P. 1
Memory

Memory

|Views: 6|Likes:
Published by Patrick Ramos
computer memory
computer memory

More info:

Categories:Types, Presentations
Published by: Patrick Ramos on Jul 23, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PPT, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/14/2015

pdf

text

original

MEMORY COMPUTER

MEMORY
Is a temporary ( Volatile ) or
permanent ( Nonvolatile )
storage devices faster than fixed
disk drives.
TYPE OF MEMORY
RANDOM ACCESS MEMORY
( RAM )
Is a temporary ( Volatile )
storage devices faster than fixed
disk drives.
Data is remain as long as the
power is present, but when the
power is cut off all data will lost.
RANDOM ACCESS MEMORY
( RAM )

Memory Module

1. SIMM – Single In-Line Memory Module

2. DIMM – Dual In-Line Memory Module
TYPES OF SIMM
1. 30 Pins SIMM
a. They are typically found in older Intel
286 and 386 desktop computer
systems.
b. They come in both 8 bit and 9 bit
(parity) configurations,
c. Memory ranges of 256K to 8
megabyte,
d. 60ns to 80ns and are 5 Volts only.
30 PINS SIMM
Figure 1
TYPES OF SIMM
2. 72 Pins SIMM :

a. The 72 Pin SIMM was the second generation of the
SIMM family.
b. They are typically found in the Intel 486, 486DX, 586
and some early Pentium desktop computer
systems.
c. They come in both 32 bit and 36 bit (parity)
configurations,
d. with memory ranges of 4, 8, 16 and 32 megabytes.
e. These were normally produced in two voltage, 5V
and 3.3V,
f. speeds ranged from 60ns to 70ns.
g. approximately 4 ¼ inches long by 1 inch high,
having one notch along the bottom.
72 PINS SIMM
Figure 2
72 PINS SIMM
Figure 3
DIMM
Dual Inline Memory Modules (DIMMs)
were developed to put separate signals on
each contact so each side of the module
provides a different signal.
Most common today are 168-pin
DIMMs, approximately 5 ¼ inches long by 1
inch high, having two notches along the
bottom.

TYPES OF DIMM
1. 168 Pins SDRAM :
a. introduced around 1996
b. Synchronous Dynamic Random Access
memory ( SDRAM )
c. PC66 (SDRAM); Clock Speed: 66MHz,
Data Rate: 66MHz, Through-put 528MB/s
d. PC100 (SDRAM); Clock Speed: 100MHz,
Data Rate: 100MHz, Through-put 800MB/s
e. PC133 (SDRAM); Clock Speed: 133MHz,
Data Rate: 133MHz, Through-put 1100MB/s
f. PC150 (SDRAM); Clock Speed: 150MHz,
Data Rate: 150MHz, Through-put 1200MB/s
168 PINS SDR DIMM
Figure 4
TYPES OF DIMM
2. 184 Pins DDR SDRAM :
a. started to show up in 2001
b. Double Data Rate SDRAM, ( 2.5v signaling )
c. PC1600 (DDR-200 SDRAM); Clock Speed: 100MHz,
Data Rate: 200MHz, Through-put 1600MB/s
d. PC2100 (DDR-266 SDRAM); Clock Speed: 133MHz,
Data Rate: 266MHz, Through-put 2100MB/s
c. PC2400 (DDR-300 SDRAM); Clock Speed: 150MHz,
Data Rate: 300MHz, Through-put 2400MB/s
d. PC2700 (DDR-333 SDRAM); Clock Speed: 166MHz,
Data Rate: 333MHz, Through-put 2600MB/s
e. PC3000 (DDR-366 SDRAM); Clock Speed: 183MHz,
Data Rate: 366MHz, Through-put 2900MB/s
f. PC3200 (DDR-400 SDRAM); Clock Speed: 200MHz,
Data Rate: 400MHz, Through-put 3200MB/s

184 PINS DIMM
Figure 5
184 PINS DDR DIMM
Figure 6
184 PINS DDR DIMM
Figure 7
TYPES OF DIMM
3. 240 Pins DDR2 SDRAM :
* Introduced mid. 2005
a. DDR2 is a leading-edge generation of memory with an
improved architecture that allows it to transmit data very
fast.
b. 240-pin DIMMs are available in DDR2 PC2-5300
(DDR2 667) SDRAM.
c. To use DDR2 memory, your system motherboard must have
240-pin DIMM slots and a DDR2-enabled chipset. A
DDR2 SDRAM DIMM will not fit into a standard SDRAM
DIMM socket or a DDR DIMM socket.
d. 240-pin DIMM can vary, but it always has 120 pins on the
front and 120 pins on the back, for a total of 240.
e. 240-pin DIMMs are approximately 5.25 inches long and 1.18
inches high, though the heights can vary. While 240-pin
DDR2 DIMMs,
f. 240-pin DIMMs and 184-pin DIMMs have only one notch
within the row of pins. The notch in a 240-pin DDR2 DIMM
is closer toward the center of the module.
TYPES OF DIMM
3. 240 Pins DDR2 SDRAM :

g. PC2-3200 (DDR2-400 SDRAM); Clock Speed: 133MHz,
Data Rate: 532MHz, Through-put 3200MB/s

h. PC2-4300 (DDR2-533 SDRAM); Clock Speed: 133MHz,
Data Rate: 532MHz, Through-put 4300MB/s

i. PC2-5300 (DDR2-667 SDRAM); Clock Speed: 167MHz,
Data Rate: 667MHz, Through-put 5300MB/s

j. PC2-5400 (DDR2-675 SDRAM); Clock Speed: xxMHz,
Data Rate: 675MHz, Through-put 5400MB/s

k. PC2-6400 (DDR2-800 SDRAM); Clock Speed: 200MHz,
Data Rate: 800MHz, Through-put 6400MB/s
240 PINS DDR2 DIMM
Figure 9
240-pin DIMM approx. 5.25" x 1.18" (13.34cm x 2.99cm)
Figure 8
240-pin DIMM approx. 5.25" x 1.25" (13.65cm x 2.54cm)
TYPES OF DIMM
4. 240 Pins DDR3 SDRAM :
* Introduced late 2005 – 2006

a. DDR3 SDRAM: Third Generation RAM
Double Data Rate SDRAM III 1.5v signaling,
b. PC3-xxx (DDR3-1066 SDRAM); Clock Speed: 133MHz,
Data Rate: 1066MHz, Through-put xxMB/s
c. PC3-xxx (DDR3-1333 SDRAM); Clock Speed: 167MHz,
Data Rate: 1333MHz, Through-put xxMB/s
d. PC3-xxx (DDR3-1600 SDRAM); Clock Speed: 200MHz,
Data Rate: 1600MHz, Through-put xxMB/s
TYPES OF DIMM
5. RDRAM :
a. RAMBUS memory was used by some Intel systems starting
around 2000.
b. The modules are called RIMMs and have 184 pins like DDR
DIMMs,
but are not compatible.
c. RAMBUS was invented as a way to decrease the number of
wires needed on the motherboard to handle memory slots. While
SDRAM and DDR SDRAM use 64-bit data paths,
d. RDRAM's interface is only 16 bits wide but runs at a higher rate.
When first introduced it was astoundingly expensive - ten times
more than regular memory - and benchmarks showed it was
actually slower in some cases.
e. It certainly wasn't as fast as it was supposed to be. Now, a couple
years later, it's only about 1.5 times as expensive as DDR
memory and the performance problems seem to have been
ironed out.
f. Still, even Intel is pulling back from it, so it will probably fade
away except perhaps in specialty uses like video game consoles,
where the lower trace count matters much more.

TYPES OF DIMM
4. RDRAM :

g. RDRAM memory comes in a number of different
speeds:
1. PC1066, 533MHz DDR, 2.1 GB/s
2. PC800, 400MHz DDR, 1.6 GB/s
3. PC700, 350MHz DDR, 1.4 GB/s
4. PC600, 300MHz DDR, 1.2 GB/s

RDRAM
Figure 10
The 184 pin RIMM is used on motherboards using the latest Intel
i820/i840 chipsets and is referred to as Rambus
TYPES OF DIMM
6. SODIMM :

a. started to show up in 2001
b. Small Outline Dual Inline Memory Modules
(SO DIMMs)
b. Smaller version of DIMMs developed for
notebook computers.
c. Most common today are 144-pin SO DIMMs,
d. approximately 2 1/3 inches long by 1 inch high.
e. PC1600 (DDR-200 SDRAM); Clock Speed:
100MHz,

SODIMM
Figure 11
72 pins SODIMM
144 pins SODIMM
Figure 13
Figure 12
100 pins SODIMM
144 pins MICRO DIMM
Figure 14
SODIMM
200 pins SODIMM
Figure 15
FACTS ABOUT RAM
Mixing Speeds


it's generally a bad idea to mix different speeds of
memory. What usually happens is the system treats all
the memory as if it was the slowest kind. Not fatal, just a
waste of your good memory.

All DRAM chips must be of the same speed which
is represented by the last digit of the part number on a
chip. This last digit should be a 6, 7, or 8 which
corresponds to 60,70, or 80 nanoseconds (ns). That is the
speed of your SIMM. The lower the number, the faster the
DRAM.
How do I know if there is enough mem.?
The amount of mem. you need is determined by
several factors; the software, operating system and
the number of programs you want to have open at
the same time. When you determine mem. needs,
you'll also want to consider what your needs will be
six months down the road. If you think you may be
upgrading your operating system or adding more
software, it's a good idea to factor that into the
equation now.
Symptoms of Memory Failures


1. No display on screen, but CPU and video
card are ok

2. Continues beeps ( IBM/Award bios )

3. 1-3-1-1 beeps sequence ( Phoenix bios )

4. 1 long 3 short beeps ( AMI bios )


Possible Solution :


1. Clean the memory contact and reseat the
memory modules
2. Swap with other known good memory with
the same specification value.
3. Replace the memory modules
Prefetch

Prefetch is a new and very useful technique
in Windows XP. Windows XP "monitors"
itself and notices which applications are
launched frequently. It gathers information
about these applications and what they
access with the launch and stores this
information in the prefetch folder. It then
uses this information to "optimize" access to
these files so that they launch faster.

Prefetch

The Prefetcher component in Windows XP is
part of the Memory Manager, and helps to
shorten the amount of time it takes to start
Windows and programs.

How to Troubleshoot Prefetch Problem?


1. Go to Start/Run/Regedit and navigate to this key:
2. HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\
Session Manager\Memory Management\PrefetchParameters
3. Inside Prefetch Parameter it contained “EnablePrefetcher”. Open it
and change the value to 5

Clean Your Memory in one click


1. Right click on desktop-New
2. Create shortcut. Dialogue box appear.
3. Write: %windir%\system32\rundll32.exe advapi32.dll,ProcessIdleTasks
4. Click Next
5. Type the name of the shortcut, ex. “Clear Memory"
6. Finish
The end

Activity No. 2

1. Increase prefetch value to 5
2. Create a simple program that will clean your memory
in just one click

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->