You are on page 1of 3

Developing and Using Academic Language- Reading Response #6

Developing and Using Academic Language in the Visual Arts


17.Identify and copy selected benchmars in three different grade levels that are directly related to
using the vocabulary of art.List some of the academic language !ith definitions you thin is important to
help your students develop and use as part of your visual arts curriculum as a "#$ arts educator.%his is a
sill you need !hen you develop your unit plan in the visual arts. &'or a glossary of visual arts vocabulary
see the Appendi( inAn Essential Arts Toolkit for the Grade K-5 Classroom Teacher.)
Developing and Using Academic Language- Reading Response #6
Developing and Using Academic Language in the Visual Arts
17.Identify and copy selected benchmars in three different grade levels that are directly related to
using the vocabulary of art.List some of the academic language !ith definitions you thin is important to
help your students develop and use as part of your visual arts curriculum as a "#$ arts educator.%his is a
sill you need !hen you develop your unit plan in the visual arts. &'or a glossary of visual arts vocabulary
see the Appendi( inAn Essential Arts Toolkit for the Grade K-5 Classroom Teacher.)
06/18/14
06/18/14
ocabulary and academic language is
something that students need to develop in
visual arts. In every grade there are
benchmarks to help teachers stay on task
with keeping the students visual arts
vocabulary updated. For fifth grade, the
arts benchmark states: How the Arts are
rgani!ed " FA.5.3.1: Create a class
dramatization by collaborating as actors,
directors, scriptwriters, and technical
artists. For the third grade benchmark, it
states: How the Arts Communicate
FA.3.!.": #se speci$ic musical terms to
respond to elements o$ a musical
per$ormance. #astly, in fourth grade the
arts benchmark states: How the Arts Are
%rganized FA &.3.1: 'nterpret a
character(s e)ternal moti*ations.
Fifth grades benchmark e$presses
importance of vocabulary by having each
student script write, act, or direct a play.
%hird grades benchmark also shows
vocabulary importance because the
students need to know musical terms and
definitions to be able to respond to a
musical performance. #astly, fourth grades
benchmark shows language academic
importance because the students will need
to talk about each characters motivations
and they will need to know powerful
vocabulary words to describe that
character.
&ome academic language that is
important for various elementary grade
levels are articulate, asymmetrical,
blending, clima$, composer, conflict,
creativity, fluency, focus, illustration,
narrative, plot, primary colors, pro'ection,
setting, symmetrical, tableau, theme, and
tone. (ach word has its own very own
meaning. Articulate means to speak
clearly. Asymmetrical means to be visually
e)ual but not identical. *lending means to
mi$ media together. +lima$ means the
turning point in a plot. A composer is
someone who creates the music. A conflict
is when characters in a story have different
opinions that change the plot. +reativity is
having uni)ue or original thoughts and
responses. Fluency is when things flow
smoothly and effortlessly. Focus is being
fi$ated on one spot. Illustrations are
pictures or drawings. ,arrative is the
communication in a story. -lot is the order
at which a play, movie, or story is
presented. -rimary colors are blue, red,
and yellow because no colors combined
can make those three colors. -ro'ection is
speaking loudly. &etting is the place, time,
or surrounds at which a story is being told.
&ymmetrical is when something is divided
into pieces and is e)ual. A tableau is a
fro!en picture made up of characters.
%heme is the main idea in a play. #astly,
tone consists of sound which includes
duration, pitch, timbre, and loudness.
As teachers, we are here to help
students to learn and comprehend the
many sub'ects, way or life, and becoming
an individual. .ocabulary and the use of
academic language play an important role
in that. +hoosing the words carefully is
important, but we have to be cautious to
not limit our students word walls.
http://arts.k01.hi.us/
Three Arisic !rocesses- Reading Response #"
1$.Describe the three artistic processes* creating+ performing,e(hibiting+ and responding.
-hare specific ideas about ho! you can engage your elementary students in these three processes in a
visual art e(perience that you design for them. .e specific. %his is lie !riting the instructional
strategies in a lesson plan that focuses on !hat the students !ill do and !hat the teacher !ill do. %his is
a sill you need !hen you develop the lessons for your unit plan.
Three Arisic !rocesses- Reading Response #"
1$.Describe the three artistic processes* creating+ performing,e(hibiting+ and responding.
-hare specific ideas about ho! you can engage your elementary students in these three processes in a
visual art e(perience that you design for them. .e specific. %his is lie !riting the instructional
strategies in a lesson plan that focuses on !hat the students !ill do and !hat the teacher !ill do. %his is
a sill you need !hen you develop the lessons for your unit plan.
06/18/14
06/18/14
he three artistic processes are
+reating, -erforming/($hibiting, and
2esponding. (ach artistic process has its
own steps. %hese steps will help guide the
students to be able to be more open
minded towards other art work and teach
students how to eventually evaluate art.
+reating, the first artistic process
starts with imagining as its first step.
Imagining is the step where the students
learn to develop ideas and emotions.
%hen, the students begin to plan by
e$perimenting, doing research, and create
ways to present their thoughts using
materials. After -lanning is 3aking,
(valuating, and 2efining. %his helps
students use their learned skills to create
art work. #astly, there is -resenting.
-resenting is where the students will then
show off their work to get others
comments and approval or disapproval.
%he second artistic process is
-erforming or ($hibiting. -erforming starts
with the step &electing. %his is where an
artist will choose the work to show off.
,e$t, is Analy!ing. Analy!ing is where the
artist gets more information about the art
work. %hen, Interpreting is used to show
the emotions and ideas behind the piece of
art work. ,e$t is 2ehearsing, (valuating,
and 2efining. Again, the artist will use this
time to reflect on their techni)ues used
and connect it with the idea of the art
piece. #astly is presenting, where the artist
will show their work to others.
%he final process is 2esponding.
2esponding has many of the same steps
as -erforming. It starts with &election and
goes to Analy!ing. After Analy!ing is
Interpreting and ends with (valuation. %he
2esponding process does not use a
presenting step because it ends with giving
feedback toward the )uality of an artists
art piece.
It is very important for students to
be aware of the different stages and
processes of art. f course you would not
describe this to an elementary student this
way. 2ather, for the creating process you
could have each student draw a picture of
what they did over their summer vacation.
%hen, you would have them think about
how they want to present it and what type
of materials or art techni)ues they would
want to use. After that, have the students
check their work and make any changes.
%hey need to ask themselves4 's this art
wor+ what ' am trying to portray or $eel,
#astly, the students will do a performance.
5epending on the grade, you could do a
simple art walk where students choose
pieces of art work they like the most and
the author talks a little bit about what
inspired them.
For the -erforming process, you
may want to have the students search for a
piece of art work on the internet or in a te$t
book and research important facts on the
art piece4 6hat inspired it, what does it
look like, what does it represent, etc. %he
students would then give reasons of what
they think it was create for. After the
students have connected with the piece,
have them notice the type of media the art
Three Arisic !rocesses- Reading Response #"
1$.Describe the three artistic processes* creating+ performing,e(hibiting+ and responding.
-hare specific ideas about ho! you can engage your elementary students in these three processes in a
visual art e(perience that you design for them. .e specific. %his is lie !riting the instructional
strategies in a lesson plan that focuses on !hat the students !ill do and !hat the teacher !ill do. %his is
a sill you need !hen you develop the lessons for your unit plan.
Three Arisic !rocesses- Reading Response #"
1$.Describe the three artistic processes* creating+ performing,e(hibiting+ and responding.
-hare specific ideas about ho! you can engage your elementary students in these three processes in a
visual art e(perience that you design for them. .e specific. %his is lie !riting the instructional
strategies in a lesson plan that focuses on !hat the students !ill do and !hat the teacher !ill do. %his is
a sill you need !hen you develop the lessons for your unit plan.
06/18/14
06/18/14
work is made from and how well done the
piece is. #astly, the students can do an art
e$hibit where they have a tri4fold poster
board that has all their found information
and their ideas of the art piece. %he last art
process is 2esponding. 2esponding can
be a tougher process because you have to
know how to notice )uality work,
techni)ues, and different descriptions of
the art piece before you can give
feedback. However, the students can start
slow by choosing an art piece that is
simple and made by someone from the
internet. %he students will do research to
find an art work and use what they have
learned about different features and
techni)ues in art work to understand what
the art work resembles. %hey will then
write a half a page on how they feel about
the )uality of the art work and the
intentions of the artist. %hey will end with
evaluating the overall work of the piece
with positive thoughtfulness, but honest
opinions. %hey will turn their paper in with
a picture of the art work they were
evaluation and responding to.
f course there are many ways to
use the three artistic processes, these are
'ust some ways to get an idea of what
students can do with the use of technology,
resources, and choices.