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Maths Planner Term 1 Level 3 and 4

Topic Vocabulary/Resources Not Negotiable


AusVels Links
Level 2 (Grade 2) Level 3 (Grade 3) Level 4 (Grade 4) Level 5 (Grade 5)
Week
1-2
Number
: Place
Value
Odd and
Even
Numbers
Vocabulary:
Ones, tens, hundreds,
thousands, tens of thousands,
hundreds of thousands, tenths,
hundredths, thousandths,
estimating, round up and
down, expanding, contracting,
decimals

Resources:
Nelson 3 unit 1, 2 and 3
and 2 pg. 24-32
Nelson 4 unit 1, 2 and 3
and 2 pg.: 24-32
Signpost Maths 3 Unit 6
24-25
Signpost Maths 4 Unit 5
22-27
Team board interactive
activities.
aaamaths.com.au
mathsisfun.com
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative Learning
Space

Skip counting by even
numbers, skip counting
by odd numbers.
Counting backwards
and forwards from a
given number.
Identify numbers that
end in 2, 4, 6 etc. are
even and numbers in 3,
5, 7 are odd.
Sorting numbers of
increasing sixe into
odd and even columns.
Investigate number
sequences, initially those
increasing and
decreasing by twos,
threes, five and ten from
any starting point, then
moving to other
sequences.

developing fluency
and confidence with
numbers and
calculations by
saying number
sequences
recognising patterns
in number
sequences, such as
adding 10 always
results in the same
final digit

Investigate the
conditions required for
a number to be odd or
even and identify odd
and even numbers

identifying even
numbers using
skip counting by
twos or by
grouping even
collections of
objects in twos
explaining why
all numbers that
end in the digits
0, 2, 4, 6 and 8
are even and that
numbers ending
in 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9
are odd
Investigate and use
the properties of odd
and even numbers
using the four
operations with
pairs of odd or
even numbers or
one odd and one
even number,
then using the
relationships
established to
check the
accuracy of
calculations

Suggested Activities
Identify with the
students the Place
value of number.
Working from one
through to hundreds of
thousands. Students
create a chart in their
books the place value
of numbers.
Using the Place
Value chart,
students make
model using M.A.B.
different (or other
hands on materials
numbers into
hundreds+
In a circle
students are given
a starting number.
They need to
count on by a
given number, eg
5, 7, 9, 11.
Students are
given a series of
number on a
display chart and
Create an anchor
chart of Odd
numbers and
Even Numbers.
Students identify
the that any
number that ends
in 1,3,5,7,9 are
odd and that any
number ending
in 2,4,6,8,0 are
Create and
anchor chart on
rounding
numbers by
looking at the
place value.
Students begin
by rounding
numbers to 10
then 100, 1000
and 10,000.

have to count on
my particular
numbers.

even.
Students are
given a series of
numbers and
need to separate
them into odd
and even
numbers.
Make a list of Words
we have covered so
far. Begin to make a
vocabulary chart of
Maths Terms
Introduce the
CUBES Strategy for
solving
Mathematical
problems. Begin
with Guess and
Check problem
solving strategy
using the CUBES
Process.
Use worded
problems to
guess and check
to find the right
answer.

Topic Vocabulary/Resources Not Negotiable
AusVels Links
Level 2 (Grade 2) Level 3 (Grade 3) Level 4 (Grade 4) Level 5 (Grade 5)
Week 2
and 3
Number
: Place
Value
Place Value Place value of whole
number in appropriate
columns.
Draw and abacus,
place value tables,
place value of digits in
numbers.
Identify larger and
smaller numbers.
Expanded and
contracting numbers
up to 5 digits.
Writing numbers using
digits and words.
Place Value Columns
Value of 0 in the ten,
hundreds and
thousands columns etc.
Use of and when
reading numbers.
Recognise, model,
represent and order
numbers to at least 1000
recognising there
are different ways of
representing
numbers and
identifying patterns
going beyond 100
developing fluency
with writing
numbers in
meaningful contexts

Recognise, model,
represent and order
numbers to at least 10
000
placing four-digit
numbers on a
number line using
an appropriate
scale
reproducing
numbers in words
using their
numerical
representations
and vice versa
Recognise, represent
and order numbers to
at least tens of
thousands
reproducing five-
digit numbers in
words using their
numerical
representations,
and vice versa

Investigate number
sequences involving
multiples of 3, 4, 6, 7,
8, and 9
recognising that
number
sequences can be
extended
indefinitely, and
determining any
patterns in the
sequences

Suggested Activities
Students create number
lines placing on them
numbers in the correct
sequence.
Using a Place value
chart, identify the
value of number in
the number
sentence. 456=
400+50+6
Using a Place
value chart,
identify the value
of number in the
number sentence.
400+50+6=456
Use an abacus to
identify the value
of numbers on an
abacus.
Use a
calculator to
create number
sentences to
change
numbers from
25-20
Have the students
write their birthday eg
4/2/77 would become
4277, then order
themselves from
smallest to largest
Wirte a number on
the board. Have the
students write
anything they can
think of to do with
that number, eg odd,
even, four processes
to make the number.
Students use 4
dice. Roll the dice
and record the
number. Students
then use the
number to write
as expanded
notation, draw on
an abacus and
draw as MAB.
Using CUBES
process. Identify
the looking for a
pattern problem
solving strategy.
Use the game
Bull Cow and
Miss to work
out a given
number.

Topic Vocabulary/Resources Not Negotiable
AusVels Links
Level 2 (Grade 2) Level 3 (Grade 3) Level 4 (Grade 4) Level 5 (Grade 5)
Week 3
and 4
Place Value
and
Rounding
Numbers
Base 10, numbers that
make 10, quick
additions e.g.: 9+5=
14.
Rounding numbers to
the nearest 10, 100,
1000, 100000
Group, partition and
rearrange collections up
to 1000 in hundreds, tens
and ones to facilitate
more efficient counting
using an abacus to
model and represent
numbers
understanding three-
digit numbers as
comprised of
hundreds, tens and
ones/units
demonstrating and
using models such
as linking blocks,
sticks in bundles,
place-value blocks
and Aboriginal bead
strings and
explaining
reasoning

Apply place value to
partition, rearrange
and regroup numbers
to at least 10 000 to
assist calculations and
solve problems
recognising that
10 000 equals 10
thousands, 100
hundreds, 1000
tens and 10 000
ones
justifying choices
about partitioning
and regrouping
numbers in terms
of their usefulness
for particular
calculations
Apply place value to
partition, rearrange
and regroup numbers
to at least tens of
thousands to assist
calculations and solve
problems
recognising and
demonstrating that the
place-value pattern is
built on the operations
of multiplication or
division of tens
Use estimation and
rounding to check
the reasonableness
of answers to
calculations
recognising the
usefulness of
estimation to
check
calculations
applying
mental
strategies to
estimate the
result of
calculations,
such as
estimating the
cost of a
supermarket
trolley load


Suggested Activities
Create and anchor
chart on rounding
numbers by looking at
the place value.
Students begin by
rounding numbers to
10 then 100, 1000 and
10,000.
Introduce the Base
10 addition skills.
Create an anchor
chart to demonstrate
the base 10 process
and number
combinations. In
groups students race
around the group to
practise their recall
of the base 10.
Estimation of
numbers using the
rounding method.
Create and anchor
chart with the
students how we
can use rounding
to aide in
addition. Eg: 22+
12= we can round
22 to 20 and 12 to
10 to answer that
it will be around
30 the answer.
Groups rounded
to a certain
number. Write a
list of numbers
on the board,
have a selection
of them rounding
to the same
number eg: 344,
298 both round
to 300 as the
nearest 100.
Using CUBES
process.
Identify the
Act it out
problem
solving
strategy
Topic Vocabulary/Resources Not Negotiable
AusVels Links
Level 2 (Grade 2) Level 3 (Grade 3) Level 4 (Grade 4) Level 5 (Grade 5)
Week 4
and 5
Making
Graphs and
Data
Collection
Vocabulary:
Collect, represent
information, data, interpret,
pictograph, bar, column, title,
axis, axes, tally, tallying,
sorting, Venn diagram,
questionnaire, least popular,
most popular, predict, survey

Resources:
Nelson 3 Unit 4 pg. 33-
38
Nelson 4 Unit 4 pg. 33-
35
Signpost 3 Unit 27 pg.
137-141
Signpost 4 Unit 28 and
29 pg. 140-147
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative Learning
Space
Create Venn diagrams
to compare
information.
Read and interpret
graphs (pictographs,
column and bar
graphs)
Create Tally Tables
using excel.
Understand the terms;
x and y axis
Label graphs
appropriately.
Conduct surveys

Identify a question of
interest based on one
categorical variable.
Gather data relevant to
the question
determining the
variety of birdlife in
the playground and
using a prepared
table to record
observations

Collect, check and
classify data
recognising the
usefulness of tally
marks
identifying
categories of data
and using them to
sort data

Create displays of data
using lists, table and
picture graphs and
interpret them
creating picture
graphs to represent
data using one-to-
one correspondence
comparing the
usefulness of
different data
displays

Collect data, organise
into categories and
create displays using
lists, tables, picture
graphs and simple
column graphs, with
and without the use of
digital technologies
Refining
questions and
planning
investigations that
involve collecting
data, and carrying
out the
investigation (for
example
narrowing the
focus of a
question such as
which is the
most popular
breakfast cereal?
to which is the
most popular
breakfast cereal
among Level 3
students in our
class?)


Select and trial
methods for data
collection, including
survey questions and
recording sheets
comparing the
effectiveness of
different
methods of
collecting data
choosing the
most effective
way to collect
data for a given
investigation
Construct suitable
data displays, with
and without the use of
digital technologies,
from given or
collected data. Include
tables, column graphs
and picture graphs
where one picture can
represent many data
values
exploring ways
of presenting
data and showing
the results of
investigations
investigating
data displays
using many-to-
one
correspondence

Pose questions and
collect categorical
or numerical data by
observation or
survey
posing
questions about
insect diversity
in the
playground,
collecting data
by taping a
one-metre-
square piece of
paper to the
playground and
observing the
type and
number of
insects on it
over time

Construct displays,
including column
graphs, dot plots
and tables,
appropriate for data
type, with and
without the use of
digital technologies
identifying the
best methods
of presenting
data to
illustrate the
results of
investigations
and justifying
the choice of
representations


Suggested Activities
Create a tally table of
students interests.
Using the same data
create a variety of
graphs
Students se excels
to create and make
tables and graphs.

Students collect
information using
a tally table.
Students use this
information to
create a
pictograph,
horizontal and
Vertical bar or
column graphs

Read and
interpret graphs.
Ask and answer
questions.

Identify with
the kids graph
Keys were a
picture might
equal 2 or three
of the item.
Create Venn diagrams
to compare
information.
Using CUBES process.
Identify the Make a
Drawing or Graph
problem solving strategy

Topic Vocabulary/Resources Not Negotiable
AusVels Links
Level 2 (Grade 2) Level 3 (Grade 3) Level 4 (Grade 4) Level 5 (Grade 5)
Week 5
and 6
Number
Patterns and
Relationship
s
Vocabulary:
Number, pattern, increase,
decrease, add on, count on,
count back, subtract, double,
continue, rule, gap, pattern,
sequence, bridge, balance,
test, predict.

Resources:
Nelson 3 Unit 5 pg. 36-
38
Nelson 4 Unit 5 pg. 36-
38
Signpost 3 Unit 19 and
20 pg. 99-109
Signpost 4 Unit 18 and
19 pg. 100-107
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative Learning
Space
Counting from
numbers of different
sizes.
Creating number
sentences for addition,
subtraction and
multiplication.
Verbalise reasoning for
number patterns.
Identify devise and
extent patterns with
(addition,
multiplication and
subtraction)
Investigate patterns in
a hundreds chart.
Use a rule to generate
a number pattern.
Describe patterns with
numbers and identify
missing elements
describing a pattern
created by skip
counting and
representing the
pattern on a number
line
investigating
features of number
patterns resulting
from adding twos,
fives or 10s

Describe, continue,
and create number
patterns resulting from
performing addition or
subtraction
identifying and
writing the rules
for number
patterns
describing a rule
for a number
pattern, then
creating the
pattern
Explore and describe
number patterns
resulting from
performing
multiplication
identifying
examples of
number patterns
in everyday life
Describe, continue
and create patterns
with fractions,
decimals and whole
numbers resulting
from addition and
subtraction
using the
number line or
diagrams to
create patterns
involving
fractions or
decimals
Suggested Activities
Students revise skip
counting and counting
from a given number.
Have students stand in
a circle and skip count
from a given number.
Use a calculator.
Students type in a
number then add a
number to it,
without clearing the
number, students
press enter
repeatedly and
record the pattern.
Use a number
chart identify
patterns in
counting eg: 12,
22, 32, 42, 52 etc.
Students are
given a number
pattern, eg: 5, 9,
11, 14 (adding 3
each time). They
work out what
the pattern is and
how the pattern
works.
Students can
create their own
patterns to give
to a firend.
Using 100
chart, students
create their
own multi-step
pattern. Eg: +3,
-1,+3, -1 to a
series of
numbers.
Create a Anchor Chart
for BODMAS.
Students are then given
some problem and use
the BODMAS rule to
solve simple equations
Using CUBES
process. Identify
the Make a number
Sentence problem
solving strategy


Topic Vocabulary/Resources Not Negotiable
AusVels Links
Level 2 (Grade 2) Level 3 (Grade 3) Level 4 (Grade 4) Level 5 (Grade 5)
Week 7
and 8
Shapes and
Lines
Vocabulary:
Straight, curved, diagonal,
horizontal, vertical, pentagon,
hexagon, triangles, squares,
rectangles, circles, ovals,
trapeziums, octagons, corners,
sides, geometric, angles,
perpendicular.

Resources:
Nelson 3 Unit 6 pg. 39-
41
Nelson 4 Unit 6 pg. 39-
41
Signpost 3 Unit 1 pg. 1-4
and Unit 4 pg. 18
Signpost 4 Unit 1 pg. 1-7
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative Learning
Space

Recognise simple
lines: oblique,
diagonal, horizontal
etc.)
Identify 2 D shapes
and then create.
Describe lines used in
shapes and in the
environment.
Identify shapes from
given clues.
Create pictures using
specified lines.
Describe and draw
basic angles.
Describe and draw two-
dimensional shapes, with
and without digital
technologies
identifying key
features of squares,
rectangles, triangles,
kites, rhombuses
and circles, such as
straight lines or
curved lines, and
counting the edges
and corners

Describe the features of
three-dimensional objects
identifying
geometric features
such as the number
of faces, corners or
edges
Make models of three-
dimensional objects
and describe key
features
exploring the
creation of three-
dimensional
objects using
origami,
including prisms
and pyramids
Compare and describe
two dimensional
shapes that result
from combining and
splitting common
shapes, with and
without the use of
digital technologies
identifying
common two-
dimensional
shapes that are
part of a
composite shape
by re-creating it
from these
shapes
creating a two-
dimensional
shapes from
verbal or written
instructions

Connect three-
dimensional objects
with their nets and
other two-
dimensional
representations
identifying the
shape and
relative
position of
each face of a
solid to
determine the
net of the solid,
including that
of prisms and
pyramids
representing
two-
dimensional
shapes such as
photographs,
sketches and
images created
by digital
technologies





Number
Suggested Activities
Create an Anchor
Chart of the different
types of lines: oblique,
horizontal, vertical,
parallel, straight,
curved, perpendicular.
Students create a table
with the names of lines
down the side then
identify things in the
room that would fit the
description. Eg
Window would be next
to horizontal and
vertical.
Create an anchor
chart of the different
types of angles.
Identify the values
of the angles: eg
right angle is 90
degrees.
Students create a
angle finder using 2
rectangles and split
pins.
Students draw and
then able items from
around the room. Eg
a table has right
angles that are 90
degrees.
Create and anchor
chart with the
class the different
names of 2
Dimensional
Shapes.
Students then
draw and label
the shapes
identifying the
key features of
the shape e.g.:
square has 2
horizontal and 2
vertical lines with
4 angles of 90
degrees
Students write
their name in
Block writing.
They then label
their name with
the names of the
lines they have
used/alternativel
y they can draw
a picture on the
computer using
shapes, print off
then label the
picture.
Students then use
this chart to label
their
names/pictures
from the
previous lesson
with the angles
they have
created.
Using CUBES
process.
Identify the
Make a table
or graph
problem
solving
strategy
Note that the first 2 weeks/8days of teaching are getting to know you activities (Maths number activities were included in the first 8 days activities).
Week 1 begins in the Third week of the teaching year.
Students were asked to choose a number between 100 and 10,000. Using their knowledge of number they then created a think board using that
number to demonstrate their skills in rounding, a picture, number sentence and in patterns.
Your Number in a number Sentence Your number in a pattern










Use your number in rounding Use your number as a picture









Below Level At Level Above Level
Number Sentence
Rounding
As a picture
In patterns

Angles and Lines
Students were required to create a picture on the computer using 2D shapes. They were then required to print the picture
and label the lines and angles found in their picture.
Below Level At Level Above Level
Create a picture using the computer
then label the lines and angles.



Maths Planner Term 2 Level 3 and 4
Topic Vocabulary/Resources Not Negotiables
AusVels Links
Level 2 (Grade 2) Level 3 (Grade 3) Level 4 (Grade 4)
Level 5 (Grade
5)
Week
1,2,3

Addition
*Level 3
Naplan
Preparation
Vocabulary:
Double, near doubles, count
on, count back, 10 facts, make
up to ten, sum, total, add on,
plus, addition, equation, word
problem, number lines, place
value, increase, repeated
addition, altogether.

Resources:
Nelson 3 Unit 7 pg. 42
Nelson 4 Unit 13 pg. 68
Signpost 3 Unit 11-12
pg. 49-59
Signpost 4 Unit 9 pg. 46-
52
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative Learning
Space
Open Ended Maths
Activities (OEMA)
pg:17
Addition problems
involving 3 and 4 digit
numbers.
Addition for grate 4s
into the tens of
thousands.
Generate worded
problems.
Addition involving
money.
Doubling and near
doubles activities.
Solving worded
problems involving
addition.
Addition using inverse:
3+5= and 5+3=
Wish ball challenge

Solve simple addition
and subtraction problems
using a range of efficient
mental and written
strategies
becoming fluent
with a range of
mental strategies for
addition and
subtraction
problems, such as
commutativity for
addition, building to
10, doubles, 10 facts
and adding 10
modelling and
representing simple
additive situations
using materials such
as 10 frames, 20
frames and empty
number lines
becoming fluent
with partitioning
numbers to
understand the
connection between
addition and
subtraction
using counting on to
identify the missing
element in an
Represent practical
situations to model
addition and sharing
using a range of
practical
strategies for
adding small
groups of
numbers, such as
visual displays or
concrete materials
using Aboriginal
and Torres Strait
Islander methods
of adding,
including spatial
patterns and
reasoning
Apply place value to
partition, rearrange
and regroup numbers
to at least tens of
thousands to assist
calculations and solve
problems

Solve problems
involving purchases
and the calculation of
change to the nearest
five cents with and
without digital
technologies
recognising that
not all countries
use dollars and
cents, eg India
uses rupees.
Carrying out
calculations in
another currency
as well as in
dollars and cents,
and identifying
both as decimal
systems

additive problem

Subtraction
*Level 3
Naplan
Preparation
Vocabulary:
Difference between, count
back, subtraction, count up
from, word problems, minus,
difference.

Resources:
Nelson 3 Unit 8 pg. 45
and Unit 9 pg 48.
Nelson 4 Unit 13 pg. 68-
71
Signpost 3 Unit 13-14
pg. 60-71
Signpost 4 Unit 10 pg.
53-59
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative Learning
Space
Open Ended Maths
Activities (OEMA)
pg:17
Addition and
subtraction problems.
Choosing appropriate
methods (written,
calculator and mental)
Solve money problems
Generate and solve
worded problems.
Communitivity.
Wishball challenge.
Problems that have the
answer but are missing
some of the sum digits.
Mental strategies for
adding 9 etc and taking
away 9 from a given
number
Solve simple addition
and subtraction problems
using a range of efficient
mental and written
strategies
becoming fluent
with a range of
mental strategies for
addition and
subtraction
problems, such as
commutativity for
addition, building to
10, doubles, 10 facts
and adding 10
modelling and
representing simple
additive situations
using materials such
as 10 frames, 20
frames and empty
number lines
becoming fluent
with partitioning
numbers to
understand the
connection between
addition and
subtraction
using counting on to
identify the missing
element in an
additive problem

Represent practical
situations to model
addition and sharing
using a range of
practical
strategies for
adding small
groups of
numbers, such as
visual displays or
concrete materials
using Aboriginal
and Torres Strait
Islander methods
of adding,
including spatial
patterns and
reasoning
Apply place value to
partition, rearrange
and regroup numbers
to at least tens of
thousands to assist
calculations and solve
problems

Solve problems
involving purchases
and the calculation of
change to the nearest
five cents with and
without digital
technologies
recognising that
not all countries
use dollars and
cents, eg India
uses rupees.
Carrying out
calculations in
another currency
as well as in
dollars and cents,
and identifying
both as decimal
systems

Week
4-5
Time
*Level 3
Naplan
Vocabulary:
Oclock, analogue, digital,
clock, minutes, hours, days,
Interpret timetables
and calendars.
Tell time to the quarter-
hour, using the language
of 'past' and 'to'
Tell time to the minute
and investigate the
relationship between
Convert between units
of time
identifying and
Compare 12- and
24-hour time
systems and convert
Preparation weeks, half past, quarter past,
quarter to, am and pm,
measure, months, elapsed
time, years, decades, century,
calendar, days of week,
seconds, hands of clock,
timetables, 24 hour time

Resources:
Nelson 3 Unit 11 pg. 54-
63
Nelson 4 Unit 25-26 pg.
116-120
Signpost 26 Unit 1 pg.
131-136
Signpost 4 Unit 27 pg.
134-136
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative Learning
Space
Open Ended Maths
Activities (OEMA)
pg:68-71
Estimate length of
time. How long things
will take.
Measure with Timers
Read analogue and
digital clocks.
Converting 12 hour to
24 hour time.
24 hour clock.
Venn diagrams to
compare analogue and
digital.
Converting between
day, hours, minutes
and seconds (using a
calculator)
Write timetables for
their day.
Homework: Record
where you find time
devices at home.

describing the
characteristics of
quarter-past times
on an analogue
clock, and
identifying that the
small hand is
pointing just past
the number and the
big hand is pointing
to the three
Name and order months
and seasons
investigating the
seasons used by
Aboriginal people,
comparing them to
those used in
Western society and
recognising the
connection to
weather patterns.

Use a calendar to identify
the date and determine
the number of days in
each month
using calendars to
locate specific
information, such as
finding a given date
on a calendar and
saying what day it
is, and identifying
personally or
culturally specific
days
units of time
recognising there
are 60 minutes in
an hour and 60
seconds in a
minute
using the correct
operation for
converting units
of time

Use am and pm
notation and solve
simple time problems
calculating the
time spent at
school during a
normal school
day
calculating the
time required to
travel between
two locations
determining
arrival time
given departure
time

between them
investigating
the ways time
was and is
measured in
different
Aboriginal
Country, such
as using tidal
change
using units
hours, minutes
and seconds

Week 6 TESTING FOR REPORTING
Week Length and Vocabulary: Making reasonable Compare and order Measure, order and Use scaled Choose appropriate
7 Temperatur
e

Degrees, Celsius, centimetre,
metre, ruler, tape measure,
length, width, height, shortest,
longest, furthest, length,
millimetres, scale, trundle
wheel, cooler, hotter,
thermometer, weather
channel, forecast.

Resources:
Nelson 3 Unit 15 pg. 66-
68
Nelson 4 Unit 4 pg. 32-
35
Signpost 3 Unit 21 pg.
110-114
Signpost 4 Unit 20 pg.
108-112
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative Learning
Space
Open Ended Maths
Activities (OEMA)
pg:73
estimates
Reading scales,
Compare length.
Measure accurately.
Beginning at 0 etc.
Converting from cm to
m to km.
Ordering length.
Taking temperatures.
Identifying
temperatures in various
environments.
Reading vertical scales
Compare and order
lengths with different
unit
Select suitable tolls
and unit of measure.
Eg Trundle wheel to
measure the oval in
metres.
several shapes and
objects based on length,
area, volume and
capacity using
appropriate uniform
informal units
comparing lengths
using finger length,
hand span or a piece
of string
comparing areas
using the palm of
the hand or a stone
comparing
capacities using a
range of containers

compare objects using
familiar metric units of
length, mass and
capacity
recognising the
importance of
using common
units of
measurement
recognising and
using centimetres
and metres, grams
and kilograms,
and millilitres and
litres

instruments to
measure and compare
lengths, masses,
capacities and
temperatures
reading and
interpreting the
graduated scales
on a range of
measuring
instruments to
the nearest
graduation

units of
measurement for
length, area,
volume, capacity
and mass
recognising
that some units
of
measurement
are better
suited for some
tasks than
others, for
example
kilometres
rather than
metres to
measure the
distance
between two
towns
investigating
alternative
measures of
scale to
demonstrate
that these vary
between
countries and
change over
time, for
example
temperature
measurement
in Australia,
Indonesia,
Japan and USA
Week
8-9-10

Multiplicati
on
Vocabulary:
Doubling, multiplying,
equations, number sentences,
arrays, number problems, find
the product, lattice method,
Mental strategies for
doubling and halving.
Communitivity eg:
4x6= 24 is the same as
6x4= 24
Recognise and represent
multiplication as
repeated addition, groups
and arrays
representing array
Recall multiplication
facts of two, three, five
and ten and related
division facts
establishing
Recall multiplication
facts up to 10 10
and related division
facts
using known
Solve problems
involving
multiplication of
large numbers by
one- or two-digit
halving, strategy, factors,
square roots, multiples.

Resources:
Nelson 3 Unit 16 and 17
pg. 69-74
Nelson 4 Unit 10 and 11
pg. 56-64
Signpost 3 Unit 15 and
16pg 74-87
Signpost 4 Unit 12 and
13 pg. 65-73
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative Learning
Space
Open Ended Maths
Activities (OEMA)
pg:44
Repeated addition.
Write and solve
worded problems.
Multiplying with 10,
100, 1000. (adding the
0s)
Recall multiplication
facts.
Making arrays
Square numbers
problems with
available materials
and explaining
reasoning
visualising a group
of objects as a unit
and using this to
calculate the
number of objects in
several identical
groups

multiplication
facts using
number
sequences

multiplication
facts to calculate
related division
facts

Represent and solve
problems involving
multiplication using
efficient mental and
written strategies and
appropriate digital
technologies
writing simple
word problems
in numerical
form and vice
versa
using a
calculator to
check the
solution and
reasonableness
of the answer
numbers using
efficient mental,
written strategies
and appropriate
digital technologies
exploring
techniques for
multiplication
such as the
area model, the
Italian lattice
method or the
partitioning of
numbers
applying the
distributive law
and using
arrays to model
multiplication
and explain
calculation
strategies
Solve problems
involving division
by a one digit
number, including
those that result in a
remainder
using the fact
that equivalent
division
calculations
result if both
numbers are
divided by the
same factor
interpreting
and
representing
the remainder
in division
calculations
sensibly for the
context
Use efficient mental
and written
strategies and apply
appropriate digital
technologies to
solve problems
using
calculators to
check the
reasonableness
of answers
Division
Vocabulary:
Divide, division, quotient,
share between, how many,
sets of, groups of, remainder,
arrays, doubling, place value,
strategy, mental
computations, factors,
halving, short division,
remainders

Resources:
Nelson 3 Unit 22 and 23
pg. 87- 92
Nelson 4 Unit 15 and 16
pg. 76-83
Signpost 3 Unit 17 and
18 pg: 88-97
Signpost 4 Unit 14 and
15 pg. 84-92
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative Learning
Space
Open Ended Maths
Activities (OEMA)
pg:44
Recall of
multiplication facts
Multiplication linked
with division.
Symbols for
multiplication and
division.
Short division,
language of dividing a
whole number by a
quotient and how
many times a number
can go into a bigger
number.
Squaring numbers.
Diving with
remainders
Dividing with
remainders, decimals
and fractions.
Dividing by 10, 100
and 1000
Writing and using a
calculator to record
inverse operations.
Recognise and represent
division as grouping into
equal sets and solve
simple problems using
these representations
dividing the class or
a collection of
objects into equal-
sized groups
identifying the
difference between
dividing a set of
objects into three
equal groups and
dividing the same
set of objects into
groups of three

Develop efficient
mental and written
strategies and use
appropriate digital
technologies for
multiplication and for
division where there is
no remainder
using known facts
and strategies,
such as
commutativity,
doubling and
halving for
multiplication,
and connecting
division to
multiplication
when there is no
remainder

Week
11
REVISION/CATCH UP WEEK





Maths Planner Term 3 Level 3 and 4
Topic
Vocabulary/
Resources
Not Negotiable
AusVels Links
Level 2 (Grade 2) Level 3 (Grade 3) Level 4 (Grade 4)
Level 5
(Grade 5)
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Money

Dollars, cents, notes,
coins, total, change,
addition,
subtractions,equatio
ns, quality,
operations,
methods, word
problems, budgeting.

Resources:
Play Money.
Supermarket
catalogues.
Nelson 3: pg: 5, 106-
Grade 3
identifying
equivalent values in
collections of coins
or notes, such as two
five-cent coins
having the same
value as one 10-cent
coin
counting collections
of coins or notes to
make up a particular
value, such as that
shown on a price tag

recognising the
relationship between
dollars and cents,
and that not all
countries use these
denominations and
divisions (for
example Japanese
Yen)
recognising that
not all countries
use dollars and
cents, eg India uses
rupees.
Carrying out
calculations in
another currency
as well as in
dollars and cents,
and identifying
both as decimal
systems

creating a
simple
budget for a
class
fundraising
event
identifying
the GST
component
of invoices
and receipts

Adding decimals
that involve
money. eg: $1.25
+ 1.10
Relationship
between Dollars
and cents eg 100
cents equals $1
Different currency
from around the
world.
Grade 4
107
Nelson pg: 55, 65,76,
104, 105
Signpost 3: pg 59, 71
Signpost 4: 105
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative
Learning Space
Mathletics
Interactive
whiteboard activities

Adding decimals
that involve
money to 3 digts
eg:
$234.25+$135.55=
Relationship
between Dollars
and cents eg 100
cents equals $1
Different currency
from around the
world.
Suggested
Activities
Week 1
Students draw and
label the Australian
money system.
Students are given
some play money
and need to
demonstrate a given
amount using the
money. eg: How
many ways can you
make a $1, $20, $100
Use a calculator to
work out the change
to be given from a
given amount.
Students are given
a list of items
(canteen,
supermarket
catalogue) and
then use addition
to work out how
much 3-6 items
would cost. Use a
calculator to check
their answers
Students use
subtraction to
work out the
change that
would need to
receive after
spending a
certain
amount. Eg:
coffee cost
$3.25, we give
a $5, $10, $20,
$50 note
Week 2
Students convert
money from dollars to
cents and from cents
to dollars. Eg: $2 can
be written as 10 20c
pieces etc.
Use a shopping
catalogue. Students
are given a budget
eg $20-$50-$100.
Students needs to
spend as their
money as close to
the given amount as
Research money
systems from around
the world. Students
use a map of the
world to find and
label as many
currency systems as
possible and label
Portfolio Task:
Create a 3 day timetable for
meals, entertainment and other
items. Under the timetable,
students then need to create a
shopping list, from the weekly
meal timetable and shopping
list, students find the cost for
possible. them on the map. feeding a family of 4 for a week.
Grade 3 can create a menu for a
2days using the same process.

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Mapping

Map, brids-eye view,
plan, path, forward,
backwards, right,
left, turn, shortest,
longer, scale,
degrees, North,
South, East, West,
near, grid, route,
compass, cardinal
points, compass
rose, key, legend.

Resources:
Atlases
Google Earth
Nelson 3 Unit 29 pg
86-88
Nelson 4 Unit 30 pg:
85-87
Signpost 3: pg 19-23
Signpost 4: 18-21
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative
Learning Space
Mathletics
Interactive
whiteboard activities




Grade 3
understanding that
we use
representations of
objects and their
positions, such as on
maps, to allow us to
receive and give
directions and to
describe place
constructing
arrangements of
objects from a set of
directions

creating a map of
the classroom or
playground
identifying the
scale used on maps
of cities and rural
areas in Australia
and a city in
Indonesia and
describing the
difference
using directions to
find features on a
map

comparing
aerial views
of Country,
desert
paintings and
maps with
grid
references
creating a
grid
reference
system for
the
classroom
and using it
to locate
objects and
describe
routes from
one object to
another

Compasses
Grid co-ordinates
Following
directions
Reading maps
Compass Rose
Grade 4
Compasses
Grid co-ordinates
Following
directions
Reading maps
Reading Scales
Cardinal Points
Compass Rose
Giving directions
to find things on a
Map.

Suggested
Activities
Week 1
Students create a Rose
Compass from a set of
given directions.
Class discussion
and modelling of
using N,S,E,W to
find specific
places on a map
Using a map of
the world,
teacher calls out
a country,
students then
need to identify
if the country is
N, S, E, W from
Melbourne.
Students are given a
map and need to
follow the grid co-
ordinates to find
specific places on the
map.
Students are write
a set of directions
next to a map of
the school for a
friend to follow to
get from one place
to another.
Using their
maths grid
books,
students
create a
letter/number
grid and from
the directions
from the
teacher the
students
create a line
drawing.
Week 2
Students sit back
to back with a
map, only giving
location
directions, direct a
friend to a specific
place on the map.
Demonstrate
how to draw a
birds-eye view of
the classroom.
Students then
draw a Birds-eye
view of their
bedroom with
appropriate
labels.
Describe the
difference from
a map between
city in Indonesia
and Melbourne
(Venn Diagram)
Portfolio Task.
Demonstrate on the board, map
drawing with a key/legend
Students draw a Map of a desert
Island with hidden treasure and
a set of instructions for a friend
to follow to find the treasure.
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Angles

Straight, acute,
obtuse, degree right
angle, corner,
square, face, full
turn, quarter turn,
three-quarter, turn,
reflex,right angel,
protractor
Grade 3 predicting and
reproducing a
pattern based
around half and
quarter turns of a
shape and sketching
the next element in
the pattern
opening doors
partially and fully
and comparing the
size of the angles
created
recognising that
analogue clocks use
the turning of arms
to indicate time, and
comparing the size
creating angles
and comparing
them to a right
angle using digital
technologies
measuring
and
constructing
angles using
both 180
and 360
protractors
recognising
that angles
have arms
right angle
acute
obtuse
straight
Use a clock to
identify angles
Grade 4

Resources:
Nelson 4 Unit 9 pg:
26-28
Signpost 3: pg 129-
130
Signpost 4: 132-133
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative
Learning Space
Mathletics
Interactive
whiteboard activities


right angle
acute
obtuse
straight
reflex
Use a protractor
to find the angles
Use a protractor
to find the angels
and the degrees.
Use a clock to
identify angles
of angles between
the arms for familiar
times

and a vertex,
and that size
is the amount
of turn
required for
one arm to
coincide with
the other

Suggested
Activities
Week 1
Demonstrate the
different types of
angles on the
board. Create an
angle finder using
2 rectangle pieces
of cardboard and
a split pin.
Students create an
angle finder and
then using a table
go around the
room and identify
the different
angels they can
see. (Grade 4 can
then use the
protractor to
measure the
angles.
Have different angels
on a card and
students then order
the angles from
smallest to largest.
Students use icy-pole
sticks to create
angles and write the
names.
Students use a
clock and record on
a table the time
and the angle it
creates.
Students write
their names
using capital
letters and
then write the
angles that the
letters create
eg: H has 4
right angles.
(grade fours
could also
write the
degrees using
a protractor)
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Symmetry
and
Tesselation

Flip, slide, turn,
rotate, translate,
reflect, tessellate,
pattern, tiling







Grade 3 understanding that
objects can be
moved but changing
position does not
alter an objects size
or features
redicting and
reproducing a
pattern based
around half and
quarter turns of a
shape and sketching
identifying
symmetry in
Aboriginal rock
carvings or art
identifying
symmetry in the
natural and built
environment

Using stimulus
materials such as
the motifs in
Central Asian
textiles, Tibetan
artefacts, Indian
lotus designs and
symmetry in
Yolngu or Central
and Western
Desert art
identifying
and
describing
the line and
rotational
symmetry of
a range of
two-
dimensional
shapes, by
manually
cutting,
folding and
Flip
Slide
Turn
Reflect
Patterns
Symmetry
Tessellate
Grade 4


Resources:
Nelson 3pg. 54
Nelson 4 Unit 15 and
16 pg. 76-83
Signpost 3 Unit 3
and 18 pg: 13-15,
16-17
Signpost 4 Unit 3 pg.
13-17
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative
Learning Space
Mathletics
Interactive
whiteboard activities

www.topmarks.co.uk
(symmetry game)

Reflect
Patterns
Symmetry
Tessellate
Translate
Rotate
Lines of symmetry
the next element in
the pattern
turning
shapes and
by using
digital
technologies
identifying
the effects of
transformatio
ns by
manually
flipping,
sliding and
turning two-
dimensional
shapes and
by using
digital
technologies
using digital
technologies
to enlarge
shapes
using a grid
system to
enlarge a
favourite
image or
cartoon


Suggested
Activities
Week 1
Students use simple
pictures that are cut in
half to draw the other
side.
Students use
attribute blocks to
create patterns
without gaps.
Students use regular
shapes to draw the
line of symmetry
(grade 4s can draw
more than one line
of symmetry for the
shapes.
Students Identify
from the Alphabet
the lines of
symmetry. E.g. H
has two lines of
symmetry.
Take a photo
of the
students face.
Cut the photos
in half and
students then
draw in the
other half.
Week 2
Students use black
card to cut out shapes
then using cellophane
create stain glass
window.
OR
Students use paper to
cut out snowflakes to
create symmetrical
patterns.
Students cut out a
shape from a 10cm
by 10cm piece of
cardboard. They
then attach the two
sides together and
create a tessellating
pattern.
Portfolio task:
Cut a picture in half, Students
use their knowledge of
symmetry to fill in the second
half of the picture OR students
draw 2 lines of symmetry, create
a picture and then colour using a
symmetrical pattern (we could
use Escher pictures as
inspiration)

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Chance

Chance, likely to
happen, not likely to
happen, most likely,
least likely,
impossible, qual
chance, outcomes,
possible, certain,
uncertain, always,
never sometimes,
might, maybe, 50/50
chance, fair, unfair,
lucky, unlucky,
predict
Grade 3 classifying a list of
everyday events
according to how
likely they are to
happen, using the
language of chance,
and explaining
reasoning
conducting repeated
trials of chance
experiments such as
tossing a coin or
drawing a ball from a
bag and identifying
the variations
between trials
using lists of
events familiar to
students and
ordering them
from least likely
to most likely to
occur
using examples
such as weather,
which cannot be
dry and wet at the
same time
explaining why the
probability of a
new baby being
commenting
on the
likelihood of
winning
simple
games of
chance by
considering
the number
of possible
outcomes
and the
consequent
chance of
winning in
Chance
Conducting
experiments with
different
possibilities.
Vocabulary
around chance.
Using real life
examples of apply
chance
vocabulary.
Grade 4

Resources:
Nelson 3 Unit 25 pg.
75-77
Nelson 4 Unit 5 pg.
70-72
Signpost 3 Unit 29
pg: 148-150
Signpost 4 Unit 28
pg. 137-139
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative
Learning Space
Mathletics
Interactive
whiteboard activities

Chance
Conducting
experiments with
different
possibilities.
Vocabulary
around chance.
Using real life
examples of apply
chance
vocabulary.
either a boy or a
girl does not
depend on the sex
of the previous
baby
simple
games of
chance such
as jan-ken-
pon (rock-
paper-
scissors)
Investigating
the
probabilities
of all
outcomes for
a simple
chance
experiment
and verifying
that their
sum equals 1
Suggested
Activities
Week 1
Students flip a coin to
identify the chance of
a head or tail coming.
Chocolate game:
Students in small
groups roll a dice,
only when they roll a
6 do they get to eat a
piece of chocolate.
Have a bag/box,
place in the box
different coloured
objects. Students
take 10 goes of
taking out a counter
from the box and
predict what colour
it would be.
Create a coloured
spinner, students
then create a tally
table to identify
which colour
comes up the most
often.
Using the
seasons,
students write
down the
types of
weather and
the chance of
rain, snow,
hail, frost etc.
Week 2
Students label
situations as likely,
unlikely, equal chance
etc.
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REVISION/CATCH UP WEEK
Portfolio Task Create a weekly timetable for meals, entertainment and other items. Under the timetable, students then need to create a
shopping list, from the weekly meal timetable and shopping list, students find the cost for feeding a family of 4.
Students draw a Map of a desert Island with hidden treasure and a set of instructions for a friend to follow to find the treasure.
Cut a picture in half, Students use their knowledge of symmetry to fill in the second half of the picture OR students draw 2 lines of
symmetry, create a picture and then colour using a symmetrical pattern (we could use Escher pictures as inspiration)

Maths Planner Term 4 Level 3 and 4
Topic
Vocabulary/Resour
ces
Suggested
Activities/Not
Negotiables
AusVels Links
Level 2 (Grade 2) Level 3 (Grade 3)
Level 4 (Grade
4)
Level 5 (Grade
5)
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Division
Vocabulary:
Doubling, multiplying,
equations, number
sentences, arrays,
number problems, find
the product, lattice
method, halving,
strategy, factors, square
roots, multiples.

Resources:
Nelson 3 Unit 16
and 17 pg. 69-74
Nelson 4 Unit 10
and 11 pg. 56-64
Signpost 3 Unit 15
and 16pg 74-87
Signpost 4 Unit 12
and 13 pg. 65-73
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative
Learning Space
Open Ended Maths
Activities (OEMA)
pg:44
Grade 3
Recognise and
represent
division as
grouping into
equal sets and
solve simple
problems using
these
representations
dividing the
class or a
collection of
objects into
equal-sized
groups
identifying the
difference
between
dividing a set
of objects into
three equal
groups and
dividing the
same set of
Develop
efficient
mental and
written
strategies
and use
appropriate
digital
technologies
for
multiplicatio
n and for
division
where there
is no
remainder
using known facts
and strategies,
such as
commutativity,
doubling and
halving for
multiplication,
and connecting
division to

Symbols for
multiplication and
division.
Short division,
language of dividing a
whole number by a
quotient and how
many times a number
can go into a bigger
number.
Squaring numbers.
Diving with
remainders
Dividing with
remainders, decimals
and fractions.
Dividing by 10, 100
and 1000
Writing and using a
calculator to record
inverse operations.
Grade 4

Symbols for
multiplication and
division.
Short division,
language of dividing a
whole number by a
quotient and how
many times a number
can go into a bigger
number.
Squaring numbers.
Diving with
remainders
Dividing with
remainders, decimals
and fractions.
Dividing by 10, 100
and 1000
Writing and using a
calculator to record
inverse operations.
objects into
groups of three

multiplication
when there is no
remainder

Suggested Activities

Week 1

Week 2

Week 3, 4 and 5

Fractions
Equal parts, divide into,
Grade 3
recognising that sets partitioning areas,
exploring the recognising the

partition, half, third,
quarter, fifths, sixths
etc. Decimal, decimal
point fractions,
hundredths, larger,
number line, order,
place value, smaller,
units, whole number,
zero, equivlant

Resources:
Nelson 3 Unit 30
pg. 111
Nelson Ausvles pg
103-107
Nelson 4 Unit 27
pg. 124
Signpost 3 Unit 9
and 10 pg: 38-48
Signpost 4 Unit 7
and 8 pg.34-45
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative
Identify and divide
shapes into equal
parts.
Recognise halves,
thirds and
quarters up to
tenth
Maths the words,
fractions and
diagram.
Place fractions on
a number line.
Use a fraction wall
to find equivalent
fractions.
Fractions of
collections
of objects can be
partitioned in
different ways to
demonstrate
fractions
relating the number
of parts to the size
of a fraction

lengths and
collections to
create halves,
thirds, quarters
and fifths, such as
folding the same
sized sheets of
paper to illustrate
different unit
fractions and
comparing the
number of parts
with their sizes
locating unit
fractions on a
number line
recognising that
in English the
term one third is
used (order:
numerator,
denominator) but
relationship
between families
of fractions
(halves, quarters
and eighths or
thirds and sixths)
by folding a
series of paper
strips to
construct a
fraction wall
converting mixed
numbers to
improper
fractions and
vice versa
investigating the
use of fractions
and sharing as a
way of managing
Country: for
example taking
connection
between the
order of unit
fractions and
their
denominators
modelling and
solving
addition and
subtraction
problems
involving
fractions by
using jumps on
a number line,
or making
diagrams of
fractions as
parts of shapes
using
knowledge of
place value and
Grade 4
Learning Space
Mathletics
Interactive
whiteboard
activities
OEMA: 22-26

Identify and divide
shapes into equal
parts.
Recognise halves,
thirds and
quarters up to
tenth
Maths the words,
fractions and
diagram.
Place fractions on
a number line.
Use a fraction wall
to find equivalent
fractions.
Fractions of
collections
Adding and
subtracting
fractions with
same
denominator.
Mixed numbers.
that in other
languages this
concept may be
expressed as
three parts, one
of them (order:
denominator,
numerator) for
example Japanese

no more than
half the eggs
from a nest to
protect future
bird populations
using division by
10 to extend the
place-value
system
using knowledge
of fractions to
establish
equivalences
between
fractions and
decimal notation

division by 10
to extend the
number system
to thousandths
and beyond
recognising the
equivalence of
one
thousandths
and 0.001
locating
decimals on a
number line
Suggested Activities
Week 1 Introduce students to
different Fractions
http://www.mathsisfu
n.com/fractions-
interactive.html .
Using a piece of paper
students fold the
paper into equal
sections and write the
different fractions (in
Count our different
coloured items into
a bag with the
students.
Demonstrate the
denominator is the
amount that went
in. Taking out a
handful of items out
then write the
Look at shapes
and divide them
into EQUAL parts
to identify the
different
Fractions.
Extension:
Students have a
polygon and need
to come up with
Student use a
graphic organiser
where they can
demonstrate the
relationship
between the
words, the
fraction and a
picture (grade 4s
also demonstrate
Students work
on partitioning a
polygon e.g. a
shape divided
into 10 equal
parts where 7
are shaded and
3 are unshaded.
(reading a
partition and
groups students could
have a fraction each
and fold the paper to
demonstrate and
make an anchor chart)
fraction. Introduce
the students to the
language of
fractions:
Numerator,
Denominator and
Vinculum.
as many different
fractions as
possible for the
one polygon.
an equivalent
fraction).
creating a
partition).
Week 2 Grade 3: Students
use a fraction wall
to find simple
equivalent
fractions.
Grade 4: Students
create and then
use a fraction wall
to show
equivalent
fractions.
Grade 3:
Students create
a fraction
number line
beginning with
fractions less
than a whole.

Grade 4:
Students create
a fraction
number line
with mixed
numbers.
Use manipulative
to work out the
fraction of a
collection.

Mathletics has
good resources.
Use mathematical
concepts find the
fraction of a
whole number.
Post assessment
to identify any
gaps.
Week 3 Revision of key concepts/Non-negotiable during the explicit teaching.
All about a Fraction. Students choose a fraction on a Think Board: They have to show or represent
the fraction in as many different ways as they can e.g. Fraction, number line, picture, cut things
into quarters etc.
Week

6 and 7

Decimals/Perc
Tenths, whole, one,
Grade 3
using division by using
entages
decimal point, decimal
point,
Equal parts, divide into,
partition, half, third,
quarter, fifths, sixths
etc. Decimal, decimal
point fractions,
hundredths, larger,
number line, order,
place value, smaller,
units, whole number,
zero, equivalent

Resources:
Nelson 3 Unit 33
and 34 pg. 120-125
Nelson 4 Unit 27
pg. 124-127
Signpost 3 Unit 10
pg: 45-48
Signpost 4 Unit 8
pg. 40-45
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative
Learning Space
Mathletics
Interactive
Students can
identify tenths
and Hundredths
Read, write, say,
compare and
order numbers to
2 decimal place
Recognise the
decimal point in
the number affect
the value of the
number eg: 23 and
2.3
Understand that
tenths can be
recorded as a
decimal.
Add and subtract
number involving
tenths.
10 to extend the
place-value
system
using knowledge
of fractions to
establish
equivalences
between
fractions and
decimal notation

knowledge of
place value and
division by 10
to extend the
number system
to thousandths
and beyond
recognising the
equivalence of
one
thousandths
and 0.001

Grade 4
whiteboard
activities
OEMA: pg: 27-31

Students can
identify tenths,
Hundredths and
thousandths.
Read, write, say,
compare and
order numbers to
3 decimal place
Recognise the
decimal point in
the number affect
the value of the
number eg: 23 and
2.3
Understand that
tenths can be
recorded as a
decimal.
Add and subtract
number involving
hundredths.
Make connections
between fractions
and decimals
Suggested Activities








Week 1
Introduce Tenths as
part of a whole
number. Draw the
decimal point and
identify the place
value of tenths and
hundredths. Students
draw a number with
decimal points and
Students use
number strips to
show the
relationship
between fractions
and decimals. Make
a chart of all the
decimals from 0.1 to
1
Demonstrate
vertical addition
with decimals.
Making sure the
decimal point
lines up.
Students use
magazines to add
the price of two
items with
decimals points.
Students are
given blank
number lines to
order a
combination of
fractions and
decimals.
































then draw a picture of
a whole divided into
ten equal parts with
parts shaded.
Week 2
Demonstrate vertical
subtraction with
decimals. Making sure
the decimal point lines
up.
Students use
number dice to
convert fractions to
decimals and from
decimals to
Fractions. Matching
activity.
Game of Zero is
the Go pg: 113 of
students Nelson 3
Ausvels book.
Students create
decimal number
line to create
their own
patterns with
decimals and
fraction.
Student
assessment
from Nelson
Maths Ausvels
addition.
W
e
e
k

8

a
n
d

9

Testing and
Revision
Using On Demand
Testing for Number
and Algebra,
Measurement and
Geometry,
Statistics and
Probability.

Multiplication
and Division.

Vocabulary:
Doubling, multiplying,
equations, number
sentences, arrays,
number problems, find
the product, lattice
method, halving,
strategy, factors, square
roots, multiples.

Resources:
Nelson 3 Unit 16
and 17 pg. 69-74
Nelson 4 Unit 10
and 11 pg. 56-64
Grade 3
Recognise and
represent
division as
grouping into
equal sets and
solve simple
problems using
these
representations
dividing the
class or a
collection of
objects into
equal-sized
groups
identifying the
difference
between
dividing a set
of objects into
three equal
groups and
dividing the
same set of
objects into
groups of three

Develop
efficient
mental and
written
strategies
and use
appropriate
digital
technologies
for
multiplicatio
n and for
division
where there
is no
remainder
using known facts
and strategies,
such as
commutativity,
doubling and
halving for
multiplication,
and connecting
division to
multiplication
when there is no
remainder




Number: 2110
W5C4FKB1
Measurement:
2111 M9RD38BP
Space: 2112
8LS6M9QF
Adaptive General:
2128 LH153822
Structure: 2400
78RQ36N9
Grade 4
Recognise and represent Recall multiplication Recall multiplication Solve problems
Signpost 3 Unit 15
and 16pg 74-87
Signpost 4 Unit 12
and 13 pg. 65-73
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative
Learning Space
Open Ended Maths
Activities (OEMA)
pg:44

Number: 2113
PG6DDGCL
Measurement:
2114 P3LCXLFT
Space: 2115
RTQ5ZTK5
Adaptive General:
2129 XPTJYVRP
Structure: 2401
31D7HC2H
multiplication as
repeated addition, groups
and arrays
representing array
problems with
available materials
and explaining
reasoning
visualising a group
of objects as a unit
and using this to
calculate the
number of objects in
several identical
groups

facts of two, three, five
and ten and related
division facts
establishing
multiplication
facts using
number
sequences

facts up to 10 10
and related division
facts
using known
multiplication
facts to calculate
related division
facts

Represent and solve
problems involving
multiplication using
efficient mental and
written strategies and
appropriate digital
technologies
writing simple
word problems
in numerical
form and vice
versa
using a
calculator to
check the
solution and
reasonableness
of the answer
involving
multiplication of
large numbers by
one- or two-digit
numbers using
efficient mental,
written strategies
and appropriate
digital technologies
exploring
techniques for
multiplication
such as the
area model, the
Italian lattice
method or the
partitioning of
numbers
applying the
distributive law
and using
arrays to model
multiplication
and explain
calculation
strategies
Solve problems
involving division
by a one digit
number, including
those that result in a
remainder
using the fact
that equivalent
division
calculations
result if both
numbers are
divided by the
same factor
interpreting
and
representing
the remainder
in division
calculations
sensibly for the
context
Use efficient mental
and written
strategies and apply
appropriate digital
technologies to
solve problems
using
W
e
e
k

1
0

Chance

Chance, likely to
happen, not likely
to happen, most
likely, least likely,
impossible, qual
chance, outcomes,
possible, certain,
uncertain, always,
never sometimes,
might, maybe,
50/50 chance, fair,
unfair, lucky,
unlucky, predict

Resources:
Nelson 3 Unit 25
pg. 75-77
Nelson 4 Unit 5
pg. 70-72
Signpost 3 Unit 29
pg: 148-150
Signpost 4 Unit 28
pg. 137-139
Ultranet RHPS
Collaborative
Learning Space
Mathletics
Interactive
whiteboard
activities

Grade 3
classifying a list of
everyday events
according to how
likely they are to
happen, using the
language of
chance, and
explaining
reasoning
conducting
repeated trials of
chance
experiments such
as tossing a coin
or drawing a ball
from a bag and
identifying the
variations
between trials
using lists of
events familiar to
students and
ordering them
from least likely
to most likely to
occur
using examples
such as weather,
which cannot be
dry and wet at the
same time
explaining why the
probability of a
new baby being
either a boy or a
girl does not
depend on the sex
of the previous
baby
commenting on
the likelihood of
winning simple
games of chance
by considering the
number of
possible outcomes
and the
consequent
chance of winning
in simple games of
chance such as
jan-ken-pon (rock-
paper-scissors)
Investigating the
probabilities of all
outcomes for a
simple chance
experiment and
verifying that their
sum equals 1
Chance
Conducting
experiments
with different
possibilities.
Vocabulary
around chance.
Using real life
examples of
apply chance
vocabulary.
Grade 4
Chance
Conducting
experiments
with different
possibilities.
Vocabulary
around chance.
Using real life
examples of
apply chance
vocabulary.







Suggested
Activities
Week 1
Students flip a
coin to identify
the chance of a
head or tail
coming.
Students label
situations as
likely, unlikely,
equal chance
etc.
Chocolate game:
Students in small
groups roll a dice,
only when they roll
a 6 do they get to
eat a piece of
chocolate.
Have a bag/box,
place in the box
different coloured
objects. Students
take 10 goes of
taking out a
counter from the
box and predict
what colour it
would be.
Create a coloured
spinner, students
then create a tally
table to identify
which colour
comes up the most
often.
Using the seasons,
students write
down the types of
weather and the
chance of rain,
snow, hail, frost
etc.
W
e
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k

1
1

Christmas
Maths
Grade 3 And 4
Christmas Maths
Portfolio Tasks
All about a Fraction. Students choose a fraction on a Think Board: They have to show or represent the fraction in as
many different ways as they can e.g. Fraction, number line, picture, cut things into quarters etc.
Christmas co-ordinate pictures. (Brendan will supply the worksheets). Students follow a set of co-ordinates to create
Christmas pictures.
Students use a tessellating pattern to create a A3 tessellating tile pattern.
The number 45 and 70 think board.
MONEY
Students were required to create a 2 day timetable for meals that their family would eat. Under the timetable, students then need to create a shopping list
to find the cost for feeding their family of for 2 days.
Monday Tuesday
Breakfast:




Breakfast:




Lunch:



Lunch:



Dinner:




Dinner:




Shopping list and cost per item.












Shopping list and cost per item.







MONEY
Students were required to create a 3 day timetable for meals, entertainment and other items that their family would require. Under the timetable,
students then need to create a shopping list to find the cost for feeding and entertaining their family for three days.
Monday Tuesday Wednesday
Breakfast Breakfast:


Breakfast:



Lunch:



Lunch:



Lunch:



Dinner:



Dinner:




Dinner:




Entertainment:

Entertainment: Entertainment:
Shopping list and cost per item.











Shopping list and cost per item.







Shopping list and cost per item.







MONEY RUBRIC

Student Name: ________________________________________


CATEGORY 4 3 2 1
Mathematical Concepts
Explanation shows complete
understanding of the
mathematical concepts used to
solve the problem(s).
Explanation shows substantial
understanding of the
mathematical concepts used to
solve the problem(s).
Explanation shows some
understanding of the
mathematical concepts needed to
solve the problem(s).
Explanation shows very limited
understanding of the underlying
concepts needed to solve the
problem(s) OR is not written.
Mathematical Reasoning
Uses complex and refined
mathematical reasoning.
Uses effective mathematical
reasoning
Some evidence of mathematical
reasoning.
Little evidence of mathematical
reasoning.
Mathematical Errors
90-100% of the steps and
solutions have no mathematical
errors.
Almost all (85-89%) of the steps
and solutions have no
mathematical errors.
Most (75-84%) of the steps and
solutions have no mathematical
errors.
More than 75% of the steps and
solutions have mathematical
errors.
Uses concept of Money
Appropriately
Is able to use a timetable to
budget for a family. Is then able
to use money to budget to
purchase required items.
Has created a timetable and
demonstrated some money
budgeting to purchase required
items.
Has created a timetable and
demonstrated little money
budgeting to purchase required
items.
Timetable is messy and difficult
to understand. Demonstrates no
money use to budget for required
items.




Map of Desert Island
Students draw a Map of a desert Island with hidden treasure and a set of instructions for a friend to follow to find the
treasure. The map needs to include; Instructions for finding the treasure, rose compass, Key/Legend and scale.
At Level 3: Students are able to draw and label a simple map with directions to find specific objects.
At Level 4: Students were required a complex that included a legend/key, scale, directions and rose compass.
Below Expected Level At Expected Level Above Expected Level



Symmetry
Students were required to cut a ready-made picture in half. They were then expected to symmetrically draw the other
half of the picture as accurately as possible.
Below Expected Level At Expected Level Above Expected Level








Fractions
Below Expected Level At Expected Level Above Expected Level
Symbols For Fraction
Write Your Fraction in Words
Write in a Decimal Form
Pictorial Representation of a Whole
Write your fraction in Words
Pictorial Representation of a
Collection

Give an example of where you
might see this fraction in a real life
situation.

Show your Fraction from the media
eg Photo, magazine, newspaper


Teacher Comment:




Symbols for Fractions Write Your Fraction in Words Write in a Decimal Form
Pictorial Representation of a Whole
YOUR
CHOSEN
FRACTION
Write your fraction in Words
Pictorial Representation of a Collection Give an example of where you might see this
fraction in a real life situation.
Show your Fraction from the media eg Photo,
magazine, newspaper