Power Generation 1

Kodierung
World Bank Energy Week
Raymond Baumgartner
Director- 60 Hz Reference Plants
Advanced Coal Technology
to Power the World
March 7, 2006
Power Generation 2
WorldBank_EnergyWeek.ppt
World Bank Energy Week 2006
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Oil Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Renewables
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Coal Will Continue to Fuel Major Portion of
World Electrical Generation Capacity
Through 2025
EIA International Energy Outlook 2005
• Most abundant fossil fuel constituting 2/3 of world’s proven reserves
• Widely distributed with enough recoverable reserves to last 200 years
• US, Russia, China, India reserves constitute 67% of total
Concern is Impact
on Environment
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March 7, 2006
Power Generation 3
WorldBank_EnergyWeek.ppt
World Bank Energy Week 2006
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Mature Market Economies
Transitional Economies
Emerging Economies
Worldwide Coal-Fired Capacity by Region
2002-2025
EIA International Energy Outlook 2005
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• Modest growth in mature markets (largest in US)
• Significant growth in emerging markets (largest in China, India)
• Will add 3 billion metric tons of CO
2
emissions annually
EIA Definitions:
Mature Market: North America, Western
Europe, Japan
Transitional: Eastern Europe/FSU
Emerging: Asia, Africa, Middle East
March 7, 2006
Power Generation 4
WorldBank_EnergyWeek.ppt
World Bank Energy Week 2006
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2002 Additions 2025
US
China
India
Installed Coal-Fired Capacity
• US: 311GW (generating 50% of total capacity)
• China: 204 GW (generating 80% of total capacity)
• India: 66 GW (generating 70% of total capacity)
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EIA International Energy Outlook 2005
March 7, 2006
Power Generation 5
WorldBank_EnergyWeek.ppt
World Bank Energy Week 2006
New Coal-Fired Capacity Additions
Through 2025
• US: 311 GW 90 GW 401 GW
• China: 204 GW 230 GW 434 GW
• India: 66 GW 60 GW 126 GW
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India
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EIA International Energy Outlook 2005
March 7, 2006
Power Generation 6
WorldBank_EnergyWeek.ppt
World Bank Energy Week 2006
No. Units
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100-199 200-299 300-499 500-599 > 600
No. Units
Coal-Fired Units in China
Output Range (MW)
Of the 1000 units in operation, ten 600 MW-class are supercritical
Most units installed since 1980 (but low fleet efficiency)
Less than 5% have emissions controls
few
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March 7, 2006
Power Generation 7
WorldBank_EnergyWeek.ppt
World Bank Energy Week 2006
Coal Plant Ordering Pattern in China
Proportion of MW ordered >200 MW
supercritical
subcritical
Yuhuan 4x1000 MW
262 bar, 600°C / 600°C
Waigaoqiao 2x900 MW
250 bar, 538°C / 566°C
Yuhuan – China´s first ultra-supercritical power plant
The good news is China is embracing large unit Ultra-supercritical technology
Technology for New Units in China
March 7, 2006
Power Generation 8
WorldBank_EnergyWeek.ppt
World Bank Energy Week 2006
Coal-Fired Units in India
No. Units
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<100 100-200 200-250 500
No. Units
• 343 units in operation- no supercritical, no emission controls
• India’s 10/11
th
Plan- almost all 660 MW supercritical units
converted to 500 MW subcritical; few planned for future
• Actual capacity additions typically half of Plan
25% Installed Capacity
< 24% Net Efficiency
Output Range (MW)
few
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March 7, 2006
Power Generation 9
WorldBank_EnergyWeek.ppt
World Bank Energy Week 2006
1%-Point gain in efficiency for typical 700 MW plant reduces
• 30-yr lifetime emissions by
2000 t NO
x
, 2000 t SO
2
, 500 t Particulates
2 ½Mio t CO
2
• fuel consumption by 2.4%
Proven Technology is Available Today to
Significantly Reduce Environmental
Impact Tomorrow
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167 bar
538°C
538°C
250 bar
540°C
560°C
250 bar
566°C
566°C
270 bar
580°C
600°C
285 bar
600°C
620°C
Subcritical
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Ultra-
Supercritical
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Fuel: Bituminous coal
March 7, 2006
Power Generation 10
WorldBank_EnergyWeek.ppt
World Bank Energy Week 2006
Proven Technology is Available Today to
Significantly Reduce Environmental
Impact Tomorrow
Presently > 400 supercritical units in operation
Supercritical technology is proven in operating units worldwide
Capital costs are reasonable compared to subcritical units (only 2-5% higher)
Manufacturing capability in many countries, including China, India
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167 bar
538°C
538°C
250 bar
540°C
560°C
250 bar
566°C
566°C
270 bar
580°C
600°C
285 bar
600°C
620°C
Fuel: Bituminous coal
Subcritical
Ultra-
Supercritical
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March 7, 2006
Power Generation 11
WorldBank_EnergyWeek.ppt
World Bank Energy Week 2006
Siemens has built Supercritical Unit
References Worldwide
Up to 1000 MW with steam parameters up to 265 bar and over 600 °C
1x600 MW / Main Steam: 251 bar / 600°C
Reheat Steam: 610°C, Condenser:0.0507 bar
Isogo, Japan
Niederaussem, Germany
Waigaoqiao 1+2, China
2x900 MW / Main Steam: 250bar / 538°C
Reheat Steam: 566°C, Condenser: 0.049/0.0368 bar
1x1025 MW / Main Steam: 265 bar/576°C
Reheat Steam: 600°C, Condenser: 0.0291/0.0368 bar
in Operation
since 2003
in Operation
since 2002
in Operation
since 2004
4x1000 MW/ Main Steam: 262.5 bar / 600°C
Reheat Steam: 600°C, Condenser: 0.054/0.044 bar
Yuhuan, China
Waigaoqiao 3, China
1x1000 MW/ Main Steam: 270 bar / 600°C
Reheat Steam: 600°C, Condenser: 0.054/0.044 bar
planned Operation
in 2008
planned Operation
in 2009
1x750 MW/ Main Steam: 250 bar / 540°C
Reheat Steam: 560°C, Condenser: 0.2 bar
Kogan Creek, Australia
planned Operation
in 2007
March 7, 2006
Power Generation 12
WorldBank_EnergyWeek.ppt
World Bank Energy Week 2006
Siemens Remains Committed to
Designing and Building Clean, Efficient
Power Plants Worldwide
By investing significant R&D in advanced coal technologies including
Ultra Supercritical Plants
Integrated Gasification CC Plants
By investing heavily in large manufacturing plants worldwide, including
China
The technology is available …the manufacturing is available …
all that is needed is a commitment to use our precious resources
more effectively
March 7, 2006
Power Generation 13
WorldBank_EnergyWeek.ppt
World Bank Energy Week 2006
What Should we do to Protect the
Environment for Future Generations?
For Countries Rich in Natural Gas
Build high efficiency combined-cycle plants (but plan fuel diversity)
For Emerging Countries with Small Installed Grids and low Natural Gas
Reserves
Build small (250-500 MW) coal plants using modern day subcritical
technology with low NO
X
burners and post-combustion emissions
controls for SO
2
and particulates
For Emerging Countries Rich in Coal with Large Installed Grids and Mature
Countries Rich in Coal
Continue to clean up/retire old coal-fired operating units
Build large (600-1000 MW) supercritical/ultrasupercritical coal plants
with post-combustion emissions controls for NO
X
, SO
2
and particulates
Embrace IGCC as it becomes more commercially available
Continue development toward CO
2
capture
March 7, 2006
Power Generation 14
WorldBank_EnergyWeek.ppt
World Bank Energy Week 2006
How Can the World Financing Community
Help?
Bring Emission Guidelines in line with requirements in rest of
the world and available technologies
Stipulate efficiency thresholds to promote advanced coal
technologies
Promote carbon credits to effectively reduce CO
2
Present Emissions Guidelines for Coal-Fired Plants
World Bank Typical US/EU Available Technology
NO
X
750 150 - 200 LNB+SCR
SO
2
2000 200 FGD
Particulates 50 30 ESP
mg/Nm
3
LNB = Low NOx Burners/ SCR = Selective Catalytic Reduction/
FGD = Flue Gas Desulphurization/ ESP = Electrostatic Precipitator
Power Generation 15
Kodierung
World Bank Energy Week
Raymond Baumgartner
Director- 60 Hz Reference Plants
Advanced Coal Technology
to Power the World
A Sound Commitment
Today for Generations
to Come
Thank You

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