You are on page 1of 44

Just In Time (JIT)

I tip my hat to the new constitution


Take a bow for the new revolution
Smile and grin at the change all around
Pick up my guitar and play
Just like yesterday
Then I get on my knees and pray
WE DON'T GET FOOLED AGAIN!

–The Who

1
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Origins of JIT

• Japanese firms, particularly Toyota, in 1970's and 1980's


• Taiichi Ohno and Shigeo Shingo
• Geographical and cultural roots
• Japanese objectives
– “catch up with America” (within 3 years of 1945)
– small lots of many models
• Japanese motivation
– Japanese domestic production in 1949 – 25,622 trucks, 1,008 cars
– American to Japanese productivity ratio – 9:1
– Era of “slow growth” in 1970's

2
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Toyota Production System

Pillars:
1. just-in-time, and
2. autonomation, or automation with a human touch

Practices:
• setup reduction (SMED)
• worker training
• vendor relations
• quality control
• foolproofing (baka-yoke)
• many others

3
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Supermarket Stimulus

• Customers get only what they need

• Stock replenished quickly

• But, who holds inventory?

4
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Auto-Activated Loom Stimulus

• Automatically detect problems and shut down

• Foolproofing

• Automation with a human touch

5
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Zero Inventories

Metaphorical Writing:
The Toyota production wrings water out of towels that are already dry.

There is nothing more important than planting “trees of will”.


– Shingo 1990
5W = 1H
– Ohno 1988
Platonic Ideal:
Zero Inventories connotes a level of perfection not ever attainable in a
production process. However, the concept of a high level of excellence is
important because it stimulates a quest for constant improvement through
imaginative attention to both the overall task and to the minute details.
– Hall 1983

6
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
The Seven Zeros

• Zero Defects: To avoid delays due to defects. (Quality at the source)


• Zero (Excess) Lot Size: To avoid “waiting inventory” delays.
(Usually stated as a lot size of one.)
• Zero Setups: To minimize setup delay and facilitate small lot sizes.
• Zero Breakdowns: To avoid stopping tightly coupled line.
• Zero (Excess) Handling: To promote flow of parts.
• Zero Lead Time: To ensure rapid replenishment of parts (very close to
the core of the zero inventories objective).
• Zero Surging: Necessary in system without WIP buffers.

7
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
The Environment as a Control

Constraints or Controls?
• machine setup times
• vendor deliveries
• quality levels (scrap, rework)
• production schedule (e.g. customer due dates)
• product designs

Impact: the manufacturing system can be made much easier to manage


by improving the environment.

8
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Implementing JIT

Production Smoothing:
• relatively constant volumes
• relatively constant product mix

Mixed Model Production (heijunka):


• 10,000 per month (20 working days)
• 500 per day (2 shifts)
• 250 per shift (480 minutes)
• 1 unit every 1.92 minutes

9
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Implementing JIT (cont.)

Production Sequence: Mix of 50% A, 25% B, 25% C in daily


production of 500 units
0.5 × 500 = 250 units of A
0.25 × 500 = 125 units of B
0.25 × 500 = 125 units of C

A–B–A–C–A–B–A–C–A–B–A–C–A–B–A
–C…

10
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Inherent Inflexibility of JIT

Sources of Inflexibility:
• Stable volume
• Stable mix
• Precise sequence
• Rapid (instant?) replenishment

Measures to Promote Flexibility:


• Capacity buffers
• Setup reduction
• Cross training
• Plant layout

11
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Capacity Buffers

Problems:
• JIT is intrinsically rigid (volume, mix, sequence)
• No explicit link between production and customers
• How to deal with quota shortfalls

Buffer Capacity:
• Protection against quota shortfalls
• Regular flow allows matching against customer demands
• Two shifting: 4 – 8 – 4 – 8
• Contrast with WIP buffers found in MRP systems

12
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Setup Reduction

Motivation: Small lot sequences not feasible with large setups.

Internal vs. External Setups:


• External – performed while machine is still running
• Internal – performed while machine is down

Approach:
1. Separate the internal setup from the external setup
2. Convert as much as possible of the internal setup to the external setup
3. Eliminate the adjustment process
4. Abolish the setup itself (e.g., uniform product design, combined
production, parallel machines)

13
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Cross Training

• Adds flexibility to inherently inflexible system


• Allows capacity to float to smooth flow
• Reduces boredom
• Fosters appreciation for overall picture
• Increase potential for idea generation

14
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Workforce Agility

Cross-Trained Workers:
• float where needed
• appreciate line-wide perspective
• provide more heads per problem area

Shared Tasks:
• can be done by adjacent stations
• reduces variability in tasks, and hence line stoppages/quality
problems

15
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Plant Layout

• Promote flow with little WIP


• Facilitate workers staffing multiple machines
• U-shaped cells
– Maximum visibility
– Minimum walking
– Flexible in number of workers
– Facilitates monitoring of work entering and leaving cell
– Workers can conveniently cooperate to smooth flow and
address problems

16
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Layout for JIT

Cellular Layout:
• Proximity for flow control, material handling, floating labor, etc.
• May require duplication of machinery (decreased utilization?)
• logical cells?

Advanced Material Handling:


• Avoid large transfer batches
• Close coordination of physically
separate operations
Inbound Stock Outbound Stock

17
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Focused Factories

Pareto Analysis:
• Small percentage of sku’s represent large percentage of volume
• Large percentage of sku’s represent little volume but much complexity
Dedicated Lines:
• for families of high runners Saw Lathe Mill Drill

• few setups

Warehouse
Saw Mill Drill Paint

Assembly
Stores
• little complexity Grind Mill Drill Paint

Job Shop Environment: Weld Grind Lathe Drill

• for low runners


Saw Grind Paint
• many setups

Warehouse
• poorer performance, but only

Assembly
Stores Lathe
on smaller portion of business
Mill
Drill

18
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Total Quality Management

Origins: Americans (Shewhart, Deming, Juran, Feigenbaum)

Fertility of Japan:
• Japanese abhorrence for wasting scarce resources
• The Japanese innate resistance to specialists (including QA)

Integrality to JIT:
• JIT requires high quality to work
• JIT promotes high quality
– identification of problems
– facilitates rapid detection of problems
– pressure to improve quality

19
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Total Quality Management (cont.)

Techniques:
• Process Control (SPC)
• Easy-to-See Quality
• Insistence on Compliance (quality first, output second)
• Line Stop
• Correcting One's Own Errors (no rework loops)
• 100 Percent Check (not statistical sampling)
• Continual Improvement
• Housekeeping
• Small Lots
• Vendor Certification
• Total Preventive Maintenance

20
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Kanban

Definition: A “kanban” is a sign-board or card in Japanese and is the name of the


flow control system developed by Toyota.
Role:
Kanban is a tool for realizing just-in-time. For this tool to work
fairly well, the production process must be managed to flow as much
as possible. This is really the basic condition. Other important
conditions are leveling production as much as possible and always
working in accordance with standard work methods.
– Ohno 1988
Push vs. Pull: Kanban is a “pull system”
• Push systems schedule releases
• Pull systems authorize releases

21
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Sistema KANBAN

Es un sistema de información que se utiliza para controlar el flujo de los materiales.


El sistema trabaja con tarjetas o Kanbanes que reemplazan las órdenes de producción para
comunicar “necesidades” a través del sistema productivo.
El flujo de los Kanbanes es de los procesos finales hacia los iniciales, originando el proceso de
jalar la producción.
El proceso final (puede ser ensamble) es el único en el que se programa la producción, la cual
normalmente debe hacerse de acuerdo al ritmo de la demanda.

11/29/09 22
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
MRP versus Kanban
MRP
Lover
Level … Assem-
Inven- bly
tory

Kanban
Lover
Level … Assem-
Inven- bly
tory

Kanban Signals Full Containers


23
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Conceptos de Empujar y Jalar

Planeación
Programas de Producción
Para Cada Área

1 2 3 F
Empuja Mercado
Planeación

1 2 3 F

Flujo Matl. Comunicación vía Kanbanes


Flujo Info´n.
11/29/09 24
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Tipos de Sistemas KANBAN

Sistema Dual-Card Kanban:


Opera con dos tipos de Kanban; Suministro y producción.
Ambos Kanbanes contienen el número del artículo, capacidad del
contenedor, la celda o proceso previo, y el próximo.
El de suministro incluye además la cantidad de artículos que el proceso
posterior puede obtener del anterior.
El de producción incorpora también la cantidad de artículos a fabricar
por el proceso anterior.
El sistema es visual.

11/29/09 25
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Two-Card Kanban

Inbound Outbound Move stock to


stockpoint stockpoint inbound stock point.

Move card
authorizes
pickup of parts.

When stock is Remove move


removed, place card and place
production card in hold box.
Production in hold box. Move Production
cards cards card authorizes
start of work.

26
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Sistema Single-Card Kanban:

Este sistema usa solamente el Kanban de suministro.


Se elimina el área de inventario del proceso posterior (drilling).
El Kanban de suministro circula entre el área de inventario del proceso
anterior (milling) y el proceso posterior (drilling).
La producción del proceso anterior se controla por el programa diario de
producción

11/29/09 27
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
One-Card Kanban
Outbound Outbound
stockpoint Completed parts with cards stockpoint
enter outbound stockpoint.

Production When stock is Production


cards removed, place card authorizes
production card start of work.
in hold box.

28
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Reglas del Sistema KANBAN
Regla 1.-El proceso posterior debe tomar los artículos necesarios del anterior en las cantidades
requeridas en el momento adecuado.
Surtir sin Kanban se prohíbe.
Surtir cantidad mayor al especificado en Kanbanes se prohíbe.
Un Kanban siempre acompaña a un arículo.
Regla 2.- El proceso anterior debe producir los artículos en la cantidad surtida al posterior.
La producción debe estar nivelada.
Está prohibido producir más que lo especificado en Kanbanes.
La secuencia de producción es el la que llegaron los Kanbanes.
Regla 3.- Productos defectuosos no deben pasar al siguiente proceso.
Regla 4.- El número de Kanbanes debe minimizarse gradualmente para mejorar los procesos
reduciendo desperdicio.
Regla 5.-La cantidad de Kanbanes debe determinarse para tolerar una mínima variación en
demanda. No se recomienda transmitir variaciones mayores del 10% de la demanda para un
número establecido de Kanbanes.
Regla 6.- Si no hay un Kanban no hay producción o transferencia de artículos.

11/29/09 29
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Tipos de Kanbanes

Proveedor: Se utiliza para requerir partes o artículos de proveedores.


Incluyen tiempo de entrega, frecuencia diaria de envío, y área de
recepción.
Emergencia o Especial: Se usa para requerir artículos adicionales por
producción defectuosa o cambios bruscos de demanda. Se usan
temporalmente, recogiéndose inmediatamente de satisfacerse.
Señal: Se usa para producir en lotes. Es un Kanban triangular que se
incorpora al grupo de contenedores en el sitio que se indica como punto de
reorden. Al llegar a ese punto el Kanban se remueve señalándose la
necesidad de producir.
Material: Se usa junto con el de señal. Este ordena los materiales o partes
requeridas para producir el lote señalado por el Kanban de señal. El sitio
donde se coloca este Kanban es anterior al de señal, con el propósito de
asegurar la disponibilidad de los materiales.

11/29/09 30
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Cálculo del Número de Kanbanes

• Es una actividad de planeación que normalmente se realiza


mensualmente.
• El número de Kanbanes en el sistema representa el nivel de inventario
del mismo.
• La cantidad de Kanbanes se determina mediante la siguiente fórmula:

Número de Kanbanes = (Consumo durante ciclo del Kanban)/ Capacidad del Contenedor*

= (Demanda promedio diaria*(1+ α )*ciclo)/ Capacidad de Contenedor

Donde α representa un coeficiente de seguridad (0 <α < 1).

* 10% de la demanda diaria. Supone que set-ups se han reducido.

11/29/09 31
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Ejemplo 1 de Cálculo de Kanbanes

Suponga que el requerimiento de producción de una parte específica es de 55 unidades por


mes. El tiempo de ciclo es de 22 dias y el tamaño del lote a emplear es de 15. Considere
que el proceso todavía no es estable y por lo tanto se desea tener un factor de seguridad
de 1.5. Determine la cantidad de Kanbanes a utilizar.

- Demanda diaria = 55/20 (dias hábiles) = 2.75 unidades.

- Cantidad de Kanbanes = (Demanda diaria)(Ciclo de tiempo)(Factor de seguridad)/Tamaño de lote

= (2.75)(22)(1.5)/15 = 6.

11/29/09 32
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
EJEMPLO
4

Almacen C Almacén B Almacén A


HRS C.T. D
Centro Trabajo A

KANBAN DE
SUMINISTRO
KANBAN DE
PRODUCCIÓN
C.T. C
5
DIAS

48 C.T. B
MIN

33
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
KANBAN DE SUMINISTRO
CENTRO DE PARTE DEM DIARIA T. ESPERA FACTOR CAPACIDAD NO.
TRABAJO (UNID) (DIAS) SEGURIDAD CONTENEDORES KANBAN
RETIRO

B B 500 .1 1.2 30 2
C C 100 5 1.2 100 6
D D 60 .5 1 15 2

•Ahora el tiempo de viaje a CT B es 5 dias y el lote aumenta a 250

•Ahora, si 2 kanban están en el CT B en un turno normal. ¿Donde


estarán los otros 10?

•Es mejor seleccionar a los proveedores mas cercanos posible al


34
proceso
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
FACTORES

Factor de suguridad.- 1 es lo ideal, pero implica un desempeño


perfecto. ( los problemas de calidad y en las entregas no se
solucionan de la noche a la mañana).
Emplear de manera temporal un kanban de colchón como
factor de seguridad, hasta que el sistema funcione
adecuadamente.
Reducción del tamaño del lote de los kanban de retiro (p.ej. 10)
de manera que el kanban temporal sea mas económico.

35
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
KANBAN DE PRODUCCIÓN
CENTRO DE PARTE DEM DIARIA T. ESPERA FACTOR CAPACIDAD NO.
TRABAJO (UNID) (DIAS) SEGURIDAD CONTENEDORES KANBAN
RETIRO

B B 500 5 1.1 300 9


C C 100 1 1.0 50 2
D D 60 3 1.0 30 6

El tiempo de espera para cada parte en la tabla es el tiempo necesario


para la manufactura de las partes en el subproceso correspondiente.
Es de utilidad contar con un kanban multiplo exacto de otro, Esto
evitara tener algunos kanban parciales detenidos en las areas
intermedias. ¿Por qué?

36
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
MULTIPLOS EXACTOS

CENTRO DE PARTE DEM DIARIA T. ESPERA FACTOR CAPACIDAD NO.


TRABAJO (UNID) (DIAS) SEGURIDAD CONTENEDORES KANBAN
RETIRO

B B 500 .1 1.2 30 2
C C 100 5 1.2 100 6
D D 60 .5 1 15 2

CENTRO DE PARTE DEM DIARIA T. ESPERA FACTOR CAPACIDAD NO.


TRABAJO (UNID) (DIAS) SEGURIDAD CONTENEDORES KANBAN
RETIRO

B B 500 5 1.1 300 9


C C 100 1 1.0 50 2
D D 60 3 1.0 30 6

37
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Heurística Para Determinar Número de Kanbanes*

Debido a la complejidad de los modelos de programación matemática, Moeeni &


Chang proponen algoritmos heurísticos para resolver la cantidad de kanbanes
necesarios para un sistema de producción multi-etapas. Estos se aplican con
los siguientes supuestos:
• Cada centro de trabajo en el proceso produce solo un tipo de artículo.
• Debe satisfacerse la demanda sin retrasos.
• El tiempo de set-up es cero.
• El tiempo de preparación kanban es 1 (una tarjeta que regresa a un centro de trabajo
en el tiempo t puede usarse para iniciar la producción en el tiempo t+1).
• Capacidad ilimitada.
• un artículo individual. Existe un solo almacén entre dos centros de trabajo
consecutivos, por lo que cada tarjeta circula para

* Moeeni, F., and Chang, Y., An Approximate Solution to Deterministic Kanban Systems,
Decision Sciences, Vol. 21, No. 3, 1990.
11/29/09 38
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Heurística Para Determinar Número de Kanbanes

El método heurístico tiene los siguientes pasos:


• Paso 1. Establezca U01 = máxt {Xt0} - V01.
• Paso 2. Establezca U0n =U0s(n) + W0s(n) - W0n, n=2,3,...,N.
El método considera satisfacer las restricciones siguientes:

Wt-1 1 + Xt1 > Xt0 , t=1,...,T. - Satisfacer la demanda.

- Producción de cada centro de


Wt-1 j + Xtj > Xtn , n=1,..,N; t=1,...,T; j ε P (n) trabajo no exceda la cantidad de
producto suministrado por centros
que le preceden..

Utn > Xtn , n=1,..,N; t=1,...,T - Producción de cada centro de


trabajo no exceda la cantidad de
kanbanes disponibles.
- La cantidad de kanbanes de un centro
Utn + Wt-1 n = U0n + W0n ; n=1,..,N; t=1,...,T. de trabajo es constante durante el
horizonte de programación.

11/29/09 39
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Ejemplo de Cálculo de Kanbanes

Concepto Tarjetas Iny.* Período 1 Período 2 Período 3 Período 4 Período 5


Demanda 4 15 20 5 12
Centro 1 20
Inv. Inicial 0 16 5 0 15
Producción 20 4 15 20 5
Inv. Final 16 5 0 15 8

Centro 2 15
Inv. Inicial 5 0 16 5 0
Producción 15 20 4 15 20
Inv. Final 0 16 5 0 15

Centro 3 20
Inv. Inicial 0 5 0 16 5
Producción 20 15 20 4 15
Inv. Final 5 0 16 5 0

Centro 4 18
Inv. Inicial 2 0 5 0 16
Producción 18 20 15 20 4
Inv. Final 0 5 0 16 5

11/29/09 40
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Ejemplo de Cálculo de Kanbanes

Un sistema productivo tiene 4 centros de trabajo. El horizonte de planeación es de 5


períodos. La empresa desea determinar la cantidad de kanbanes necesarios para
satisfacer la demanda. Se cuenta con la siguiente información:

Período Demanda (X0t) Centro Inventario


Inicial (V0n)
1 4 1 0
2 15 2 5
3 20 3 0
4 5 4 2
5 12 Sistema de Producción
Procedimiento: M.P. 4 3 2 1
P.F.
- Paso 1. Establezca U01 = máxt {Xt0} - V01 = Máx { 4,14,20,5,12} - 0 = 20

- Paso 2. Establezca U0n =U0s(n) + V0s(n) - V0n, n=2,3,...,N.

n = 2; U02 = U0s(2) + V0s(2) - V02 = 20 +0 -5 = 15. s(2) = {1}


n = 3; U03 = U0s(3) + V0s(3) - V03 = 15 +5 -0 = 20. s(3) = {2}
n = 4; U04 = U0s(4) + V0s(4) - V04 = 20 +0 -2 = 18. s(4) = {3}

11/29/09 41
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
Resumen de Solución y Proyección del Ejemplo de Cálculo de Kanbanes

Concepto Tarjetas Iny.* Período 1 Período 2 Período 3 Período 4 Período 5


Demanda 4 15 20 5 12
Centro 1 20
Inv. Inicial 0 16 5 0 15
Producción 20 4 15 20 5
Inv. Final 16 5 0 15 8

Centro 2 15
Inv. Inicial 5 0 16 5 0
Producción 15 20 4 15 20
Inv. Final 0 16 5 0 15

Centro 3 20
Inv. Inicial 0 5 0 16 5
Producción 20 15 20 4 15
Inv. Final 5 0 16 5 0

Centro 4 18
Inv. Inicial 2 0 5 0 16
Producción 18 20 15 20 4
Inv. Final 0 5 0 16 5

11/29/09 42
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
The Lessons of JIT

• The production environment itself is a control

• Operational details matter strategically

• Controlling WIP is important

• Speed and flexibility are important assets

• Quality can come first

• Continual improvement is a condition for survival

43
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO
EJERCICIOS

Hay 2 centros de trabajo, en un centro subsecuente y otro


precedente. El ritmo de producción del centro de trabajo 1
es de 175 partes por hora. Cada contenedor estándar es
para 100 piezas. Toma un promedio de 1.10 hrs para que
un contenedor haga el ciclo completo, desde que sale lleno
hasta que se devuelve vacio, se llena con producciòn y
vuelve a salir. Calcule la cantidad de contenedores
necesarios, si el sistema trabaja con un factor de seguridad
del 25%.

44
M I IND ITP MC ADRIAN ROMERO