P. 1
The_News_Leader_20140709_A03_0

The_News_Leader_20140709_A03_0

|Views: 6|Likes:
Published by Laura Peters

More info:

Published by: Laura Peters on Jul 09, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/09/2014

pdf

text

original

Staunton News Leader 07/09/2014 Page : A03

Copyright © 2014 Staunton News Leader 07/09/2014 July 9, 2014 2:04 pm / Powered by TECNAVIA
Copy Reduced to %d%% from original to fit letter page 
HAVINGA BALL
Alivia Teri, 7 of Fredericksburg tosses a baseball with her family during Catch on the Field – a regular feature prior to Sunday
Flying Squirrels home game – at The Diamond in Richmond on Sunday. AP
WE DNE S DAY, J ULY 9 , 2 014 • T HE NE WS L E ADE R • WWW. NE WS L E ADE R . C OM S E CT I ON A, PAGE 3
LOCAL &STATE
LOCAL EDITOR: WILLIAM RAMSEY, WRAMSEY@NEWSLEADER.COM, 540.213.9182
RAPHINE — Local farmers will gather
Wednesday in Raphine to learn techniques for
revitalizing old crop land.
Theprogramgives farmers ahands-onexpe-
rience to learn about warm-season annuals for
summer grazing, like forage crabgrass and
grazing corn. The tour also explains species se-
lection, forage quality, grazing management
and soil health.
The program is a partnership between the
Virginia Cooperative Extension and the Vir-
ginia Natural Resources Conservation Service
and will be held at Beck-n-Rich Farm&Greene
LLC, owned by Richard
Clemmer.
This tour was previ-
ously held at the same
farmin the winter.
Clemmer’s land was
plantedwithannual cover
crops this past winter.
Forage crop planted back
in May will prepare the
transition into an im-
proved perennial sod,
said Matt Booher, an ex-
tension agent.
“A year ago at this
time, he decided that he had this field of grass
that was getting old, so he wanted to renovated
it,” Booher said.
Forage plants are those that grow almost
continuously, includingannuals andperennials,
producing vegetation biomass that can be har-
vested for feed or livestock on farms, or it can
be grazed, according to J.B. Daniel, a state
grassland specialist for the NRCS.
Farmers normally kill off big patches of
grass inorder to start a freshcropof perennials
and there’s nothing growing on it in the mean-
time, Booher said.
“Instead, (Clemmer) put cover crop in dur-
ing the fall and grazed it all winter,” Booher
said. “It’s a really good way of renovating a pas-
ture and having forage in the meantime.”
The cover cropshouldset Clemmer upto put
in a new perennial grass mixture to be used on
his farm, Booher said.
According to the Virginia Cooperative Ex-
tension, tall fescue is the predominant forage
(plant leaves and stems) species on more than1
millionacres of hayandpasturelandinVirginia
and more than 35 million acres across the na-
tion.
Forages offer tremendous growth potential
in the summer and warmer seasons, when the
perennial grass is dormant, Daniel said.
Farmers
forage
tour now
available
By Laura Peters
lpeters@newsleader.com
IF YOU GO
Beck-n-Rich Farms &
Greene LLC at 76
Pleasant Valley Road
in Raphine on
Wednesday
Sign-in: 5 - 5:30 p.m.
Dinner: 5:30 - 6:30
p.m.
Tour: 6:30 - 8 p.m.
Fee: $5
Beef cattle graze on Beck-n-Rich Farm & Greene
LLC in Raphine was planted with annual cover
crops this past winter, and forage crop was
planted back in May to create an improved
perennial sod. SUBMITTED
News Leader education reporter Megan Williams live-
blogged from the Waynesboro School Board meeting on
Tuesday. Here are excerpts from that blog:
Facility study
Superintendent Jeffrey Cassell met with the board to
discuss the facility study of Waynesboro High School, Berke-
ley Glenn Elementary School and Wenonah Elementary
School. He wants input on how to proceed with the in-
formation presented last month by an architectural compa-
ny.
Cassell also wants to begin by disseminating information
to the schools and City Council. He also wants to present
the findings at PTO meetings at each of the schools to
parents and community members.
Linda Jones asked Cassell which school is a priority. He
said that will have to be up to the community, but Waynes-
boro High School serves all students.
School board members have said previously that they
would like to see Wenonah Elementary close. That con-
versation is coming up again. Berkeley Glenn is on a lot of
land, whereas Wenonah is surrounded by other buildings.
The conversation will move to the school and community
level in the next few months.
2014-15 budget
Cassell talked about the 2014-15 budget now that a state
budget has been approved. Less Title funds this year means
the division will have to close one prekindergarten class-
room this year. There will only be eight classes this year,
instead of the usual nine offered in the past.
WAYNESBORO SCHOOL BOARD
MEETING
There may be a very
good reason why a Fairfax
County police officer shot
and killed John Geer as he
stood in his townhouse
doorway on
Aug. 29, 2013.
Or there may
be no reason.
But after 10
months, the
authorities in
NorthernVir-
ginia still
have provid-
ed no expla-
nation for why this un-
armed citizen was gunned
down by an unnamed offi-
cer, who remains on paid
desk duty.
Geer, 46, hadbeendrink-
ing and there was a gun in
his home on Pebble Brook
Court in Springfield. The
two patrol officers who
stood 15 feet away knew
this and spoke to him for
about 50 minutes, before
Geer started to slide his
hands down the frame of
the doorway from over his
head. One of the officers
firedonceintoGeer’schest,
Geer turned, closed the
door and collapsed. The po-
lice then waited another
hour before sending in
first-aid for someone who
had been shot almost point-
blankinthechest. Geerwas
dead.
We know these things
fromspeaking to witnesses
at the scene that day, not
from anything Fairfax
County police, Fairfax
County prosecutors or fed-
eral prosecutors have told
the public. Because they
have told the public noth-
ing. The police have not ex-
plained why they did not
summon a negotiator
trained in dealing with dis-
traught people, rather than
allowing patrol officers to
deal with him, or why they
didn’t just back off from a
man with no hostages and
no indication that he was
going to harm anyone else.
They also have not ex-
plained why they waited an
hour to render aid, though
presumably that was for
concerns for their own
safety.
At the five month mark
of silence, Fairfax prosecu-
torRayMorroghbootedthe
casetofederal prosecutors,
saying there was “a poten-
tial conflict with one of the
witnesses and this office,”
and another conflict “con-
cerns some information
and I just can’t get it.”
Morrogh said last week
that hecouldnot discussthe
case since he was no longer
investigatingit. ActingU.S.
Attorney Dana Boente said
he could not even confirm
the case’s existence. Fair-
faxCountypolice Chief Ed-
win Roessler Jr. said that
the FBI was reviewing the
case, but hadnomoreinfor-
mation than that.
Two months after Mor-
rogh sent the case to the
feds, Geer’s father, girl-
friend and close friend Jeff
Stewart met with federal
prosecutors, FBI agents
and a lawyer from the Jus-
tice Department’s Civil
Rights Division. Stewart
said they seemed interest-
ed but gave no indication of
what they might do. This
was three months ago.
To recap, Stewart spoke
with Geer on the phone be-
fore the police arrived, and
then watched in horror as
the Fairfaxofficer shot and
killed his friend. “If John
made any kind of aggres-
sive move,” Stewart said,
“I’d have been the first one
to testify on the police offi-
cer’s behalf. But there was
nothing in his [Geer's]
hands, he was not making
an aggressive move, he did
nothing to provoke a shot
being fired. I told them
[federal investigators], this
was an execution.” He said
if investigators try to ex-
plain the shooting as a “sui-
cidebycop”byGeer, “that’s
a farce.”
Shooting of unarmed man a mystery
Fairfax officials
close-mouthed on
Aug. 2013 incident
By TomJackman
Washington Post
Geer
“If John (Geer) made any kind of
aggressive move, I’d have been the first
one to testify on the police officer’s
behalf.”
JEFF STEWART, CLOSE FRIEND OF MAN SHOT BY POLICE
Dave Brat names
newcampaign staff
RICHMOND — Republi-
can congressional candi-
date Dave Brat is naming
newsenior campaign staff.
Brat’s campaign said
Tuesdaythat Phil Rappwill
be the new campaign man-
ager. He worked was a vol-
unteer coordinator during
the GOP primary.
Rapp is Brat’s third
campaign manager. Za-
charyWerrell managedthe
primary campaign when
Brat won a surprising vic-
tory against U.S. House
Majority Leader Eric Can-
tor. Former Cantor aide
Amanda Chase briefly
served as interim cam-
paign manager for Brat af-
ter the June 10 primary.
The Brat campaign also
announced that Tim Edson
will be a consultant for the
campaign. Edson previous-
ly worked for Florida Re-
publican Allen West.
ODU hosting rooftop
solar power project
NORFOLK — Dominion
Virginia Power is marking
the installation of solar
panels on roof of Old Do-
minion University’s recre-
ation center.
The state’s largest utili-
ty and school officials in
Norfolkdedicatedthesolar
installation Tuesday.
Dominion says more
than 600 solar panels were
installed on the roof of the
school’s student recreation
center as part of its Solar
Partnership Program.
The Richmond-based
energy provider says that
the project at Old Domin-
ion will generate 125 kilo-
watts for the grid, or
enough to power 31 homes.
Virginia regulators in
2012 approved Dominion’s
programto build and oper-
ate up to 30 megawatts of
company-owned solar fa-
cilities on leased rooftops
or on the grounds of com-
mercial businesses and
public properties in its ser-
vice area. When fully im-
plemented, the program
would generate enough
power for 7,500 homes.
Sea turtle released
by Va. aquarium
hooked again
VIRGINIA BEACH — A
Kemps ridley sea turtle re-
leased by the Virginia
Aquarium Marine Animal
Care Center has been
hooked again.
The aquarium’s strand-
ing response teamrescued
the turtle in late June after
it was hooked at the Buck-
roe Fishing Pier in Hamp-
ton. Theaquariumreleased
the turtle, named Volde-
mort by the team, last
Wednesday.
The aquarium tells
media outlets that Volde-
mort was rescued a second
time on Saturday after the
turtle was hooked at the
Norfolk Naval Station rec-
reational fishing pier.
The aquarium says the
hook was surgically re-
moved from Voldemort’s
throat. Theturtleis expect-
ed to make a full recovery.
– Associated Press
BRIEFLY

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->