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1. Introduction:
1.1. Human resource management: an overview

It is a widely shared belief that the human resources are the most primary source of competitive
edge for business organizations in this era (Hughes & Rogue 2008). It is important to ensure that
the appropriate policies are in place so that the employees in an organization are nurtured,
developed and retained. It is hence no wonder that the developing countries have time and again
treated the impacts of HRM policies as the leading area of research (Delaney and Huselid 1996,
as cited in Absar et al 2010).
With the change in current business world, the management strategies are continuously evolving.
In order to deal with the current changes in the industrial world, the labor intensive
manufacturing companies are in need of developing their HR in conformity with the business
strategies (Huda et al 2007). This is owing to the fact that the concurrent changes in
globalization, liberation, technology etc are posing both challenges and opportunities for
organizations. In order to acquire the competitive advantage and treat the change as an
opportunity, organizations must amend and develop their operational strategy accordingly. It is
hence evident that effective human resource management is crucial for an organization. Human
resource management is effectively the set of activities that provide for and coordinate the
human resources in an organization (Lloyd and Leslie 2000 as cited in Huda et al 2007) . It can
also be regarded as the composition of practices, policies and systems that can influence the
employees’ attitude, behavior and performance. (Absar et al 2010). Hence organizations often
employ planned human resource deployment and design a strategic framework to support long-
term business goals and outcome (CIPD 2013). As a result, the approach to human resource
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management is continuously changing with the concern being long-term people issues and
macro-concerns regarding structure, culture, quality, values and commitment and match
resources to future needs. (CIPD 2013).
This study will highlight the HR policies regarding recruitment & selection, training &
development, career planning, performance appraisal and compensation & benefits as the key
focus of research. The inclusion of these criteria are justified by the fact that they are
incorporated in the guest model of HRM, which is believed to be the most superior among the
top models of Human resource management.(Aswathappa 2008, as cited in Absar et al 2010)
1.2. Brief overview of the RMG industry Bangladesh

Being an overpopulated country, Bangladesh often have to face macro-economic challenges.
RMG industry plays a vital role in the economy through export earnings, employment
generation, poverty alleviation and empowerment of women in Bangladesh (Rahman & Hossain
2010). It also largely contributes to the generation of GDP in the economy. To mention in
numerical figures, it accounts for over 75 percent of the country’s total export earnings, provides
employment almost 5 million people, accounts for over 10 percent of the country’s GDP, and
contributes around 40% of its manufacturing output (Rahman & Hossain 2010). Around 44 lakhs
are currently employed in the RMG industry and over 80 percent are women from rural areas
(Ovi 2013). It is believed, that the export-quota system and the availability of cheap labor are the
two main reasons behind the success of the industry (Haider 2007, as cited in Rahman & Hossain
2010). Naturally the government takes extra interest on RMG sector and needs to play an
important role for the welfare of this industry (Ovi, 2013) Hence, the HR policies that are in
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practice in the RMG sector are not just in response to organizational goals but also a result of
regulations provided by the Government and other governing bodies present.
The Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association (BGMEA) is one such
governing body that has formulated its own code of conduct for the industry, in collaboration
with the major trade unions. It has also set up a compliance unit that monitors labor conditions in
its members' factories (UNIFEM 2008, as cited in Huda et al 2007). The standards of
compliances set by BGMEA and Bangladesh Knitwear Manufacturers and Export Association
(BKMEA) are mostly to ensure health, safety and the fair treatment of the employees with the
focus being on details starting from the basic fire equipment to minimum wage and flexible job
facilities for workers(Huda et al 2007). The HRM approach should ultimately be structured
keeping employee satisfaction in aim as it has a significant influence on employee commitment,
absenteeism, turnover and grievances thereby increasing organizational productivity.
Numerous dramatic changes are being expected from RMG world as it is operating a challenging
voyage in the 21st century. Human resources are hence a key factor to consider in the
organization development and emphasis must be put on the factors in response to micro and
macro-environmental changes of business (Huda et al 2007).
1.3. Research Gap:
The research in this paper aims to identify the actual HR policies that are in practice in the RMG
industry of Bangladesh. Although extensive research exists about best practice of human
resource management in the international HRM journal database, it is repeatedly observed that
organizations fail to adopt the practices that the researches has found out to be the most effective
(Rogers 1995 as cited in Sanders et al 2008). Given that, the existing literature suggests that there
has not been a lot of extensive research made on the HR policy and practices specific to
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Bangladesh and especially in RMG industry. As the key focus in this paper is the practices in
local RMG factories, this paper aims to fulfill the research gap by providing the desired analysis
by using the primary and secondary data collected. Additionally, this paper aims to investigate
the theoretical knowledge regarding these HR issues in our subject organizations and how it is
similar to or different from the management they actually practice.

1.4. Rationality

The RMG industry is the only multi-billion-dollar manufacturing and export industry in
Bangladesh. Whereas the industry contributed only 0.001 per cent to the country’s total export
earnings in 1976, its share increased to about 75 per cent of those earnings in 2005. Over the past
one and half decade, RMG export earnings have increased by more than 8 times with an
exceptional growth rate of 16.5 percent per annum, due to policy support of the government and
dynamism of the private sector entrepreneurs. The “export-quota system” in trading garment
products played a significant role in the success of the industry. However, the quota system came
to an end in 2004. Even after the end of the quota system, earnings reached about 8 billion USD
in FY06, which was only less than a billion USD in FY91. Excepting FY02, the industry
registered significant positive growth throughout this period. Bangladesh exported garments
worth the equivalent of $6.9 billion in 2005, which was about 2.5 per cent of the global total
value ($276 billion) of garment exports. The country’s RMG industry grew by more than 15 per
cent per annum on average during the last 15 years. The foreign exchange earnings and
employment generation of the RMG sector have been increasing at double-digit rates from year
to year. Some important issues related to the RMG industry of Bangladesh are noted in table 1.




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Table 01: Important issues related to the Bangladesh ready-made garment industry



Currently, The RMG industry in Bangladesh has still been expanding horizontally and
contributing to national development significantly. It comprises of about 16 percent of GDP (FY
2010-11) providing employment (both directly and indirectly) to 10.72 percent of national labor
force, in which 6.83 percent are directly employed (BBS& BGMEA). Nearly 79 percent of the
total exports of the country comprises of RMG products in FY 2010 – 11(EPB). Now as per the
2011 statistics, the number of RMG units is around 5,000 and the export earnings have reached
over $19.00 billion and over 3.7 million garment workers are working in the RMG units, of
whom 80 per cent are women. The following table shows the growth of RMG sector in
Bangladesh.


To about 30 countries around the world, Bangladesh presently exports ready-made garments,
with over 45% to USA, 50% to the countries in EU and 3% to Canada and rest to the other
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countries of the world. Bangladesh is known in these countries as -“Bangladesh is a small
country with a strong presence.”
In terms of GDP, RMG’s contribution is highly remarkable; it reaches 13 percent of GDP which
was only about 3 percent in FY91. This is a clear indication of the industry’s contribution to the
overall economy. It also plays a pivotal role to promote the development of other key sectors of
the economy like banking, insurance, shipping, hotel, tourism, road transportation, railway
container services, etc.


Figure: Trend of RMG Export Volume, Export Growth and Contribution to GDP
Bangladeshi RMG products are mainly destined to the US and EU. Back in 1996-97, Bangladesh
was the 7th and 5th largest apparel exporter to the USA and European Union respectively. The
industry was successful in exploring the opportunities in markets away from EU and US. In
FY07, a successful turnaround was observed in exports to third countries, which having a
negative growth in FY06 rose three-fold in FY07, which helped to record 23.1 percent overall
export growth in the RMG sector. It is anticipated that the trend of market diversification will
continue and this will help to maintain the growth momentum of export earnings.
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Data Source Export Promotion Bureau (Year 1983-84 to Year 2013-14) Compiled by BGMEA
(
3
Based on Table 03)


Data Source Export Promotion Bureau (Year 1992-93 to Year 2013-14) Compiled by BGMEA
(
4
Based on Table 04)


0
5000
10000
15000
20000
25000
30000
35000
1
9
8
3
-
8
4
1
9
8
4
-
8
5
1
9
8
5
-
8
6
1
9
8
6
-
8
7
1
9
8
7
-
8
8
1
9
8
8
-
8
9
1
9
8
9
-
9
0
1
9
9
0
-
9
1
1
9
9
1
-
9
2
1
9
9
2
-
9
3
1
9
9
3
-
9
4
1
9
9
4
-
9
5
1
9
9
5
-
9
6
1
9
9
6
-
9
7
1
9
9
7
-
9
8
1
9
9
8
-
9
9
1
9
9
9
-
0
0
2
0
0
0
-
0
1
2
0
0
1
-
0
2
2
0
0
2
-
0
3
2
0
0
3
-
0
4
2
0
0
4
-
0
5
2
0
0
5
-
0
6
2
0
0
6
-
0
7
2
0
0
7
-
0
8
2
0
0
8
-
0
9
2
0
0
9
-
1
0
2
0
1
0
-
1
1
2
0
1
1
-
1
2
2
0
1
2
-
1
3
2
0
1
3
-
1
4
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT ON EXPORT OF RMG AND
TOTAL EXPORT OF BANGLADESH
3
EXPORT OF RMG
In Million US$
TOTAL EXPORT OF BANGLADESH
In Million US$
0
5000
10000
15000
20000
25000
30000
0
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
VALUE OF TOTAL APPAREL EXPORT
FISCAL YEAR BASIS
4
WOVEN KNIT TOTAL
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Table 05: Bangladesh's RMG Export to World (FY 11-12, FY12-13 & FY13-14)
Million US$ Woven Knit Total
Major EU
Countries 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Austria 17.50
23.07 25.33
34.49
29.26 31.81
51.99 52.33 57.15
Belgium 238.61
248.61 335.29
320.46
317.19 440.63
559.07 565.80 775.92
Bulgaria 0.54
0.20 0.10
0.68
0.92 0.82
1.23 1.13 0.91
Denmark 86.80
125.91 145.24
318.72
375.62 450.71
405.51 501.52 595.94
Finland 7.85
10.81 10.07
29.25
25.55 26.10
37.10 36.36 36.18
France 416.72
498.00 579.52
855.18
892.45 964.27
1271.90 1390.44 1543.79
Germany 1,358.92
1,509.79 1,803.85
2039.97
2,168.49 2,573.70
3398.89 3678.28 4377.55
Greece 8.14
4.14 5.59
21.17
12.77 14.16
29.31 16.91 19.76
Italy 291.15
358.26 447.23
571.46
554.94 731.91
862.62 913.20 1179.14
Ireland 63.03
67.51 68.36
123.92
133.44 149.87
186.95 200.95 218.24
Netherlands 226.76
252.99 294.52
325.28
331.48 385.48
552.04 584.47 680.00
Portugal 6.68
6.43 9.98
25.57
22.91 32.53
32.25 29.33 42.51
Romania 4.30
3.23 3.39
7.62
5.66 6.07
11.93 8.89 9.47
Spain 410.39
515.33 651.29
660.73
702.90 856.28
1071.12 1218.23 1507.56
Sweden 109.07
125.88 120.39
203.87
220.50 244.07
312.94 346.37 364.46
U.K. 1,026.77
1,189.09 1,262.79
1103.30
1,259.84 1,335.25
2130.07 2448.93 2598.04
Cyprus 0.08
0.05 0.15
1.11
1.12 2.38
1.18 1.17 2.53
Czech
Republic 37.99
39.38 66.65
25.77
32.92 43.69
63.75 72.30 110.33
Estonia 0.74
1.08 0.26
2.52
2.14 1.29
3.26 3.21 1.55
Hungary 0.21
0.11 0.71
2.14
3.88 8.71
2.34 3.99 9.41
Latvia 0.29
0.12 0.50
1.22
1.90 2.05
1.51 2.01 2.56
Lithuania 0.18
0.28 0.00
0.98
1.94 0.82
1.16 2.23 0.82
Malta 0.02 0.02
0.79
0.45
0.80 1.70
0.47 0.82 2.49
Poland 112.77
159.73 204.57
209.96
240.79 304.99
322.74 400.52 509.57
Slovakia 20.31
30.25 30.19
36.54
40.54 43.60
56.85 70.79 73.79
Slovenia 1.04
3.60 6.16
6.33
11.05 19.57
7.37 14.65 25.73
Sub-Total
(EU) 4446.87 5173.86 6072.91 6928.69 7390.99 8672.47 11375.56 12564.85 14745.39
EU % of
World 46.31 46.87 48.81 73.04 70.55 71.97 59.59 58.40 60.21
Growth% 23.18 16.35 17.38 0.27 6.67 17.34 8.13 10.45 17.35
USA 3515.45
3,865.68 3,943.52
1013.95
1,130.90 1,197.85
4529.40 4996.58 5141.38
% of USA 36.61 35.02 31.70 10.69 10.80 9.94 23.73 23.22 20.99
Growth% 0.27 9.96 2.01 -9.39 11.53 5.92 -2.07 10.31 2.90
Canada 473.04
518.29 556.87
401.82
461.97 445.10
874.85 980.26 1001.97
% of Canada 4.93 4.69 4.48 4.24 4.41 3.69 4.58 4.56 4.09
Growth% 2.44 9.57 7.44 -7.18 14.97 -3.65 -2.21 12.05 2.22
Non-
Traditional
Markets
Australia 94.83
132.46 142.52
212.72
295.98 288.24
307.54 428.44 430.76
Brazil 50.45
56.50 72.54
77.33
115.33 97.70
127.78 171.84 170.24
Chile 5.57
7.17 10.31
11.36
21.13 22.70
16.93 28.31 33.01
China 57.83
86.55 142.08
46.69
52.59 99.29
104.52 139.14 241.37
India 42.20
60.87 76.44
12.82
14.34 19.81
55.02 75.21 96.25
Japan 239.99
280.17 318.92
163.65
198.31 253.35
403.65 478.48 572.27
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Korea Rep. 61.27
73.66 77.63
18.75
40.73 57.96
80.01 114.39 135.60
Mexico 36.74
46.22 51.50
61.91
63.99 73.12
98.65 110.21 124.63
Russia 27.67
51.04 74.92
48.82
88.52 132.82
76.49 139.55 207.74
South Africa 29.31
30.46 26.18
26.45
27.19 22.38
55.76 57.66 48.55
Turkey 231.20
263.39 440.41
124.73
151.92 181.96
355.93 415.31 622.37
Other
Countries 290.92 393.51 435.30 336.68 421.99 485.06 627.60 815.5 920.36
Sub-Total
(Non-Trad.) 1167.98 1482.01 1868.77 1141.90 1492.03 1734.38 2309.88 2974.04 3603.15
% of Non-
Traditional 12.16 13.42 15.02 12.04 14.24 14.39 12.10 13.82 14.71
% Growth of
Non-
Traditional 36.62 26.89 26.10 11.91 30.66 16.24 23.17 28.75 21.15
GRAND
TOTAL 9603.34 11039.85 12442.07 9486.35 10475.88 12049.81 19089.69 21515.73 24491.88
% Growth 13.88 14.96 12.70 0.05 10.43 15.02 6.56 12.71 13.83
Source: Export Promotion Bureau, Compiled by: RDTI Cell, BGMEA
5



Data Source Export Promotion Bureau (FY 2012-13 & 2013-14) Compiled by BGMEA
(
6
Based on Table 06)

0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
BANGLADESH'S WOVEN EXPORTS TO WORLD,
FY 2012-13 & 2013-14
6
Value in Million US$
Woven (2012/13) (Million US$) Woven (2013/14) (Million US$) Growth Rate (%)
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Data Source Export Promotion Bureau (FY 2012-13 & 2013-14) Compiled by BGMEA
(
6
Based on Table 06)

Data Source Export Promotion Bureau (FY 2012-13 & 2013-14) Compiled by BGMEA
(
6
Based on Table 06)
-10
0
10
20
30
40
50
0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
BANGLADESH'S KNIT EXPORTS TO WORLD, FY
2012-13 & 2013-14
6
Value in Million US$
Knit (2012/13) (Million US$) Knit (2013/14) (Million US$) Growth Rate (%)
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
BANGLADESH'S RMG ((Woven + Knit) EXPORTS
TO WORLD, FY 2012-13 & 2013-14
6
Value in Million US$
Total (Woven + Knit)
(2012/13) (Million US$)
Total (Woven + Knit)
(2013/14) (Million US$)
Growth Rate (%)
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2. Methodology:
2.1. Overview of the Methodology:

A research needs methodology which reveals how the researcher is going to achieve his/her
objectives of the specified study. Aminuzzaman in “Introduction to Social Research” states, as a
systematic study. Research methodology deals primarily with the approaches and techniques as
how to undertake a research without being biased and prejudiced. It offers a bunch of tactical
approaches and logical skills to observe, record, interpret and infer on matters under study.
According to Kothari (2004, p. 8), research methodology is a way to solve the research problem
systematically and scientifically.
The objectives of the study are to explore Human Resource Management Practices and
Organizational performance in garments industry Bangladesh. Three research methods- content
analysis, questionnaire and interview are used in this study. Content analysis is used for the
descriptive part of the study. Interview and questionnaire methods have been used for collecting
data for the study. Use of three methods is supposed to reduce biasness and work as a reliable
tool for research. The objectives of this research called for a descriptive research. For this
particular research the data source was both "primary and secondary data. In order to collect
primary data, direct Interviews were conducted based on a questionnaire. The secondary data
was collected via secondary data analysis. The data collected for the research
contained qualitative data.
Firstly we visited Designed & Sources Limited in Karwanbazar. We had personal interviews
with the senior staff members. We meet Mr Mohammad Rafiqul Islam, Manager, Accounts.
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Then we visited Epyllion Group in Tajgaon. We had Conversation with the workers of the
company as well as Mohammad Obydull Akbar, Senior Manager of the company.
Then we visited Z A Apprales in Motijheel. We had Conversation with the workers of the
company. Mr. Apu Banik helped us to survey our questionnaire.
Our last visit was on Ha-meem Group in Tajgaon. We contact with Ms. Surovi Easmin who
helped us to conduct the survey.
We had the pleasure of working with the officials who dealt with HRD related matters and so it
was an opportunity for us to directly observe the HRD related facts and learn from them. Their
relentless support and cooperation helped us a lot in getting information about the HR practice in
RMG industry.
2.2. Data collection method:

In this research both primary and secondary data are used. The sources are:
Primary sources:
· Personal interviews with the senior staff members of "Design & Sources, Z A Apprales,
Ha-meem Group, Epyllion Group”
· Face to Face conversation with respective officers of the company.
· Practical work exposures on Human resource department of the company.
· Conversation with the workers of the company
Secondary sources:
· Annual report of " Design & Sources, Z A Apprales, Ha-meem Group, Epyllion Group”
· Periodical reports published by BGMEA
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· Different publications and websites regarding RMG policies.
· Relevant file study and research papers as provided by the officers concerned.
2.3. Sampling:

As data collection was based on primary sources there was a requirement of respondents for
interviewing. The target population for the research was the worker of " Design & Sources, Z A
Apprales, Ha-meem Group, Epyllion Group”. Convenience sampling was utilized for sample
selection. The sample size of worker was 50.
2.4. Research Design

Research Design basically talks about the details of the study, Measurement and Data Analysis.
With all this there is one problem statement of which we are finding solution.
Let us describe each one of this element of Research Design:
1) Problem Statement: A problem statement is the main thesis statement on which we will be
working on.
2) Details of the study: This contains some sub element which describes about our study.
Here I am describing this.
a. Purpose of the study: We have to make sure there must be no similar research has been
done in this area. We also have to make sure about this situation not much is known. We are
doing this study to better comprehend the nature of the problem.
b. Design of Study: We have to make sure that combination of quantitative and qualitative
data are analyzed properly
c. Extent of researcher interface: We will study the events as they normally occur
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d. Studying setting: we will try our best to keep the setting noncontrived
e. Unit of analysis: we will make sure the units are clear
f. Sampling: We will try to take our sample more accurately so that the proportion of
probability comes more natural.
3) Time horizon: We will make sure it is a onetime data collections. We will measure the
variables of interest for several types of tenants and property managers at a single period of time.
4) Measurement:
a. Measurement and analysis: we will do the gap analysis.
b. Data collection Method: We will do the questionnaire interview for our data collection.
5) Data Analysis:
We made questionnaire for analysis of the study. Based on questionnaire we survey to the
garments industry. Same set of questions were asked to all HR officials of our subject
companies in the form of semi structured interview. Based on the interview answers common
practises and perceptions were identified and recorded. All the data collected through the
interview were compared and analyzed to identify common HR practices in the local RMG
factories in Bangladesh.




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3. Result and findings
3.1. Recruitment and selection criteria:

Recruitment and selection is a crucial part in overall HR activities (CIPD 2014).
Recruitment decisions and HR forecasting, hence play a key role in the organizational
development and it is not any different for RMG factories in Bangladesh. It was apparent
from our study that these decisions were mostly made in the process of holistic decision
making where a clear line of communication had to exist between the HR managers, line
managers and other key decision makers in the hierarchy. These decisions often pose
challenge for them owing to the fact that a lot of elements has to be taken into
consideration. Effectively, selection and recruitment of new employee are not done by just
keeping replacement of a departing employee in mind. It is rather done with the aim to
enrich a company’s existing pool with people who are capable of showing high level of work
and demonstrate commitment, and the better a company is able to achieve that the more
successful they are in the process. (Ballantyne, 2009 as cited in Rees & French 2010).

It was evident from the study that, following the standard procedure, the recruitment and
selection process starts off with Job analysis in all of the subject organizations. Research
suggests that the best practice is to make the job analysis a joint effort where HR specialist,
line managers and other decision makers can provide their input (Dessler 2010). All of our
subjects seem to be in conformity with that idea, because they stated that the recruitment
decisions were made in board meetings or general meetings. The process then proceeds
on to the next steps once the decisions about the kind of employees to be recruited are
made.

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At Factory level, the next step depends on what kind of employee is being sought after. For
factory workers, banners and notice board advertising are the most preferred media of
advertisements. In case of executive and above executive level positions, the preference
is mostly towards online Job sites. When asked about their preference for internet as a
medium of recruitment, most replied that it has become the most convenient way of
attracting suitable candidates as internet advertisements usually draw attentions of “Smart”
and “Computer literate” candidates and in the most time convenient manner.
From our study it was apparent that head hunting may often take place in the RMG
industry. When they are in need of specialized skills and expert knowledge, especially
during the setup of a new unit in the business, they deploy headhunting. On this point, when
issues regarding recruiting from competitor’s company were discussed, most of the subjects
suggested that it did not pose a problem or conflict. Overall clean background and work
experience are prioritized more by the HR professionals.
On the issue of recommendations and referrals, the HR professionals responded very
positively. All of the subjects stated that their organisations encourage employee referrals
from time to time. Furthermore, it was also mentioned, that it was equally beneficial for both
employees and employer. This is owing to the fact that, a positive response to the
employee referral usually makes the employees feel more committed while simultaneously
bringing out good quality candidates for the HR managers with a minimum or no
advertisement cost. As for recommendations, it was found that the HR professionals utilise
it from time to time. At factory-worker and their immediate supervisor levels, the subjects
mentioned that they often consider candidates that the existing workers bring with them for
interview. For the white collar jobs, the recommendations hold more weight when they are
made from people in their networks who, they are in good relationship with. This could be
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ex-employees, existing employees, professors and other people in the same industry. When
questioned about the reliability of the employee referrals as a source of recruitment, the
subjects replied very positively. It was mentioned that since the candidates have to go
through further screening procedure anyway, it ensures that the position ultimately goes to
the most deserving.
It was agreed by all the subjects that Curriculum Vitae (CV) stands out to be one of the
most important thing in the recruitment process. It contributes greatly to the screening
process and short listing on the first round are carried out on the basis of the CVs. All CVs
which do not meet the minimum requirements stated by the job analysis are automatically
eliminated.
Employment test results are one of the key determinants of the job. The employment test
can be divided into two parts: Intelligence test and Aptitude test. The first part of their
written exam is mostly composed of set of questions that test one’s aptitude. It has basic
mathematics, logical reasoning and English language test, which the employees have to
complete before moving on to the next section. The second part contains questions that are
more specialized where employees need to apply their academic and practical knowledge
regarding the position that they have applied for. The aptitude test result and the
intelligence test results are valued equally, or in other words, candidates who have better
results in both are preferred more for the next round.
On the issue of interview, all of our subjects agreed that it carries great weight in the
selection process. The interview panel mostly contains HR officer and line managers. Once
the candidate comes in, the board encourages him/her to talk, so in other words, the
interview is mostly slanted towards semi-structured interview. Apart from bringing out the
18 | P a g e

candidate’s previous experience, sometimes some questions asked are scenario based to
further test the candidate’s competency.
Employee selection has to be made keeping health or medical condition in mind too.
While candidates applying for white collar jobs are mostly asked to fill out a form to disclose
any specific health concerns, the factory workers are requested to take an appointment with
the organizational physician. Factory workers usually go through a very standard medical
checkup regarding height, weight, blood pressure in order to find out any incompetence that
the candidate might have.
Overall, it was stated that the recruitment process has been devised in a way so that the
best of the candidates are attracted and selected. While organizations have been focusing
increasingly on campus recruitments in recent years, our subject organisations stated that
they were not looking in to it presently. However, some of them discussed that they would
like to include it in the future.
3.2. Training & Development Criteria:
We found that in all four companies, before new joiners start their work they are given a small
brief about what we are expecting from them. After that the company tags them with one of their
experienced worker. Those experienced workers show the new joiners how the system is
working, this is how they give new joiners on-the-job training. Many facilities has a nice library
which is full of books containing knowledge about garment industry. Any worker can go there
and read as much as they want. They also have a audio visual section. There they have video of
every training session. If any worker wants to revisit any training session they can go there and
watch the session videos. Companies also supply those training materials as hard copy, so that
they can take those in home, and read about garments industry. All the company found that
19 | P a g e

classroom lectures does not work on people of their company. They like to do it as they go. They
really like the on the job training program. They feel classroom lecture is for school going kids,
they all are adults now. So they really feel they need a small brief and on the job training. On the
quarter basis they hold a conference for their workers. They hire specialists to lecture in that
conference. Their worker gains much knowledge from those conferences. They have an audio
visual section. There they have video of every training session. If any worker wants to revisit any
training session they can go there and watch the session’s video. In every month, they have one
simulation exercise. They rang the fire alarm, and everyone leaves the workstation and left the
building through the fire exit staircases. They make sure no worker was hurt in this situation.
After that the authority told them it was a simulation exercise. After they feel comfortable then
the authority told them they need to do this properly if an actual fire took place. We found the
authority tag some new joiners with an experienced worker. the experienced worker gives them
the training without compromising production speed or quality. All the companies have some
silver rules their employees can never break. That is why they give trainees some programmed
instructions. Their trainee does all the departments’ job by rotation; for example, they count three
month as training period. Every two weeks they have to move from a department to another
department. In this way, job rotation has been used as a training & development tool in their
organization. In their company there is no role playing exercises.
3.3. Promotion Criteria:
In their company, they always try to promote the person, who gave their company long term
service. However, there are some exceptional cases. A very few time they promote a person who
has less length of service, but that person has better skill-set than the other candidates. In that
situation, they promote the person with less length of service. Though they always promote the
20 | P a g e

person with longer period of time or a special skill-set; recommendation by direct supervisor got
the third priority. It is important, but not that much important to have an impact on promotion
decision. Their company is strongly support merit based promotion system. If a worker can show
special skill on something, they will definitely count that special skill of that person. When it
comes to promotion, and as they do promote people who serve their company for long term
basis, it is a workers best chance to overcome those experienced workers and get a promotion.
Merit Based promotion is preferred by every organization we went. They always look for a
people who have right attitude and value. If they hire or promote a person who has bad attitude
and values; it will have bad influence on their company. That is why it is important that
whenever they are promoting, they are promoting a polite person. Knowledge and skills is
evaluated by the mistakes the employees made in every organization we went. The less an
employee made a mistake, the more skilled he or she is. Record of training does not have any
impact on promoting decisions in any organization we went. it is all about a good performer who
performed really well while doing the actual job. A supervisor conduct performance based
appraisal after a certain amount of time, in those company it is after every 4 months a supervisor
does this. A supervisor sits with every employee and discusses with them all the issues. Then he
put his findings on the performance based appraisal paper. In their company periodic
performance evaluation has impact on promoting an employee. When they are promoting an
employee, they always measure how much he is contributing to the company. While they are
promoting an employee, party membership does not affect any evaluation decisions in their
company. All those companies are completely politics less company.
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3.4. Performance Appraisal Criteria
Out of the four local garments factory that we’ve visited follows more or less the same
performance appraisal systems.
For the essay appraisal system we’ve found that all of the garments faced difficulties using it as
most of the employees are under educated. They have also faced difficulties using this technique
for the educated employees as Managers do not take this method sincerely and Insufficient try
from all involved.
Out of the four garments the most common
components performance appraisal system are
Timely Reviews & Feedback, planning, developing
guideline and setting up the goals.
Surprisingly the main objectives of all the four
garments companies are same. The main objective
of performance appraisals is to measure and
improve the performance of employees and increase their future potential and value to the
company. Other objectives include providing feedback, improving communication,
understanding training needs, clarifying roles and responsibilities and determining how to
allocate rewards. All these are to meet the organizational goals.
Among the four companies, three company’s traditional performance appraisal system have
failed but all four companies gets conflicting results because manages sometimes lacks skill in
providing feedback and often provokes a defensive response from the employee, who may
justifiably feel he is under attack. Consequently, managers avoid giving honest feedback which
22 | P a g e

defeats the purpose of the performance appraisal. For these reasons they think "Behavioral
anchored rating scale (BARS)" might to overcome this problem as it is behaviorally based,
easy to use, fully equitable, individualized and action-oriented based system.
Three out of four selected garment company has following the modern and effective 360 degree
performance appraisal system because it help to design effective training and development
programs that increase the company’s overall performance and productivity. It gives employees
a broad view of their performance from a range of sources and an opportunity to identify
strengths and weaknesses.
All four selected garment company follow the “Forced Choice Rating” method for selecting or
recruiting new employees and they follow it to identify the activities the candidate prefers to
focus, whether or not the candidates’ strongest technical skills and knowledge areas match the
job requirements. To identify whether the candidate prefers to work in a role where they are
isolated and influence decisions solely or as part of a larger consensus. And finally to identify at
what management style, they are the most productive.
Practically it’s not possible to follow “Critical Incident Appraisal” technique in Bangladeshi
Garment Industries as the number of general worker are very high and it results in very close
supervision which may not be liked by the employee.
Graphic Rating Scales
Company Name Initiated by Conducted by Time Frame
Epyllion Group HR Department Managers After every Three Months
SHa-Meem Group HR & Admin Department HR Department After every Six Months
ZA Apparels
Head of the Respective
Department
Head of the
Department Yearly
Design & Source
Ltd. HR Department & Manages Managers Yearly
Table: 07
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“Annual Confidential Report (ACR)”
Company
Name Evaluation Period Format of the Point Scale
Epyllion
Group
01
st
January to 31
st
December : For Workers
01
st
July to 30
th
June : For
Employees and other Worker
Numeric Point Scale for General
Worker.
Both Numeric and Qualitative Point
Scale for All other Employees.
SHa-Meem
Group
01
st
January to 31
st
December : For All
Workers
Both Numeric and Qualitative Point
Scale for All Employees
ZA Apparels
01
st
January to 31
st
December : For All
Employees
Qualitative Point Scale for All
Employees
Design &
Source Ltd.
01
st
July to 30
th
June : For All
Employees
Qualitative Point Scale for All
Employees
Table: 08
Out of four three of the selected company doesn’t follow the “Management by Objective
(MBO)” system because as in the local garment industry, the management has little trust on its
general workers as well as on its other employees. This is the reason why management makes
decisions autocratically and relies heavily on external controls to direct employee behavior. The
amount of time needed to implement and maintain an MBO process may also cause problems as
most of the employees have very little education. And only one company follows this system for
their top level of employees.
3.5. Benefit & Service Criteria:
The goal of HRM is to enhance the productivity of an organization by optimizing the
effectiveness of its employees while improving the work life of employees and treating
employees as valuable resources.
Out of the four local garments factory that we’ve visited are following more or less same benefit
and service packages.
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Most of the garments do not have attracting benefit and service packages. Employee those who
are working in office have some sort of attracting benefit and service packages. But those who
are work in factory they do not have the facility.
As we know major categories of benefits managed by HRM managers are: employee services,
such as purchasing plans, recreational activities, and legal services; vacations, holidays, and
other allowed absences; and insurance, retirement, and health benefits. To successfully
administer a benefits program, HRM professionals need to understand tax incentives, retirement
investment plans, and purchasing power derived from a large base of employees. Garments
managers in Bangladesh do not have clear idea about it as well as owners do not want to apply
these sorts of services.
Table 09: Service provided to employee in garments industries:

Services Provided Not Provided
House rent allowance √

Medical Allowance √

Bonuses √

Paid leaves √

Sick leave √

Maternity leave √

Paternity leave √

Marriage leave √

Annual leave √

Facility of short-term disability √

Conveyance Allowance

×
Entertainment Allowance

×
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Recreation Allowance

×
Children’s education facility

×
Home Furnishing Allowance

×
Electricity and gas expense

×
Facility of long-term disability

×
Insurance facility

×
Safety and health issue

×

The garments factory we visited they have House rent allowance which is 20%-40% of basic
salary, Medical Allowance which is 20%-30% of basic salary, some telephone allowances only
for executives only, 2 festival bonuses, additional 2-3 performance/profit bonuses, 5-10 paid
leaves, sick leave, maternity leave, paternity leave, marriage leave, annual leave, facility of
short-term disability.
Most of the organization does not have Conveyance Allowance, Entertainment Allowance,
Recreation Allowance, Children’s education facility, Home Furnishing Allowance, electricity
and gas expense, facility of long-term disability, insurance facility, safety and health issue.

3.6. Compensation Criteria:
Garments industries in Bangladesh have several compensation criteria. After joining employee
compensation will fully dependent on employee performances. Most of the company follows
skill-based payment policy. Because if any employee is very much efficient, his increment will
be more than the other inefficient employee.
Goodwill of the company is another fact of employee different compensation. Like we visited
Design & Sources Limited and Z A apprales Limited as because Design & Sources Limited is
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more popular than Z A apprales Limited so the same designated employee get more salary than
the others. As well as Epyllion Groups employee get more salary than Ha-meem group.
Industries did not share the pay structure of the company. they give us the very brief idea like the
salary of the worker starts from 8000 and the salary of the worker starts from 10,000-15,000.

4. Recommendations
Although the HR activities of garments industries is doing a great job at the present, but there is
possibility to improve development both internally and externally. To streamline and strengthen
the overall activities of the factory the following areas have been identified:
a. Recruiting more HR personnel
Currently the company has average 5-6 HR employees. As in this company there is a huge need
of HR then there should be more HR personnel hired in order to make the HR team more
stronger and so that the employees can be handled for smoothly and all the operations in the
company functions properly.
b. Providing more facilities to increase job satisfaction
More facilities should be given in order to increase the job satisfaction in the company. It is a
fact that if the employees are happy then they will feel more motivated towards work and thus
increase the productivity in the long run. Many facilities can be provided to the labors such as
health benefits, occasional arrangements during festivals, air conditioning, healthcare and more
importantly day care centers for the female employees who have children. The Reporting
Officers must be more cooperative, cordial and friendly to HR department.

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c. The HR should monitor the line managers properly.
According to our observation we have found out that one of the main reasons of the employee
turnover is because of the line managers. The line managers make them go through a lot of
hassle. So HR needs to monitor the line manager.
d. Introduce service employee career development
At first, the employees’ requirements and needs should be fulfilled and then they can become
aware of their customer’s needs. We learn from this that it will reduce employee turnover and
can contribute to increased customer satisfaction. There are many graduates in Bangladesh who
has a good professional degree but because of proper career development they don’t want to go
for garments industries. So if garments industries provide opportunity for individuals both
garments industries and individuals will be benefited.
e. Communication skill needs to improve:
Communication skills of every employee need to improve. Because employee faces
communication problems while communicate to the hierarchy.

5. Limitations of the study:
Some limitations were faced while conducting the study, among which is making textbook
knowledge compatible with real life scenario while talking to the organization, which was
sometimes disappointing. This also proved to be a limitation. These limitations were:-
· Due to limitation of time and resource the sample size of study was limited.
· Getting relevant papers and documents were strictly prohibited.
· The human resources department was reluctant to provide information because of
confidentiality.
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· In many cases the latest information was not available.
· Owing to time and distance constraint, factories of outside Dhaka and other distant places
could not be covered.
· Inside the garment factory, workers are very reserve to answer the questions

6. Conclusion

It is apparent from our study that the HR practices present in the local RMG factories are quite
similar. The current focus in our entire subject organizations were towards making a standard
framework that would enable them to address any people related issues in their organizations. It
can hence be said, that the local RMG factories had been adaptive to changes and gradually they
are modifying their HR practices with time in order to remain competitive in the market. In our
study, it was observed that the HR officials are more inclined to being proactive about the
problems and they showed an attitude where they seemed to be open towards new ideas.
However, the key concerns remains in the fact that the HRM structure in our subject
organizations were quite rigid, and hence, the changes could not be expected at a fast pace.







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Reference:
Absar, Mir Mohammad Nurul, Mohammad TahlilAzim, NimalathasanBalasundaram, and Sadia Akhter (2010).
"Impact of Human Resources Practices on Job Satisfaction: Evidence from Manufacturing Firms in
Bangladesh." I mpact of Human Resources Practices on J ob Satisfaction: Evidence from Manufacturing Firms
in Bangladesh LXII.2: 31-42. Web.

BGMEA (2014, May 14). Trade Information. Retrieved from
http://bgmea.com.bd/home/pages/TradeInformation#.U-9JDfmSySp

CIPD (2014). "Recruitment: An Overview." Factsheets. Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development.
Web. 01 Aug. 2014. Retrieved from <http://www.cipd.co.uk/hr-resources/factsheets/recruitment-
overview.aspx>

CIPD (2013)."Strategic Human Resource Management." Factsheets. Chartered Institute of Personnel and
Development, July 2013. Web. 05 Aug. 2014.

EPB (2014). Export Promotion Bureau, Bangladesh. Retrieved from http://www.epb.gov.bd/index.php

Huda, Kazi Nazmul, Rezaul Karim, and Ferdous Ahmed (2007). "Practices of Strategic Human Resource
Development in RMG Sector of Bangladesh: An Empirical Study: 2007." I nternational Business Management
1-6. Web.
Hughes, Julia Christensen, and Evelina Rog(2008). "Talent Management: A Strategy for Improving Employee
Recruitment, Retention and Engagement within Hospitality \Organizations." I nternational J ournal of
Contemporary Hospitality Management 20.7: 743-57. Web.

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Mote, D. (2014) Human Resource Management (HRM). Retrieved from
http://www.referenceforbusiness.com/encyclopedia/Gov-Inc/Human-Resource-Management-
HRM.html#ixzz3AWXG93Bw

Ovi, Ibrahim Hossain (2013). "New Wages Trigger RMG Jobs at Stake." Dhaka Tribune.N.p., 22 Dec. 2013. Web. 3
Aug. 2014.

Rees,G., & French,R (2010). Leading, Managing and Developing People: Recruitment and Selection. 169-190.
CIPD 2010. Retrieved from:<http://www.cipd.co.uk/NR/rdonlyres/01F95685-76C9-4C96-B291-
3D5CD4DE1BE5/0/9781843982579_sc.pdf>.
Rahman, Md Arifur, and Mir Sohrab Hossain (2012). "Compliance Practices in Garment Industries in Dhaka
City." J ournal of Business and Technology (Dhaka) 5.2: n. pag. Web.

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Table List:
Table 1: Important issues related to the Bangladesh ready-made garment industry



Table 02:






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Table 03: COMPARATIVE STATEMENT ON EXPORT OF RMG AND TOTAL EXPORT OF
BANGLADESH
YEAR
EXPORT OF
RMG
(IN MILLION
US$)
TOTAL
EXPORT OF
BANGLADESH
(IN MILLION
US$)
% OF RMG’S TO
TOTAL EXPORT
1983-84 31.57 811.00 3.89
1984-85 116.2 934.43 12.44
1985-86 131.48 819.21 16.05
1986-87 298.67 1076.61 27.74
1987-88 433.92 1231.2 35.24
1988-89 471.09 1291.56 36.47
1989-90 624.16 1923.70 32.45
1990-91 866.82 1717.55 50.47
1991-92 1182.57 1993.90 59.31
1992-93 1445.02 2382.89 60.64
1993-94 1555.79 2533.90 61.40
1994-95 2228.35 3472.56 64.17
1995-96 2547.13 3882.42 65.61
1996-97 3001.25 4418.28 67.93
1997-98 3781.94 5161.20 73.28
1998-99 4019.98 5312.86 75.67
1999-00 4349.41 5752.20 75.61
2000-01 4859.83 6467.30 75.14
2001-02 4583.75 5986.09 76.57
2002-03 4912.09 6548.44 75.01
2003-04 5686.09 7602.99 74.79
2004-05 6417.67 8654.52 74.15
2005-06 7900.80 10526.16 75.06
2006-07 9211.23 12177.86 75.64
2007-08 10699.80 14110.80 75.83
2008-09 12347.77 15565.19 79.33
2009-10 12496.72 16204.65 77.12
2010-11 17914.46 22924.38 78.15
2011-12 19089.69 24287.66 78.60
2012-13 21515.73 27018.26 79.61
2013-14 24491.88 30176.80 81.16
Data Source Export Promotion Bureau Compiled by BGMEA






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Table 04: VALUE OF TOTAL APPAREL EXPORT FISCAL YEAR BASIS
YEAR
TOTAL APPAREL EXPORT IN MN.US$
WOVEN KNIT TOTAL
1992-1993 1240.48 204.54 1445.02
1993-1994 1291.65 264.14 1555.79
1994-1995 1835.09 393.26 2228.35
1995-1996 1948.81 598.32 2547.13
1996-1997 2237.95 763.30 3001.25
1997-1998 2844.43 937.51 3781.94
1998-1999 2984.96 1035.02 4019.98
1999-2000 3081.19 1268.22 4349.41
2000-2001 3364.32 1495.51 4859.83
2001-2002 3124.82 1458.93 4583.75
2002-2003 3258.27 1653.82 4912.09
2003-2004 3538.07 2148.02 5686.09
2004-2005 3598.20 2819.47 6417.67
2005-2006 4083.82 3816.98 7900.80
2006-2007 4657.63 4553.60 9211.23
2007-2008 5167.28 5532.52 10699.80
2008-2009 5918.51 6429.26 12347.77
2009-2010 6013.43 6483.29 12496.72
2010-2011 8432.40 9482.06 17914.46
2011-2012 9603.34 9486.35 19089.69
2012-2013 11039.85 10475.88 21515.73
2013-2014 12442.07 12049.81 24491.88
Data Source Export Promotion Bureau Compiled by BGMEA

Table 05: Bangladesh's RMG Export to World (FY 11-12, FY12-13 & FY13-14)
Million US$ Woven Knit Total
Major EU
Countries 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14
Austria 17.50
23.07 25.33
34.49
29.26 31.81
51.99 52.33 57.15
Belgium 238.61
248.61 335.29
320.46
317.19 440.63
559.07 565.80 775.92
Bulgaria 0.54
0.20 0.10
0.68
0.92 0.82
1.23 1.13 0.91
Denmark 86.80
125.91 145.24
318.72
375.62 450.71
405.51 501.52 595.94
Finland 7.85
10.81 10.07
29.25
25.55 26.10
37.10 36.36 36.18
France 416.72
498.00 579.52
855.18
892.45 964.27
1271.90 1390.44 1543.79
Germany 1,358.92
1,509.79 1,803.85
2039.97
2,168.49 2,573.70
3398.89 3678.28 4377.55
Greece 8.14
4.14 5.59
21.17
12.77 14.16
29.31 16.91 19.76
Italy 291.15
358.26 447.23
571.46
554.94 731.91
862.62 913.20 1179.14
Ireland 63.03
67.51 68.36
123.92
133.44 149.87
186.95 200.95 218.24
Netherlands 226.76
252.99 294.52
325.28
331.48 385.48
552.04 584.47 680.00
Portugal 6.68
6.43 9.98
25.57
22.91 32.53
32.25 29.33 42.51
Romania 4.30
3.23 3.39
7.62
5.66 6.07
11.93 8.89 9.47
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Spain 410.39
515.33 651.29
660.73
702.90 856.28
1071.12 1218.23 1507.56
Sweden 109.07
125.88 120.39
203.87
220.50 244.07
312.94 346.37 364.46
U.K. 1,026.77
1,189.09 1,262.79
1103.30
1,259.84 1,335.25
2130.07 2448.93 2598.04
Cyprus 0.08
0.05 0.15
1.11
1.12 2.38
1.18 1.17 2.53
Czech
Republic 37.99
39.38 66.65
25.77
32.92 43.69
63.75 72.30 110.33
Estonia 0.74
1.08 0.26
2.52
2.14 1.29
3.26 3.21 1.55
Hungary 0.21
0.11 0.71
2.14
3.88 8.71
2.34 3.99 9.41
Latvia 0.29
0.12 0.50
1.22
1.90 2.05
1.51 2.01 2.56
Lithuania 0.18
0.28 0.00
0.98
1.94 0.82
1.16 2.23 0.82
Malta 0.02 0.02
0.79
0.45
0.80 1.70
0.47 0.82 2.49
Poland 112.77
159.73 204.57
209.96
240.79 304.99
322.74 400.52 509.57
Slovakia 20.31
30.25 30.19
36.54
40.54 43.60
56.85 70.79 73.79
Slovenia 1.04
3.60 6.16
6.33
11.05 19.57
7.37 14.65 25.73
Sub-Total
(EU) 4446.87 5173.86 6072.91 6928.69 7390.99 8672.47 11375.56 12564.85 14745.39
EU % of
World 46.31 46.87 48.81 73.04 70.55 71.97 59.59 58.40 60.21
Growth% 23.18 16.35 17.38 0.27 6.67 17.34 8.13 10.45 17.35
USA 3515.45
3,865.68 3,943.52
1013.95
1,130.90 1,197.85
4529.40 4996.58 5141.38
% of USA 36.61 35.02 31.70 10.69 10.80 9.94 23.73 23.22 20.99
Growth% 0.27 9.96 2.01 -9.39 11.53 5.92 -2.07 10.31 2.90
Canada 473.04
518.29 556.87
401.82
461.97 445.10
874.85 980.26 1001.97
% of Canada 4.93 4.69 4.48 4.24 4.41 3.69 4.58 4.56 4.09
Growth% 2.44 9.57 7.44 -7.18 14.97 -3.65 -2.21 12.05 2.22
Non-
Traditional
Markets
Australia 94.83
132.46 142.52
212.72
295.98 288.24
307.54 428.44 430.76
Brazil 50.45
56.50 72.54
77.33
115.33 97.70
127.78 171.84 170.24
Chile 5.57
7.17 10.31
11.36
21.13 22.70
16.93 28.31 33.01
China 57.83
86.55 142.08
46.69
52.59 99.29
104.52 139.14 241.37
India 42.20
60.87 76.44
12.82
14.34 19.81
55.02 75.21 96.25
Japan 239.99
280.17 318.92
163.65
198.31 253.35
403.65 478.48 572.27
Korea Rep. 61.27
73.66 77.63
18.75
40.73 57.96
80.01 114.39 135.60
Mexico 36.74
46.22 51.50
61.91
63.99 73.12
98.65 110.21 124.63
Russia 27.67
51.04 74.92
48.82
88.52 132.82
76.49 139.55 207.74
South Africa 29.31
30.46 26.18
26.45
27.19 22.38
55.76 57.66 48.55
Turkey 231.20
263.39 440.41
124.73
151.92 181.96
355.93 415.31 622.37
Other
Countries 290.92 393.51 435.30 336.68 421.99 485.06 627.60 815.5 920.36
Sub-Total
(Non-Trad.) 1167.98 1482.01 1868.77 1141.90 1492.03 1734.38 2309.88 2974.04 3603.15
% of Non-
Traditional 12.16 13.42 15.02 12.04 14.24 14.39 12.10 13.82 14.71
% Growth of
Non-
Traditional 36.62 26.89 26.10 11.91 30.66 16.24 23.17 28.75 21.15
GRAND
TOTAL 9603.34 11039.85 12442.07 9486.35 10475.88 12049.81 19089.69 21515.73 24491.88
% Growth 13.88 14.96 12.70 0.05 10.43 15.02 6.56 12.71 13.83
Source: Export Promotion Bureau, Compiled by: RDTI Cell, BGMEA
5


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Table 06: BANGLADESH'S RMG EXPORTS TO WORLD, FY 2012-13 & 2013-14
Value in Million US$
Month
ALL COUNTRIES
Woven
Growth
Rate
Knit
Growth
Rate
Total
(Woven + Knit)
Growth
Rate
Year Year
2012/13 2013/14 2012/13 2013/14 2012/13 2013/14
July 993.84 1262.38 27.02 1001.07 1253.76 25.24 1994.91 2516.14 26.13
August 765.85 796.05 3.94 792.53 848.15 7.02 1558.38 1644.20 5.51
September 697.17 985.26 41.32 746.23 1058.29 41.82 1443.40 2043.55 41.58
October 761.48 820.49 7.75 873.16 862.01 -1.28 1634.64 1682.50 2.93
November 710.04 889.35 25.25 653.96 877.61 34.20 1364.00 1766.96 29.54
December 1042.68 1229.98 17.96 908.94 1048.87 15.39 1951.62 2278.85 16.77
January 1147.64 1195.2 4.14 944.96 1045.83 10.67 2092.60 2241.03 7.09
February 979.71 1049.64 7.14 811.24 915.76 12.88 1790.95 1965.40 9.74
March 991.77 993.37 0.16 854.68 920.69 7.72 1846.45 1914.06 3.66
April 835.17 944.95 13.14 795.11 972.38 22.30 1630.28 1917.33 17.61
May 997.72 1092.26 9.48 1008.37 1115.72 10.65 2006.09 2207.98 10.06
June 1116.78 1183.14 5.94 1085.63 1130.74 4.16 2202.41 2313.88 5.06
Total:
11039.8
5
12442.0
7 12.70 10475.88 12049.81 15.02 21515.73 24491.88 13.83
Source: EPB

Table: 07
Graphic Rating Scales
Company Name Initiated by Conducted by Time Frame
Epyllion Group HR Department Managers After every Three Months
SHa-Meem Group HR & Admin Department HR Department After every Six Months
ZA Apparels
Head of the Respective
Department
Head of the
Department Yearly
Design & Source
Ltd. HR Department & Manages Managers Yearly




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Table: 08
“Annual Confidential Report (ACR)”
Company
Name Evaluation Period Format of the Point Scale
Epyllion
Group
01
st
January to 31
st
December : For Workers
01
st
July to 30
th
June : For
Employees and other Worker
Numeric Point Scale for General
Worker.
Both Numeric and Qualitative Point
Scale for All other Employees.
SHa-Meem
Group
01
st
January to 31
st
December : For All
Workers
Both Numeric and Qualitative Point
Scale for All Employees
ZA Apparels
01
st
January to 31
st
December : For All
Employees
Qualitative Point Scale for All
Employees
Design &
Source Ltd.
01
st
July to 30
th
June : For All
Employees
Qualitative Point Scale for All
Employees

Table 09: Service provided to employee in garments industries:

Services Provided Not Provided
House rent allowance √

Medical Allowance √

Bonuses √

Paid leaves √

Sick leave √

Maternity leave √

Paternity leave √

Marriage leave √

Annual leave √

Facility of short-term disability √

Conveyance Allowance

×
Entertainment Allowance

×
Recreation Allowance

×
Children’s education facility

×
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Home Furnishing Allowance

×
Electricity and gas expense

×
Facility of long-term disability

×
Insurance facility

×
Safety and health issue

×