INTENSIFIERS

TOO AND ENOUGH
• We use intensifiers to make a stronger adjective.

• Example:
• My homework is too much.
• My homework is not easy enough.


TOO, ENOUGH, VERY AND REALLY
• We use TOO, when the adjective gives a negative description about a noun.
• Please teacher, it is too much information!
• Merida is too crowned.

• We use ENOUGH, when the adjective gives a positive description about a noun
• The weather is good enough.

• We use VERY and REALLY, for both descriptions (negative or positive)
• We were very happy about the good news.
• I’m not very happy today.
• You are not really good.
• You are really good.


WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN REALLY
AND VERY?

• "Very" and "really" both mean a lot.
• Really can be used before an adjective or before a verb.
• Very can only be used before an adjective.
• Examples:
• I like the cookies very much.
• I really like the cookies.

EXERCISE
Unscramble the words to make correct sentences:
• too /Those / big /for /me/ shoes/are /
• expensive /house, /I /that /but /was /too /wanted /it /to buy
• to do / old/ enough/he /wants/ He/ is// what
• enough/ She/ for/ not/ job/ was/ good/ the
• happy /news /We /were /about /good /the /very
• very /that /It /sad /them /in /situation /was /to see
• you /with /be /to /want /really /She
• Peter/ isn’t /really /clever /to /play /chess



ANSWERS
• Those shoes are too big for me.
• I wanted to buy that house, but it was too expensive.
• He is old enough to do what he wants.
• She was not good enough for the job.
• We were very happy about the good news.
• It was very sad to see them in that situation.
• She really want to be with you.
• Peter isn’t really clever to play chess.

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