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PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
HANDBOOK 2014.
Contents
Welcome from the School of Education 4
Introduction 5
Conceptual Framework 7
Professional Learning Communities 7
Reflection and Reflexivity 8
Partnerships 9
Overview of Professional Experience Courses 10
Key Themes 10
Course Descriptions 11
Key Contacts 13
Professional Experience Team Leader 13
Professional Experience Office 13
Prerequisites and Requirements 14
Criminal History Screening 15
First Aid requirement (Early Childhood only) 16
Placement process 16
Placement Agreement Form 16
Attendance in schools and sites 16
Absence during professional experiences 16
Dress Code 17
Name Badges 17
Roles and responsibilities 18
Professional Experience Administrators 18
Site Coordinators 19
Mentor Teachers 19
University Liaison 20
Preservice Teachers 20
Assessment and Reporting 22
Formative Assessment and Reporting 22
Managing Concerns During the Placement 22
Interim Placement Reporting 23
Termination of Placement 23
Summative Assessment and Reporting 24
Contents
Welcome from the School of Education 4
Introduction 5
Conceptual Framework 7
Professional Learning Communities 7
Reflection and Reflexivity 8
Partnerships 9
Overview of Professional Experience Courses 10
Key Themes 10
Course Descriptions 11
Key Contacts 13
Professional Experience Team Leader 13
Professional Experience Office 13
Prerequisites and Requirements 14
Criminal History Screening 15
First Aid requirement (Early Childhood only) 16
Placement process 16
Placement Agreement Form 16
Attendance in schools and sites 16
Absence during professional experiences 16
Dress Code 17
Name Badges 17
Roles and responsibilities 18
Professional Experience Administrators 18
Site Coordinators 19
Mentor Teachers 19
University Liaison 20
Preservice Teachers 20
Assessment and Reporting 22
Formative Assessment and Reporting 22
Managing Concerns During the Placement 22
Interim Placement Reporting 23
Termination of Placement 23
Summative Assessment and Reporting 24
Submission of Final Report 25
E-portfolio 25
Professional Knowledge 26
Professional Practice 28
Professional Experience 30
Personal Literacy and Numeracy Skills 31
Resources for Mentor Teachers 31
Policies and Procedures 33
Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual 33
Preservice Teachers with Disabilities 33
Legal Responsibilities (Duty of Care) 33
Work, Health & Safety 33
Fitness to Teach 33
Insurance Cover 33
Processes to be followed in the Event of
an Incident or Injury to Preservice Teachers
whilst on Placement are: 34
Site Coordinator and Mentor Teacher Payment 35
Department for Education and Child Development
(DECD) settings 35
Independent/Catholic Education or other
Non DECD settings 36
Claiming the Supervision payment for the Site 37
Any Further Queries 37
References 38
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Welcome from the
School of Education
The University of South Australia draws on a rich history of teaching and learning in South
Australia. Through partnerships with diverse learning communities, valuable collaborations
have guided our vision for the discipline of Education. Since the pioneering work of Lillian de
Lissa, South Australia has been recognised as a place where exceptional people come together
to enhance teaching and learning. Kaurna Land, where the School of Education is located,
has always been a place of such teaching and learning and we also acknowledge the valuable
contributions that the Kaurna people have made and continue to make to this valuable work.
We are proud of the partnerships that we have established with teachers and learners within
and beyond South Australia. We are therefore excited to extend a warm welcome to you
as a valuable contributor to this continuing story of quality teaching and learning through
partnership.
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Introduction
Professional Experience or practicum refers to
the time that pre-service teachers are in early
years settings and/or schools to learn about
teaching and about being a teacher. This site
based experience forms a key learning context
in initial teacher education programs. It is
a mandatory requirement of initial teacher
education and is formally assessed. All pre-
service teachers must satisfactorily pass the
required professional experience to qualify
for the degree in which they are enrolled and
to seek Teachers’ Registration. Professional
experience is key to initial teacher education
(Ramsey, 2000; Kruger, et al., 2009; House
of Representatives Standing Committee on
Education and Vocational Training, 2007)
and is unequivocally rated by pre-service
teachers as the most important component
of their initial teacher education. Professional
Experience provides pre-service teachers with
first-hand experiences of being a teacher and
the enjoyment and satisfaction that comes from
facilitating successful learning experiences for
children and young people.
The School of Education at the University of
South Australia has developed a professional
experience curriculum to scaffold pre-service
teachers’ learning. It is a spiral curriculum which
supports pre-service teachers in each year of the
program – either the Bachelor of Education or
the Master of Teaching program. This curriculum
has online and/or on-campus components,
as well as the professional experience or
placement. Pre-service teachers complete 80
days in the undergraduate program (Bachelor
of Education) or 60 days in the graduate-entry
program (Master of Teaching). The Professional
Experience Curriculum provides a transparent
framework of learning which aligns with
the Australian Professional Standards for
Teachers. Pre-service teachers are expected to
demonstrate proficiency across the Australian
Professional Standards for Teachers on
completion of their degree:
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AUSTRALIAN PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS
FOR TEACHERS
www.teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au
Standard 1: Know students and how they learn
Standard 2: Know the content and how to teach it
Standard 3: Plan for and implement effective teaching and learning
Standard 4: Create and maintain supportive and safe learning environments
Standard 5: Assess, provide feedback and report on student learning
Standard 6: Engage in professional learning
Standard 7: Engage professionally with colleagues, parents/carers and the community
Pre-service teachers in the Early Childhood Education strand must also meet the standards set by the
Australian Children’s’ Education and Care Quality Authority (ACECQA). www.acecqa.gov.au
The Professional Experience curriculum acknowledges that successful professional experiences are
built on partnerships both external to the University and internal to the University. All stakeholders
play an integral role, including mentor teachers, site co-ordinators, university staff (both academic
and administrative) and pre-service teachers. Everyone involved in Professional Experience should
expect it to be stimulating, challenging and ultimately rewarding. This Professional Experience
Handbook has been prepared to assist in this endeavour. It contains essential contextual information,
contact details and guidance in relation to roles, responsibilities, assessment and reporting. Please
note: individual professional experience courses will provide specific overviews to be read in
conjunction with this handbook.
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Conceptual Framework
All professional experience courses are
underpinned by a commitment to the
development of:
• Professional Learning Communities
• Refection and Refexivity
• Partnerships
PROFESSIONAL LEARNING
COMMUNITIES
The framework for the development of our
professional experience courses is communities
of practice, the basis of which as Buysse,
Sparkman and Wesley (2003) explain, is the
promotion of dialogue and inquiry for the
purpose of supporting a learning environment
in which practice is improved. Many schools
and educational sites today operate as
communities of practice or professional learning
communities. It is well recognised in the teacher
development and school reform literature
that such communities provide a positive and
enabling context for teachers’ professional
growth. In communities of practice, members
depend on each other for learning, mutual help,
constructive critiques and collective thinking
(Wenger, 1998). Collaboration is a central
feature of such communities.
In keeping with a communities of practice
model, we structure time and space into
professional experiences for pre-service teachers
to engage in learning relationships with a range
of colleagues, including their peers, mentors,
other school/site based colleagues and their
university liaison. For this reason we aim to
cluster pre-service teachers in sites, as peer
support has been shown to play an important
role in the process of learning to teach. We strive
for all of these professional learning relationships
to be characterised by trust and reciprocity
with a strong appreciation of the critical nature
of professional conversations for ongoing
professional learning.
We know that “getting on the inside” of
any community requires multiple levels of
involvement that initially reside at the ‘edges’
of that community (Wenger, 1998)” (Smith
& Lowrie, 2010, p. 168). Smith and Lowrie
highlight boundaries and lines of distinction
between being an ‘insider’ and an ‘outsider’,
such as “holding local knowledge about what
is acceptable practice in a staffroom or how
to gain access to the computer labs or other
resources” (p. 168). We acknowledge that
as part of their learning during professional
experiences, pre-service teachers need to learn
to negotiate these boundaries.
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We are committed to developing reflective
practice. This term is based on the belief that
teaching involves continuous learning and
regards each person as having the potential to
take control of his/her practice and learning.
Reflective practice also acknowledges that
teaching is difficult and complex work. There are
certain attitudes and skills that are necessary for
effective reflection. Pre-service teachers are
introduced to these before beginning their first
placement and are encouraged to demonstrate
their reflective understandings and skills during
their professional experiences.
Three attitudes are seen as prerequisites for
reflective practice.
These are:
• open-mindedness: an ‘active desire to listen
to more sides than one’
• responsibility: an ability to ask ‘why am I
doing what I am doing in the classroom’
• wholeheartedness: an ability to take risks and
act. Dewey, 1939)
Dewey contended that these three attitudes;
open-mindedness, responsibility and
wholeheartedness, together with a command of
the skills necessary for inquiry, enable a teacher
to be a reflective practitioner. They also enable a
teacher to be reflexive. Drawn from sociology
literature, the term reflexivity refers to a process
of not only identifying what it is that we think
about a particular event or phenomenon, but
also how we came to develop those views and
perspectives. It is a difficult, subtle and complex
task. But again, one that we believe is worth
cultivating, as it increases one’s understanding of
oneself and how one teaches.
The skills of reflection are related to the ability to
ask particular questions. Three questions are
critical:
• WHAT?
• WHY?
• FOR WHOM?
These three questions provide a framework for
reflection consisting of three levels. Level one
considers the ‘what’ and ‘how’ of teaching and
learning. Level two considers the ‘why’
questions. The third level considers the impact of
the strategies on different students. The
questions ‘for whom?’ and ‘who is being
advantaged / disadvantaged?’ are relevant at
this level. The third level of reflection is often
known as critical reflection. There is a
commitment to social justice incorporated in this
concept. The underlying question is; ‘How is this
practice compatible with justice and fairness?’
Being a reflective practitioner means asking the
hard questions. It means being prepared to
confront tensions, dilemmas and contradictions
in one’s thinking and to weigh the ethical
implications of one’s behaviour. It also means
being committed to teaching in ways which
maximise learning outcomes for all students.
ReFLeCTIOn And ReFLexIvITY
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PARTNERSHIPS
We are committed to working in partnership
with sites and stakeholders to ensure quality
professional experience placements. This is
evident by the following logo that appears on all
the University of South Australia’s Professional
Experience correspondence.

This commitment to partnership strengthens
our relationships with sites and stakeholders
to enable quality experiences for pre-service
teachers. We are committed to working
collaboratively and collegially with teachers
and leaders to ensure that all participants
involved in professional experience can benefit
from the opportunities provided for enhanced
professional dialogue and professional learning.
There is also partnership within the University
of South Australia for staff across different
courses to work together to maximise the
learning opportunities afforded by professional
experience. The success of our Professional
Experience is also highly dependent on the
skilled and committed staff in our Professional
Experience Office. Many other partnerships
exist including the partnership that is developed
between mentor teachers, pre-service teachers
and children/young people and their parents/
caregivers. Ultimately it is the learning of
children and young people that is the key
concern of all partners.
The commitment to strengthen partnerships,
together with developing reflective practitioners
and a community of practice drives the integrity
of our professional experience courses.
This commitment to partnerships reflects our
understanding of the important work that
is undertaken within schools to meet the
Australian Professional Standards for Teachers
(Australian Institute for Teaching and School
Leadership, 2012). In particular, Standards 6
and 7 reflect the ways in which school-based
educators engage their colleagues, students,
parents and broader school communities to
improve outcomes for teachers and students
at all levels. This is further enhanced by our
understanding that it is through enduring
partnerships between the University and schools,
and as a product of a shared vision for and
commitment to excellence in the preparation
of pre-service teachers (Program Standard 5,
Australian Institute for Teaching and School
Leadership, 2011), that we can ensure that our
graduates are adequately prepared for entry into
the profession.
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Overview of Professional
Experience Courses
KeY THeMes
The professional experience curriculum that has been developed at UniSA acknowledges that
professional experience, like teaching, is relational. Key themes form the basis of the spiral curriculum
and these are developed across all professional experience courses. These themes align with the
Australian Professional Standards for Teachers:
Themes Standards
Teacher Identity/career development S6 S7
Managing learning environment S4
Professional communication and relationships S6, S7
Planning, teaching, assessing and reporting S3, S5
Valuing/celebrating diversity S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, S6 ,S7
Teacher as reflective practitioner/researcher S6, S7
Negotiating the context/culture S3, S6, S7
Resilience/wellbeing/emotional work S6, S7
Advocacy and agency/professional standards S6, S7
Learning in/from workplace S6, S7
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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Each Professional Experience course in each program has a course name and code as well as a
particular focus. These are identified in the table below together with the corresponding number of
placement days:
Bachelor of Education (MBET) Early Childhood, Primary, Primary/Middle
Code Course Name Focus Days in sites
EDUC 1081 Professional Experience 1 Introduction to Educators
Practices
10 days
whole school
experience
EDUC 1044 Professional Experience:
Birth to 3 (Early Childhood only)
Birth to three years 20 days
(ECE only)
EDUC 2062 Professional Experience 2 Curriculum and Pedagogy 20 days
EDUC 3061 Professional Experience 3 Assessment and Reporting 25 days
EDUC 4206 Professional Experience 4 Teacher as Inquirer 25 days
PLEASE NOTE: EDUC 1044 is only undertaken by pre-service teachers in the Early Childhood
specialisation.
Master of Teaching (MMET) Early Childhood
Code Course Theme Days in sites
EDUC 5186 Professional Experience and Reflection 1 Introduction to Early
Childhood Educators
Practices
20 days
Childcare
EDUC 5188 Professional Experience and Reflection 2 Teachers Work 25 days
Preschool
EDUC 5189 Professional Experience and Reflection 3 Teacher as Inquirer 35 days
Junior Primary
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Master of Teaching (MMET) Primary, Primary/Middle, Secondary
Code Course Theme Days in sites
EDUC 5187 Professional Experience and Reflection 1 Introduction to
Educators Practices
10 days
EDUC 5188 Professional Experience and Reflection 2 Teachers Work 25 days
EDUC 5150 Professional Experience and Reflection 3 Teacher as Inquirer 25 days
In 2014, the School of Education are phasing out a number of programs which you may have
pre-service teachers from. These include:
LBES Bachelor of Education, Bachelor of Science
LBDT Bachelor of Education (Design and Technology) (Home Economics)
DBSM Bachelor of Education, Bachelor of Arts (Australian Studies)
DBGM Bachelor of Education, Bachelor of Arts (Aboriginal Studies)
IBHU Bachelor of Education, Bachelor of Applied Science (Human Movement and Health
Studies)
LCAV Graduate Certificate in Education (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages)
The requirements outlined in this Handbook also apply to pre-service teachers enrolled in these
programs while on professional experience placement.
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Key Contacts
Professional Experience Team Leader
Michelle Kennedy
Telephone: (08) 8302 6337
Fax: (08) 8302 6688
Office Location: Mawson Lakes Campus - G1-08
Email: michelle.kennedy@unisa.edu.au
Professional Experience Office
Mailing Address: University of South Australia
Garth Boomer Building (G1-11)
Mawson Lakes Campus
Mawson Lakes Boulevard
Mawson Lakes SA 5095
Telephone: (08) 8302 6337
Email: EDS-PracticumOffice@unisa.edu.au
Criminal History Screening Administrator
and Placement Finance Officer
Pearly Tan
Office Location: Mawson Lakes Campus - G1-14
Telephone: (08) 8302 6543
Fax: (08) 8302 6688
Email: EDS-PracticumOffice@unisa.edu.au
Communication with you
All communication in regard to Professional
Experience placements is through the
Professional Experience Office generic email
EDS-PracticumOffice@unisa.edu.au or by phone
contacts listed above.

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Prerequisites and Requirements
CRIMInAL HIsTORY
SCREENING
The Department for Education and Child
Development (DECD), Catholic Education
South Australia (CESA) and the Association of
Independent Schools of South Australia (AISSA)
have advised all South Australian Universities
that all students participating in Professional
Experience Placement or Professional Experience
Activity must obtain a Criminal History Screening
clearance through the Department for
Communities and Social Inclusion (DCSI)
Criminal History Screening Unit prior to the
commencement of the placement or activity
where they will be working with minors in
South Australian Educational or Early Childhood
settings.
Please note: the University CANNOT accept the
National Police Certificate (NPC) from SA Police
(SAPOL) and/or Police Check Clearance from
Catholic Education South Australia (CESA).
Pre-service teachers who fail to lodge the
appropriate Criminal History Screening
documentation at least eight (8) weeks before
the commencement of their Professional
Experience placement will not be permitted to
undertake this placement or undertake other
activities that involve working with minors as
part of their studies in the School of Education
at UniSA.
Further information about this mandatory
process can be found at www.unisa.edu.au/
eds/working_with_minors.asp
The Criminal History Screening must be renewed
every three years.
All preservice teachers must provide evidence
of a DCSI Criminal History Screening clearance
whilst on placement and if requested by a site/
school Director or Principal.
Failure to do so may lead to cancellation of the
placement.
RESPONDING TO ABUSE
AND NEGLECT
In relation to Mandatory Notification processes
the University of South Australia has agreement
with DECD, CESA and AISSA that no pre-service
teacher can enter a school without completing
the Promoting Safety and Wellbeing: Induction
for tertiary students. This induction is included
in all first year professional experience courses.
The Protective Practices document is central
for pre-service teachers’ understanding of the
role of a teacher and this is also introduced
in conjunction with the Promoting Safety and
Well-being: Induction for tertiary students. The
Professional Experience Office maintains records
of the pre-service teachers who have completed
this induction. Pre-service teachers are required
to complete their Responding to Abuse and
Neglect Training: Education and Care Training
(seven hour course with an education care
focus) before their final placement.
Please note: Pre-service teachers are required to
provide evidence to the PEO of the completion
of Responding to Abuse and Neglect Training:
Education and Care Training at least 12 days
prior to the commencement of their final
placement.
All pre-service teachers must provide evidence
of completion of the Responding to Abuse and
Neglect Training: Education and Care Training
whilst on placement and if requested by a site/
school Director or Principal.
Failure to do so may lead to cancellation of the
placement.
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FIRST AID REQUIREMENT
(eARLY CHILdHOOd OnLY)
Pre-service teachers enrolled in the Early
Childhood strand must complete and provide
evidence of completion of Basic Emergency
Life Support (DECD) or Applied First Aid before
commencing the course EDUC 1044 Professional
experience 1 Birth – Three Years.
PLACEMENT PROCESS
All placements are organised by the Professional
Experience Office. Pre-service teachers do not
organise their own placements and do not
contact schools regarding potential placements
under any circumstance. Pre-service teachers
undertake the placement process electronically
through MyPlacement. The University values
diversity of placements to support the
development of the pre-service teachers and
they can expect to experience a range of
settings over their program.
Please note: Pre-service Teachers can expect
to travel up to an hour from their home to
any Professional Experience placement. If they
are unable to fulfil these requirements of the
placement, they may choose to un-enrol and re-
enrol in the relevant course when they are able
to meet all requirements.
PLACEMENT AGREEMENT
FORM
Pre-service teachers must complete the
Placement Agreement form each year before the
HECS census dates; 31 March and 31 August
respectively. This is critical for placements that
are scheduled prior to these dates. If so, forms
need to be completed 12 days prior to the
commencement of the first visit day.
ATTENDANCE IN SCHOOLS
AND SITES
Pre-service teachers are expected to attend all
compulsory Professional Experience days from
8.15am - 4.30pm or as required by each site/
school. This includes the blocks which require
a continuous, full-time, on-going commitment.
At times, pre-service teachers may be required
to attend additional events or activities as
requested by sites and schools.

ABSENCE DURING
PROFESSIONAL
EXPERIENCES
The initial teacher education program has been
accredited by the South Australian Teachers
Registration Board of South Australia for 80
days placement in an undergraduate program
and 60 days placement in a graduate-entry
program. The university of South Australia must
comply with these requirements, therefore
days missed are required to be made up in the
same study period to ensure the appropriate
number of days are completed for preservice
teachers to graduate from the respective
programs. Pre-service teachers in the early
childhood strand complete 100 days in the
undergraduate program and 80 days in the post
graduate program to meet Australian Children’s
Education and Care Quality Authority (ACEQUA)
requirements.
During Professional Experience placements,
absences are only allowed for reasons pertaining
to staff at the site e.g. illness or compassionate
reasons such as the death of a family member or
close friend.
Please note: holidays or events such as weddings
do not constitute compassionate reasons. Any
case for variation to a Professional Experience
placement must be made by completing
the ‘Request to Variation’ form available by
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contacting the Professional Experience office by
email on EDS-PracticumOffice@unisa.edu.au.
Variations to placement will only be granted in
exceptional circumstances. Documentary evidence
will be required to support any requests.
Pre-service teachers who are absent must
notify the setting by 8.00am on the morning
of absence and must also notify their university
liaison. Absence during the block will need to
be made up in the week immediately following
the block. This will be negotiated with the
site coordinator, the mentor teacher/s and the
University liaison.
DRESS CODE
Pre-service teachers must dress professionally
(i.e. smart casual) at all times during professional
experience in attire that is suitable for active
teaching. This includes suitable and safe
footwear. Pre-service teachers should observe
the accepted dress code at their placement
school or site and adhere to any particular
codes.
UniSA School of Education polo shirts are
available and can be purchased through Campus
Central. They are available in Navy Blue or White
and are suitable to be worn in most schools
whilst on placement.
NAME BADGES
All pre-service teachers must purchase and wear
an official UniSA name badge that identifies
them as a UniSA student while in schools and
sites for Professional Experience. These must be
worn on all visits and activities and be clearly
visible. The badges can be purchased through
Campus Central.
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PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
ADMINISTRATORS
The Professional Experience Office (PEO) administrators
are the critical link between the placement setting and
the University. The Professional Experience Office:
• negotiates and secures Professional
Experience placements
• Allocates pre-service teachers to placements
• Communicates with sites throughout the
Professional Experience placement
• Provides copies of relevant documentation to
site coordinators for wider distribution to
mentor teachers
• Is the point of contact for the site in relation
to any Professional Experience matter,
including any accident or incident involving
the pre-service teacher
• ensures pre-service teachers have provided
evidence of all compulsory placement
conditions (e.g. Criminal History Screening)
• Processes At Risk agreements and Final
Reports
• Forwards Pay Claims to the Professional
Experience Office Finance Officer for
validation and processing
• Manages any other matters relevant to each
pre-service teacher’s professional experience
placement.
Roles and
responsibilities
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SITE COORDINATORS
The site coordinator is responsible for the overall
coordination of each pre-service teacher’s
program at the designated site. It is their
responsibility to encourage the effective
interaction of all partners; the pre-service
teacher, the mentor teacher, the site and the
University program. Their role is paramount to
maximising the success of the professional
experience and includes;
• Allocating suitable mentor teachers to the
pre-service teacher
• Providing induction and professional learning
opportunities
• Being the point of contact (via telephone and
email) for the Professional Experience Office
• Forwarding any relevant UnisA
documentation and information to the
mentor teachers
• Communicating with the University liaison
and mentor teacher to monitor the progress
of the pre-service teacher
• Collaborating with the mentor teacher, the
pre-service teacher and University liaison to
manage any pre-service teachers considered
‘at risk’
• ensuring that all reports are received by the
Professional Experience Office (signed hard
copy) within one week following the final day
of placement
• ensuring that all claim forms are correctly
completed and received by the Professional
Experience Office following one week of the
completion of the final Professional
Experience placement day.
MENTOR TEACHERS
The relationship between the pre-service teacher
and the mentor teacher is critical. The role of the
mentor teacher includes;
• developing a professional relationship with
the pre-service teacher in order to facilitate
their learning
• Providing relevant information to maximise
the pre-service teacher’s involvement in the
site e.g. timetable information, policies and
procedures, student information, etc.
• discussing educational issues, theories or
practices and how they can impact upon
day-to-day teaching responsibilities
• supporting the pre-service teacher to plan
and implement an appropriate program for
the students
• Providing feedback, verbal and written, on a
regular basis to the pre-service teacher in
areas prioritised by either the mentor teacher
or pre-service teacher, including the
completion of a written report
• Completing forms and ensuring they are
signed by the site coordinator and received by
the Professional Experience Office following
one week of the final day of placement
• supporting the pre-service teacher in their
transition to the profession of teaching.
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UnIveRsITY LIAIsOn
The role of the University liaison is to maintain
and strengthen the partnership between the
university and the site. One University liaison will
be appointed to each site. Once appointed to
the site the University liaison will:
• establish and maintain contact with allocated
students while on their respective Professional
Experience placements
• Make face-to-face visits or email and phone
contact (depending on context) with
site coordinators and/or mentor teachers to
ensure students are making
satisfactory progress
• Liaise with mentor teachers and Course
Coordinators to ensure the site understands
the documentation associated with the
professional experience placement
• support the site if a pre-service teacher is
considered at risk in conjunction with the
Course Coordinator.

PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS
We encourage the relationship between the
pre-service teacher and site personnel to be
collaborative and reciprocal. To enable such
learning relationships to develop, pre-service
teachers are expected to act professionally at all
times and to demonstrate the following;
• Reliability
• Passion
• Creativity
• Initiative
• support and consideration of colleagues
• Confdentiality
• Ability to discuss and to respond to evaluation
• Appropriate dress codes
• Adherence to site policy in particular relating
to online communication
• Active involvement in the working life of the
site
• Commitment to the teaching profession
Pre-service teachers will also be required to show
evidence of planning, evaluating and reflecting,
in accordance with the following guidelines:
Planning
Detailed written plans must be completed for all
learning and teaching experiences. These plans
must be submitted to the mentor teacher in a
timely manner before undertaking any teaching.
The manner (e.g. hard or electronic copies) in
which this happens should be negotiated with
the mentor teacher ahead of time. These plans
could include:
• Full lesson plans
• daily Planners
• A weekly timetable
• Unit Planners
The planning should take into account the
site contexts, curriculum documents (e.g.
Australian Curriculum (Australian Curriculum,
Assessment and Reporting Authority [ACARA],
2011), early Years Learning Framework [eYLF]
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(Department of Education, Employment and
Workplace Relations and Council of Australian
Governments [DEEWR and CAG], 2009) and any
other systemic documentation (e.g. Teaching for
Effective Learning Framework [TfEL] (Department
of Education and Children’s Services, 2010)).
Evaluating
Evaluations are to be written for each teaching
experience. These will initially focus on individual
teaching experiences and then on half and
whole days. Each evaluation should focus on the
students’ learning and the pre-service teacher’s
teaching and learning. Useful guiding questions
include:
• To what extent were intended learning
outcomes achieved?
• What went well?
• What individual/group/class needs should be
noted for attention?
• What needs programming or follow up due to
interruptions, lack of time, students’ interests
etc?
• What should I try to improve in my own
teaching and/or management?
• What else did I learn about my teaching?
• What do I want to discuss with my mentor
teacher/s and/or university liaison?
Reflecting
An expectation of all Professional Experience
courses is that pre-service teachers will critically
reflect on educational practice by engaging in
personal reflection and professional dialogue
with colleagues (peers, mentor teachers and
other staff). Pre-service teachers are introduced
to a range of strategies for promoting reflection
on their learning and teaching including the
use of journals (for reflection on their learning,
as distinct from evaluating their teaching),
critical friends and peer observation and
debriefing. Pre-service teachers are expected to
take responsibility for implementing strategies
for reflection during the placement including
negotiating time outside of the classroom for
this to occur.
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22
FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT AND
REPORTING
Formative assessment and reporting will occur
throughout the placement. Mentor teachers provide
regular verbal and written feedback to pre-service
teachers based on their observations of and discussions
about their work. Both the pre-service teacher and the
mentor teacher will engage in on-going evaluation of
the pre-service teacher’s performance against the criteria
identified in the Final Report based on the Australian
Professional Standards for Teachers.

MANAGING CONCERNS
DURING THE PLACEMENT
If, at any point in the placement, there are concerns
about the pre-service teacher’s performance, the
mentor teacher and/or site coordinator must contact
the University liaison and/or the Professional Experience
Office. The mentor teacher, university liaison and pre-
service teacher then complete the At Risk Agreement.
This process will enable pre-service teachers who are
deemed to be ‘at risk’ to address the concerns, and
for the university liaison to provide additional support
to the pre-service teacher and mentor teacher. The
At Risk Agreement must be sent to the Professional
Experience Office. On receipt of the agreement the
Course Coordinator will be contacted and will manage
the ongoing process.

Assessment
and Reporting
Assessment and reporting of pre-service teachers’ learning and
teaching in the placement is both formative and summative.
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23
INTERIM PLACEMENT
REPORTING
During the second week of any block placement
of four weeks or longer, the mentor teacher/s
will discuss and complete the Interim Report
with the pre-service teacher. The Interim Report
is a formative document and therefore becomes
part of the pre-service teacher’s portfolio and
does not need to be sent to the Professional
Experience Office, unless the pre-service
teacher is deemed to be At Risk in any area.
The Interim Report provides the opportunity for
clear identification of the pre-service teacher’s
strengths and those areas needing further
development. It can be used as an opportunity
for the pre-service teacher to set goals for the
remainder of the placement.
TERMINATION OF
PLACEMENT
Pre-service teachers who do not meet the
conditions of the At Risk Agreement will have
their placement terminated and will receive a
Fail grade for the course.
Immediate termination can occur, at any time,
without going through the At Risk Agreement.
A pre-service teacher who is deemed by the
Principal, site coordinator, mentor teacher or
university liaison to be behaving unprofessionally
(e.g. unsatisfactory attendance, preparation
and/or teaching), or who is compromising the
learning of the students/children, will have their
placement terminated. Written documentation
is critical evidence in the event that a change
to placement is to be considered. All parties
must keep dated, written records to assist this
process.
Pre-service teachers do not terminate a
placement without the advice and consultation
of other professionals like the mentor teacher,
site coordinator, Principal, University liaison or
Course Coordinator. If a pre-service teacher
chooses to leave a placement, it will be deemed
unsatisfactory, a Fail grade will be awarded and
the pre-service teacher will be able to repeat the
placement when it is next offered in the relevant
course, if appropriate. Alternate placements
are not sought unless there are extenuating
circumstances that have been determined
and where consultation has occurred with
appropriate school and university personnel.
Under any of these circumstances, the pre-
service teacher will be advised by the Course
Coordinator to contact the Program Director
for academic advice and, if required, the
Learning and Teaching Unit, for counselling. If
a placement is terminated under any of these
circumstances, the pre-service teacher will
receive a Fail grade for the course, and may be
able to enrol in the relevant course when it is
next offered and repeat it at that time.
The Professional Experience Coordinator may
also be involved in this process.
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24
SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING
The final report provides evidence of achievement during each placement. Final reports are designed
to be either developmental or for employment purposes, as depicted in the table below.
Final Reports
Developmental Employment
Bachelor of Educa-
tion
Professional Experience 1
Professional Experience:
Birth - Three Years (eCe)
Professional Experience 2
Professional Experience 3
Professional Experience 4
Master of Teaching Professional Experience and
Reflection 1
Professional Experience & Reflection 2
Professional Experience & Reflection 3
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25
A final report for developmental purposes
should indicate the level of development
achieved by the pre-service teacher and identify
important areas of growth that has occurred
during the placement. It is important that
comments include rich descriptions and provide
examples to illuminate aspects of the pre-service
teacher’s performance.
A final report for employment purposes should
indicate the level of achievement against the
Australian Professional Standards for Teachers.
The following is a guide (see pages 26 - 30) to
assist mentor teachers in writing summative
comments on the final reports. The indicators
listed are consistent with the categories in the
final Professional Experience report and the
terminology used reflects the Australian
Professional Standards for Teachers (Australian
Institute for Teaching and School Leadership
[AITSL], 2011) for entry into the Teachers
Registration Board [TRB] register and the TRB
Code of Ethics (Teachers Registration Board of
South Australia, 2012).
More details about the standards and focus
areas can be found at this site:
www.teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au/static/
docs/Australian_Professional_Standard_for_
Teachers_FINAL.pdf
SUBMISSION OF FINAL
REPORT
In situations where the pre-service teacher is
working with more than one mentor teacher, it
may be necessary for each mentor teacher to
write a separate report for the pre-service
teacher. This is especially the case in secondary
settings where the pre-service teacher is working
in two or more Learning Areas. In non-secondary
settings, where the pre-service teacher works
with more than one mentor teacher in a team
teaching situation, it is more appropriate, in
most instances, to complete one report. Mentor
teachers in a team teaching situation can either
both write comments (but no extra space should
be used), or use a collaborative approach
whereby both contribute pertinent information,
but one person takes responsibility for writing
and submitting the report.
The Principal/site coordinator and mentor
teacher/s make an overall rating of satisfactory
or unsatisfactory achievement. The University
liaison will also indicate a satisfactory or
unsatisfactory achievement level on the report
based on their communications with mentor
teachers and/or site co-ordinator.
A report template will be sent to mentor
teachers via an email to the site coordinator and
a signed hard copy should be returned by the
end of the week following completion of
placement to:
University of South Australia
Professional Experience Office

School of Education
Garth Boomer Building (G1-11)
Mawson Lakes Boulevard
MAWSON LAKES SA. 5095
E-PORTFOLIO
The reports and evidence of meeting the AITSL
requirements at graduate level will be compiled
as a part of the pre-service teacher’s e-portfolio.
This will form an ongoing record of evidence
collected from a variety of sources including
placement, university course and short courses
both internal and external to the university over
the course of the program.
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26
PROFESSIONAL KNOWLEDGE
Standard 1: Know students and how they learn
Focus Areas Graduate achievement
1.1 Physical, social and intellectual
development and characteristics of
students
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of
physical, social and intellectual development and
characteristics of students and how these may affect
learning.
1.2 Understand how students learn Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of
research into how students learn and the implications
for teaching.
1.3 Students with diverse linguistic,
cultural, religious and socio-economic
backgrounds
Demonstrate knowledge of teaching strategies that
are responsive to the learning strengths and needs of
students from diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and
socio-economic backgrounds.
1.4 Strategies for teaching Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander students
Demonstrate broad knowledge and understanding of
the impact of culture, cultural identity and linguistic
background on the education of students from
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds.
1.5 Differentiate teaching to meet the
specific learning needs of students
across the full range of abilities
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of
strategies for differentiating teaching to meet the
specific learning needs of students across the full range
of abilities
1.6 Strategies to support full participa-
tion of students with disability
Demonstrate broad knowledge and understanding of
legislative requirements and teaching strategies that
support participation and learning of students with
disability
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27
Standard 2: Know the content and how to teach it
2.1 Content and teaching strategies of
the teaching area
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the
substance and structure of the content and teaching
strategies of the teaching area.
2.2 Content selection and organisation Organise content into an effective learning and teach-
ing sequence.
2.3 Curriculum, assessment and
reporting
Use curriculum, assessment and reporting knowledge
to design learning sequences and lesson plans.
2.4 Understand and respect Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander people
to promote reconciliation between
Indigenous and non-Indigenous
Australians
Demonstrate broad knowledge of, understanding of
and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
histories, cultures and languages.
2.5 Literacy and numeracy strategies Know and understand literacy and numeracy teaching
strategies and their application in teaching areas.
2.6 Information and Communication
Technology (ICT)
Implement teaching strategies for using ICT to expand
curriculum learning opportunities for students
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28
PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE
Standard 3 – Plan for and implement teaching and learning
Focus Areas Graduate achievement
3.1 Establish challenging
learning goals
Set learning goals that provide achievable challenges for
students of varying abilities and characteristics.
3.2 Plan, structure and sequence
learning programs
Plan lesson sequences using knowledge of student learning,
content and effective teaching strategies.
3.3 Use teaching strategies Include a range of teaching strategies.
3.4 Select and use resources Demonstrate knowledge of a range of resources, including
ICT, that engage students in their learning.
3.5 Use effective classroom
communication
Demonstrate a range of verbal and non-verbal
communication strategies to support student engagement.
3.6 Evaluate and improve
teaching programs
Demonstrate broad knowledge of strategies that can be used
to evaluate teaching programs to improve student learning.
3.7 Engage parents/carers
in the educative process
Describe a broad range of strategies for involving parents/
carers in the educative process.
Standard 4: Create and maintain supportive and safe learning environments
4.1 Support student participation Identify strategies to support inclusive student participation
and engagement in classroom activities.
4.2 Manage classroom activities Demonstrate the capacity to organise classroom activities and
provide clear directions.
4.3 Manage challenging
behaviour
Demonstrate knowledge of practical approaches to manage
challenging behaviour.
4.4 Maintain student safety Describe strategies that support students’ well-being and
safety working within school and/or system, curriculum and
legislative requirements.
4.5 Use ICT safely, responsibly
and ethically
Demonstrate an understanding of the relevant issues and
the strategies available to support the safe, responsible and
ethical use of ICT in learning and teaching.
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29
Standard 5: assess, provide feedback and report on student learning
5.1 Assess student learning Demonstrate understanding of assessment strategies,
including informal and formal, diagnostic, formative and
summative approaches to assess student learning.
5.2 Provide feedback to students
on their learning
Demonstrate an understanding of the purpose of providing
timely and appropriate feedback to students about their
learning
5.3 Make consistent and
comparable judgements
Demonstrate understanding of assessment moderation
and its application to support consistent and comparable
judgements of student learning.
5.4 Interpret student data Demonstrate the capacity to interpret student assessment
data to evaluate student learning and modify teaching
practice.
5.5 Report on student
achievement
Demonstrate understanding of a range of strategies for
reporting to students and parents/carers and the purpose of
keeping accurate and reliable records of student achievement.
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30
PROFESSIONAL ENGAGEMENT
Standard 6 – Engage in professional learning
Focus Area Graduate achievement
6.1 Identify and plan
professional learning needs
Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the Australian
Professional Standards for Teachers in identifying professional
learning needs
6.2 Engage in professional
learning and improve practice
Understand the relevant and appropriate sources of professional
learning for teachers
6.3 Engage with colleagues
and improve practice
Seek and apply constructive feedback from supervisors and
teachers to improve teaching practices.
6.4 Apply professional
learning and improve student
learning
Demonstrate an understanding of the rationale for continued
professional learning and the implications for improved student
learning.
Standard 7 Engage professionally with colleagues, parents/carers and the community
7.1 Meet professional ethics
and responsibilities
Understand and apply the key principles described in codes of
ethics and conduct for the teaching profession.
7.2 Comply with legislative,
administrative and
organisational requirements
Understand the relevant legislative, administrative and
organisational policies and processes required for teachers
according to school stage.
7.3 Engage with the parents/
carers
Understand strategies for working effectively, sensitively and
confidentially with parents/carers.
7.4 Engage with professional
teaching networks and
broader communities
Understand the role of external professionals and community
representatives in broadening teachers’ professional knowledge
and practice.
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31
Personal Literacy and
Numeracy Skills
Pre-service teachers also need to demonstrate
competence in literacy, language,
comprehension and numeracy skills.
This is exemplified by the pre-service teacher’s
ability to:
• communicate in written and verbal forms
effectively with learners, parents/carers and
other professionals
• demonstrate profciency in english language
• show competency in comprehension skills
• demonstrate competence in numeracy
RESOURCES FOR MENTOR
TEACHERS
The following web resources are available
for mentor teachers to assist them in the
assessment of pre-service teachers:
1. UniSA: Mentoring for Success
The School of Education has developed a
resource to assist mentor teachers in supporting
UniSA pre-service teachers. The resource
Mentoring for Success provides clarification
around expectations, roles and responsibilities
and assessment. The resource has an
introduction module and six modules. Each
is subdivided into chapters that are accessed
through the menu. These chapters contain
all the course content (eg PowerPoint slides,
videos, handouts, other resources) and links
to collaboration tools like wikis, blogs and
discussion forums. To register as a guest go to:
www.resource.unisa.edu.au/course/enrol.
php?id=3933
2. AITSL: Supervising Pre-service
Teachers
Supervising Pre-service Teachers is an interactive
and self-directed online professional learning
program that supports teachers who are either
supervising a pre-service teacher, or thinking
about a supervising role.
www.aitsl.edu.au/professional-learning/
supervising-preservice-teachers/supervising-
preservice-teachers.html
3. OLT: Teacher Evidence.net
This resource was developed by a team of
teacher educators and mentor teachers in
SA, Qld and Victoria, as part of an Office
for Learning and Teaching grant. It provides
information, activities and resources to inform
experienced teachers and preservice teachers
about the learning, the demonstration of that
learning and the judgements made about
the achievement of that learning. It provides
guidance as to what counts as evidence in
regard to the National Standards for teachers.
www.teacherevidence.net/about-the-
project/
and OLT: Authentic Assessment in Professional
Experience
www.teacherassessment.net/
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32
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33
ASSESSMENT POLICIES AND
PROCEDURES MANUAL
Pre-service teachers should refer to the current
Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual
(APPM) especially section 4 Practicum, Field and
Clinical Placements as it applies to education sites
and schools.
www.w3.unisa.edu.au/policies/manual/
default.asp
PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS
WITH DISABILITIES
Pre-service teachers with disabilities (ie those
pre-service teachers who have an official Learning
and Teaching Unit (LTU) Access Plan) may be
entitled to reasonable variations or modification
to standard assessment arrangements. Policy
for students with disabilities is available at this
web link: www.unisa.edu.au/policies/. The
University is committed to making reasonable
adjustments to placements in accordance with
the pre-service teachers access plan which needs
to be forwarded to the Course Coordinator of the
Professional Experience course within two weeks
of enrolling in the course.
LEGAL RESPONSIBILITIES
(dUTY OF CARe)
Pre-service teachers undertaking responsibilities
with students must be supervised at all times by
the site/school staff. When working with groups
of students pre-service teachers should be located
in such a way that there is a clear line of vision for
the mentor teacher so the pre-service teacher can
be supported when and if necessary.
Legal advice received by the University indicates
that pre-service teachers cannot undertake the
role of relieving teachers or staff members in the
absence of regular teachers. At all times pre-
service teachers need to know which teacher is
responsible for their supervision.
Pre-service teachers are strongly advised to
seek clarification of expectations, routines and
practices to be followed when support is needed,
and to avoid situations which could place
students and themselves at risk.
WORK, HEALTH AND
sAFeTY
Pre-service teachers will adhere to Work Health
and Safety policies and procedures at their
Professional Experience placement site.
FITNESS TO TEACH
Where there are concerns regarding a pre-service
teacher’s ability to commit to a Professional
Experience placement for health reasons and in
accordance with the University of South Australia
Assessment Policy 4.3 Suitability to Teach, a
‘fitness to teach’ may be required.
INSURANCE COVER
The University of South Australia carries insurance
policies that apply to pre-service teachers whilst
engaged on Professional Experience placements.
The University’s insurance website is informative
on these matters. It can be found at:
www.unisa.edu.au/fin/insurance/student_
placements.asp
Policies and Procedures
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34
PROCESSES TO BE FOLLOWED IN THE EVENT OF AN
InCIdenT OR InjURY TO PRe-seRvICe TeACHeRs
WHILST ON PLACEMENT ARE:
S
t
e
p

1
Follow the individual site’s policy
and procedure with regards to
immediately dealing with the
injury or incident.
S
t
e
p

2
Pre-service teachers notify
the Professional Experience
Office of the incident or injury
as soon as practicable. If the
pre-service teacher is unable to
do so due to the nature of the
injury or incident, then the site
coordinator’s or delegated site
personnel responsibility should
do so.
The telephone number of the
Professional Experience Office is
(08) 8302 6337.
S
t
e
p

3
The Professional Experience
Office will notify the pre-service
teacher’s Emergency Contact
as listed on University of South
Australia information database
if required. It is the pre-service
teacher’s responsibility to keep
these records up-to-date.
S
t
e
p

4
The Professional Experience
Office will report any incident
involving, or causing injury to
a pre-service teacher on any
University approved activity to
the Insurance Office, the Course
Coordinator and University
liaison as soon as possible.
S
t
e
p

5
The Professional Experience Office will
forward the pre-service teacher a copy
of the UniSA Student Incident Report
(FS24) form. The pre-service teacher
will need to complete all sections
(including all relevant signatures).
The pre-service teacher will return all
relevant documentation to the Team
Leader, Professional Experience Office
via Fax (08) 8302 6688 or via email
(pdf version only accepted) to the
EDS-PracticumOffice@unisa.edu.au
S
t
e
p

6
The Professional Experience Office:
• Will forward the original copy to
the Insurance Office, Level 3, 101
Currie Street, Adelaide 5000
• Provide hard copies to the Program
Director and Course Coordinator
• Will retain a copy of the student
Incident Report (FS24) Form on
file in the Professional Experience
Office
S
t
e
p

7
Dependant on the nature of the injury
or illness the pre-service teacher may
be required to provide a medical
clearance indicating that they are fit to
return to their Professional Experience
Placement.
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35
sITe COORdInATOR And MenTOR TeACHeR PAYMenT
A daily supervision allowance is payable for both site coordinator(s) and mentor teacher(s) for the
supervision of a pre-service teacher during their mandated professional experience placement days
(80 days for Bachelor of Education and 60 days for Master of Teaching).
DEPARTMENT FOR EDUCATION AND CHILD
DEVELOPMENT (DECD) SETTINGS
Employees working within the Government sector: Department for Education and Child Development
(DECD) will be able to obtain the relevant forms from the DECD website.
Site coordinators who are intending to claim should complete the following form:
> STATEMENT OF THE SCHOOL COORDINATOR OF SUPERVISION OF STUDENT TEACHERS – VL603
Mentor teachers who are intending to claim should complete the following form:
> STATEMENT OF SUPERVISION OF A STUDENT TEACHER - VL602L
When completing each claim form, please ensure the following sections have been completed:
• Payroll dates
• number of days claiming
• Claimant(s) signature
• Countersigned by site coordinator and the Principal
Information for completing the Account Code Section as shown on the VL602L and VL603:
Account Code
Apt
Rsn
Cost Account
Project Object Cost Centre
3 7 2 7 1 1 1 1 X D A C U
School Code
ALL claim forms must be forwarded to the Professional Experience Office for validation. The
Professional Experience Finance Officer will be responsible for forwarding the validated claims to
Shared Services Payroll Department for payroll payment.
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36
INDEPENDENT/CATHOLIC
EDUCATION OR OTHER NON
DECD SETTINGS
Employees working within the Non-Government sectors,
(e.g. Early Childhood Centres, Adult Education settings,
Non-Government Schools and Interstate Schools) will
be required to complete a claim form provided by the
University of South Australia.
Claims forms will be forwarded to the school setting
prior to the commencement of professional experience
placement.
Site coordinators who are intending to claim should
complete the following form:
> sTATeMenT OF CLAIM BY sCHOOL COORdInATOR
Mentor teachers who are intending to claim should
complete the following form:
> sTATeMenT OF sUPeRvIsIOn BY MenTOR TeACHeR
When completing each claim form, please ensure the
following sections have been completed:
• Contract (Placement) dates
• number of days claiming
• Countersigned by site coordinator and/or the Principal
• Completion of all personal details (page 2)
• Claimant signature
Non-Government employees can choose to complete
and submit an original Australian Taxation Office (ATO)
Tax File declaration.
Each site coordinator and mentor teacher need only
complete one ATO Tax File declaration form for all claims
submitted for professional experience placements.
Please forward the original ATO tax file declaration form
together with your claim form(s) to the Professional
Experience Office to ensure that you are not taxed at the
highest rate.
The Australian Taxation Office states a general exemption
can only be claimed with one employer at any one time.
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37
ATO Tax File declaration form may be obtained
from most local newsagents.
For information relating to the total number
of claimable days, please refer to emails and/
or correspondence previously forwarded by the
Professional Experience Office.
ALL claim forms must be forwarded to the
Professional Experience Office for validation. The
Professional Experience Finance Officer will be
responsible for forwarding the validated claim
form to UniSA Payroll.
CLAIMING THE
sUPeRvIsIOn PAYMenT
FOR THE SITE
An option is available for all settings to claim for
professional experience placement by providing
a Tax Invoice.
DECD placement settings must provide a tax
invoice on government endorsed letterhead.
Non-Government placement settings to provide
a tax invoice on the official letterhead.
Please ensure the following information is
recorded on your invoice:
• Placement setting name
• Placement setting Address
• Placement setting ABn
• The words “Tax Invoice”
• details of Professional experience Placement
(i.e.: students name, number of days)
• Add GsT to the TOTAL Claimable amount
• Total amount payable
Please note: It is a requirement for all
Professional Experience placement claims to
be submitted on completion of the pre-service
teacher’s professional experience placement
thereby ensuring prompt and timely payment of
claims.
There will be a month grace period in which
claims will be accepted for validation after
the completion of the professional experience
placement.
ALL QUERIES REGARDING
THE CLAIMS CAN BE
ADDRESSED TO:
Professional Experience Office Finance
Officer:
Pearly Tan
University of South Australia
School of Education
Garth Boomer Building (G1-14)
Mawson Lakes Boulevard
Mawson Lakes SA 5095
Office Location: Mawson Lakes Campus - G1-14
Telephone: (08) 8302 6543
Fax: (08) 8302 6688
Email: EDS-PracticumOffice@unisa.edu.au
Any Further Queries
If you have any further queries in relation to
any section in this guide, please contact the
Professional Experience Office on:
Telephone: (08) 8302 6337
Email: EDS-PracticumOffice@unisa.edu.au
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38
References
Australian Children’s Education and Care Quality
Authority (2013). Children’s Education and Care
Quality Authority. www.acecqa.gov.au/ (online,
accessed 31/10/2013).
Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting
Authority. (2011). The Australian Curriculum.
Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting
Authority,
www.acara.edu.au/curriculum/curriculum_
design_and_development.html (online, accessed
31/10/2013).
Australian Institute for Teaching and School
Leadership. (2011). Accreditation of initial teacher
education programs in Australia: Standards and
Procedures,
www.aitsl.edu.au/verve/_resources/
Accreditation_of_initial_teacher_education.pdf
(online, accessed 31/10/2013).
Australian Institute for Teaching and School
Leadership. (2012). Australian Professional
Standards for Teachers,
www.teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au/ (online,
accessed 31/10/2013).
Buysse, V., Sparkman, K.L. & Wesley, P.W. (2003).
‘Communities of practice: Connecting what we
know with what we do’. Exceptional children, vol.
69, no. 3, pp. 263-278.
Department of Education & Children’s Services.
(2010). South Australian teaching for effective
learning framework guide. Adelaide, SA,
Government of South Australia,
www.learningtolearn.sa.edu.au/tfel/pages/
tfelresources/satfelframeworkguide/?reFlag=1
(online, accessed 31/10/2013).
Department of Education, Employment and
Workplace Relations and Council of Australian
Governments. (2009). Belonging, Being and
Becoming: The Early Years Learning Framework for
Australia.
www.deewr.gov.au/Earlychildhood/Policy_
Agenda/Quality/Documents/Final%20EYLF%20
Framework%20Report%20-%20WEB.pdf
(online, accessed 31/10/2013).

Dewey, J. (1939). ‘Creative Democracy: The
Task Before Us’, John Dewey and the Promise of
America. Progressive Education Booklet, No. 14,
American Education Press.
House of Representatives Standing Committee on
Education and Vocational Training. (2007). Top
of the class: Report on the inquiry into teacher
education. Canberra, ACT, Commonwealth of
Australia.
Kruger, T., Davies, A., Eckersley, B., Newell, F.
& Cherednichenko, B. (2009). Effective and
sustainable university-school partnerships: Beyond
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Ramsey, G. (2000). Quality matters. Revitalising
teaching: Criticisms, critical choices: Report of
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Smith, T. & Lowrie, T. (2010). ‘Communicating
collaboratively with peers, mentors and supervisors’,
in R. Ewing, T. Lowrie & J. Higgs (eds.) Teaching
and communicating: Rethinking professional
experiences, pp. 165-175, Melbourne, Vic., Oxford
University Press.
Teachers Registration Board of South Australia.
(2012). Code of Ethics for the Teaching Profession
in South Australia. www.trb.sa.edu.au/pdf/Code-
of-Ethics.pdf (online, accessed 31/10/2013).
Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of practice:
Learning, meaning, and identity. Cambridge, UK,
Cambridge University Press.
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39
I speak highly of mentor teachers because they …. provide us with every
opportunity to learn and build our identities as professionals in this field.
They enable us to support students in their learning whilst they sit there
observing but giving us constructive feedback on what they really liked
that we did, some of them asking if it would be alright if I can take that
idea of yours, but also how we could improve next time. Not only are they
your mentor teacher whilst your journey of becoming a teacher starts but
they maintain your mentors throughout your whole teaching career as they
are always there for you. If you ever need a resource, or help, or just want
to chat about your day they are always there for you. They are someone
you can always count on during your teaching career.
- Sami
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40
The University of South Australia would like to acknowledge the significant work of
Briony Carter, Professional Experience Coordinator, by dedicating this booklet in her
honour. Briony passed away suddenly 8.10.13
Information correct at time of print January 2014
CRICOS Provider Number 00121B
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