaction
º New Construction
º Additions
º Remodels
º Green Building
Specialists
Technology Solutions for
Building and Living
Locally owned in Belmont
650-832-1673
www. tekhomei nc. com
CA# B-869287
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont/Castro Valley, CA
(650) 318-3993
Cleaning
Concrete
AAA CONCRETE DESIGN
Stamps • Color • Diveways •
Patios • Masonry • Blockwalls
• Landscaping
Quality Workmanship,
Free Estimates
(650)834-4307
(650)771-3823
Lic# 947476
Construction
Construction
LEMUS CONSTRUCTION
(650)271-3955
Dry Rot • Decks • Fences
• Handyman • Painting
• Bath Remodels & much more
Based in N. Peninsula
Free Estimates ... Lic# 913461
N. C. CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen/Bath, Patio w/BBQ built
ins, Maintanace,Water Proofing,
Concrete, Stucco
Free Estimates
38 years in Business
(650)248-4205
Lic# 623232
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
• New Construction,
• Remodeling,
• Kitchen/Bathrooms,
• Decks/ Fences
(650)589-0372
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
27 Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Screens
DON’T SHARE
YOUR HOUSE
WITH BUGS!
We repair and install all types of
Window & Door Screens
Free Estimates
(650)299-9107
PENINSULA SCREEN SHOP
Mention this ad for 20% OFF!
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Window Washing
Windows
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Cemetery
LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
49ers, Giants & Warriors,
low prices, large selection.
450 W. San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
(650)771-6564
Dental Services
ALBORZI, DDS, MDS, INC.
$500 OFF INVISALIGN TREATMENT
a clear alternative to braces even for
patients who have
been told that they were not invisalign
candidates
235 N SAN MATEO DR #300,
SAN MATEO
(650)342-4171
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
RUSSO DENTAL CARE
Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno
(650)583-2273
www.russodentalcare.com
Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities
(650) 295-6123
1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
Food
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
SCANDIA
RESTAURANT & BAR
Breakfast• Lunch• Dinner
OPEN EVERYDAY
Scandinavian &
American Classics
742 Polhemus Rd. San Mateo
HI 92 De Anza Blvd. Exit
(650)372-0888
SEAFOOD FOR SALE
FRESH OFF THE BOAT
(650) 726-5727
Pillar Point Harbor:
1 Johnson Pier
Half Moon Bay
Oyster Point Marina
95 Harbor Master Rd..
South San Francisco
Financial
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay
Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Housing
CALIFORNIA
MENTOR
We are looking for quality
caregivers for adults
with developmental
disabilities. If you have a
spare bedroom and a
desire to open your
home and make a
difference, attend an
information session:
Thursdays 11:00 AM
1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.
Suite 230
San Mateo
(near Marriott Hotel)
Please call to RSVP
(650)389-5787 ext.2
Competitive Stipend offered.
www.MentorsWanted.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
Jewelers
INTERSTATE
ALL BATTERY CENTER
570 El Camino Real #160
Redwood City
(650)839-6000
Watch batteries $8.99
including installation.
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy Coins, Jewelry, Watches,
Platinum, Diamonds.
Expert fine watch & jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave. Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Locks
COMPLETE LOCKSMITH
SERVICES
Full stocked shop
& Mobile van
MILLBRAE LOCK
(650)583-5698
311 El Camino Real
MILLBRAE
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ACUHEALTH
Best Asian Healing Massage
$29/hr
with this ad
Free Parking
(650)692-1989
1838 El Camino #103, Burlingame
sites.google.com/site/acuhealthSFbay
ASIAN MASSAGE
$55 per Hour
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $19.99
Body Massage $44.99/hr
10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame
(650)389-2468
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
Aria Spa,
Foot & Body Massage
9:30 am - 9:30 pm, 7 days
1141 California Dr (& Broadway)
Burlingame.
(650) 558-8188
HEALING MASSAGE
• Newly remodeled
• New Masseuses every two
weeks
$50/Hr. Special
2305-A Carlos St.,
Moss Beach
(Cash Only)
OSETRA WELLNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY
Prenatal, Reiki, Energy
$20 OFF your First Treatment
(not valid with other promotions)
(650)212-2966
1730 S. Amphlett Blvd. #206
San Mateo
osetrawellness.com
Pet Services
CATS, DOGS,
POCKET PETS
Mid-Peninsula Animal Hospital
Free New Client Exam
(650) 325-5671
www.midpen.com
Open Nights & Weekends
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity based direct lender
Homes • Multi-family
Mixed-use • Commercial
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Bureau of Real Estate
Retirement
Independent Living, Assisted Liv-
ing, and Memory Care. full time R.N.
Please call us at (650)742-9150 to
schedule a tour, to pursue your life-
long dream.
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway
Millbrae, Ca 94030
www.greenhillsretirement.com
Schools
HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY
Where every child is a gift from God
K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco
(650)588-6860
ww.hillsidechristian.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10
Wills & Trusts
ESTATE PLANNING
TrustandEstatePlan.com
San Mateo Office
1(844)681-3782
Complete Estate Plans
Starting at $399
28
Weekend • July 5-6, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
º 0eaI With £xperts º 0uick 8ervice
º 0nequaI 0ustomer 0are
www.8est8ated6oId8uyers.com
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRY BURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 7/31/14
WEBUY
$â0
OFF
Established 1979
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR

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