Principles of The

Constitution
What is Identity?
Hipster Emo
What is identity?
Soldier Politician
What else can
shape an
identity?
Family
Past experiences
Environment
Economic status
Religion
Helps Shape Identity
Values
 Sets of beliefs about
good and bad, right
and wrong and
about many other
aspects about living
and interacting in a
society with others.
 Examples: Love,
compassion
Principles
 Rules or laws that are
universal in nature.
These principles are
about human
behavior and set or
govern the
interaction between
people in a society.
Principles are
unwritten laws
What is the American Identity?
Group Product
What influences and
principles have helped
shape the American
Identity? (2-3 minutes)
Let’s Make a T-Chart!
Lets Make a T-Chart!
Left side- Term

Middle- Definition

Right side- Definition
in your own words.
Pretend you are
explaining this to a
fourth grader.
Group Product
What are
Individual
Rights? (2-3
minutes)
Individual Rights
 When the Framers of the constitution met
to establish a new form of government,
they were very careful about the powers
they gave the government. Many of the
Framers were political scholars, and the
speeches given at the Convention are
sprinkled with references to governments
from ancient times right up to the then-
current ones in Europe.
Group Product
What were the Framers thoughts about
the Constitution in reference to
individual rights? (3 minutes)
The Framers were concerned with a
few things overall. They wanted to
create a national government that
was effective and powerful, but
which did not infringe upon the
rights of the individual, nor upon the
powers of the states.
Bill of Rights
Group Product
What is the most
important Right to you
and why?(3 minutes)
Define Individual Rights
on your T-Chart
Limited
Government
Background
 The Magna Carta of 1215 stands as the
earliest document that limited the reach
of the King’s power. While it’s limits
protected only a small portion of the
English population, it did state that the
King’s barons possessed rights which they
could assert against the King.
 Basically, the Magna Carta limited the
King’s total authority.
Background continued….
 English Bill of Rights established limits of
royal power. It is associated with the
Glorious Revolution of 1688.
 In contrast, the United States Constitution
of 1787 created a government limited by
the terms of the written document itself.
Group Product
 What is the Magna
Carta?
(2-3 minutes)
 What is the English
Bill of Rights?
(2-3 minutes)
 Why do you think
the Magna Carta
and the English Bill
of Rights were
necessary?
(2-3 minutes)
Define Limited Government on your
Column Chart
Republicanism
 Define Republicanism on your Column
Chart
 Republicanism- A form of government in
which leaders are elected by the people
for a specific period.
 The elected leaders have their power only
because the people give it to them.
Background
 Republicanism has been a major part of
the American society since the American
Revolution. It’s stresses liberty and
“unalienable rights” as central values,
makes the people as a whole sovereign,
rejects aristocracy and inherited political
power, expects citizens to be
independent in their performance of civic
duties, and vilifies corruption.
 Group Product: What are characteristics
of Republicanism? (3 minutes)
Checks and Balances
Group Product
 Name the three Branches of Government
 Why do we have three branches of
government instead of one?
 Give an example of another group or
organization that uses checks and
balances.
(8-10 minutes)
Let’s Define!
Column Chart  Define Checks and
Balances & Federalism

Left side- Term

Middle- Definition

Right side- Definition in
your own words. Pretend
you are explaining this to
a fourth grader.

Federalism
Background
 In the United States, federalism originally
referred to the belief in a stronger central
government. When the U.S. Constitution
was being drafted, the Federalist Party
supported a stronger central government,
while “Anti-Federalists” wanted a weaker
central government. This is very different
from the modern usage of Federalism in
Europe and the United States.
Group Product
 What was the early definition of
Federalism and what is it now?
 Define “enumerated”
 What enumerated responsibilities do you
have in this class?
 Define “implied”
 What implied responsibilities do you have
in this class?
(8-10 minutes)
Let’s talk Powers
Separation of Powers
Group Product
What is the point of having
separation of powers
What types of government have no
separation of powers?
(5 minutes)
Let’s Define!
 Define Separation of
Powers & Popular
Sovereignty

Left side- Term

Middle- Definition

Right side- Definition in
your own words. Pretend
you are explaining this to
a fourth grader.

Popular Sovereignty
Background
 Popular Sovereignty comes from an idea
that dates to the social contracts school
represented by Thomas Hobbes, John
Locke, Jean Jacques Rousseau. This was
a political work that highlighted the ideals
of general will and further matured the
idea of popular sovereignty. The idea is
that legitimacy of rule or of law is based
on the consent of the governed.
Group Product
Does the popular vote always yield
the right choice?
It is important to protect minority
rights?
(5 minutes)