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D&D 3.5 - Rules Compendium [OEF]

D&D 3.5 - Rules Compendium [OEF]

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Gaze attacks can charm, damage, petrify, or even kill. Those
gaze attacks not produced by a spell or spell-like ability are
supernatural.

Unless specified otherwise, a creature that has a gaze attack
(a gazing creature) can suppress the attack at will without
using an action to do so. The gazing creature can also veil
its eyes, negating its gaze attack.
Gaze attacks can affect ethereal opponents. Invisible
creatures can’t use gaze attacks.

IMMUNITY

Blind creatures are immune to gaze attacks unless
the attack’s description says otherwise. A gazing
creature is immune to the gaze attacks of others of
its kind.

PASSIVE GAZE ATTACKS

Each creature within range of a gaze at-
tack must attempt a saving throw, which
can be a Fortitude save or a Will save,
each round at the beginning of its turn.
The DC usually equals 10 + 1/2
the gazing creature’s HD + its
Cha modifier. A potentially
affected creature can avert
or cover its eyes to gain a
better chance to be unaf-
fected by the gaze attack.
Just looking at a gazing
creature’s image, such as in
a mirror, doesn’t subject the
viewer to a gaze attack.

Averting Eyes

Allies of a creature that has a gaze
attack might be affected, but
they’re all considered to be
averting their eyes. Each
round, a creature that is
averting its eyes has
a 50% chance of not
needing to make a sav-
ing throw.
An opponent can
avert its eyes from the

gazing creature’s face while at the same time looking at the
creature’s body, watching its shadow, or tracking the creature
in a reflective surface. The gazing creature gains concealment
relative to such an opponent.

Covering Eyes

An opponent can shut its eyes, turn its back on the gazing
creature, or wear a blindfold. In these cases, the opponent
doesn’t need to make a saving throw. The gazing creature
gains total concealment relative to such an opponent.

Environmental Factors

If limited visibility results in conceal-
ment, a percentage chance equal to
the normal miss chance exists that a
creature doesn’t need to make a saving
throw against the gaze attack during
a given round. This chance isn’t cu-
mulative with averting the eyes. It’s
rolled separately.
If complete darkness pervades
an area, creatures that have dark-
vision are affected by gaze attacks
normally.

ACTIVE GAZE
ATTACKS

A gazing creature can actively use
its gaze as a standard action. The
creature simply chooses a target
that it has line of sight to and is
within range, and that opponent
must attempt a saving throw.
If the target has chosen to
defend against the gaze as
discussed earlier, the op-
ponent has a chance to
avoid needing to attempt
the saving throw. If a gaz-
ing creature uses its gaze
in this way, it’s possible for
a foe to need to save twice
during the same round—
once before its turn and
once at the beginning of
its turn.

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LOOK INTO MY EYES!

A monster that has a gaze attack can be tricky to play properly
because the gaze attack needs to be resolved not only on the
monster’s turn but also at the start of every character’s turn.
In recent years, I’ve grown lazy and adopted a house rule stat-
ing that gaze attacks are swift actions that happen only on the
monster’s turn. In other words, a monster can make its gaze
attack as a swift action against a single foe on its turn, and
characters don’t need to worry about accidentally meeting the
creature’s gaze on their turns. Hey, it speeds up play and gets
me off the hook.

Frankly, the game could use a few more monsters with gaze
attacks that do something other than petrify. A good example
is the nothic (introduced in Miniatures Handbook), which has
a gaze attack that deals damage—very easy to resolve. I once
designed a monster with a gaze attack that compelled the target
to make a melee attack against itself as an immediate action.
What’s funnier than a character smacking himself in the fore-
head with a greatclub? Sadly, my players killed the beast before
it managed to affect anyone with its gaze.

—Christopher Perkins, D&D Design Manager

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