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Running head: HOW NURSES DISPLAY CARING BEHAVIORS 1

How Nurses Display Caring Behaviors


Troy A Davis
Dixie State University


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How Nurses Display Caring Behaviors
Is caring an aspect of nursing that is built into the profession? In a way it is, because as a
nurse we are responsible for taking care of patients, but there is a big difference between
responsibility and truly caring. Just because someone has a nursing title, it does not mean they
truly care. Caring is a compilation of actions, behaviors, beliefs, and perceptions. A caring nurse
positively affects the experiences felt by everyone, patients, their families, and co-workers. They
are honest, interact without prejudice, have compassion for others, listen attentively, comfort,
and have patience.
Caring Situation
When I reflect back on the times when I was the patient, I think of all the great care
received from Intermountain Health Care employees. In 2009, I was diagnosed with Hodgkin
lymphoma; the care I received was unforgettable. While receiving treatment, the nursing staff
made accommodations for my wife and parents. They allowed them come into the infusion area
while I received treatment, I am sure it was harder for them because there were four of us instead
of the usual two that most patients had there for support. The nursing staff showed a lot of
compassion while they were talking with us. I watched as they adapted care going between
patients based solely on their needs. They were active listeners, a great source of information,
and even used touch as they cared for us. For a very stressful situation it was amazing to watch.
Literature Review Caring Behaviors
Caring is an essential part of nursing. It is interesting because it is a core concept that is
unsolidified; it is hard to study yet its part of our day-to-day lives. Dr. Jean Watson created the
Theory of Human Caring; it was created based on her knowledge, values, and practices. She
created 10 caring factors as listed below
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1. Formation of a Humanistic-altruistic system of values
2. Instillation of faith-hope
3. Cultivation of sensitivity to ones self and to others
4. Development of a helping-trusting, human caring relationship
5. Promotion and acceptance of the expression of positive and negative feelings
6. Systematic use of a creative problem-solving caring process
7. Promotion of transpersonal teaching-learning
8. Provision for a supportive, protective, and/or corrective mental, physical, societal, and
spiritual environment
9. Assistance with gratification of human needs
10. Allowance for existential-phenomenological-spiritual forces. (Watson, 1989, pp.
3&4)
The 10 factors of caring have served as a general guideline for nurses to practice and study.
Conclusion
While researching caring behaviors and nursing, I noticed a trend between what I thought
caring was and what research indicated. The information I found coincided with my beliefs. The
biggest difference was in the way she prioritized and worded the 10 carative factors. Watsons
framework has severed as a tool to educate nurses and nursing students; her theory has also been
used in curriculums to reinforce key aspects of nursing. Nurses are patient advocates and should
spend time with their patients developing relationships.



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References
Wade, G.H. & Kasper, N. (2006). Nursing students' perceptions of instructor caring: An
instrument based on Watson's theory of transpersonal caring. Journal of Nursing
Education, 45(5), 162-8. Retrieved from
http://search.proquest.com/docview/203963629?accountid=27045
Watson, J. (1989). Original ten carative factors. Theory of Human Caring. 1-13 Retrieved from
http://watsoncaringscience.org/images/features/library/THEORY%20OF%20HUMAN%
20CARING_Website.pdf