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09/01/2014

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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 • Vol XV, Edition 13
Just South of Whipple Avenue
Phones Cameras Watches
Cars Hearing Aids Tools
SEIGE BROKEN
WORLD PAGE 7
TESLA MOTORS:
WHERE TO BUILD?
BUSINESS PAGE 9
IRAQI FORCES BREAK ISLAMIC EXTREMISTS’
6-WEEK HOLD ON SHIITE TOWN
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With the school year kicked off,
some schools are struggling to
find space for students in class-
rooms, including one school in
Redwood City.
Teachers at Hawes Elementary
School became concerned about
what they believe is an antiquated
system for setting up classes when
there wasn’t enough space for all
kindergartners to start with a per-
manent teacher. One class of 32
opened up with a substitute
teacher, which ultimately ended up
beginning with 17 students and
has dwindled down to six students
since students have been moved to
classrooms with openings.
Teachers said they were first told a
class of 45 kindergartners for the
first 10 days of school would be
opened up.
“This year kindergarten is over-
flowing,” said Hawes kindergarten
teacher Roxanne Dragan at an Aug.
20 meeting of the Redwood City
Elementary School District Board
of Trustees. “We have to support
stuffing until Sept. 8. How does
that market the school? You must
be satisfied with interim 10-day
placement until the numbers can
be adjusted at a choice school?
Imagine you’re the 5-year-old?
You are looking forward to making
new friends, in reality, you’re in
crowded classroom with 44 other
students.”
The state mandated class size is
31 students, but the numbers can
be over for the first 10 days of
school. School began Aug. 25.
The reason for the complica-
tions is the fact the district has a
large amount of student choice for
schools, said Naomi Hunter, direc-
tor of communications for the
Redwood City Elementary School
District. Five district schools in
Kindergarten gets crowded in Redwood City
District officials want to update registration process after Hawes Elementary space struggles
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Landlords are in need of tenants.
Homeless individuals are in need
of, well, homes. Anew pilot proj-
ect in San Mateo County is hoping
to put both camps together and
recently shared in $1.1 million
worth of state grants that may help
make the goal a reality.
The San Mateo County Human
Services Agency received $62,724
from the Department of
Community Services and
Development for its San Mateo
County Housing Locator Pilot
Project.
The CSD, which works under the
umbrella of the state HSA to pro-
vide housing, recently announced
$1.1 million in competitive com-
munity service block grants to 18
providers focusing on youth pro-
grams and homeless services.
The San Mateo County project
aims to help people living on the
streets, in vehicles, encampments
and emergency shelters by recruit-
ing landlords willing to rent units
to those either already homeless or
County aims
to play home
matchmaker
With $1.1M grant, pilot project
pairs landlords with homeless
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
While aiming to create an eco-
friendly, transit-oriented develop-
ment next to the Hayward Park
Caltrain station, the San Mateo
Planning Commission held its
first study session last week on the
formal application for the 12-acre
Station Park Green site.
“We’re all pushing for some-
thing that’s a little more transit
friendly or addressed the needs of
folks coming from the [Hayward
Park] station,” Planning
Commission Vice Chair Charlie
Drechsler said. “Our focus was
really listening to the residents
and the public comment about the
experience that would be hopeful-
ly enjoyed by not just residents,
but people interacting with that
space.”
After placing the project on hold
in 2011 due to financing, property
owner EBL&S Development sub-
mitted its updated application to
demolish the Kmart and Michaels
Arts and Crafts at 1700 and
1790 S. Del aware St . j ust
north of State Route 92.
Kmart closed its doors Sunday
and Michaels Arts and Crafts,
which appealed to the City
Council in December to relocate to
the old Borders site at 2925 S. El
Camino Real after being denied by
the Planning Commission, will
First review for Station Park Green
KERRY CHAN/DAILY JOURNAL
The Kmart on South Delaware Street in San Mateo closed its doors Sunday. The store location is the site of a
proposal for 599 residential units of housing, along with retail, restaurant and office space. Below, A bird’s eye
view rendering of the proposed Station Park Green development, looking east.
As Kmart closes, 12-acre development slated to take its place
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A$78 a year parcel tax is set to
expire in June and the San Carlos
Elementary School District Board
of Trustees is preparing to explore
options for renewal, an increase,
potential consolidation or to not
renew the tax.
Measure B, a six-year, $78 per
year tax, passed in 2009 with
71.67 percent approval and is one
of two active parcel taxes the dis-
trict currently has running. The
other, Measure A, was approved in
2011 for eight years and is a
charge of $110.60 per parcel per
year. The district has until Feb. 6
to compose a resolution for a May
San Carlos school district
consideringtax renewal
$78 a year parcel tax set to expire next June
See STATION, Page 16
See CLASS, Page 8
See HOMES, Page 16
See TAX, Page 8
SPORTS PAGE 10
Dog turns on stove,
which then sets laptop ablaze
LACEY TOWNSHIP, N.J. — Police
say a New Jersey family’s dog turned
on the stove, which caught the laptop
resting on the burner on fire and sent
smoke through the roof.
The fire was reported early Friday
evening in Lacey Township while the
owners were away.
Police tell the Asbury Park Press
that investigators believe the dog
accidentally turned on the stove,
though they didn’t specify how that
occurred.
Police say heat from the stove even-
tually burned a laptop computer that
had been left on top of the appliance.
Smoke was pouring from the roof
when firefighters arrived, but the blaze
was quickly extinguished.
Firefighters rescued the dog, which
emerged unscathed.
Motorcyclist brags to
cops he hit 185 mph in chase
CONCORD, N.H. — New Hampshire
police say a motorcyclist clocked at 127
mph bragged after being arrested that he
had reached 185 mph during the chase.
State police say 31-year-old David
J. Fries, of Manchester, was spotted
by a trooper on Interstate 93 in Bow at
about 2:45 a.m. Saturday.
The first trooper eventually ended
the chase, but another trooper saw
Fries crash into a guardrail after he
exited Interstate 393.
Police say Fries then led officers on
an hourlong foot chase in Concord. He
was subdued with help from a police
dog.
Fries was treated for injuries from
the crash and from the dog.
He faces a variety of charges and is
being held on $30,000 bail.
It’s unclear if he has a lawyer.
Slice of Princess Diana’s
wedding cake auctioned
LOS ANGELES — A 33-year-old
slice of cake from Prince Charles and
Princess Diana’s 1981 wedding has
sold at auction for $1,375.
The cake, still in its original white
and silver presentation box, was sold
online Thursday by Nate D. Sanders
Auctions of Los Angeles.
With the box was a card stating,
“With best wishes from Their Royal
Highnesses, the Prince & Princess of
Wales.”
Auction house spokesman Sam
Heller says the buyer is a private col-
lector.
Although the cake came wrapped in
its original wax paper, Heller says it
wouldn’t be a good idea to try to eat it.
He adds, however, that there is a
small but dedicated group of royal cake
collectors.
Some, Heller says, have purchased
cakes dating to the days of Britain’s
Queen Victoria, who married in 1840.
1K-pound alligator
caught in Alabama sets record
CAMDEN, Ala. — Agigantic alliga-
tor caught by a family in Alabama ear-
lier this month has set a Safari Club
International world record.
AL.com reports a pair of master
measurers from Safari Club
International examined the 1,000-
pound alligator on Friday, determin-
ing a total length of 15-feet, 9-inches.
That’s 13 inches longer than the
organization’s previous world record
American alligator, which had been
killed in Texas.
The Alabama alligator was caught by
the Stokes family after battling with it
for more than five hours. It was hooked
in a creek about 80 miles west of
Montgomery.
The first attempt to weigh the gator
destroyed a winch state biologists
typically use, so they had a backhoe
lift it.
Austrian SWAT team
raids wrong apartment
VIENNA— The drug bust was perfect-
ly planned. Unfortunately, Austrian
police broke down the wrong door.
Police official Josef Knoflach has
confirmed a media report that a SWAT
team that used a battering ram to bust
into an apartment at daybreak and sur-
round its sleeping tenant with guns
drawn was actually meaning to target
the neighboring dwelling.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Singer Gloria
Estefan is 57.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1939
World War II began as Nazi Germany
invaded Poland.
“If you want to get across
an idea, wrap it up in person.”
— Ralph J. Bunche, American diplomat (1904-1971).
Talk show host Dr.
Phil McGraw is 64.
Comedian-actress
Lily Tomlin is 75.
Birthdays
Kids perform Greek folk dance in authentic, handmade costumes at the Belmont Greek Festival.The event includes arts and
crafts,music,dancing,food and dramatic performances.The festival runs from noon to 8 p.m.through Monday,Sept.1 at the
Church of the Holy Cross, 900 Alameda at Ralston Avenue. For more information visit www.goholycross.org/festival.
Labor day: Mostly cloudy in the
morni ng t hen becomi ng sunny.
Patchy fog in the morning. Highs
near 70. Northwest winds 5 to 10
mph.
Monday ni ght: Mostly cloudy.
Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in
the upper 50s. West winds 10 to 15
mph.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning.
Highs in the mid 60s. Southwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Tues day ni ght: Partly cloudy in the evening then
becoming cloudy. Patchy fog. Lows in the upper 50s.
Wednes day t hrough Sat urday: Mostly cloudy.
Patchy fog. Highs in the mid to upper 60s. Lows in the
upper 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
In 11 5 9, Pope Adrian IV, the only English pope, died.
I n 1807, former Vice President Aaron Burr was found not
guilty of treason. (Burr was then tried on a misdemeanor
charge, but was again acquitted.)
I n 1894, the Great Hinckley Fire destroyed Hinckley,
Minnesota, and five other communities, killing more than
400 people.
I n 1 9 1 4, the last passenger pigeon in captivity,
“Martha,” died at the Cincinnati Zoo.
I n 1923, the Japanese cities of Tokyo and Yokohama were
devastated by an earthquake that claimed some 140,000
lives.
I n 1932, New York City Mayor James J. “Gentleman
Jimmy” Walker resigned following charges of graft and
corruption in his administration.
I n 1942, U.S. District Court Judge Martin I. Welsh, ruling
from Sacramento, California, upheld the wartime detention
of Japanese-Americans and Japanese nationals.
I n 1951, the United States, Australia and New Zealand
signed a mutual defense pact, the ANZUS treaty.
I n 1969, a coup in Libya brought Moammar Gadhafi to
power.
I n 1976, U.S. Rep. Wayne L. Hays, D-Ohio, resigned in
the wake of a scandal in which he admitted having an affair
with “secretary” Elizabeth Ray.
I n 1983, 269 people were killed when a Korean Air Lines
Boeing 747 was shot down by a Soviet jet fighter after the
airliner entered Soviet airspace.
I n 1989, Baseball Commissioner A. Bartlett Giamatti
died of a heart attack at his summer home in Martha’s
Vineyard, Massachusetts, at age 51.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
LARVA STALL FIGURE NAUSEA
Saturday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The fight at the family reunion was —
ALL RELATIVE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
WARBN
TAYES
SOLENS
DRAIZL
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
C
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c
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Print your
answer here:
Former Defense Secretary Melvin R. Laird is 92. Actor
George Maharis is 86. Conductor Seiji Ozawa is 79. Attorney
and law professor Alan Dershowitz is 76. Actor Don Stroud is
71. Conductor Leonard Slatkin is 70. Singer Archie Bell is 70.
Singer Barry Gibb is 68. Rock musician Greg Errico is 66.
Former White House Press Secretary Dee Dee Myers is 53. Jazz
musician Boney James is 53. Singer-musician Grant Lee
Phillips (Grant Lee Buffalo) is 51. Country singer-songwriter
Charlie Robison is 50. Retired NBAAll-Star Tim Hardaway is
48. Rap DJ Spigg Nice (Lost Boyz) is 44. Actor Ricardo
Antonio Chavira is 43. Rock singer JD Fortune is 41.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Big Ben, No. 4,
in first place; Eureka, No. 7, in second place; and
Lucky Charms,No.12,in third place.The race time
was clocked at 1:47.67.
9 1 7
3 26 45 58 73 12
Mega number
Aug. 29 Mega Millions
5 28 31 52 59 27
Powerball
Aug. 30 Powerball
5 12 18 23 37
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
1 9 0 5
Daily Four
5 2 7
Daily three evening
9 15 31 32 46 14
Mega number
Aug. 30 Super Lotto Plus
3
Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
August Joseph Marino
March 21, 1925 – August 26, 2014
Resident of San Mateo
A loving husband of 57 years to Mae who preceded him in death in Jan. 2013 devoted father
of Daniel Murphy (Janet) & David Marino (Jennifer). Cherished grandfather of 6 and great
grandfather of 3.
A native of the North Beach Community in San Francisco and a lifetime member of SFIAC.
Augie was a celebrated WWII Army Veteran who served actively in the South Pacific. He
returned home, completed his secondary education, and became a Special Education teacher
and athletic coach for Balboa High School for 37 years. Augie had positive influences on many
people throughout his life and career.
Family and friends may visit at 6pm on Tues. Sept 2nd and invited to attend a Vigil at 7:30pm at
Schneider, Sullivan, O’Connell Funeral Home, 977 El Camino Real San Mateo. A mass will be held
at 10:30am on Wed. Sept. 3
rd
at St. Gregory Catholic Church, 28th & Hacienda Street San Mateo.
Obituary
MILLBRAE
Arre s t. Aman was arrested for vandalism
on the first block of Library Lane before
6:33 p.m. Wednesday, Aug 27.
Arre s t. A man was arrested for possess-
ing unlawful paraphernalia at El Camino
Real and Victoria Avenue before 8:29
p.m. Monday, Aug. 25.
Burglary . A residence was burglarized
and a glass door was smashed on the first
block of Sherwood Court before 3:42
p.m. Monday, Aug. 25.
BELMONT
Sus pi ci ous ci rcumst ances. Agroup of
men in a gardening truck were reported
for harassing a woman at Notre Dame and
Mezes avenues before 5:59 p.m. Tuesday,
Aug. 26.
Ani mal cal l. Aperson reported seeing a
dog jump through a window and break it
on Wessex Way before 6:13 p. m.
Monday, Aug. 25.
Mi nor i njury acci dent. A bicyclist
was struck by a vehicle on Old County
Road before 5:28 p.m. Monday, Aug. 25.
Ci t i z e n as s i s t. A man reported a laser
light that had damaged his eye on
Marsten Avenue before 10:01 a.m.
Monday, Aug. 25.
Police reports
Here kitty kitty
Awoman suspected her neighbor of rub-
bing poison on nearby tan bark to
harass her cats at Douglas Court and
East Bayshore Road in Redwood City
before 6:20 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 28.
H
istory is “the past,” and it is also
“now.” What is “now” rapidly
becomes the “past” and evokes
memories that will grow fainter as your
years pass.
In 1769, Gaspar de Portola and his men
discovered San Francisco Bay from Sweeney
Ridge (to the west of present Millbrae). In
1776, the Anza expedition pioneered El
Camino Real which became the main road
between Mission Dolores (San Francisco)
and Mission Santa Clara (San Jose).
Between the 1770s and the 1820s,
Rancho Buri Buri was used to graze cattle
and horses as well as grow vegetables, etc.
for the Mission Dolores. Rancho Buri Buri
ran from San Bruno Mountain to
Burlingame, and from the east of the El
Camino Real to the crest of the hills to the
west (15,000 acres). In the 1790s, a mis-
sion hospice was built by San Mateo Creek
and became a very successful source of food.
In 1822, Mexico took over the Spanish
empire in the Americas and the church no
longer functioned as the only authority or
holder of vast spreads of land. Hundreds of
land grants followed, land given to deserv-
ing and faithful soldiers.
On Nov. 5, 1835, Rancho Buri Buri was
granted to Jose Antonio Sanchez as he had
retired from the army. He built an adobe
hacienda on the site by a creek just south of
Millbrae Avenue. Sanchez died in 1843 and
the land was divided up between his 10 chil-
dren. Jose de la Cruz lost his land south of
Millbrae Avenue in a sheriff’s sale and then
D.O. Mills bought the land for $10,000.
Jose de la Cruz then bought the land south of
Capuchino High School from his brother,
Manuel, built a corral and home and lived
there until his death in 1879. Mildred
Cavanaugh Wilson, born in Millbrae, lived
on this property and died nearby.
In 1872, Juan Sanchez built the 16-Mile
House at Center Street and El Camino Real to
provide a income for him and his mother
(Francisca Sanchez, wife of Manuel). It
became the social center of the area and it
was razed in 1971 after a failed effort to save
it as a historic structure. The Millbrae
Historical Society was born out of the effort
to save the building. The 17-Mile House was
built at Millbrae Avenue and El Camino Real
and served oysters taken from the Bay to the
east for many years. It no longer exists.
In 1870, the Spring Valley Water Works
completed a dam to the west of Millbrae.
In the 1870s, Darius O. Mills built a 40-
plus room mansion on land once owned by
Francisco Sanchez and completed an up-to-
How Millbrae came to be
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MILLBRAE MUSEUM
Early Millbrae (looking west) in the late 1920s.
See HISTORY, Page 16
4
Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Prosecutors refile case
against pimping suspect
The San Mateo County District
Attorney’s office on Thursday
refiled charges against a Fresno
man accused of forcing a woman
into prostitution and then beating
her at a San Mateo motel in June.
Shayne Joshua Lusalah, 21, is
facing charges of pimping, human
t r a f f i c k i n g ,
assault and
vandalism. He
pleaded not
guilty to the
charges.
San Mateo
County Deputy
D i s t r i c t
Attorney Al
Serrato said the
case was origi-
nally discharged on Tuesday,
because prosecutors had trouble
locating the victim.
Lusalah is accused of taking the
woman throughout California to
work as a prostitute approximate-
ly 15 to 16 times over the span of
a couple weeks.
Police said Lusalah took her cell
phone, controlled her through fear
and kept all the money she earned
while prostituting herself. Police
said Lusalah arranged many of the
dates. Investigators also found a
website where Lusalah advertised the
woman’s services as a prostitute.
Lusalah was arrested on June 30
after police received a call from a
motel about a woman staying
there being beaten by her
boyfriend.
Police said Lusalah beat the
woman after he found her using a
phone in their motel room to call
for help and get away from him.
The woman told police she had
met Lusalah a few weeks prior and
had been working as a prostitute
since.
Lusalah’s preliminary trial hear-
ing is scheduled for Sept. 10.
Man dies after falling
from cliff in Daly City
The San Mateo County coro-
ner’s office has identified a person
killed in a fall in Daly City early
Saturday morning as 29-year-old
Santa Rosa resident Sean
Carrington.
Emergency crews from the North
County Fire Authority responded to
a report of a cliff rescue around 4:35
a.m., according to fire officials.
Carrington was one of three peo-
ple who fell about 250 to 350 feet
down a cliff near Palisades Drive
and Westridge Avenue, just below
Palisades Park, fire officials said.
The trio was found just south of
Thornton State Beach, law
enforcement and fire officials said.
Firefighter paramedics found the
victims and quickly implemented
advanced life-saving protocols
and measures.
The U.S. Coast Guard deployed a
helicopter to remove the victims
from the beach, fire officials said.
The injured victims were airlift-
ed to a landing zone where para-
medics continued to treat them.
Carrington was pronounced dead
at the scene and the two other vic-
tims were transported by ambu-
lance to a trauma center with seri-
ous injuries, fire officials said.
Pastor sees bail
reduced in molestation case
ADaly City pastor charged with
lewd acts on a young girl had his
bond reduced Thursday from
$300,000 to $100,000, prosecu-
tors said.
Venije Cornelis Singkoh, 70,
was also ordered to surrender his
passport and will have to check in
with probation two times a week if
released.
Prosecutors said Singkoh was
the pastor of the Indonesian
Pentecostal Foursquare Church at
378 18th Ave. in San Francisco
when he molested a 9-year-old girl
several times over the course of a
year.
Prosecutors said Singkoh had
the girl sit on his lap and would
kiss her inappropriately.
The victim told investigators
the last incident occurred in
February. Daly City police arrest-
ed Singkoh after the girl came for-
ward to her parents.
They told other church leaders,
and child protective services and
police were notified.
Singkoh denied the accusations
and has pleaded not guilty to three
counts of lewd acts on a child.
Singkoh’s case is set for a pre-
liminary hearing on Sept. 24.
At-risk Burlingame woman
missing since Thursday
The California Highway Patrol
has activated a Silver Alert in an
effort to locate an 82-year-old at-
risk woman last seen Thursday
afternoon at her Burlingame
home, police said.
Sharon Feix was last seen at
about 2 p.m. Thursday driving
away from her Burlingame resi-
dence in a black 1988 Toyota
long-bed pickup truck with the
California license 3R67862.
Feix suffers from a medical con-
dition and may become disorient-
ed, police said.
She is described as a white
woman standing about 5 feet 2
inches tall and weighing about
170 pounds. She has gray hair and
hazel eyes. Feix was last seen
wearing a white sleeveless blouse
and a blue skirt, according to
police.
Shayne
Joshua Lusalah
Local briefs
5
Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Always Welcome!
By Andrew Dalton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Gov. Jerry Brown
appealed a court ruling that struck down
tenure and other job protections for
California’s teachers, setting himself apart
from leaders in some other states who have
fought to end such protections or raise the
standards for obtaining them.
Attorney General Kamala Harris filed the
appeal Friday in a Los Angeles County court
on behalf of the governor and the state.
The move came a day after Superior Court
Judge Rolf Treu finalized his June ruling that
found five laws violated the California
Constitution by depriving some of the
state’s 6.2 million students of a quality edu-
cation. He’d earlier said the system “shocks
the conscience.”
Republicans had urged state leaders not to
appeal the ruling and criticized the
Democratic governor’s decision Friday.
“A federal court ruled that the State of
California is depriving minority children
their constitutionally guaranteed right to an
equal education and the governor decides to
appeal? Unbelievable,” Senate Minority
Leader Bob Huff, R-Diamond Bar, said in a
written response.
The governor’s one-page notice of appeal
said that under the state’s constitution “the
important issues pre-
sented in this case — if
they are to have
statewide legal impact —
must be reviewed by a
higher court, either the
Court of Appeal or the
Supreme Court of
California.”
It says that for reasons
that are “unclear and
unexplained” actual
school districts were dismissed as parties to
the lawsuit before trial, meaning the court’s
decision “applies only to parties that have
no role or duties under the challenged laws.”
It also criticizes Treu for failing to pro-
vide details on the legal basis for his rea-
soning, and simply making his tentative
decision final instead of elaborating and
expanding on in the ruling that was affirmed
Thursday.
California’s Superintendent of Public
Instruction Tom Torlakson had asked the
attorney general for the appeal earlier
Friday because he lacked the legal authority.
Torlakson was among those named in a
lawsuit brought by nine students that
argued California’s hiring-and-firing
rules for teachers saddled schools — espe-
cially those in poor and minority neigh-
borhoods — with bad teachers who effec-
tively couldn’t be fired.
The judge has declined
to tell the state
Legislature exactly how
to change the system, but
he has expressed confi-
dence it will do so in a
way that passes constitu-
tional muster.
However, Torlakson
said in a statement Friday
that the ruling isn’t sup-
ported by facts or law and is too vague to
guide state lawmakers in making alterations.
The trial represented the latest battle in a
nationwide movement to toughen the stan-
dards for granting teachers permanent
employment protection and seniority-
based preferences during layoffs.
The powerful teachers’
union in California and
unions elsewhere have
fought to keep the rules,
arguing that they protect
academic freedom and help
attract teachers to a tough
and badly paid profession.
Torlakson, a union ally
who is seeking reelection
this fall, said teachers were
being blamed unfairly for
failings in the educational
system.
“We do not fault doctors
when the emergency
room is full. We do not
criticize the firefighter
whose supply of water
runs dry. Yet while we
crowd our classrooms and
fail to properly equip
them with adequate
resources, those who filed
and support this case
shamelessly seek to
blame teachers who step forward every day
to make a difference for our children,”
Torlakson’s statement said.
A challenger to Torlakson’s re-election,
Marshall Tuck, said Torlakson’s appeal
effort shows that he is standing “with his
Sacramento funders and not with students.”
California appeals teacher tenure ruling
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6
Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION
By Philip Elliott
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Leaders of the House
and Senate intelligence committees on
Sunday prodded President Barack Obama to
take decisive action against what they say are
growing threats from Islamic State militants
on U.S. soil.
The lawmakers, one Republican and one
Democratic, offered bipartisan pressure on
the White House to turn back the hazard of
Islamist fighters who have taken control of
vast swaths of Syria and Iraq. Those militants
now are looking toward the United States or
Western Europe for its next targets, lawmak-
ers said.
Without offering specifics on any threats or
suggestions how to confront them, the law-
makers said Obama soon needs to develop a
comprehensive strategy to crush the fighters.
“His foreign policy is in absolute free-fall,”
said Rep. Mike Rogers, a Michigan
Republican who heads the House Intelligence
Committee.
In another TV interview, Sen. Dianne
Feinstein, the California Democrat who leads
the Senate intelligence panel, said Obama is
perhaps “too cautious” in his approach to
combatting the Islamic State group.
“This is a group of peo-
ple who are extraordinari-
ly dangerous,” Feinstein
said. “And they’ll kill with
abandon.”
The pair of lawmakers,
who have access to some
of the nation’s most sensi-
tive secrets and receive
regular and detailed
briefings from the
nation’s spy agencies,
offered dire predictions of an attack on the
United States or its European allies if the mil-
itants are not confronted.
“They have announced that they don’t
intend to stop,” Feinstein said. “They have
announced that they will come after us if they
can, that they will, quote, `spill our blood.’”
The threat, Rogers said, could include
Americans who have trained with Islamic State
fighters. He said there are hundreds of Islamic
State-trained Americans who can return to the
U.S. with their American passports.
“I’m very concerned because we don’t know
every single person that has an American pass-
port that has gone and trained and learned how
to fight,” Rogers said.
Rogers said U.S. intelligence agencies were
tracking the Americans who are known to
have traveled to the region.
If they helped Islamic
State fighters, he said, they
should be charged under
laws that prohibit
Americans from aiding ter-
rorists.
“ISIL would like to have
a Western-style attack to
continue this notion that
they are the leading
jihadist group in the world,” Rogers said,
using another name for the group.
The top Democrat on his intelligence panel,
Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger of Maryland,
was more skeptical. He said more needs to be
known before judging whether they plan to
commit terrorist acts in the U.S. any time
soon. The group’s priority now seems to be to
hold on to territory it has gained rather than
export violence.
“It is extremely urgent, but you don’t just
rush in,” he said.
It was a view shared by Rep. Adam Smith,
a Washington state Democrat on the House
Armed Services Committee: “We can’t sim-
ply bomb first and ask questions later.”
Sen. John McCain, an Arizona Republican
who serves on the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, urged fast action and said Islamic
State fighters “must be defeated, not con-
tained,” because they represent a direct threat
to the U.S.
Added Homeland Security Committee
member Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y.: “The
longer we wait, the more dangerous” the
group becomes.
Feinstein said she has seen nothing that
compares to the viciousness of the militants
who have overrun large portions of Iraq,
killed civilians and beheaded American jour-
nalist James Foley. The Islamic State group
has financing, military structure and
weapons unlike any other militants, she said.
Obama said Thursday he did not yet have a
strategy for dealing with the Islamic State
organization, a remark that brought criticism
from Democrats and Republicans. In an inter-
view published early this year by The New
Yorker, the president appeared to minimize
the group by comparing it to a junior varsity
basketball team. The White House said he
was speaking about a different threat posed by
a range of extremists across the world.
Feinstein said she thought the basketball
analogy was wrong - “I think it’s a major var-
sity team” - but would not say whether she
thought Obama projected weakness by admit-
ting he had no strategy.
House, Senate intel chiefs flag Islamic State risk
Dianne Feinstein Mike Rogers
By Robert Burns
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Fearing a Russian inva-
sion and occupation of Alaska, the U.S. gov-
ernment in the early Cold War years recruited
and trained fishermen, bush pilots, trappers
and other private citizens across Alaska for a
covert network to feed wartime intelligence to
the military, newly declassified Air Force and
FBI documents show.
Invasion of Alaska? Yes. It seemed like a
real possibility in 1950.
“The military believes that it would be an
airborne invasion involving bombing and the
dropping of paratroopers,” one FBI memo
said. The most likely targets were thought to
be Nome, Fairbanks, Anchorage and Seward.
So FBI director J. Edgar Hoover teamed up
on a highly classified project, code-named
“Washtub,” with the newly created Air Force
Office of Special Investigations, headed by
Hoover protege and former FBI official
Joseph F. Carroll.
The secret plan was to have citizen-agents
in key locations in Alaska ready to hide from
the invaders of what was then only a U.S. ter-
ritory. The citizen-agents would find their way
to survival caches of food, cold-weather gear,
message-coding material and radios. In hiding
they would transmit word of enemy move-
ments.
This was not civil defense of the sort that
became common later in the Cold War as
Americans built their own bomb shelters. This
was an extraordinary enlistment of civilians
as intelligence operatives on U.S. soil.
This account of the “Washtub” project is
based on hundreds of pages of formerly secret
documents. The heavily censored records
were provided to The Associated Press by the
Government Attic, a website that publishes
government documents it obtained through
the Freedom of Information Act.
The Russians never invaded, of course.
So the covert cadre of “stay-behind agents,”
as they were known, was never activated to
collect and report wartime information from
backwoods bunkers. It was an assignment that
federal officials acknowledged (to each other,
if not to the new agents) was highly danger-
ous, given that the Soviet Union’s military
doctrine called for the elimination of local
resistance in occupied territory.
To compensate for expected casualties, a
reserve pool of agents was to be held outside
of Alaska and inserted by air later as short-
term replacements. This assignment was seen
as an easier sell to potential recruits because
“some agents might not be too enthusiastic
about being left behind in enemy-occupied
areas for an indefinite period of time,” one
planning document noted dryly.
“Washtub” was not, however, a washout.
It operated from 1951-59, according to
Deborah Kidwell, official historian of the
Air Force Office of Special Investigations,
or OSI.
“While war with the Soviet Union did not
come to Alaska, OSI trained 89 SBA (stay-
behind agents), and the survival caches
served peacetime purposes for many years to
come,” she wrote in an OSI magazine last
year.
With the benefit of hindsight, it would be
easy to dismiss “Washtub” as a harebrained
scheme born of paranoia. In fact it reflected
genuine worry about Soviet intentions and a
sense of U.S. vulnerability in a turbulent
post-World War II period.
As the plan was being shaped in 1950,
Soviet-backed North Korea invaded South
Korea, triggering a war on the peninsula that
some in the Pentagon saw as a deliberate
move by Moscow to distract Washington
before invading Europe. The previous sum-
mer the Soviets stunned the world by explod-
ing their first atomic bomb. Also in 1949, the
U.S. locked arms with Western Europe to
form the NATO alliance, and Mao Zedong’s
revolutionaries declared victory in China,
adding to American fear that communism was
on the march.
“Washtub” was known inside the govern-
ment by several other codenames, including
Corpuscle, Stigmatic and Catboat, according
to an official Air Force history of the OSI,
which called it one of OSI’s “most extensive
and long-running Cold War projects.” The
FBI had its own code word for the project:
STAGE.
“Washtub” had two phases.
The first and more urgent was the stay-
behind agent program. The second was a
parallel effort to create a standby pool of
civilian operatives in Alaska trained to clan-
destinely arrange for the evacuation of
downed military air crews in danger of
being captured by Soviet forces. This “eva-
sion and escape” plan was coordinated with
the CIA.
Among those listed as a stay-behind agent
was Dyton Abb Gilliland of Cooper
Landing, a community on the Kenai
Peninsula south of Anchorage. A well-
known bush pilot, Gilliland died in a plane
U.S. trained Alaskans as secret ‘stay-behind agents’
WORLD 7
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By Sameer N. Yacoub
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD — Iraqi security
forces and Shiite militiamen on
Sunday broke a six-week siege
imposed by the Islamic State
extremist group on the northern
Shiite Turkmen town of Amirli, as
a suicide bombing killed 14 peo-
ple in Anbar western province,
officials said.
Army spokesman Lt. Gen.
Qassim al-Moussawi said the
operation started at dawn Sunday
and the forces entered the town
shortly after midday.
Speaking live on state TV, al-
Moussawi said the forces suffered
“some causalities,” but did not
give a specific number. He said
fighting was “still ongoing to
clear the surrounding villages.”
Breaking the siege was a “big
achievement and an important vic-
tory” he said, for all involved: the
Iraqi army, elite troops, Kurdish
fighters and Shiite militias.
Turkmen lawmaker Fawzi Akram
al-Tarzi said they entered the town
from two directions and were dis-
tributing aid to residents.
About 15,000 Shiite Turkmens
were stranded in the farming com-
munity, some 105 miles (170
kilometers) north of Baghdad.
Instead of fleeing in the face of the
Islamic State group’s rampage
across northern Iraq in June, the
Shiite Turkmens stayed and forti-
fied their town with trenches and
armed positions.
Residents succeeded in fending
off the initial attack in June, but
Amirli has been surrounded by the
militants since mid-July. Many
residents said the Iraqi military’s
efforts to fly in food, water and
other aid had not been enough, as
they endured the oppressive
August heat with virtually no elec-
tricity or running water.
Nihad al-Bayati, who had taken
up arms with fellow residents to
defend the town, said some army
units had already entered while the
Shiite militiamen were stationed
in the outskirts. He said residents
had fired into the air to celebrate
the arrival of the troops.
“We thank God for this victory
over terrorists,” al-Bayati told
The Associated Press by phone
from the outskirts of Amirli. “The
people of Amirli are very happy to
see that their ordeal is over and
that the terrorists are being defeat-
ed by Iraqi forces. It is a great day
in our life.”
State TV stopped regular pro-
grams and started airing patriotic
songs following the victory
announcement, praising the coun-
try’s security forces. They have
been fighting the militants for
weeks without achieving signifi-
cant progress on the ground.
On Saturday, the U.S. conducted
airstrikes against the Sunni mili-
tants and air-dropped humanitarian
aid to residents. Aircraft from
Australia, France and Britain
joined the U.S. in the aid drop,
which came after a request from the
Iraqi government. The U.S.
Central Command said another
airstrike on Sunday damaged a tank
used by Islamic State fighters.
Iraqi forces break militant siege of Shiite town
REUTERS
Iraqi security forces and Iraqi Shiite volunteers react after breaking a
two-month siege by the Islamic State extremist group on Amerli.
LOCAL/STATE 8
Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
the district don’t have any neighborhood
boundaries and families can apply to go to a
different school than their neighborhood
one. There’s also the fact that some families
don’t register until the last minute and peo-
ple move into the district right before
school starts, she noted.
“We don’t know until school actually
starts who is going to show up,” she said.
“The first few days of school, we’re doing a
lot of monitoring. … Kids don’t come in
perfect packages of 30. It’s a lot of math. Our
first priority is always the kids; we want
them to be placed in the best possible place
as early as possible.”
The district is in the process of switching
over to an electronic system, called
InfoSnap, for its Schools of Choice registra-
tion. Standard registration already does go
through InfoSnap. It was all paper until
about two years ago, Hunter said.
“It allows us to track demand for certain
schools to help us with some of these issues
that occur,” she said. “We will be taking a
look at our overall systems. We are trying to
identify where some of the problems are. It’s
not going to change the fluctuations in any
given year and you can’t put a student in a
place you don’t have a chair for them. It will
give us better ideas about stats and trends and
it will streamline things too for us so we
have more time — it will make the whole
system more efficient.”
‘Glitch in the system’
The district would never put 45 students in
a classroom, said John Baker, deputy super-
intendent of curriculum and instruction.
“There was a glitch in the system some-
where,” Baker said. “Naomi (Hunter) has
brought it to forefront that we need to fix the
Schools of Choice process, so we can
straighten this out before registration in
November. There’s a disconnect between
online and paper; they’re not matching up
between what school sites have.”
Student registration happens in January
and February, while the school of choice reg-
istration is in November. Every student who
lives in the district is guaranteed a seat
somewhere, Hunter said.
Since Hawes is a small school, this has
happened before, Hunter said. There could be
issues in the future, so this should be sorted
out soon, said Hawes kindergarten teacher
Julietta Efigenio, who has taught kinder-
garten at Hawes for 16 years. The problem
started 10-15 years ago, but the district
quickly solved the problem then.
“We kept enrolling double as many stu-
dents that would fit in kindergarten every
year,” she said. “So for each grade level as it
moved up, it would be a problem. Basically,
Hawes doesn’t have room for another class-
room. … For about 10 years it was smooth.
We would get a few extra kids, but suddenly
this year the problem has cropped up again.”
Efigenio notes that she loves the district
and it’s much better at serving students than
any charter school ever would do, but it
needs to fix the problem with registration.
“Even with this clever solution (the sub-
stitute teacher), 32 families will be bonding
with a teacher that’s not their own,” Efigenio
said separately at the board meeting. “They
registered their children long ago, is this
any way to reward their preparation? They’re
holding tanks as classrooms. Is that the rep-
utation our district wants to earn? In kinder-
garten, if you don’t have everything pre-
pared for them, some kids are going to cry;
you need to have it nice and kind of a smooth
transition for them.”
Redistricting
This problem goes back to another issue,
she said. Hawes was supposed to be redis-
tricted during a year-long process, redoing
the boundaries so the school would have the
right number of families, she said.
“I thought, ‘wow, we had already solved
this problem,’” she said.
The district is going to be looking into
what happened and how to make the process
better, said Hawes Principal Antonio Pérez,
who is in fifth year as principal at the
school. Things are going smoothly for the
students with the substitute teacher so far, he
said.
“We’re going to communicate that to our
teachers and staff and give more of a clear
understanding for everyone involved. We
have a large number of students wanting to
attend the school and it changes every year.
… We always try to do our best and place
them in a timely manner. ”
Changing school boundaries is still on the
table, said Hunter. During the 2011-12
school year, a Grade Configuration,
Enrollment and Program Choice Committee
was formed and met throughout the year to
analyze several issues affecting the district
at that time including overcrowding at some
schools. The possibility of forming a com-
mittee to examine Hawes boundaries was one
of many recommendations that came from
that committee. The district has implement-
ed many of the committee’s recommenda-
tions, including expanding Roosevelt to a
K-8 school, moving up the Schools of
Choice application period and notification
timeline and adding a dual-language Spanish
immersion program at Selby Lane. A com-
mittee to specifically address the Hawes
boundary has yet to be formed though.
“That may occur in the future,” Hunter said.
“First, we need to determine if we still have a
space shortage at Hawes. We have seen an
enrollment drop at some schools this year,
including Hawes, that appears to be related
to families being priced out of living in this
region.”
Further, aside from streamlining the sys-
tem so all registration is online, the district
plans on educating parents and staff about
how registration works, said Hunter.
Continued from page 1
CLASS
5, 2015, ballot if it wants to take that route.
The district does have elements of success
for a successful renewal, including the fact
that both community members with and
without students in the district has support-
ed the schools, said Jared Boigon of TBWB,
an advisor to the district on the Measure A
parcel tax. Boigon said he’s found all-mail
ballot special elections seem to have the
most success. He noted 11 of the 13 all-mail
special elections for K-12 parcel taxes since
2009 have passed. San Carlos had two of
those, including Measure B, which gener-
ates about $720,000 per year for the dis-
trict.
“It’s a check-in mechanism,” he said at a
meeting Thursday night. “What’s been suc-
cessful is modest bites.”
Board Vice President Carol Elliot won-
dered if there could be potential for overesti-
mating the public’s generosity, but Trustee
Kathleen Farley said the district doesn’t
have another source of revenue to take the
parcel tax’s place.
“I’m curious about the combining and how
that has worked for people in the past,”
Farley said.
If the district selects May 5 as the election
date, ballots would be mailed out April 6 and
voters would have 29 days to submit their
ballots. The suggested time to do a voter
opinion poll is September or October.
“We do have time, but we are a little rushed
to get the best data potentially,” said board
President Adam Rak.
Meanwhile, Trustee Seth Rosenblatt does-
n’t think a general poll will inform the
board very well.
“If for some reason we felt it was the right
thing to do, tax the community, even if we
felt like we were just going to renew as is,
frankly a poll wouldn’t tell me much,” he
said. “I’d rather have a poll help inform that
(the options). I’m confident voters would
approve a straight renewal.”
Rak noted the other generic questions
might inform the board as to where the com-
munity wants to spend money for the
school, from lowering class sizes to imple-
menting new technologies.
“My sense is I’d like to look at those
other options,” Rak said. “Some sort of sur-
vey would make sense. We need to get out of
habit of doing a renewal every couple years.
We should understand what the possibilities
are going into it.”
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
TAX
49er Ray McDonald
accused of domestic violence
San Francisco 49ers defensive tackle Ray
McDonald was arrested early Sunday on
felony domestic violence
charges after officers
responded to a home in
an upscale neighbor-
hood, San Jose police
said.
McDonald, 29, was
released from jail after
posting bail, Santa Clara
County sheriff’s Sgt.
Kurt Stenderup said.
NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell announced tougher penalties
this past week for players accused of domes-
tic violence. The move followed scrutiny
over Baltimore Ravens running back Ray
Rice’s two-game penalty stemming from
his arrest on an assault charge in February.
“The 49ers organization is aware of the
recent reports regarding Ray McDonald and
we take such matters seriously,” general
manager Trent Baalke said in a statement.
“As we continue to gather the facts, we will
reserve further comment.”
McDonald has been playing for San
Francisco since he was drafted as a third-
round pick in 2007.
The incident is the latest blow to what has
been one of the NFL’s fiercest defenses. On
Friday, linebacker Aldon Smith received a
nine-game suspension for what the league
called violations of its substance-abuse and
personal-conduct policies.
Strong earthquake
aftershock shakes Napa Valley
A significant aftershock from last week-
end’s magnitude-6.0 earthquake has rattled
Northern California’s wine country.
The U.S. Geological Survey says the mag-
nitude-3.2 tremor struck 5 miles south of
the city of Napa just before 2 a.m. Sunday.
Thomas Brocher, director of USGS’
Earthquake Science Center, says it wasn’t
the strongest aftershock to rumble the
region since the main quake a week ago
caused as much as $1 billion in damage and
multiple injuries.
A magnitude-3.9 aftershock centered 8
miles south of Napa hit early Tuesday morn-
ing. The USGS says there have been more
than 70 aftershocks recorded since last
Sunday’s earthquake.
No additional damage or injuries have
been reported.
Wildfires show slower growth
The U.S. Forest Service says cloudy skies
and lower temperatures have slowed the
spread of two forest wildfires that are threat-
ening as many as 250 homes in far Northern
California.
The Forest Service reported Sunday that
the fires had burned 98 square miles in the
Klamath National Forest by Sunday. That
was 8 square miles more than a day earlier,
but represented a significant reduction in the
growth of the blazes that had picked up
steam as humidity declined and winds
increased late last week.
The two wildfires are the largest among 17
that were sparked by lightning in the forest
on Aug. 11. They remained 15 percent con-
tained.
More than 2,100 firefighters and 19 heli-
copters are taking advantage of the better
weather by laying hoses, constructing fire
lines and clearing brush from around evacu-
ated communities.
Around the state
Ray McDonald
BUSINESS 9
Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Justin Pritchard
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — From the
start, little has been typical about
Tesla Motors’ plan for a $5 billion
factory to make batteries for a new
generation of electric cars.
It’s not just the project’s mas-
sive scale, the cutting-edge tech-
nology, or even the bonanza of
6,500 good-paying jobs.
It’s how Tesla is deciding where
to build.
Through a series of unusual
plays, Tesla has five states bidding
up subsidy packages to land the
coveted plant. The winner is
expected to offer the luxury car-
maker publicly financed incentives
exceeding a half-billion dollars.
Tesla signaled this would be no
ordinary competition last fall,
when it gathered economic devel-
opment officials from seven
Western states and unveiled its
vision for a “gigafactory.” (“Giga”
refers to the large amount of power
that batteries produced at the plant
will store.)
This spring, CEO Elon Musk
announced Tesla would take the
extremely unusual step of spend-
ing millions to prepare sites in
two states - or perhaps even three -
before the finalist was chosen.
Then, over the summer, Musk said
the winning state would pitch in
about 10 percent of the cost, effec-
tively signaling a minimum bid of
$500 million.
“We don’t usually see companies
setting a floor at which states will
be considered,” said Leigh
McIlvaine of the research group
Good Jobs First, which tracks
large subsidy packages by states.
For all the public anticipation
Musk has created, much about the
process remains secret.
While an industrial park in the
desert outside Reno, Nevada, is
one known site, the other - or oth-
ers - remains a mystery. Tesla has
asked states not to discuss their
offers, and states aren’t talking.
The effect is a game of high-
stakes poker, with the states as
players and Tesla dealing.
“You can’t see any cards at all.
Do you stay in or not, push more
chips onto the table or fold?” said
Kim Hill, who studies incentives
at the nonprofit Center for
Automotive Research in
Michigan.
The factory promises something
that every state wants but rarely
gets these days: thousands of
good-paying factory jobs and all
the residual economic benefits
they bring.
So far, Nevada, California,
Texas, Arizona and New Mexico
remain contenders. They have
passed tax breaks, promised work-
er-training funds or proposed
shelving environmental regula-
tions that could slow the factory’s
construction. There is talk of spe-
cial legislative sessions to sweet-
en the bids.
Tesla Motors dealing as
states play factory poker
The Board of Directors of San
Mateo Credi t Uni on
announced last week the impend-
ing retirement
of CEO
B a r r y
Jol et t e after
27 years of
s e r v i c e .
Jolette began
his credit
union career
in 1965 as an
examiner with
the National Credi t Uni on
Admi ni strati on. He began his
association with San Mateo
Credit Union in 1987. Since
then, the credit union has grown
from 18,000 to 77,000 members
and expanded its base from $7
million to $766 million in
assets.
No timeline has been estab-
lished for the transition to new
leadership. The Board of
Directors will be initiating
plans and determining the future
direction of the credit union in
the coming weeks.
On the move
Barry Jolette
REUTERS
Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk steps out of a Model S in Fremont.
By Corey Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — It took decades of
mismanagement, malfeasance and
meltdowns in its bread-and-butter
manufacturing sector for Detroit to
hit fiscal rock bottom. The path to
exit bankruptcy could take less
than a year and a half.
After some delays, the confirma-
tion trial for the largest municipal
bankruptcy in U.S. history is
scheduled to start Tuesday.
Massive debt, thousands of cred-
itors and complex union and pen-
sion issues had many experts
thinking Detroit’s bankruptcy
would take years to resolve, con-
sidering two California cities -
Stockton and San Bernardino -
filed a year before Detroit did and
still haven’t settled on plans.
Detroit expects to cut $12 bil-
lion in unsecured debt to about $5
billion, which is “more manage-
able,” according to Bill Nowling,
a spokesman for emergency man-
ager Kevyn Orr.
“None of it will get wiped out
until the plan is confirmed and the
judge issues an effective date,”
Nowling told The Associated
Press. “And it happens really fast
after that.”
Orr’s contract expires at the end
of September. His restructuring
team set an aggressive timetable
and bankruptcy Judge Steven
Rhodes also quickly named media-
tors to work out deals with credi-
tors, added Nowling.
Detroit raced toward this
week’s bankruptcy trial
SPORTS 11
Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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CHICAGO — Needing a slugger, the slug-
gish Oakland Athletics acquired Adam Dunn
from the Chicago White Sox on Sunday,
hoping to boost their lineup for the final
stretch.
The White Sox also sent cash to Oakland
while acquiring minor league pitcher Nolan
Sanburn. Because the deal was made before
Sept. 1, Dunn would be eligible for the post-
season if the A’s make the playoffs.
Oakland was second in the AL West after
three straight losses to the division-leading
Los Angeles Angels, and hadn’t scored in 22
innings going into Sunday’s series finale.
They trailed the Angels by four games —
their largest deficit since May 2013.
The A’s were looking to add a hitter after
trading Yoenis Cespedes to the Boston Red
Sox for starter Jon Lester before the July 31
nonwaiver deadline.
“We’re trying to do whatever we can to get
some offense going here,” Oakland manag-
er Bob Melvin said. “The guy has a history
of hitting homers and getting on base, and I
know he’s excited about being with us.”
Along with Dunn, the White Sox have
traded away second baseman Gordon
Beckham and outfielder Alejandro De Aza in
the past week and a half.
The 34-year-old Dunn has 460 career
homers. But he struggled in four seasons
with the White Sox, mostly as a designated
hitter. He has played first base and some out-
field, and even made his first career pitching
appearance this season in a mop-up role.
He has an expiring contract and could
retire. The trade gives Dunn, who’s batting
.220 with 20 homers and 54 RBIs, a chance
to do something he has never done — reach
the playoffs.
“I think this is just an opportunity for
him that he should’ve taken,” manager
Robin Ventura said. “It came about and you
talk to him about it, you’re happy that he
gets a chance to go do this. I think even if
he does happen to hang it up after this year,
he’ll at least get a shot at doing this.”
The White Sox envisioned making play-
off runs when they signed Dunn to a four-
year, $56 million contract in December
2010. Dunn was coming off back-to-back
38-homer seasons with Washington but the
plan didn’t unfold as envisioned.
Dunn’s first season in Chicago was brutal.
His average dropped more than 100 points
to .159 while he hit just 11 homers in 2011,
and he never really lived up to expectations
after that.
He became a lightning rod for fans with
his high strikeout totals, finishing one shy
of the record with 222 in 2012, but he
remained popular in the clubhouse.
“Some people like to lump it all togeth-
er,” teammate Paul Konerko said. “We know
the first year was a rough year, but if you
look at a lot of his time here, he kind of did
what he was supposed to be doing.”
General manager Rick Hahn said the
White Sox started to zero in on the Oakland
deal on Saturday. He discussed the possibil-
ity with Dunn, and the veteran waived his
no-trade clause.
“This deal, we feel real good about
Sanburn,” Hahn said. “He’s a young power
arm with good pitch ability and good sec-
ondary pitches.”
He said Sanburn will likely start next season
in Double-A. As for Dunn’s time in Chicago?
“Obviously, we were both disappointed
that we didn’t accomplish on the field what
we had hoped when the deal was originally
signed four years ago,” Hahn said. “He was
brought here as part of a plan to help us win
championships in that window, and it didn’t
happen. From that standpoint, I think we’re
all disappointed. From the clubhouse stand-
point, he was outstanding.”
The White Sox also called up first base-
man Andy Wilkins and Scott Snodgress
from Triple-ACharlotte, reinstated outfield-
er Moises Sierra from the 15-day disabled
list and outrighted pitcher Nestor Molina to
Double-ABirmingham on Sunday.
Wilkins, who had 30 home runs and 85
RBIs for Charlotte, started at first base on
Sunday.
Dunn, meanwhile, gets to play in mean-
ingful games down the stretch.
“I think that’s what’s probably really
exciting for him at this point, is to come in
here and play meaningful games in
September and hopefully help a team get to
the postseason,” Melvin said.
Big Donkey bound for Oakland
KELLEY L. COX/USA TODAY SPORTS
In an attempt to boost a reeling offense, Oakland acquired slugger Adam Dunn from the
White Sox Sunday in exchange for minor league pitcher Nolan Sanburn.
Angels sweep
4-game series
from Oakland
By Greg Beacham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ANAHEIM — While the Anaheim Angels
buzzed around their clubhouse preparing for
their fantasy football draft, the Oakland
Athletics had their own doors locked for a
grim team meeting.
California’s AL West powers are headed
into September in very different moods
after the Angels seized control of the divi-
sion race in one remarkable weekend.
Mike Trout hit his career-high 31st homer
and drove in three runs, Matt Shoemaker
pitched seven shutout innings of five-hit
ball, and the Angels completed a masterful
four-game sweep of the A’s with an 8-1 vic-
tory Sunday.
“That was a huge series for us in regards
the playoffs and the AL West, a huge
series,” said Shoemaker (14-4), who got his
sixth win in August. “I just wanted to keep
it going.”
Chris Iannetta also homered and had three
hits for the Angels, who took a five-game
lead in the division standings with the best
record in the majors at 83-53. Outpitching
the A’s vaunted staff and outhitting
Oakland’s usually productive lineup,
Anaheim outscored the A’s 18-4 in the four-
game set.
“We’re having fun and we’re winning
ballgames, but it’s still August,” Trout said
before grabbing his Philadelphia Eagles
helmet out of his locker and threatening to
wear it to the draft. “Can’t get too excited
yet.”
Still, it’s tough for the Angels not to get
a little bit stoked by their surge, which
includes a six-game winning streak. They
shut out the A’s for the 29 consecutive
innings during the series, and their sellout
crowd loudly chanted “Sweep! Sweep!” as
the Angels finished it off.
Trout had a two-run single during a six-run
second inning for Anaheim, which has won
15 of 19. The A’s have lost 14 of 20.
“It was embarrassing. Pathetic,” said A’s
manager Bob Melvin, who was ejected in
See OAKLAND, Page 14
dedicated to learning its nuances — and learn-
ing them well.
“(Adkins is a) dynamic athlete,” Krieger
said. “He’s a dual threat passer and runner. He
should put a little scare into opposing defens-
es, having a game plan for him.”
Protecting Adkins is a sizeable line in com-
parison to years past.
Newcomers to the offensive line such as 5-9,
215-pound guard Ngahe Mapa and 5-11, 210-
pound Robert Thorgerson join returning right
guard Ryan Del Rosario, who earned All-PAL
Lake Division honors last season. Krieger pro-
claims Del Rosario to be one of the fastest
players on the team.
“He’s running with running backs and he’s
running with receivers,” Krieger said. “He cer-
tainly is not one of your plugging-type of
guards. He certainly could become a fullback-
style kid if we ran a pro-set type of offense.”
The notion to convert the 5-9, 180-pound
senior to fullback has occurred to Krieger,
especially because Del Rosario implores him
on a daily basis to give him a crack at the back-
field. But his proven talent up front, and with
Mills not having an extraordinary amount of
depth of linemen, Del Rosario’s value at the
guard position is too great to move.
Returning senior center Justin Dasanmartino
is just as integral to the line. With the Vikings
running almost exclusively from the shotgun
formation last season, Dasanmartino was nails
as a snapper.
“It’s shocking how well he can snap that
ball,” Krieger said. “So he makes a huge differ-
ence, because if you look at a lot of teams that
are moving to some kind of shotgun offense, I
don’t think there’s a better center that I’ve seen
in my two years now that snaps the ball more
consistently than Justin does.”
As testament to Delsanmartino’s importance
to the team, he missed one game last season
due to a deep bruise on his snapping hand. The
game was an all-out battle with the King’s
Academy, which Mills lost 19-15.
The strength of Mills’line suits the character
of its biggest weapon out of the backfield, sen-
ior tailback Kendric Meleisea-Smith.
Replacing graduated star back Antonio Jeffrey
— an agile runner who could turn on a dime —
Meleisea-Smith is a straightforward bull.
“[Meleisea-Smith] is more of a downhill,
one-cut kind of runner,” Krieger said. “But he
has good vision. He’s not as shifty as [Jeffrey],
giving hips and arms and legs going different
directions. He’s going to make a decision and
he’s going to get into that hole, and make a
solid direction. He’s always thinking vertical.”
Defensively, Mills is converting to a 4-3
base this season, relying on its sizeable two-
way defensive line and a strong secondary
which will feature Adkins, Meleisea-Smith and
senior Christian Miranda.
“I expect us to be competitive to win each
game,” Krieger said. “And if we stay healthy,
and we can pull out a close game here and there
… we can have a chance to compete for the
division title.”
SPORTS 12
Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
to see what he has in newcomer Mika Smith.
“We have a little size on our line,”
Johnson said. “I think our guys up front,
they are very capable (of handling the job).
(But) we’re putting in complex run schemes
and pass protections. Teaching is half the
battle.”
Elpel will also anchor the defensive line
as the nose tackle.
“He’s a load at nose guard. There are three
words we tell him: knock them back,”
Johnson said. “He’s a strong guy. He has a
lot of explosion in his legs.”
Those three up front should help pave the
way for running backs Jamie Wilson and
Alex Bae, who were the Knights’ top two
rushers a year ago. The two combined for
551 yards and four touchdowns, averaging
more than five yards per carry.
The Knights also return their top wide
receivers from last season. Derek Ziske was
the Lake Division Wide Receiver of the Year.
Mike Miclean averaged 22 yards per catch
last season while averaging just under three
receptions per game.
“Our three main guys on offense have to
be Derek Friske, Mark Miclean and the com-
bination of Jamie Wilson and Alex Bae,”
Johnson said. “We have to be able to get the
ball to those guys in order to make plays for
us.”
As has been the case for the Knights the
last several years, depth is a concern. As is
a slow start to the season. Johnson wasn’t
hired until April and as such, the team
missed out on about three months of off-sea-
son preparation.
“We just haven’t had a lot of time (togeth-
er). We’re like three months behind the nor-
mal football program,” Johnson said. “We
had a late start, but I think we had a good
summer. The kids are getting better funda-
mentally. ”
The saving grace, according to Johnson,
is his team’s ability to quickly learn the way
he likes to do things and teach the aspects
of the game. Smarts can go a long way to
helping a team ramp up the learning curve.
“The one thing I’m blessed to have here is
a group of smart kids … who are able to
grasp concepts and retain more,” Johnson
said. “You speed up that learning curve when
you have intelligent people.”
Johnson has also been impressed with the
team’s attitude so far.
“I think they’re excited. I think they’re
eager to play somebody and see how we do
against other people,” Johnson said. “I
believe accomplishment builds confidence
and that builds belief. That’s my initial goal
at the beginning of the season.”
Continued from page 10
TKA
Coach: Mike Krieger, 3rd
season
2013 record: 2-3 Lake
Division, 6-5 overall
Key returners: Marquis Adkins (sr., QB/DB);
Ryan Del Rosario (sr.,OL/LB);Christian Miranda
(sr.,WR/QB/DB);Kendric Meleissea-Smith (sr.,
RB/DB);Justin Dasanmartino (sr.,OL/DL);Ron-
dell Dondoy (sr.,TE/LB)
Key newcomers: Ngahe Mapa (jr., OL/DT);
Robert Thorgersen (sr.,OL/DL);Jordan Ganim
(sr.,WR/DB); David Tongilava (soph. RB/LB)
2014 schedule (home games in CAPS):
Sept.5,@ San Jose,7 p.m.;Sept.13,@ Mission
San Jose, 7 p.m.; Sept. 20, SAN LORENZO
VALLEY, 2 p.m.; Sept. 26, @ Yerba Buena, 7
p.m.; Oct. 4, @ Hillsdale, 7 p.m.; Oct. 17, @
Jefferson,7 p.m.; Oct.24,KING’S ACADEMY,
3 p.m.; Nov.1, vs.Carlmont @ Burlingame, 7
p.m.; Nov. 7, @ El Camino, 7 p.m.; Nov. 15,
CAPUCHINO, 2 p.m.
Mills Vikings
Coach: Michael Johnson,
1st year
2013 record:3-2 Lake Division,
5-5 overall
Key players: Dominic Sabel (sr.,QB); Derek
Friske (sr.,WR/DB);Mark Miclean (sr.,WR/DB);
Jordan Duncan (sr., WR/CB); Alex Bae (sr.,
RB/CB); Jamie Wilson (sr., RB/TE/WR); Cole
Hansen (sr., OL/DL); Cole Elpel (OL/DL).
2014 schedule (home games in CAPS):
Sept. 12, SAN JOSE, 7 p.m.; Sept. 19, SCOTTS
VALLEY,7 p.m.;Sept.27,@ Sacred Heart Prep,
2 p.m.; Oct. 3, @ Calvary Murrieta-Southern
California,7 p.m.;Oct.10,SOQUEL,7 p.m.;Oct.
17,@ El Camino,3 p.m.;Oct.24,@ Mills,7 p.m.;
Oct. 31, CAPUCHINO, 7 p.m.; Nov. 7, @ Carl-
mont, 7 p.m.; Nov. 14, JEFFERSON, 7 p.m.
King’s Academy Knights
Continued from page 10
MILLS
the second inning. “We don’t play like that.
The last three games here were the worst I’ve
seen this team play in I can’t remember how
long. I feel bad for our fans to have to watch
that.”
Scott Kazmir (14-7) got just four outs for
the A’s, and he criticized home plate umpire
Gerry Davis afterward. Kazmir also claimed
Davis had been reprimanded by baseball offi-
cials for making a “cry-baby face” at the
Oakland dugout Saturday.
Major League Baseball said it had no com-
ment on Kazmir’s assertion.
“It’s important to rise above any personal
issue and call a fair game,” Kazmir said. “We
owe it to the game to do that. We really do.
And what I saw from the video, I saw 10-plus
pitches that I thought were right there. I
don’t know if it has something to do with
last night and how he got reprimanded or
anything like that, but the professionalism
is something that I have an issue with.
“No matter what happens on the field,
some things are just unacceptable. When
you constantly pitch inside and hit your
spot every single time and have nothing to
show for it, it’s frustrating,” he
said.Oakland, which led the AL West for
nearly four straight months this season,
now faces its biggest division deficit since
May 25, 2013.
“I definitely think something needed to be
said,” Josh Donaldson said of the A’s closed-
door meeting. “This is the time of the season
where you need to start playing your best.
And right now, we’re playing our worst.”
Gordon Beckham and Kole Calhoun drew
bases-loaded walks in the second from
Kazmir, who matched his shortest start of
the season. After Kazmir issued three
straight walks and got the hook, Melvin was
tossed for arguing with Davis.
After eight Angels relievers pitched a
three-hit shutout Saturday night, Shoemaker
(14-4) provided the bullpen with plenty of
rest. The rookie right-hander capped a
tremendous month by striking out seven and
extending his personal scoreless innings
streak to 23 1-3 innings while allowing no
Oakland runners to reach third base.
Notes: Center fielder Coco Crisp sat out
again after his wall collision Friday.
Up next: Jason Hammel (1-5, 5.77) opens
a series with Seattle at the Coliseum on
Monday night. Dunn should be available.
Oakland got slugger Adam Dunn from the
Chicago White Sox in a trade Sunday to help
their slumping offense.
He can’t arrive soon enough: The A’s 29
straight innings without scoring a run was
the third-longest streak in Oakland history.
Oakland scored its first run since Thursday
on Josh Reddick’s RBI single off Mike
Morin in the eighth.
SPORTS 13
Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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EXAMINATIONS
and
TREATMENT
of
Di seases & Di sorders
of t he Eye
EYEGLASSES
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i nsurances i ncl udi ng Medi care and HPSM
www. Dr- AndrewSoss. net
Eveni ng and Sat urday appt s
al so avai l abl e
Angels 8, Athletics 1
A’s ab r h bi Angels ab r h bi
Fuld cf 3 1 0 0 Calhoun rf 3 1 0 1
Reddick rf 4 0 1 1 Trout cf 4 1 2 3
Dnldsn 3b 4 0 2 0 Pujols 1b 4 0 0 1
Vogt 1b 4 0 0 0 Hamilton lf 4 1 1 0
Moss lf 4 0 0 0 Kendrick 2b 3 1 0 0
Norris c 4 0 2 0 Freese dh 4 0 0 0
Callspo dh 4 0 0 0 Aybar ss 4 1 1 1
Sogard 2b 3 0 1 0 Iannetta c 3 2 3 1
Parrino ss 3 0 0 0 Beckhm 3b 3 1 1 1
Totals 33 1 6 1 Totals 32 8 8 8
Oakland 000 000 010 — 1 6 1
Anaheim 060 000 11x — 8 8 0
E—Vogt (2). LOB—Oakland 6, Los Angeles 4. HR—
Trout (31), Iannetta (7).
Oakland IP H R ER BB SO
Kazmir L,14-7 1.1 2 6 6 4 0
Otero 1.2 1 0 0 0 2
J.Chavez 4 4 1 1 0 2
Scribner 1 1 1 1 0 0
Anaheim IP H R ER BB SO
Shoemaker W,14-4 7 5 0 0 0 7
Morin 1 1 1 1 1 0
Y.Herrera 1 0 0 0 0 0
WP—Shoemaker.
Umpires—Home, Gerry Davis; First, Greg Gibson; Sec-
ond, Phil Cuzzi;Third,Will Little.
T—2:54. A—44,205 (45,483).
Continued from page 11
OAKLAND
By Rachel Cohen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Caroline Wozniacki trusts
her stamina so much that she plans to return
to New York in two months to run a marathon.
Maria Sharapova, usually the one wearing
down opponents in the third set, sure couldn’t
keep up on a steamy Sunday at the U.S. Open.
Wozniacki won 6-4, 2-6, 6-2 in 2 hours, 37
minutes to get back to her first Grand Slam
quarterfinal in more than two years — and get
back in the headlines for reasons other than
her personal life.
“The season for me has been a little bit up
and down,” she said in quite an understate-
ment, “and it’s so nice to kind of start feeling
like I’m playing the way I want to.”
Because of the heat, the players received a
10-minute break before the final set;
Sharapova returned to the court late, arguing
with the chair umpire after receiving a time
violation warning. Perhaps sensing that she
was fresher than the five-time major champi-
on, Wozniacki later complained that
Sharapova was dawdling between points.
Her tardiness seemed to swing the Arthur
Ashe Stadium crowd’s support squarely in
Wozniacki’s favor. When
the 10th-seeded Dane broke
Sharapova at love to go up
3-1 in the final set, she got
a standing ovation from the
fans and waved her arms to
egg them on. Sharapova
had appeared to hit a winner
three times on that game’s
final point only for
Wozniacki to somehow
chase down the ball.
Finally, Sharapova put a volley into the net.
Wozniacki mixed in just enough aggression
with her signature defense to keep the pressure
on Sharapova in the final set.
“She’s very good at getting a lot of balls
back and making you hit another one,”
Sharapova said. “In the end, I went for a little
too much.”
She insisted the conditions didn’t bother
her. Sharapova had been 17-6 in three-set
matches this year, including her come-from-
behind second-round victory here.
The fifth-seeded Sharapova’s loss leaves
No. 1 Serena Williams as the only woman
remaining of the top six. Ninth-seeded Jelena
Jankovic was also upset, losing 7-6 (6), 6-3
to 17-year-old Swiss Belinda Bencic.
With mentor Martina Hingis cheering from
the stands, Bencic became the youngest U.S.
Open quarterfinalist since Hingis herself in
1997.
After a sloppy first set, Sharapova was
painting the lines in the second. Wozniacki
seemed to spend most of it watching in dis-
may as one of Sharapova’s 22 winners
whizzed by.
Wozniacki said she told herself before the
third set to go for her shots.
“If I’m going to lose,” she recalled think-
ing, “at least I’m going to do it with dignity.”
She closed out the match by breaking
Sharapova’s serve again with a backhand win-
ner.
Wozniacki will next face 13th-seeded Sara
Errani, who ended the run of qualifier Mirjana
Lucic-Baroni with a three-set victory.
Other women’s singles results
Sara Errani (13), Italy, def. Mirjana Lucic-
Baroni, Croatia, 6-3, 2-6, 6-0; Caroline
Wozniacki (10), Denmark, def. Maria
Sharapova (5), Russia, 6-4, 2-6, 6-2; Peng
Shuai, China, def. Lucie Safarova (14), Czech
Republic, 6-3, 6-4; Belinda Bencic,
Switzerland, def. Jelena Jankovic (9), Serbia,
7-6 (6), 6-3.
Men’s doubles results
Eric Butorac, United States, and Raven
Klaasen (12), South Africa, def. Guillermo
Garcia-Lopez, Spain, and Philipp Oswald,
Austria, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4; Ivan Dodig, Croatia,
and Marcelo Melo (4), Brazil, def. Mariusz
Fyrstenberg and Marcin Matkowski, Poland,
6-4, 6-4; Scott Lipsky and Rajeev Ram,
United States, def. Daniel Nestor, Canada, and
Nenad Zimonjic (3), Serbia, 6-3, 6-4.
Women’s doubles results
Serena and Venus Williams, United States,
def. Garbine Muguruza and Carla Suarez
Navarro (12), Spain, 6-1, 6-0; Ekaterina
Makarova and Elena Vesnina (4), Russia, def.
Vania King and Lisa Raymond, United States,
6-3, 6-7 (4), 6-2; Zarina Diyas, Kazakhstan,
and Xu Yi-Fan, China, def. Lucie Hradecka,
Czech Republic, and Michaella Krajicek (11),
Netherlands, 7-6 (3), 6-2.
Wozniacki outlasts Sharapova in U.S. Open quarters
Caroline
Wozniacki
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Roger Federer regrouped
after a fortuitously timed rain delay to move
on at the U.S. Open in four sets.
The second-seeded Federer was a game
from losing the first set to Marcel Granollers
in the third round Sunday when play was
stopped because of lightning.
After they returned to the court two
hours later, Granollers won the set, but
Federer dominated the rest of the way in a
4-6, 6-1, 6-1, 6-1 victory.
Drenched with sweat on a humid night,
Federer acknowledged afterward that the
break helped him. He started serving better
in the final three sets.
“He was doing a lot of things really well,”
Federer said later. “It was just, for me, going
to be one of those things to like weather the
storm and see if he could maintain that level
of play or not and if I could lift my game up
and see how that matched up. I think overall
it worked out great at the end.”
The 42nd-ranked Granollers was looking
to make the fourth round at the U.S. Open for
the second straight year.
Federer next faces 17th-seeded Roberto
Bautista Agut of Spain, who beat Adrian
Mannarino 7-5, 6-2, 6-3. The 17-time
Grand Slam champion has dropped one set
through three matches.
Other men’s singles results
Gilles Simon (26), France, def. David
Ferrer (4), Spain, 6-3, 3-6, 6-1, 6-3; Marin
Cilic (14), Croatia, def. Kevin Anderson
(18), South Africa, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4; Tomas
Berdych (6), Czech Republic, def. Teymuraz
Gabashvili, Russia, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4; Dominic
Thiem, Austria, def. Feliciano Lopez (19),
Spain, 6-4, 6-2, 6-3; Roberto Bautista Agut
(17), Spain, def. Adrian Mannarino, France,
7-5, 6-2, 6-3; Gael Monfils (20), France, def.
Richard Gasquet (12), France, 6-4, 6-2, 6-2.
Federer advances to semis
first time since Aug. 24-26, 2007. Milwaukee was outscored 31-
8 in the series. Ryan Braun homered in the eighth.
Kyle Lohse (12-8) allowed seven runs and nine hits in 5 2/3
innings for his fourth defeat in five decisions.
Backup catcher Andrew Susac was given a start and went 3 for 4
with three RBIs, including a two-run double and an RBI double. Joe
Panik had a two-run triple as San Francisco earned its fifth series
sweep this year. The Giants have a season-best six-game winning
streak at AT&T Park.
The Brewers briefly took a lead in the first when Braun grounded
into a run-scoring double play. Bumgarner was unscathed other-
wise, allowing five hits with one walk.
San Francisco's starting pitchers combined for a 1.07 ERAwith
57 strikeouts and seven walks on the 6-1 homestand.
"Look where we're at, we've turned it on at the best time of the
year," Bumgarner said. "We're getting hot and everybody's doing
their part."
Sandoval tripled to start the second. He walked in a seven-run
seventh, his first shot at the cycle. Fans chanted "Double!" but he
flied out later in the inning.
Tim Lincecum pitched the eighth and ninth for San Francisco in
his first relief outing since he was pulled out of the rotation last
Monday.
The Giants' 10 extra-base hits were their most at their 15-year-
old ballpark. They twice had nine. Sunday's total included six dou-
bles, and it was their first game with 10 extra-base hits at home
since Sept. 22, 1998, against the Pirates at Candlestick Park.
Notes: Catcher Buster Posey got the afternoon off, a day after he
took a foul tip off the right forearm and also a couple of others
Saturday night. "Buster needs a day, "
Bochy said. "He's just got general soreness."
The Giants transferred catcher Hector Sanchez (concussion) and
infielder Ehire Adrianza (hamstring) to the 60-day disabled list.
Up next: San Francisco will resume its suspended May 22 game
with the Rockies at Coors Field, using a new pitcher and lineup
because rosters changed for both clubs since that day. The teams
will have expanded rosters available, and Bochy wouldn't say who
will pitch first. The game, suspended by weather, is tied 2-all with
two outs and a runner on first in the bottom of the sixth.
"That first game is going to get intriguing," Bochy said.
September callups: After the game, the Giants recalled outfielder
Juan Perez and left-handed Mike Kickham from Triple-AFresno and
right-handed Hunter Strickland from Double-ARichmond. Infielder
Chris Dominguez and catcher Guillermo Quiroz had their contracts
purchased from Fresno.
SPORTS 14
Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
*CBCT Xray,Extraction and Grafting are
NOT INCLUDED in the special.
Discount does not apply to insurance pricing
Call by 9/15/14
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millbraedental.com/implants Dr. Sherry Tsai
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Giants 15, Brewers 5
Brewers ab r h bi Giants ab r h bi
Gomez cf 2 1 1 0 Pagan cf 5 1 2 1
Parra cf 3 0 0 1 Duffy 3b 0 0 0 0
Lucroy 1b 5 0 1 0 Panik 2b 4 2 1 2
Braun rf 4 1 1 1 Pence rf 5 3 4 2
Ramirez 3b 4 0 2 0 Sandovl 3b 4 3 3 3
Herera 3b 0 0 0 0 Linccm p 0 0 0 0
Davis lf 4 0 0 0 Morse 1b 2 0 0 1
Weeks 2b 4 1 2 0 Iskwa 1b-lf 1 2 1 0
Maldndo c 3 2 1 1 Blanco lf-cf 4 0 1 0
Segura ss 3 0 0 0 Susac c 5 1 3 3
Lohse p 1 0 0 0 Crawford ss 4 2 0 1
Duke p 0 0 0 0 Bmgrnr p 2 0 0 0
Overay ph 0 0 0 0 Kontos p 0 0 0 0
Rynlds ph 0 0 0 0 Lopez p 0 0 0 0
Figaro p 0 0 0 0 Arias ph-1b 2 1 1 1
Smith p 0 0 0 0
Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0
Gnett ph 1 0 1 1
Totals 34 5 9 4 Totals 38 151614
Milwaukee 100 000 112 — 5 9 1
SanFrancisco 013 021 71x — 15 16 0
E—Maldonado(6).DP—San Francisco 1.LOB—Mil-
waukee 6, San Francisco 6. 2B—Ar.Ramirez (19),
R.Weeks (17), Pence 2 (28), G.Blanco (10), Susac 2 (3),
Arias(7).3B—Panik(2),Pence(10),Sandoval (3).HR—
Braun(18),Maldonado(4),Sandoval (15).SB—Pagan
(14). S—Lohse, Bumgarner. SF—Morse.
Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO
Lohse L,12-8 5.2 9 7 7 2 3
Duke .1 0 0 0 0 0
Figaro 0 2 3 3 1 0
W.Smith .2 3 4 4 1 1
Kintzler 1.1 2 1 1 1 1
SanFrancisco IP H R ER BB SO
Bmgrner W,16-9 6 5 1 1 1 7
Kontos .2 1 1 1 0 0
J.Lopez .1 0 0 0 1 0
Lincecum 2 3 3 2 0 0
HBP—byLincecum(Maldonado).WP—Figaro.PB—Susac.
Umpires—Home, Adam Hamari; First, Quinn Wolcott;
Second, Dale Scott;Third, Dan Iassogna.
NL GLANCE AL GLANCE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Baltimore 79 56 .585 —
New York 70 65 .519 9
Toronto 69 67 .507 10 1/2
Tampa Bay 66 71 .482 14
Boston 60 76 .441 19 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Kansas City 74 61 .548 —
Detroit 74 62 .544 1/2
Cleveland 70 64 .522 3 1/2
Chicago 62 75 .453 13
Minnesota 59 77 .434 15 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Anaheim 83 53 .610 —
A’s 78 58 .574 5
Seattle 73 62 .541 9 1/2
Houston 59 79 .428 25
Texas 53 83 .390 30
Saturday’s Games
Toronto 2, N.Y. Yankees 0
Chicago White Sox 6, Detroit 3, 1st game
Baltimore 3, Minnesota 2
Tampa Bay 7, Boston 0
Cleveland 3, Kansas City 2, 11 innings
Detroit 8, Chicago White Sox 4, 2nd game
Houston 2, Texas 0
Angels 2, Oakland 0
Washington 3, Seattle 1
Sunday’s Games
Toronto4, N.Y.Yankees 3
Baltimore12, Minnesota8
Boston3,TampaBay0
ChicagoWhiteSox6, Detroit 2
Houston3,Texas 2
Angels 8, Oakland1
Seattle5,Washington3
CLeveland4, Kansas City2, 10thinnings, susp., rain
Monday’s Games
RedSox(DeLaRosa4-5)atTampa(Smyly9-10),10:10a.m.
Twins(Hughes14-9)atBalt.(Gausman7-6),10:35a.m.
Tigers (Price 12-10) at Cle. (Kluber 13-8), 1:05 p.m.
M’s (C.Young 12-6) at Oak. (Hammel 1-5), 1:05 p.m.
Rangers(Lewis9-11) at K.C.(Ventura10-9),5:10p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 77 58 .570 —
Atlanta 72 65 .526 6
Miami 66 69 .489 11
New York 64 73 .467 14
Philadelphia 62 74 .456 15 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 73 63 .537 —
St. Louis 73 63 .537 —
Pittsburgh 71 65 .522 2
Cincinnati 66 71 .482 7 1/2
Chicago 61 76 .445 12 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 77 60 .562 —
Giants 74 62 .544 2 1/2
San Diego 64 71 .474 12
Arizona 57 79 .419 19 1/2
Colorado 54 82 .397 22 1/2
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 5, St. Louis 1, 1st game
Pittsburgh 3, Cincinnati 2
Miami 4, Atlanta 0
Philadelphia 7, N.Y. Mets 2
Colorado 2, Arizona 0
St. Louis 13, Chicago Cubs 2, 2nd game
San Diego 2, L.A. Dodgers 1, 10 innings
San Francisco 3, Milwaukee 1
Washington 3, Seattle 1
Sunday’s Games
N.Y. Mets 6, Philadelphia 5
Cincinnati 3, Pittsburgh 2
St. Louis 9, Chicago Cubs 6
San Francisco 15, Milwaukee 5
Arizona 6, Colorado 2
Dodgers 7, San Diego 1
Seattle 5, Washington 3
Atlanta 1, Miami 0
Monday’s Games
Mets(Wheeler9-9)atMiami (Alvarez10-6),10:10a.m.
Phils(Hamels7-6)atAtlanta(Teheran13-9),10:10a.m.
Bucs(Cole7-4) at StL(Lynn14-8),11:15a.m.
Brewers(Nelson2-5)atCubs(Turner4-8),11:20a.m.
D-Backs(Cahill3-9)atSanDiego(T.Ross12-12),1:10p.m.
Completionof suspendedgame:
Rockies2,Giants2,tie,6innings,game,1:10p.m.
Giants(Hudson9-9)atColorado(Morales5-7),1:10p.m.
Nats(Gonzalez6-9) at L.A.(Hernandez8-9),5:10p.m.
Continued from page 10
GIANTS
we battled every single match.”
Cal had to work through some
defensive issues on the back row
Sunday against Air Force and ulti-
mately had to rally back from a 2-1
match deficit. But after buckling
down on serve receives, the Cal
offense found a rhythm with sopho-
more setter Alyssa Jensen making a
statement with 58 assists through-
out to lead the Bears to a 25-22, 18-
25, 19-25, 25-18, 15-10 victory.
“I was really happy with the way
she commanded the offense,” Feller
said.
Jensen is new to the starting setter
role, taking over for graduated Joan
Caloiaro — cousin of three-time
beach volleyball Olympic gold
medalist Kerri Walsh Jennings. And
Jensen had the new-look Bears’
offense firing like clockwork. Cal
got double-figure kills nine times,
from five different players, through-
out the weekend tournament.
“We do have a little bit of depth,
and we got to use that [Sunday] in
particular,” Feller said. “If we’re in
system, we’ve got middle blockers
that can terminate the ball and that
creates an opponent who wants to
double block the middle. As soon as
they start double blocking the mid-
dle, then we’ve got a big advantage
on the outside.”
The height of those middle block-
ers is unlike any Alftin has ever
shared the court with. Previous to
this season, the tallest teammate
with whom Alftin ever played was as
an underclassman at St. Francis —
before she transferred to Woodside
— when the Lancers featured 6-3
Savannah Pavin. The shorter of
Cal’s two first-string middle block-
ers, redshirt junior Lillian
Schonewise, matches that height at
6-3. Croatian-born junior Lara
Vukasovic is on the taller side of 6-5
and owns an advanced reach which
allows her to play ever taller.
Meanwhile, Alftin is one of just
two Cal players — along with
Jensen — being counted upon as
six-rotation players.
“She’s being asked to carry a pretty
big load, and that’s a tough haul for a
freshman,” Feller said. “She came and
went a little bit with her game, and
sometimes she got a little bit too
anxious and made some unforced
errors. But she brought it back under
control. She’s going to learn every
minute that she’s on the court.”
Sunday’s outburst from Alftin and
Gooden-Smith could be the shape of
things to come in future seasons for
Cal. They are two of eight freshmen
in this year’s mix, and were a big fac-
tor in the Bears having the ninth-
ranked freshman class in the nation
this season, according to
PrepVolleyball.com.
“The foundation is there. The con-
sistency will come,” Feller said. “The
level of their skill in the game of vol-
leyball and their knowledge of the col-
lege game will grow exponentially.”
Cal travels to the New Mexico
State Tournament on Sept. 5-6. The
Golden Bears open at home Sept. 12
against University of the Pacific, 7
p.m. at Haas Pavilion.
“I’m so excited and so anxious,”
Alftin said. “I’m excited to see all our
fans and I’m actually excited to get
to know all our fans.”
Continued from page 10
CAL
15
Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
650-354-1100
T
here is something I miss about the
days of getting film processed.
When I was a kid, our family would
drop off our roll of film at the yellow
Fotomat drive-through booth in Millbrae,
get a small slip of paper stamped with a
due back date, then head back a week or so
later. On that return trip, we could hardly
wait to flip through the pack (24 or 36
photos) to see how many winners we had.
Even some of the lousy photos could be
fun. In a way, for this “kid,” it was like
opening a pack of baseball cards and anx-
iously thumbing through for singles (the
cards I needed to complete a team or set)
and, of course, for Giants players. These
days, we take photos of everything and it
costs us nothing. We delete tons of shots,
keep even more, rarely print any and have
immediate gratification with a good shot.
Within seconds, we share that photo with
our social media friends and get immediate
feedback, shares and tags. All that is
great, but I still miss the buildup and ele-
ment of surprise (not the cost!) of “old
school” photo processing. Last week,
some of your friends likely posted shots
of their dogs online, for National Dog
Appreciation Day. Great shots, too. To
take even better shots of your pets, con-
sider these tips: Get down to your pet’s
level, don’t stand above them. I’ve even
seen pet photography pros lie on the
ground to get their shot. Get close. Too
often, pets get lost in the photo unless
you make an effort to get close. Also,
tighter shots lead to fewer distracting
background elements in the frame. Take
photos while someone else in your family
is playing with your pet to capture your
pet engaged, active and unsuspecting.
And, use natural light. Aflash distracts
pets and can lead to those awful red eye
shots.
Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Adoption,
Behavior and Training, Education, Outreach,
Field Services, Cruelty Investigation,
Volunteer and Media/PR program areas and
staff from the new Tom and Annette Lantos
Center for Compassion.
***
G a r e t h
Gibson and Nina Pascuzzi
of Belmont, gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequioa Hospital in Redwood City Aug. 10,
2014.
Jason and Teresa Schnei der of
Redwood City, gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequioa Hospital in Redwood City Aug. 11,
2014.
Garrett Eggers and Georgette
Castanedo of Redwood City, gave birth to
a baby girl at Sequioa Hospital in Redwood
City Aug. 11, 2014.
John and Bogomi l a Pf ei ffer of
Belmont, gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequioa Hospital in Redwood City Aug. 11,
2014.
Bennett and Michelle Lebherz of
San Mateo gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequioa Hospital in Redwood City Aug. 14,
2014.
Kyle and Katie Woodfil l of Foster
City gave birth to a baby boy at Sequioa
Hospital in Redwood City Aug. 14, 2014.
Zhongke Ma and Qinfei Yu of San
Jose gave birth to a baby girl at Sequioa
Hospital in Redwood City Aug. 16, 2014.
Jeffrey and Jessi ca Ci sl i ni of Half
Moon Bay gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequioa Hospital in Redwood City Aug. 16,
2014.
Dane and Al i sha Jensen of Belmont
gave birth to a baby girl at Sequioa Hospital
in Redwood City Aug. 19, 2014.
Aldo and Liza Quintero of Hayward
gave birth to a baby girl at Sequioa Hospital
in Redwood City Aug. 19, 2014.
Christopher and Chelsea Bray of
Woodside gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequioa Hospital in Redwood City Aug. 19,
2014.
Antony and Amy Sargent of
Sunnyvale gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequioa Hospital in Redwood City Aug. 20,
2014.
Ke Yang and Wenj i e Song of Foster
City gave birth to a baby girl at Sequioa
Hospital in Redwood City Aug. 22, 2014.
Eduardo Ruiz and Noemmy Barro n of
Atherton gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequioa Hospital in Redwood City Aug. 22,
2014.
Joseph and Renee Turi el l o of
Redwood City gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequioa Hospital in Redwood City Aug. 23,
2014.
John and Heather Haehl of Redwood
City gave birth to a baby boy at Sequioa
Hospital in Redwood City Aug. 23, 2014.
Jenni fer Tsang and Andrea
Weidemann of San Jose gave birth to a
baby boy at Sequioa Hospital in Redwood
City Aug. 23, 2014.
Maroo Lieuw and Nan Yu of Mountain
View gave birth to a baby boy at Sequioa
Hospital in Redwood City Aug. 24, 2014.
Jason and Amanda Hauns of Fremont
gave birth to a baby boy at Sequioa
Hospital in Redwood City Aug. 24, 2014.
Joshua Bruckner and Cornel i a
Tayl or of San Mateo gave birth to a baby
boy at Sequioa Hospital in Redwood City
Aug. 25, 2014.
Ian and Lena Gunderman of Belmont
gave birth to a baby girl and baby boy at
Sequioa Hospital in Redwood City Aug. 25,
2014.
Congratulations to Frank and Evelyn George who celebrated their 71st wedding anniversary
on Aug. 15.They were married in 1943.
16
Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
MONDAY, SEPT. 1
Third Annual Burlingame Spirit
Run. 6:45 a.m. to 11 a.m. Burlingame
Intermediate School, 1715 Quesada
Way, Burlingame. Proceeds go to
Burlingame Community for
Education Foundation. Fees are $30
for ages 14 and over through Aug.
26, $20 for children ages 5-13, and
free for children 4 and under.
Registration starts at 6:45. To regis-
ter, go to
http://www.active.com/burlingame-
ca/ r unni ng/ r aces/ 3r d- annual -
burlingame-spirit-run-2014. For
more information email burlingame-
spiritrun@gmail.com or visit
www.bcefoundation.org.
Labor Day Pancake Breakfast. 8:30
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. 229 W. 20th Ave.,
San Mateo. Live music, pancakes,
eggs, bacon, juice and coffee. Adults
$8; children ages 7 to 12 $3; children
ages 6 and under free. For more
information call 345-4886 ext. 24 or
e m a i l
membership@sanmateoelks.org.
Portola Art Gallery presents
Carolyn Jones’ ‘Recent Works.’
10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Portola Art
Gallery, Allied Arts Guild, 75 Arbor
Road, Menlo Park. Oil paintings by
Carolyn Jones of Menlo Park. Runs
through Sept. 30. For more informa-
tion call 321-0220 or go to www.por-
tolaartgallery.com.
Joanie Leeds and the Nightlights.
11:30 a.m. PJCC, 800 Foster City Blvd.
Foster City. Pack a picnic, spread a
blanket and dance to the sounds of
New York’s hottest kindi-rock artist.
Doors open at 11 a.m. $7, children
under two free. For reservations call
378-2703.
Half Moon Bay Shakespeare
Company presents ‘A Midsummer
Night’s Dream.’ 6 p.m. John L. Carter
Memorial Park, Half Moon Bay.
Tickets are $20 for adults, $15 for
seniors and students, and free for
children under 12. For more informa-
tion and to purchase tickets go to
www.hmbshakespeare.org.
Dance Connection with Live Music
by Nob Hill Sounds. Free dance les-
sons 6:30 p.m.-7 p.m. with open
dance from 7 p.m.-9:30 p.m.
Burlingame Woman’s Club, 241 Park
Road, Burlingame. $9 members, $11
guests. Bring a new first-time male
friend and earn free entry (limit one
free entry per dancer). Free admis-
sion for male dance hosts. Light
refreshments. Red, white and blue
theme for Labor Day. For more infor-
mation call 342-2221.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 2
Computer Coaching Session every
Tuesday. 10 a.m. to noon. San Carlos
Library, 610 Elm St., San Carlos. For
more information call 591-0341 ext.
237.
Creating Influence on Demand. 6
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. First Presbyterian
Church, Room 204, 1500 Easton
Drive, Burlingame. Bernie Maloney
will demonstrate how to build influ-
ence. There will be refreshments.
Free. For more information call 522-
0701.
See’s Candies: A history and tast-
ing. 6:30 p.m. South San Francisco
Main Public Library, 840 W. Orange
Ave., South San Francisco. For more
information call 829-3860.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 3
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admis-
sion, but lunch is $17. For more infor-
mation call 430-6500 or see
www. sanmateoprofessi onal al -
liance.com.
San Mateo County Mental Health
& Substance Abuse Recovery
Commission. 4 p.m. San Mateo
County Health System, Room 100,
225 W. 37th Ave., San Mateo. For
more information call Robyn Thaw
at 573-3935.
Silverado’s Art for Action. 4 p.m. to
6 p.m. Silverado Memory Care, 1301
Ralston Ave., Belmont. There will be
wine and appetizers, a musical per-
formance, artwork and crafts and
some pieces will be for sale. For
more information call 654-9700.
Weekly ESL Conversation Club. 5
p.m. to 6 p.m. Menlo Park Library, 800
Alma St., Menlo Park. Free. Every
Wednesday. For more information
call 330-2525.
San Mateo’s Taste and Talk Series.
6 p.m. Main Library. September’s talk
is titled: Public Spaces in Complete
Streets.
Low-Cost Vaccination Clinic. 6 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Coyote Point Auditorium,
12 Airport Blvd., San Mateo.
Knitting with Arnie every
Wednesday evening. 6:30 p.m. to 9
p.m. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St.,
San Carlos. For more information call
591-0341 ext. 237
Lifetree Cafe Conversations:
Simply Your Life. 6:30 p.m. Bethany
Luteran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. Complimentary snacks
and beverages will be served. For
more information call 854-5897 or
visit facebook.com/LifetreeCafeMP.
Presentation: The Pros and Cons
of Gray Water and Rainwater. 7
p.m. Burlingame Public Library, 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. Tom
Bressan of the Urban Farmer Store
will explain why these alternative
water systems are growing in popu-
larity and which will work best for
your needs. For more information
contact John Piche at piche@plsin-
fo.org.
San Mateo County Democracy for
America meeting. 7 p.m. Woodside
Road United Methodist Church,
2000 Woodside Road, Redwood City.
An evening with progressive activist
Tom Hayden, who will present
‘Saving Democracy, Preventing War,
and Blocking the Right.’ Free admis-
sion and light refreshments. For
more information email Ashleigh
Evans at asevans2002@aol.com.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 4
Lifetree Cafe Conversations:
Simply Your Life. 9:15 a.m. Bethany
Luteran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. Complimentary snacks
and beverages will be served. For
more information call 854-5897 or
visit facebook.com/LifetreeCafeMP.
Adult Chess every Thursday. 10
a.m. to noon. San Carlos Library, 610
Elm St., San Carlos. For more infor-
mation call 591-0341 ext. 237.
Rotary Club of Half Moon Bay
Lunch. Noon to 1:30 p.m.
Portuguese Center, 724 Kelly St., Half
Moon Bay. Erin Tormey speaks about
Coastside Farmers Market. $25 con-
tribution at the door. For more infor-
mation contact kflint@flintstrate-
gies.com.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
stay open until it relocates Oct. 24.
In place of the retail stores, EBL&S
proposes constructing 599 residential
units, between 25,000 to 30,000
square feet of retail and restaurant
space and between 10,000 to 15,000
square feet of office space, according to
a staff report.
The residences will be comprised of
studio, 1-bedroom, 2-bedroom and 3-
bedroom apartments and townhomes,
according to the report. Per the city’s
requirements, the Station Park Green
will provide up to 90 below-market
rate units.
Parking will be enclosed in an
above-ground structure and hidden with
the residences and offices buildings
wrapping around, according to the
report.
The developer proposes at least 777
parking spaces for residences and 134
non-residential spaces, according to
the report.
The new transit-oriented develop-
ment will also provide about 2.3 acres
of open space and a 1.1-acre park,
according to the report.
“Ideally, anybody is invited to go on
in and use the park and open space on
the project. So we’re looking at how
we think it’ll be attractive to the pub-
lic,” Planning Commissioner Rick
Bonilla said. “So when you look in
from Delaware Street, does it look
inviting and something you want to
go hang out at.”
Bonilla and Drechsler said Tuesday’s
study session primarily revolved
around how residents, commuters and
pedestrians would navigate the site.
Instead of the eight developed
blocks EBL&S proposed in 2011, it
now seeks to construct four larger
buildings, according to the report.
Bonilla and Drechsler said they sug-
gested the developer focus on an archi-
tectural design that would break up the
large mass of the buildings to encour-
age non-residents to traverse through
the site.
“The aesthetic impacts of the build-
ing, so they’re not floor to ceiling flat
and very monoplane in their appear-
ance. So we’re looking for things like
… more dimensions, different materi-
als, certainly a color variety helps the
aesthetics of the building to feel like
it’s not so monolithic. And I think the
developer was agreeable to that,”
Drechsler said.
Alan Talansky, senior vice president
of development for EBL&S, did not
return a call for comment.
Bonilla said Station Park Green
would help boost growth at the neigh-
boring Caltrain station by encourag-
ing residents and those who live or
work in the surrounding area to use
public transit.
“Up until now, the Hayward Park sta-
tion has been kind of a sleepy backwa-
ter for Caltrain and at one point they
even wanted to close it. But we fought
to keep it open because we were build-
ing transit-oriented developments all
around it,” Bonilla said.
Station Park Green aims to be eco-
friendly with an integrated storm water
management system, bike paths,
drought tolerant landscaping and
achieve gold level per the California
Green Building Standards Code,
according to the report.
Bonilla and Drechsler said although
EBL&S has discussed using sustain-
ability features, they would like to see
it go a step further by installing solar
panels, electric vehicle charging sta-
tions and perhaps renewable energy
technology that recovers heat from
wastewater.
The plans for the new site have been
in the works for years, and now that
the developer is pushing ahead,
Drechsler said the commission will
strive to make it a true pedestrian
friendly and sustainable transit-orient-
ed development.
“It has a very large impact on the
surrounding areas and to make sure it’s
thoughtfully timed and laid out is
important,” Drechsler said. “I think
it’s really important that we take these
steps slowly and the planning depart-
ment is making sure we’re following
the same steps as they did with Bay
Meadows.”
The Planning Commission will con-
tinue to hold study sessions on the
Station Park Green development. For
more information visit the What’s
happening in Development? page at
www.cityofsanmateo.org.
Continued from page 1
STATION
in immediate risk of becoming so.
The pilot is expected to launch
around November, HSA spokeswoman
Effie Verducci said.
Part of the focus will be developing
marketing material and reaching out to
landlords to encourage them to partici-
pate. Some funds will also be available
to give the landlords financial incen-
tives like guarantees to pay for dam-
ages beyond those covered under the
security deposit if necessary, she said.
Similar housing locators have been
used elsewhere in the country where
rents are high and the market vacancy
rate is low, she said.
“In the county’s pricey rental mar-
ket, and with vacancy rates below 4
percent, our homeless face multiple
challenges in obtaining housing,
beyond simply the financial ability to
pay rent,” Verducci wrote in an email to
the Daily Journal.
Locally, participants will be referred
to the locator by community partners,
emergency housing shelters and hous-
ing programs serving the extremely
low-income population.
In announcing the grants, CSC
Director Linné Stout said the funds
provide a financial infusion directly
into the awarded communities for the
needy in its own backyard.
“With these grants, local providers
receive the funds needed to work quick-
ly to address the local needs of low-
income Californians,” Stout said.
San Mateo County counted 2,281
homeless individuals in 1,835, accord-
ing to the 2013 survey.
The survey, conducted every two
years, noted that of those, 1,646 were
adults, 180 were a mix of adults and
children and nine were only minors.
Continued from page 1
HOMES
date dairy to support the mansion.
Mills drained the marshes to the east of
his dairy using Chinese labor. Chinese
labor built the dam also.
In 1872, Custodo Silva (of San
Bruno) bought a strip of land through
Millbrae know as the “Silva Tract”
which now includes the City Hall
complex.
On Jan. 12, 1880, Johann Frederick
Ludemann bought 72.62 acres for
farming from Maria C.S. Sanchez for
$5,000. The golf course now owns the
property. Ludeman Lane is named for
Mr. Ludemann.
In 1889, the Millbrae Tract was
opened by silver millionaire William
Dunphy.
Continued from page 3
HISTORY
COMICS/GAMES
9-1-14
WEEKEND’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Multiply
5 Tentacle
8 Pale gray
11 Mystique
12 Campus sports org.
14 1101, in old Rome
15 Not chic
17 Corn unit
18 Rich cake
19 Fixed
21 West Coast sch.
23 Auction site
24 — kebab
27 Narrow path
29 Puffin’s kin
30 Delays (2 wds.)
34 Type of pickles
37 Hurrah!
38 Nutritious grains
39 Archipelago dot
41 Rapunzel’s pride
43 Eight, in combos
45 Worked the land
47 Brooks
50 Kind of jump
51 Wrong
54 Potpie veggie
55 Earth orbiter
56 CEO et al.
57 AARP members
58 Edgar Allan —
59 Yep opposite
DOWN
1 Moo goo — pan
2 Least of the litter
3 Black-and-white snack
4 Tusked animal
5 Show backer
6 TV maker
7 — best friend
8 One-celled creature
9 Rough like a snake
10 Charter
13 Go to
16 Write on metal
20 Fortas and Saperstein
22 Maria Conchita —
24 Droop
25 Absent-minded murmur
26 “I Like —”
28 Pacino and Hirt
30 Sellout
31 Popeye’s Olive —
32 Charge
33 Bacon feature
35 Make muddy
36 — Abdul-Jabbar
39 Rake — — (get rich)
40 Long-faced
41 Traveler on foot
42 Jane Doe, perhaps
44 Hag
45 Recipe amts.
46 Let fall
48 Company emblem
49 Kind of pump
52 Aussie marsupial
53 Sault — Marie
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
HOLY MOLE®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2014
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Honesty will be
necessary when dealing with loved ones. You may
face opposition, but in the end you will gain trust and
respect. Do your best not to reveal personal secrets.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Take the high road. Look
for the positive side of any situation you face, and you
will find a solution that is workable and cost-efficient.
Keeping the peace will be gratifying.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — No matter how
pleasant and compromising you are, you can’t win over
everyone. Keep your emotions in check, and don’t try
to be someone or something you are not.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Bureaucratic
situations will be troublesome. Take a close look
at financial, legal or contractual papers. Make
changes that ensure you will bypass authoritative
scrutiny of any kind.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Do what you can
to help a charitable organization. Offering your time,
knowledge or services to a cause you believe in will
boost your confidence and bring you satisfaction.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Negative
repercussions will arise if you express your opinions.
Let others air their views first. You’ll have a greater
impact once you know what you are up against.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — A workplace
involvement will not bode well for your reputation.
Remain professional at all times or choose to apply
for positions that will not be compromised by the
relationship in question.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Take better care of
your health and financial affairs. A hectic lifestyle can
damage your chance to get ahead. Overindulgence or
overspending will only compound matters.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — You can reduce
tension if you do things on your own. A colleague or
partner will be overly sensitive, so give him or her
enough room to cool down.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — You can accomplish
much if you share your creative ideas. Let your
peers know how serious you are about marketing
your plans in order to receive lots of input, along
with physical support.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Involve people from
all generations in your plans. Young and old alike
have a lot to offer, giving you greater insight into
your cultural background and family history.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — You’ll find it hard to
juggle everything you want to accomplish. Avoid
long or involved discussions that will distract you
from your responsibilities.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 17
THE DAILY JOURNAL
18
Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
BUS DRIVER JOBS
AVAILABLE TODAY
AT MV TRANSPORTATION
Join us in providing safe, reliable and professional community
transportation in San Mateo County.
Positions available in Redwood City,
San Carlos,
and South San Francisco.
Please call (650) 482-9359
CDL Drivers needed immediately for Passenger Vehicle and
Small Bus routes.
Paid classroom and behind-the-wheel training from exception-
al instructors and trainers. The future is bright for Bus Drivers
with an expected 12.5% growth in positions over the next ten
years!
MV Transportation, Inc. provides equal employment and affir-
mative action opportunities to minorities, females, veterans,
and disabled individuals, as well as other protected groups.
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS WANTED -- Home Care
for Elderly - Hourly or Live-in, Day or
Night Shifts, Top Pay, Immediate Place-
ment. Required: Two years paid experi-
ence with elderly or current CNA certifi-
cation; Pass background, drug and other
tests; Drive Car; Speak and write English
Email resume to: jobs@starlightcaregiv-
ers.com Call: (650) 600-8108
Website: www.starlightcaregivers.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
Limo Driver and Taxi Driver, Wanted,
full time, paid weekly, between $500 and
$700, (650)921-2071
110 Employment
NOW HIRING
Certified Nursing Assistants
(Must have Certificate)
$12 per hour
AM-PM Shifts available
Please apply in person
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
DOJ/FBI Clearance required
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
19 Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261928
The following person is doing business
as: Clean Coin Laundry, 498 San Mateo
Ave, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Tan-
foran Laundrymat Inc., CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Christina Lee/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/14/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/18/14, 08/25/14, 09/01/14, 09/08/14).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - silver locket on May 6, Crest-
view and Club Dr. Call to describe:
(650)598-0823
FOUND: KEYS (3) on ring with 49'ers
belt clip. One is car key to a Honda.
Found in Home Depot parking lot in San
Carlos on Sunday 2/23/14.
Call 650 490-0921 - Leave message if no
answer.
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Center, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
50 SHADES of Grey Trilogy, Excellent
Condition $25. (650)615-0256
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOKS, PAPERBACK/HARD cover,
Coonts, Higgins, Thor, Follet, Brown,
more $20.00 for 60 books,
(650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
TIME LIFE Nature Books, great condition
19 different books. $5.00 each OBO
(650)580-4763
295 Art
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Sign-
ed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest
Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169
296 Appliances
CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763
PONDEROSA WOOD STOVE, like
new, used one load for only 14 hours.
$1,200. Call (650)333-4400
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
ROCKET GRILL Brand new indoor grill.
Cooks fast with no mess. $70 OBO.
(650)580-4763
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SANYO REFRIGERATOR with size 33”
high & 20" wide in very good condition
$85. 650-756-9516.
SEARS KENMORE sewing machine in a
good cabinet style, running smoothly
$99. 650-756-9516.
WHIRLPOOL DEHUMIDIFIER. Almost
new. located coastside. $75 650-867-
6042.
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
298 Collectibles
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
300 Toys
K'NEX BUILDING ideas $30.
(650)622-6695
LEGO DUPLO Set ages 1 to 5. $30
(650)622-6695
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$49 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
SMALL WOOD dollhouse 4 furnished
rooms. $35. (650)558-8142
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
CASH REGISTER approximate 1930
Solid Oak Document Container with 59"
height; 33"width; 17" deep with compart-
ments. Best Offer.(650)348-3300
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $700. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BLUE NINTENDO DS Lite. Hardly used.
$70 OBO. (760) 996-0767
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
COMBO COLOR T.V. 24in. Toshiba with
DVD VHS Flat Screen Remote. $55. Cell
number: (650)580-6324
COMBO COLOR T.V. Panasonic with
VHS and Radio - Color: White - 2001
$25. Cell number: (650)580-6324
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
303 Electronics
JVC - DVD Player and video cassette re-
corder. NEW. $80. (650)345-5502
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
OLD STYLE 32 inch Samsung TV. Free
with pickup. Call 650-871-5078.
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
VINTAGE ZENITH stereo console record
player works good cond $50 (650) 756-
9516 Daly City.
WESTINGHOUSE 32” Flatscreen TV,
model#SK32H240S, with HDMI plug in
and remote, excellent condition. Two
available, $175 each. (650)400-4174
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
3 PIECE cocktail table with 2 end tables,
glass tops. good condition, $99.
(650)574-4021l
BATHTUB SEAT, electric. Bathmaster
2000. Enables in and out of bath safe-
ly.$99 650-375-1414
BURGUNDY VELVET reupholstered vin-
tage chair. $75. Excellent condition.
650-861-0088
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549
COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for key-
board, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER (5 drawers) 43" H x 36" W
$40. (650)756-9516 DC.
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER with
shelves for books, pure oak. Purchased
for $750. Sell for $99. (650)348-5169
FREE SOFA and love seat set. good
condtion (650)630-2329
GRACO 40" x28"x28" kid pack 'n play
exc $40 (650) 756-9516 Daly City
HIGH END childrens bedroom set,
white, solid, well built, in great/near
perfect condition. Comes with mat-
tress (twin size) in great condition. In-
cludes bed frame, two dressers, night
stands, book case, desk with addition-
al 3 drawers for storage. Perfect for
one child. Sheets available if wanted.
$550. (415)730-1453.
304 Furniture
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LIVING & Dining Room Sets. Mission
Style, Trestle Table w/ 2 leafs & 6
Chairs, Like new $600 obo
(831)768-1680
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OCCASIONAL, END or Sofa Table. $25.
Solid wood in excellent condition. 20" x
22". (650)861-0088.
OTTOMANS, LIGHT blue, dark blue,
Storage, Versatile, Removable cover,
$25. for both OBO. (650)580-4763
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PIANO AND various furniture pieces,
golf bag. $100-$300 Please call for info
(650)740-0687
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condi-
tion with pads, $85.OBO 650 369 9762
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR, decorative wood /
armrest, it swivels rocks & rolls
$99.00.650-592-2648
ROCKING CHAIR, decorative wood /
armrest, it swivels rocks & rolls
$99.00.650-592-2648
SOFA - excelleNT condition. 8 ft neutral
color $99 OBO (650)345-5644
SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33” x 78”
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STURDY OAK TV or End Table. $35.
Very good condition. 30" x 24".
(650)861-0088
TABLE OCTAGONAL SHAPE 17" high
18" width, made by Baker $75 (650)593-
8880
TEA/ UTILITY Cart, $15. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057
304 Furniture
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for ster-
eo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS (2) stainless steel,
temperature resistent handles, 21/2 & 4
gal. $5. SOLD!
COOLER/WARMER, UNOPENED, Wor-
thy Mini Fridge/warmer, portable, handle,
plug, white $30.00 (650) 578 9208
ELECTRIC FAN Wind Machine 20in.
Portable Round Plastic Adjustable $35
Cell Number (650)580-6324
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
SINGER ELECTRONIC sewing machine
model #9022. Cord, foot controller
included. $99 O.B.O. (650)274-9601 or
(650)468-6884
SNOW WHITE Cookie Cutters Williams-
Sanoma, new, $9, 650-595-3933
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUUM EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
307 Jewelry & Clothing
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
308 Tools
AIR COMPRESSOR, 60 gallon, 2-stage
DeVilbiss. Very heavy. **SOLD**
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SKILL saw "craftman"7/1/4"
heavy duty never used in box $45.
(650)992-4544
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench 20-150 lbs,
new/warranty case $29 650-595-3933
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6" bench grinder $40.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
20
Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Junk email
5 “A Streetcar __
Desire”
10 Talks and talks
and talks
14 Strauss of denim
15 Double-reed
instruments
16 Author __
Stanley Gardner
17 Fateful date for
Caesar
18 Unlucky thing to
draw
20 Poverty-stricken
22 Share and
share __
23 Banned apple
spray
24 Solved, as a
cryptogram
26 Tabletop game
requiring steady
hands
30 Witch trials town
31 Like a prof.
emeritus
32 Narrate
36 Supermarket
chain initials
37 McCain’s title
41 Pizzeria order
42 Male offspring
44 Univ. proctors,
often
45 Seat of New
York’s Oneida
County
47 Go on strike, in
slang
51 Vehement
speeches
54 Have in mind
55 “I’ll do whatever
you need”
56 “Language” that
gave us
“amscray”
60 Menace who
destroyed
houses made of
the ends of 18-,
26- and 47-
Across
63 Common quitting
time
64 List-shortening
abbr.
65 “... had a
farm, __”
66 Bullpen stats
67 Really annoy
68 Rose essence
69 Hankerings
DOWN
1 Got one’s
uniform dirty, as
a base runner
2 Feet pampering,
briefly
3 State confidently
4 Error
5 “Never gonna
happen”
6 Finds repugnant
7 Tie up in the
harbor
8 At any time, to
Frost
9 Summer hrs.
10 “Amscray!”
11 Extra Dry
deodorant
12 Eubie of jazz
13 Embroidered,
e.g.
19 Potato bag
21 Future prunes,
perhaps
24 Weight loss plan
25 Opposite of
endo-
26 Trident-shaped
Greek letters
27 “Othello” villain
28 Scottish family
29 Garbage
33 Larger-than-life
34 Kiss from a dog
35 Grazing grounds
38 Suffix with major
or Smurf
39 D.C. baseball
team
40 Beyond the
burbs
43 Shuffling gait
46 “30 Rock”
creator
48 Brainstorm
49 Wife of 27-Down
50 Request
earnestly, as
mercy
51 Potato or yam
52 “Lord, __?”:
Matthew
53 Fit for a king
56 Couplet creator
57 Michelin
product
58 Tennis great
Lendl
59 Mythical
monster’s loch
61 Org. with narcs
62 Oscar Wilde’s
forte
By Amy Johnson
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
09/01/14
09/01/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
308 Tools
CRAFTSMAN POCKET Socket screw-
drivers wrench tape new, $25 650-595-
3933
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
HUSKY POWER inverter 750wtts.adap-
tor/cables unused AC/DC.$50.
(650)992-4544
HYDRAULIC floor botle jack 10" H.
plus.Ford like new. $25.00 botlh
(650)992-4544
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MICROMETER MEASUREMENT
brake/drum tool new in box
$25.(650)992-4544
WHEELBARROW. BRAND new, never
used. Wood handles. $50 or best offer.
(650) 595-4617
310 Misc. For Sale
50” FRESNEL lens $99 (650)591-8062
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55.
(650)269-3712
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER selectric II
good condition, needs ribbon (type
needed attached) $35 SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
CLASSIC COUNTRY MUSIC" Smithso-
nian Collection of Recordings, 4 audio-
tapes, annotation booklet. $20.
(650)574-3229
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
FOLK SONG anthology: Smithsonian
Collection of Recordings, 4 audiotapes +
annotation booklet. $20 (650)574-3229
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840 leave a clear Message
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15., SOLD!
leave a clear Message
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10"x10",
cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
310 Misc. For Sale
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Ma-
chine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, den-
tures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208
311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, ex-
cellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, ex-
cellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296
311 Musical Instruments
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
PA SYSTEM, Yamaha 8 channel hd,
Traynor spkrs.$95/OBO - 650-345-7352
ROLAND GW-7 Workstation/Keyboard,
with expression pedal, sustain pedal, and
owner’s manual. $500. (415)706-6216
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337
312 Pets & Animals
AQUARIUM,” MARINA Cool 10”, 2.65
gallons, new pump. $20. (650)591-1500
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
DELUX"GLASS LIZARD cage unused ,
rock open/close window Decoration
21"Wx12"Hx8"D,$20.(650)992-4544
GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300
(650)245-4084
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large, Excellent
Condition, $275 (650)245-4084
315 Wanted to Buy
WE BUY
Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
ALPINESTAR JEANS - Tags Attached.
Twin Stitched. Knee Protection. Never
Used! Blue/Grey Sz34 $65.
(650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
DAINESE BOOTS - Zipper/Velcro Clo-
sure. Cushioned Ankle. Reflective Strip.
Excellent Condition! Unisex EU40 $65.
(650)357-7484
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
NEW MAN'S Wristwatch sweep second
hand, +3 dials, $29 650-595-3933
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
316 Clothes
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
317 Building Materials
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
FLOORING - Carolina Pine, 1x3 T and
G, approximately 400+ sq. ft. $650. CAll
(415)516-4964
STEPPING STONES (17) pebbled ce-
ment, 12’ round good condtion $20 San
Bruno (650)588-1946
318 Sports Equipment
2008 EZ GO Golf Cart, red, electric, new
Trojan batteries, new battery charger,
lights, windshield. Excellent condition.
$3,900 obo. Call (650)712-1291 or
(707)888-6025. Half Moon Bay.
3 WHEEL golf cart by Bagboy. Used
twice, New $160 great price $65
(650)200-8935
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.
(650)637-0930
G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond.
$20.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.
G.I. AMMO can, small, good cond.,
$15.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.
GERMAN ARMY Helmet WW2, 4 motor-
bike DOT $59 650-595-3933
IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiber-
glass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
NORDIC TRACK Pro, $95. Call
(650)333-4400
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
SOCCER BALL, unopened, unused,
Yellow, pear shaped, unique. $5.
(650)578 9208
TWO SPOTTING Scopes, Simmons and
Baraska, $80 for both (650)579-0933
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WEIGHT LIFTER'S bench and barbell
weights, located coastside, $75, 650-
867-6042
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $79
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER WITH basket $30. Invacare
Excellent condition (650)622-6695
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WHEEL CHAIR, heavy duty, wide, excel-
lent condition. $99.(650)704-7025
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
21 Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THIS AD.
So are your customers.
And future customers.
And former customers.
We understand how cool and sexy those Google
keywords and Facebook ads and Groupon deals are
However...
Neglecting the selling power of newspaper
advertising is leaving a huge hole in your
marketing efforts.
The Daily Journal has a cost effective, extremely
focused method of bringing you customers you cannot
reach via other channels.
If we received a dollar for every time someone said
“Print is dead,” well, we could afford to print this
newspaper in gold leaf.
So we understand, how unsexy and boring the
consistency of newspapers may seem.
If you feel a steady stream of business and your cash
register ringing is boring, then don’t call us for a free
assessment of how the Daily Journal can help your
business succeed.
650-344-5200
YOU’RE READING
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.- $59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
2012 LEXUS ISF - V-8, 420hp, 22k
miles, New Tires, Loaded! sliver exterior
red & black interior, Pristine $45,000
(650)245-6841
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $42!
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
DODGE ‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$2,800 OBO (650)481-5296
620 Automobiles
HONDA ‘96 LX SD all power, complete,
runs. $3500 OBO, (650)481-5296 - Joe
Fusilier
LEXUS ‘97 SC400, green. 165K miles,
good condition, $6,000. (650)207-6927
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
FORD E150 Cargo VAN, 2007, 56k
miles, almost perfect! $12,000 (650)591-
8062
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
1973 FXE Harley Shovel Head 1400cc
stroked & balanced motor. Runs perfect.
Low milage, $6,600 Call (650)369-8013
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘04 Heritage Soft
Tail ONLY 5,400 miles. $11,000. Call
(650)342-6342.
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS sales,
with mounting hardware $35.
(650)670-2888
650 RVs
COLEMAN LARAMIE pop-up camper,
Excellent Condition, $2750. Call
(415)515-6072
670 Auto Service
YAO'S AUTO SERVICES
(650)598-2801
Oil Change Special $24.99
most cars
San Carlos Smog Check
(650)593-8200
Cash special $26.75 plus cert.
96 & newer
1098 El Camino Real San Carlos
670 Auto Parts
AUTO REFRIGERATION gauges. R12
and R132 new, professional quality $50.
(650)591-6283
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
SNOW CHAIN cables made by Shur
Grip - brand new-never used. In the
original case. $25 650-654-9252.
SNOW CHAINS metal cambell brand
never used 2 sets multi sizes $20 each
obo (650)591-6842
USED BIG O 4 tires, All Terrain
245/70R16, $180 (650)579-0933
680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
FOR YOUR CABINET NEEDS
" TRUST EXPERIENCE"
FOCAL POINT KITCHENS & BATH
Modular & Custom cabinets
Over 30 Years in Business !
1222 So. El Camino Real
San Mateo
(650)345-0355
www.focalpointkitchens.com
Cleaning
Concrete
ASP CONCRETE
LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435 • (650)834-4495
by Greenstarr
Rambo
Concrete
Works
• Walkways
• Driveways
• Patios
• Colored
• Aggregate
• Block Walls
• Retaining walls
• Stamped Concrete
• Ornamental concrete
• Swimming pool removal
Tom 650.834.2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Construction
REMODELING
Chad Heeley
(650)892-8300
David Blum
(650)207-3559
Lic#676437
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont/Castro Valley, CA
(650) 318-3993
Construction
MOE
CONSTRUCTION
Remodels- Kitchen,
Bath, New Addtions
Foundation - Driveway,
Concrete, Paver Stones
Retaining Wall - Hawai-
ian Rock Walls, Blocks,
Brick Walls
Licensed and Insured
Free Estimates
(415)215-8899
LEMUS CONSTRUCTION
(650)271-3955
Dry Rot • Decks • Fences
• Handyman • Painting
• Bath Remodels & much more
Based in N. Peninsula
Free Estimates ... Lic# 913461
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
• New Construction,
• Remodeling,
• Kitchen/Bathrooms,
• Decks/ Fences
(650)589-0372
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
VICTOR FENCES
and House Painting
• Interior • Exterior
Power Washing
•Driveways •Sidewalks •Gutters
FREE ESTIMATES
(650)583-1270
or (650) 296-8089
Lic #106767
Draperies
MARLA’S DRAPERIES
& ALTERATIONS
Custom made drapes & pillows
Alterations for men & women
Free Estimates
(650)703-6112
(650)389-6290
2140A S. El Camino, SM
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
INSIDE OUT
ELECTRIC INC
Service Upgrades
Remodels / Repairs
The tradesman you will
trust and recommend
Lic# 808182
(650)515-1123
Gardening
KEEP YOUR LAWN
LOOKING GREEN
Time to Aerate your lawn
We also do seed/sod of lawns
Spring planting
Sprinklers and irrigation
Pressure washing
Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831 Lic #751832
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Housecleaning
CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING & WINDOWS
Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business
Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit
(650)278-0157
Lic#1211534
22
Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
by Greenstarr
Yard Boss
º 0omp|ete |andscape
construct|on and remova|
º Fu|| tree care |nc|ud|ng
hazard eva|uat|on,
tr|mm|ng, shap|ng,
remova| and stump
gr|nd|ng
º 8eta|n|ng wa||s
º 0rnamenta| concrete
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
Tom 650. 834. 2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
by Greenstarr
&
Chris’s Hauling
• Yard clean up - attic,
basement
• Junk metal removal
including cars, trucks and
motorcycles
• Demolition
• Concrete removal
• Excavation
• Swimming pool removal
Tom 650. 834. 2365
Chri s 415. 999. 1223
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Gutter & Roof Inspections
Friendly Service
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
CALL TODAY
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Since 1985
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES
• Fences • Decks
• Concrete Work • Arbors
We can do any job big or small
Free Estimates
(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968
contrerashandy12@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
FRANK’S HAULING
Junk and Debris
Furniture, bushes,
concrete and more
FREE ESTIMATES
(650)361-8773
Landscaping
Moving
BAY AREA
RELOCATION SERVICES
Specializing In:
Homes, Apts, Storages
Professional, Friendly, Careful
Peninsula Personal mover
(650)248-6343
Fully Lic & Bonded Cal-T190632
Painting
CORDERO PAINTING
Commercial & Residential
Exterior & Interior
Free Estimates
(650)372-8361
Lic # 35740 Insured
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Painting
Plumbing
MEYER PLUMBING SUPPLY
Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960
Roofing
NATE LANDSCAPING
• Tree Service • Pruning &
Removal • Fence Deck • Paint
• New Lawn • All concrete
• Ret. Wall • Pavers
• Yard clean-up & Haul
Free Estimate
(650)353-6554
Lic. #973081
Screens
DON’T SHARE
YOUR HOUSE
WITH BUGS!
We repair and install all types of
Window & Door Screens
Free Estimates
(650)299-9107
PENINSULA SCREEN SHOP
Mention this ad for 20% OFF!
MARTIN SCREEN SHOP
Quality Screens
Old Fashion Workmanship
New & Repair
Pick up, delivery & installation
(650)591-7010
301 Old County Rd. San Carlos
since 1957
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
Windows
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
23 Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Accounting
ALAN CECCHI EA
Tax Preparation
& Representation
Bookkkeeping - Accounting
Phone 650-245-7645
alancecchi@yahoo .com
Attorneys
INJURY
LAWYER
LOWER FEES
San Mateo Since 1976
650-366-5800
www.BlackmanLegal.com
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Cemetery
LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
49ers, Giants & Warriors,
low prices, large selection.
450 W. San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
(650)771-6564
Dental Services
ALBORZI, DDS, MDS, INC.
$500 OFF INVISALIGN TREATMENT
a clear alternative to braces even for
patients who have
been told that they were not invisalign
candidates
235 N SAN MATEO DR #300,
SAN MATEO
(650)342-4171
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
RUSSO DENTAL CARE
Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno
(650)583-2273
www.russodentalcare.com
Food
ALOFT SFO
invites you to mix & mingle at
replay on
Friday, August 15th
from 7pm till midnight!
Live DJs and specialty cocktails at W
XYZ bar to start your weekend!
401 East Millbrae Ave. Millbrae
(650)443-5500
Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities
(650) 295-6123
1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GRILL & VINE
Try Grill & Vine’s new Summer
menu and get half-off
your second entrée of equal or
lesser value when mentioning
this ad! Valid on Friday and Sat-
urday through September!
1 Old Bayshore, Millbrae
(650)872-8141
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
SCANDIA
RESTAURANT & BAR
Lunch• Dinner• Wknd Breakfast
OPEN EVERYDAY
Scandinavian &
American Classics
742 Polhemus Rd. San Mateo
HI 92 De Anza Blvd. Exit
(650)372-0888
SEAFOOD FOR SALE
FRESH OFF THE BOAT
(650) 726-5727
Pillar Point Harbor:
1 Johnson Pier
Half Moon Bay
Oyster Point Marina
95 Harbor Master Rd..
South San Francisco
Financial
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay
Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
CALIFORNIA
STOOLS*BAR*DINETTES
(650)591-3900
Tons of Furniture to match
your lifestyle
Peninsula Showroom:
930 El Camino Real, San Carlos
Ask us about our
FREE DELIVERY
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
Jewelers
LOST RING?
Professional
Metal Detecting
In sand, grass or water
Serving Peninsula & Bay Area.
Contact Marshall
at (800) 214-8534 or
marshall.smith@theringfinders.com
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ACUHEALTH
Best Asian Healing Massage
$29/hr
with this ad
Free Parking
(650)692-1989
1838 El Camino #103, Burlingame
sites.google.com/site/acuhealthSFbay
ASIAN MASSAGE
$55 per Hour
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $19.99
Body Massage $44.99/hr
10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame
(650)389-2468
Massage Therapy
HEALING MASSAGE
• Newly remodeled
• New Masseuses every two
weeks
$50/Hr. Special
2305-A Carlos St.,
Moss Beach
(Cash Only)
OSETRA WELLNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY
Prenatal, Reiki, Energy
$20 OFF your First Treatment
(not valid with other promotions)
(650)212-2966
1730 S. Amphlett Blvd. #206
San Mateo
osetrawellness.com
Pet Services
CATS, DOGS,
POCKET PETS
Mid-Peninsula Animal Hospital
Free New Client Exam
(650) 325-5671
www.midpen.com
Open Nights & Weekends
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity based direct lender
Homes • Multi-family
Mixed-use • Commercial
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Bureau of Real Estate
Retirement
Independent Living, Assisted Liv-
ing, and Memory Care. full time R.N.
Please call us at (650)742-9150 to
schedule a tour, to pursue your life-
long dream.
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway
Millbrae, Ca 94030
www.greenhillsretirement.com
Schools
HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY
Where every child is a gift from God
K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco
(650)588-6860
ww.hillsidechristian.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
CARE ON CALL
24/7 Care Provider
www.mycareoncall.com
(650)276-0270
1818 Gilbreth Rd., Ste 127
Burlingame
CNA, HHA & Companion Help
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10
24
Monday • Sept. 1, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL

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