You are on page 1of 10

MUGHAL,JAPANESE AND INDIAN

GARDENS
MUGHAL GARDEN
The most striking element of mughal Architecture
is not only the buildings but rather the layout of
the entire grand complex.
The tomb no longer stands alone in the
wilderness of a flat and barren piece of land , but
is conceived as the heart of grand symmetrically
arranged CHARBAGH (Four Gardens).
The idea of planting gardens around the tomb
was a homage by the later mughals to the nature
loving vision of their founding Babur.
The monument were basically built along the
cardinal axis.

The mughals organized each of the natural
elements within a refined manmade frame work of
geometrical patterns.
Thus , the groves of trees is dispersed into trees
planted sentinel like at strategic points , the
rivulets became rigid channels of water which
was laid along the cardinal axis of the building
punctuated by fountains at regular intervals , and
rows of flowers flagged paths became decorative
borders for the grass contained within square
quadrangles

Typical Mughal garden :
JAPANESE AND INDIAN
GARDENS:
The Mughal garden was the very anti thesis of
both Japanese and Indian gardens.
The Japanese garden tend to crystallize the most
important elements of natural beauties by
intense purification of its amorphous forms .
The Indian garden was created by merely pruning
away the undesirable elements of wild nature to
make well shaded groves for human leisure .
The Mughal garden attempted to capture natural
beauty within a man made framework highlighting
the contrast between two.
TYPICAL FEATURES OF JAPANESE
GARDEN
Typical Japanese gardens have at their center a
home from which the garden is viewed
Japanese gardens often contain several of
these elements:
Water, real or symbolic.
Rocks or stone arrangements.
A lantern, typically of stone.
A teahouse or pavilion.
An enclosure device such as a hedge, fence, or
wall of traditional character.
A bridge to the island, or stepping stones.



Thank you

back