Book

Name/Author/Copyright
Synopsis Common Core Standard(s)
addressed
McGrath, B. (2012) Teddy
Bear, Teddy Bear, School
Day Math.
This rhyming book
takes teddy bear into
patterns and groups,
adding and
subtracting basics and
is a great addition to
first time math
lessons.
CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.C.6
Identify whether the number of
objects in one group is greater
than, less than, or equal to the
number of objects in another
group, e.g., by using matching
and counting strategies.
Fisher, V. (2006) How High
Can a Dinosaur Count?
And Other Math Mysteries.
This book highlights a
series of characters
and the quirky fun
they have in their
math adventures. Each
character has a math
problem to offer,
varying from easy to
difficult this book can
be used in many grade
levels.
CCSS.Math.Content.1.OA.A.1
Use addition and subtraction
within 20 to solve word
problems involving situations
of adding to, taking from,
putting together, taking apart,
and comparing, with unknowns
in all positions, e.g., by using
objects, drawings, and
equations with a symbol for the
unknown number to represent
the problem.
Packard, E. (2000) Big
Numbers and pictures that
show just how BIG they
are!
This book uses clear
illustrations to show
us what large numbers
look like, and at the
same time showing us
how to make those
large numbers using
math equations. Great
visual support.
CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.3
Use multiplication and division
within 100 to solve word
problems in situations
involving equal groups, arrays,
and measurement quantities,
e.g., by using drawings and
equations with a symbol for the
unknown number to represent
the problem.
Wells, R. (2000) Can You
Count to a Googol?
Big numbers are very
hard to visualize, but
if you think if a simple
number like “1” then
just start adding
zero’s your number
gets bigger and bigger.
This book highlights
just how big numbers
can get when you keep
adding zeros.
CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.B.7
Add and subtract within 1000,
using concrete models or
drawings and strategies based
on place value, properties of
operations, and/or the
relationship between addition
and subtraction; relate the
strategy to a written method.
Understand that in adding or
subtracting three-digit
numbers, one adds or subtracts
hundreds and hundreds, tens
and tens, ones and ones; and
sometimes it is necessary to
compose or decompose tens or
hundreds.
Slade, S. (2012) The Great
Divide.
Clever word problems
using animals and
math equations, also
integrates interesting
facts about animal
groupings (A group of
hummingbirds is
called a charm),
making learning
division fun.
CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.3
Use multiplication and division
within 100 to solve word
problems in situations
involving equal groups, arrays,
and measurement quantities,
e.g., by using drawings and
equations with a symbol for the
unknown number to represent
the problem.
Lewis, P. (2002)
Arithmetickle An Even
Number of Odd Riddle-
Rhymes.
This book uses riddles
to get the brain
thinking about adding
and subtracting in new
fun ways.
CCSS.Math.Content.2.OA.A.1
Use addition and subtraction
within 100 to solve one- and
two-step word problems
involving situations of adding
to, taking from, putting
together, taking apart, and
comparing, with unknowns in
all positions, e.g., by using
drawings and equations with a
symbol for the unknown
number to represent the
problem.
1

Leedy, L, (1997) Mission:
Addition.
Basic addition at its
best, using fun
illustrations to
highlight the facts this
book makes addition
fun and exciting.
CCSS.Math.Content.K.OA.A.1
Represent addition and
subtraction with objects,
fingers, mental images,
drawings
1
, sounds (e.g., claps),
acting out situations, verbal
explanations, expressions, or
equations.
CCSS.Math.Content.K.OA.A.2
Solve addition and subtraction
word problems, and add and
subtract within 10, e.g., by
using objects or drawings to
represent the problem

Harris, T. (1999) 100 Days
of School.
Great examples of the
many ways to learn to
count or add to 100,
this book uses fun
illustrations to show
how easy and fun it
can be.
CCSS.Math.Content.2.OA.A.1
Use addition and subtraction
within 100 to solve one- and
two-step word problems
involving situations of adding
to, taking from, putting
together, taking apart, and
comparing, with unknowns in
all positions, e.g., by using
drawings and equations with a
symbol for the unknown
number to represent the
problem.
Schwartz, D. (1999) On
Beyond a Million an
Amazing Math Journey.
Focusing on
understanding the
number system and
how to count in tens.
Follow the professor
on a learning
adventure to stop the
out of control popcorn
popper.
CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.1
Understand that the three digits
of a three-digit number
represent amounts of
hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g.,
706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens,
and 6 ones. Understand the
following as special cases:
CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.1.a
100 can be thought of as a
bundle of ten tens — called a
"hundred."

Ziefert, H. (2003) You
Can’t Buy a Dinosaur with
a Dime.
Learning how to count
and understand
money can be a new
challenge for many
young students, this
book gives illustrated
examples of basic
money counting and
makes it easy to learn.
CCSS.Math.Content.2.MD.C.8
Solve word problems involving
dollar bills, quarters, dimes,
nickels, and pennies, using $
and ¢ symbols appropriately.
Example: If you have 2 dimes
and 3 pennies, how many cents
do you have?