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Class profile: Catering for student diversity

Year 6 class of 27 students consisting of:
 15 boys, 12 girls.
 5 students with developmental delay in Literacy and/or Mathematics
 1 child with ADHD.
 1 child identified as gifted (participating in G.A.T.E. Ways program)
 2 children with English as a Second Language, one of whom is a recently arrived
refugee.
 2 Indigenous students – 1 student with hearing impairment.
 1 parent regularly helps in the classroom, and you would like to encourage more
parents/caregivers to become involved.
 1 Literacy/numeracy Support Assistant for two hours three times each week


5 students with developmental delay in Literacy and/or Mathematics

Establishing procedures and routines is one of the best strategies for developmentally delayed
children. Structure and predictability in learning give a sense of stability to kids who already
know or sense that they are different from other children. Forming a ‘buddy system’ by
pairing high achieving students with those displaying developmental delay can also be
beneficial (Hollowell, 2014).



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1 child with ADHD

Regarding children with ADHD an effective intervention is to provide teacher mediated
direct instruction in relevant skills that require remediation. Clairfield and Stoner (as cited in
DuPaul, Weyandt & Janusis, 2011) state that computer assisted instruction in reading leads
to significant improvements in on-task behaviour and academic performance relative to
written seatwork conditions.


1 child identified as gifted (participating in G.A.T.E. Ways program)

A key element in teaching children who are gifted is to differentiate the curriculum. This can
be accomplished by providing opportunities for self-directed or autonomous learning or
permitting the exploration of various topics through verbal linguist, mathematical or visual
imagery (Woolfolk & Margetts, 2010). See also http://www.gateways.edu.au/gifted-and-
talented

2 children with English as a Second Language, one of whom is a recently arrived
refugee.

EAL/D learners receive differentiated instruction of the curriculum for their age cohort.
Department of Education, Training and Employment. (2012).



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2 Indigenous students – 1 student with hearing impairment.
Harrison (2013) states that Indigenous students learn by observation, modelling and imitation
rather than through talking or listening. He further urges that teachers should implement these
scaffolding techniques in order to have a significantly positive impact on their learning
experience. Burrow, Galloway and Weissofner (as cited in Harrison, 2013) suggest that teachers
implement the following strategies for students with hearing loss:
 Summarising and repeating instructions
 Modifying the classroom environment to minimise noise
 Installing classroom amplification systems to improve the listening environment
 Structure class seating that allows for optimal hearing
 Develop a buddy system to provide peer support for students with hearing loss
 Using routines to enable children with hearing loss to predict what will happen
Use visual supports for schedules and routines, have predictable routines. Use a consistent
visual & auditory cue to get attention before speaking .Use hand signals / natural gesture to
reinforce words. Attempt to maintain eye contact with hearing impaired students when
speaking. Keep instructions short and clear. Implement the use of repetition. Children may
need extra time to process information (Queensland Health,2011).

1 parent regularly helps in the classroom, and you would like to encourage more
parents/caregivers to become involved.

Lewis, Kim & Ashby Bey (2011) state that teachers can encourage parents to participate by
establishing a classroom volunteer program. This can be achieved by sending home a survey
to parents to identify their talents, available times and any other useful information. They
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further suggest five main teaching practices and strategies to engage parents. These are: 1.
Practicing parent outreach, 2. Establishing relationships with the parents, 3. Creating a
positive classroom climate, 4. Teaching to involve parents, and 5. Making the community
school connection. Studies have shown that this practice has improved children’s reading
achievement one year later and increased their academic achievement and reduce behavioural
problems four years later (Domina as cited in Lewis, Kim & Ashby Bey, 2011).


1 Literacy/numeracy Support Assistant for two hours three times each week

During this time students will be working in groups. I will form a work group consisting of
the two Indigenous students and the two students whose second language is English. I will
encourage the support assistant to focus most of their attention towards aiding this group with
the set tasks. This strategy is in accordance with the roles of a teacher aid which state:
“Supervision of small groups of students, undertaking specific learning activities designed by
a teacher” (Department of Education, Training and Employment, 2012). McVittie (2005)
notes that due to the raised profile and acceptance of inclusion. it is good practice to deploy
teacher-aids to work with children with special education needs (SEN).

Throughout each lesson I’ll be sure to model and scaffold all verbal instructions as well as
providing them in a visual text format to cater for the learning needs of my students.
Structure seating so that students with hearing impairments, developmental delay are closest
to the front of the class where verbal instructions will be given and with peers who will keep
them focused.