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CHCCS 400C

DHUSHY [Type here] [Type here]


Assessment activity 1
(1) Workers in any organisation be obliged to obey with policy and procedural requirements, whilst adhering to
the legal and ethical constraints within which the organisation operates. Community service workers need to know the
legal requirements relevant to the type of service provided by the organisation for which they work. They must know
how the relevant legislation, statutory and regulatory requirements will impact on the work they do and on their
responsibilities and obligations.
Legislation and statutory requirement impact on the ways in which workers and management interact with clients and
other stakeholders and on the ways in which client and worker rights and support needs are catered for. The type of
clients with whom workers will interact will depend, to large degree, on the type of service offered and the community
service area within which the employing organisation operates.
People will have different needs and will expect different services, all of them have rights and will be protected under
the legislation, statutes and regulations which impact on the service providing organisation
(2)
The prevention of discrimination
Anti-harassment
Privacy
Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO)
Freedom of information
Access and equity
Social justice
Mandatory notification
Work health and safety
Early childhood education and care

Assessment activity 2
(1)
A duty of care is a legal obligation imposed on an individual requiring that they adhere to a standard of reasonable
care while performing any acts that could foreseeable harm others. Duty of care in any circumstance where it is
reasonably foreseeable that another person in their care might suffer some sort of harm or loss because of something
they do or might not do.
(2)
Yes, as a carer Greg should observed Alice and Amanda's dressing before the accident, he would have advised them
that the floor is wet and to wear their shoes, and he should not put CD whilst they are doing exercise, also he would
give more attention to Alice and Amanda rather than playing adults .




CHCCS 400C

DHUSHY [Type here] [Type here]

Assessment activity 3
(1)
I will collect feedback from supervisor, clients and other workers regarding my performance. When I evaluate my
work, it is important to breakdown job description into specific tasks and determine the standard to which each of
tasks should be performed. I should assess my performance of these tasks in terms of feedback I receive and my own
judgment of my capabilities. I must identify any gaps between expected and required performance and actual
performance. I need to take action to address them. I need to seek help from supervisor for training or education
session to improve my skills and knowledge. It is necessary to identify own limitations, weakness. Self-evaluation, help
to determine whether the skills currently I have are sufficient or whether they need to be improved.

Assessment activity 4
(01) Information are
Case assessment, past history, personal data, family details, medical notes, psychological and therapeutic assessment,
recreational and leisure preferences, care plan, case notes, monitoring and evaluation notes.
These files and information are used for
Medical / treatment purposes
Evaluating clients progress in physically and mentally
Recording all the matters relevant to client
Whenever client moving to another service or for a special service, this records must need to the specialist or
the new service provider to provide his service to the client without any disturbance.

(02)
Confidentiality relating to the release of information about clients is a major requirement under the Privacy Act
Amendment 2000 (and agency guidelines based on this Act). However, The Child Protection Act also has specific
provisions regarding confidentiality of information about a child in care, or families who are clients of the departments
of Child Safety, Communities, etc.
Your agency policies and procedures are very likely to provide you with:
direction for consistent organisational requirements
clear steps you must follow to ensure consistency of action
direct links between current legislation and practice principles
a whole of system approach to acting in a reasonable and responsible manner across all service delivery by
the agency
A context for ongoing organisational improvement towards continued best practice.
Government policy, agency standards and procedures are all relevant to understanding your role and responsibilities.
It is important to research the relevant legislation, policy and procedures and identify what information you must
provide to clients and significant others.
Legislative requirements
CHCCS 400C

DHUSHY [Type here] [Type here]
The following are summaries of some of the major Queensland and federal family law Acts relating to the particular
clientele and target groups of your agency.
All of this legislation is fundamental to the work of support workers and, in your role as a support worker, you need to
be very aware how particular legislation relates to the particular clients you work with in your agency (e.g. the Mental
Health Act and people who have mental health issues).
Support workers often work with very disturbed and sometimes dysfunctional clients. Workers therefore need to have
confidence in themselves, in their work role, clarity about what they can offer within the role and the boundaries of
that role in order to provide the highest possible service.
Key statutory and legislative
Regulatory requirements may include those related to:
Privacy legislation
Health records legislation
Equal employment opportunities
Discrimination and harassment
Residential and community services
Poisons and therapeutics
Registration and practice of health professionals
Pharmaceutical benefits
Occupational health and safety
Freedom of information
Public health
Building standards
Criminal acts


Assessment activity 5
Seeking consent is part of a respectful relationship with an older person and should usually be seen as a process, not a
one-off event. When you are seeking a persons consent to treatment or care, you should make sure that they have
the time and support they need to make their decision. People who have given consent to a particular intervention are
entitled to change their minds and withdraw their consent at any point if they have the capacity (are competent) to
do so. Similarly, they can change their minds and consent to an intervention which they have earlier refused. It is
important to let the person know this, so that they feel able to tell you if they change their mind. Adults with the
capacity to take a particular decision are entitled to refuse the treatment being offered, even if this will clearly be
detrimental to their health. The only exception to this rule is where treatment is being provided for mental disorder,
under the terms of mental health legislation (in which case more specialist guidance should be consulted). Detention
under mental health legislation does not give a power to treat unrelated physical disorders without consent.



Assessment activity 6
(01)
Most community service organisations will have in place policies and procedures that govern and regulate privacy and
confidentiality of client information. This concept not only applies to what you can disclose about your clients or your
CHCCS 400C

DHUSHY [Type here] [Type here]
organisations outside of work, but also what can be shared in network meetings. What information can be shared with
other organisations, who shares it and how this information is given out should be clearly defined in any effective,
professional service. It is often incorporated into a workers duty statement or job description.
All organisations should have written policy and procedures, and staff training in the following areas:
a confidentiality policy
a clearly defined process for identifying and regularly updating a Community Resource Index so that all
workers are aware of what other services are available to refer to (the index contains basis contact details and
information about what each service provides)
processes for networking with other agencies, including attending relevant interagencies (meetings of local
service providers)
guidelines for case conferencing (this will be discussed in more detail a bit later)
referral protocols, including how referrals should be made, the kind of information that can be shared with
other services and any ongoing roles and responsibilities of each service with regard to the client
a policy for how long client information is kept after clients are no longer involved with the service. For
example, different government departments produce documents that outline legal requirements for their
staff in relation to storing and maintaining information.
For instance, the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program (providing accommodation support for homeless
people) outlines its policy in the Case Management Resource Kit for SAAP Services, 1997. It states that all information
regarding clients will be kept in the filing cabinet for up to 5 years before being archived. All information regarding
clients will be destroyed 7 years after the client ceases to receive
(02)
to treat clients fairly regardless of their ethnic or cultural origins, religious and political beliefs, gender, age
- to preserve the dignity and independence of clients
- to explain the limits of confidentiality and how they apply to clients
- to obtain written informed consent from the client and family before collecting and using sensitive personal
information, video-taping, audio-recording, or using third party observation involving the client and family
- to inform the client of available options, risks, benefits and costs of the service being offered and allow the client
(or their representative) to make an informed choice
- to check that the client understand the information given to them
- to allow access to records concerning the clients contacts with the service provider
- to assist the client to obtain other services if they are necessary



Assessment activity 7
(1)
1. What is the aim and purpose of the policy, procedure or protocols?
2. What is it attempting to address (eg: Improve safety, make staff aware of required service standards)?
3. How is its current effectiveness measured?
4. How current is the existing policy on which procedures and protocols are based?
CHCCS 400C

DHUSHY [Type here] [Type here]
5. How relevant are the policies, procedures and protocols to issues being faced by the organisation, its clients
and the community?
6. How do they benefit client/s, staff, and or organisation?
7. What government legislation, regulations, codes of practice or guidelines underpin the policy and associated
procedures and protocols?
8. Who are the user of the policy, procedure or protocol?
9. Does the policy, procedure or protocol provide guidance to staff on values of the organisation?
10. Are there clear and direct link between the policies and operational procedures?
11. Have organisational policies been disseminated to all staff?

(2)
It is necessary to have periodically assess and evaluate policies because it determines whether the policies are still
current & relevant to your organisation & to its clients. Whether the policies suits their intended purpose or whether
they need to be changed, eliminated, replaced or even updated.
(3)
Staff should be involved in reviews and contribute to the development of new policies procedures and protocols. This
is because they will play a bigger part in implementing the new policies and procedures in their line of duty

Assessment activity 8
(1)
The particular job specification for each employee will outline, in broad terms, the employees role, tasks and
relationships with others in the organisation. It will also outline, again broad terms, the employees responsibilities and
obligations, required skill levels, knowledge requirements, level of authority and decision-making expectations so they
can perform according to the responsibilities attributed to their role/s
(2)
They should interact with other employees, they can check their job / person specifications and discuss and issues with
manager or supervisor.
(3)
I must ask manager or supervisor for assistance



Assessment activity 9
(1)
I will ask for clarification, agree on my understanding, I will find out about the task, demonstrated by my supervisor or
by a more experienced workmate, I will not make assumption, I will make notes as I have been briefed and I will ask
my supervisor for the guidelines that go with the task.
CHCCS 400C

DHUSHY [Type here] [Type here]
(2)
I will ask my supervisor, manager or suitably experienced work colleague, because they are decision making people in
the organisation structure.
(3)
- To do my job properly
- That is my responsibility
- Responsibilities of other people in the organisation
- Avoid unwanted costing, embarrassing or even dangerous mistake.

Assessment activity 10
(1)
The process of ensuring equal opportunity and the allocation of resources and services in a fair, consistent and
inclusive manner irrespective of an individual's or group's cultural or linguistic background, their religion or spiritual
beliefs, socio-economic status, gender, age, or abilities.
In simple terms Access and Equity is about removing barriers to open up opportunities for people!
(2)
- Clients seeking a service must have access to the service basic on relative need and on resource availability.
Individual needs and personal goals of clients must be met with available resources.
- Clients, where possible, must participate in decision making, choice of activities and events in daily life.
- Client rights to privacy, dignity and confidentiality, in all aspects of their lives, must be seen to be respected
and upheld.
- Clients must be supported and included in community life.
- Client must be given opportunities to develop skills that allow them to participate in and achieve valued roles
within the community.
- Service providing organisations must have, in place, effective management policies, systems and practices.
- Ethical and commonly accepted values must be upheld by the organisation and its employees.
Assessment activity 11
(1)
In the case where an employee is concerned about the role of another person they should discuss the issue with the
involved people and try to determine an appropriate course of action. If the issue cannot be resolved readily then it
might be necessary to report to the problem to a manager or supervisor, therefore, necessary to identify the problem,
define the problem, collect data related to the problem, develop a range of alternative solutions, select a solution (or
combination of solutions), and implement the solution and check to ensure that the desired result has been achieved.

Assessment activity 12
(1)
Different cultural preferences
CHCCS 400C

DHUSHY [Type here] [Type here]
Gender
Age
Language
Ethnicity
Cultural background
Sexual orientation
Religious belief
Family relationships and roles
Social differences,
Education level
Life experience
Work experience
Socio economic background
Personality
Geographic locations and marital status

(2)
Culture to me identifies a race of people, their ways, food, language, manners, etc. We have so many cultures in
Australia and a diverse range of races of people. This makes the world interesting, it opens your eyes, and makes one
realize that their way is not the only way. It broadens ones mind, and makes one realize that there is a lot to learn in
tis humungous world. We need to learn to mix with other cultures, and time and patience will help us towards this
goal.
(3)
Recognising the individual and cultural differences of people you are supporting is the first step in being able to tailor
support and setting up a culturally and psychologically safe environment. Another words if you do not understand
your clients culture back ground you won't be able meet the clients needs when setting up his care plan. Also possible
for community service employees to interact with clients on a non- judgemental basis (without personal bias) and to
ensure that individuality and individual needs are created for.
(4)
(i) Accept the fact that you will never fully understand a culture which is not your own; however, you can still value
many aspect of that culture
(ii) Be prepare to challenge your initial reactions to people from other cultures. Be aware of the fact that your
reactions are based on the rules of your own culture.
(iii) Try to avoid stereotyping and labelling people. Treat people as individuals

Assessment activity 13
(1)
Quality of service provision, meeting clients needs and to the development of holistic strategies intended to
provide services that supports the long term needs of clients, as well as their immediate health or welfare
needs.
Clients are not taken advantage
CHCCS 400C

DHUSHY [Type here] [Type here]
Disclosures and personal conversations will not be repeated or abused
Organisations policies also act to protect workers
If a client gives a carer and expensive gift or gratuity, the staff member might be accused, by the client who
has forgotten that the item given the gift, or by relatives who did not know that the item was given as a gift, of
theft.
(2)
Discuss the issue with the involved person/s and point out, in a conciliatory manner, why you consider their behaviour
`12Q
Assessment activity 14
(1)
Community service employee have a legal obligation under privacy legislation, to protect sensitive and personal
clients information - written and verbal, they have an ethical obligation to treat client confidences appropriately,
that is, not do discuss them with others unless authorised by the client to do so
Inappropriate dissemination of information will harm relationship between the client, the employee, the organisation
and possibly the person/s to which inform is disclosed. It is also possible that disclosure might endanger a client, that
is, perhaps disclosure of the whereabouts of a client involved in a domestic violence dispute could result in harm to
the client.
(2)
Client related matters should only be discussed within the facility and with the appropriate personnel persons
within the enterprise or associated with the enterprise, who are authorised to participate in such discussions. This
might include the client (or the clients duly authorised to participate in such discussions. This might include the client
(or the clients duly authorised representative, eg a parent of minor, legal guardian, person with power of attorney),
medical practitioners, therapists, counsellors or other employees and / or specialists who are responsible for their
care, plus members of casework team ect. Also staff might need, on occasion, to explain to the interested parties that
they are under a legal obligation to protect client information and may not make unauthorised disclosures.



Assessment activity 15
(1) Clients who come to our agency for service will have a number of concerns. It is up to you to encourage the client
(or their representative / advocate) to articulate these concerns. Unless they are brought out into the open for
discussion they are not likely to be resolved. To ensure that they are able to do this you must be empathetic,
approachable and must reassure the client that their concern will be heard, respected and taken seriously. You
must provide appropriate support and reassurance so they are comfortable discussing their concerns with you. If
you are unable to assist the client with resolution of their concerns, you will need to refer them to another
person, service or agency so their needs can be met.
(2) To support the client and / or their advocate/s it will necessary to identify the real concerns or issue. Once these
have been identified they can be properly expressed. Question the client using open, close and probing questions.
CHCCS 400C

DHUSHY [Type here] [Type here]
Paraphrase or repeat back to the client the information you receive. This enables you and the client to agree on
the real meaning of their concern/s.

Assessment activity 16
(1)
Referral procedures
When considering referral, you will need to consider your organisations procedures for referring clients to other
agencies or individual service providers. You also need to be aware of the other agencys referral procedures and
guidelines for maintaining confidentiality.
Involving clients in the process
Clients have a right to be involved in assessing the suitability of services to which they are referred, just as they
have a right to be involved in identifying their needs, setting their goals and participating in decision-making on
issues impacting on their lives.
Clients may like to know more about the service to which you would like to refer them, so they can decide on the
type and amount of information to be disclosed about them to the service. They may like to see information on
the organisations role, responsibilities and expectations of service users, as well as the way this service will fit
into their support network.
Active participation by clients in decision-making regarding referral to other services may influence how
comfortable clients will feel about accessing this service.
http://legacy.communitydoor.org.au/resources/etraining/units/chccs301a/section4/section4topic06.html
(2)
Protect the rights of the client to take responsibility for their own decision making.
Rights of the clients are not overridden by other people.
Clients personal situation
Such groups might have issues or ideas that they need presented to the relevant authorities,
organisations or groups, yet lack the networking contacts, authorities or qualifications to do this on their
own behalf and to be taken seriously. They might, therefore, ask someone who is articulate and has the
necessary contacts and influence to act on their behalf.

Assessment activity 17
(1)
Remain calm and not react defensively
Be polite, treat the client and their complaint with respect and demonstrate willingness to negotiate a solution.
If the client is angry allow them to vent then question them to determine that real nature of the complaint.
Document the conversation whether it is face to face or conducted via the telephone.
Filed and stored
All written complaints must be promptly responded to- either in writing or by telephoning the complainant or by
arranging for a meeting to discuss the issue.
Empathise with the client and try to see the issue from their point of view.
Give the client time to frame and deliver the answers to your questions. Listen carefully to what they tell you.
CHCCS 400C

DHUSHY [Type here] [Type here]
Check to ensure that you and the client agree on what the complaint is intended to address.

Assessment activity 18
(1)
A change in outgoing behaviour to that of being withdrawn and fearful
Alternately, a change from being quiet and sensible to being overexcited or over enthusiastic
Cringing, hiding or showing signs of fear
Refusing to speak to, make eye contact with or be alone with certain people
Bullying, biting, kicking, physically aggressive
Displaying advanced sexual knowledge unusual for age
Demonstrating a lack of self- confidence, low self-esteem
Displaying suicidal ideation
Self- harming
Increased need for physical comfort
Anger and uncharacteristic temper tantrums
(2)
Staff should be aware of their legal and ethical responsibilities applicable to their role. They have a duty of care to
protect the safety, rights, physical and psychological health and wellbeing of clients. If they observe or reasonably
believe that a client or person associated with a client is suffering abuse or neglect they must utilise the correct
reporting processes and channels and must act promptly in line with the type and degree or risk involved.
Assessment activity 19
(1)
Language used and forms of language used
Religious affiliations, practices and beliefs
Spiritual needs
Education formal and informal
Work ethics
Food choices, preferences and taboos
Holiday and religious observances
Family customs
Holidays and celebrations
(2)
Be patient, speak clearly, but do not shout. Repeat yourself, speak slowly, use signage, gestures, draw diagrams or
pictures etc.
Appropriate body language, para- language, gestures and facial expressions will aid the communication process. Do
not make assumptions about people and their intelligence based on their ability to either read written English, or to
understand communications (or instructions)
(3)
If client are struggling to communicate with you- to understand you or to make themselves understood
because English is not their native language, you might need to involve an interpreter.
A professional interpreter should be used because:
CHCCS 400C

DHUSHY [Type here] [Type here]
They are professionally trained to understand the clients situation
Interpreters understand verbal and non-verbal communication involved
An objective interpreter will ensure that accurate communication occurs while cultural sensitivities and
confidentiality are taken into account.
In times of crises or in traumatic or emotionally- charged situation, second-language competency can decrease
dramatically.
Being able to communicate in their first language can make them feel much more secure and comfortable.
Qualified interpreters are bound by a strict code of ethics, therefore, they practise impartiality, and their
conduct is professional.
(4)
Providing for spiritual support and making allowance for clients to practise their religion.
Early assessment of the spiritual needs of clients, including in the original assessment process.
Discuss spiritual and religious needs with their clients.
Consultation with the client about what is spiritually important to the client.
Must not impose their own spiritual notions or their own beliefs when delivering client care. Nor must they
make assumptions about what the client would prefer.
ASSESSMENT TOOL -02
(1)
Human rights
Anti-discrimination
Drug and Alcohol
Health
Mental Health
The prevention of discrimination
Anti-harassment
Privacy (national privacy legislation and principles)
Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO)
Freedom of information
Access and equity
Social justice
Mandatory notification
OHS legislation

(2)
Your duty of care is your legal duty to take reasonable care so that others aren't harmed. If you identify a reasonably
likely risk of harm, you must take reasonable care in response. It is a concept common to all modern occupational
health and safety (OHS) / workplace health and safety (WHS) regimes.
There is a general duty of care on employers of the workplace to ensure the health, safety and welfare at work of
all employees and others who come on to the workplace.
It is the employers responsibility to ensure that all reasonably practicable measures have been taken to control
risks against all possible injuries arising from the workplace.
The employer's duty of care applies to all people in the workplace, including visitors, contractors etc.
CHCCS 400C

DHUSHY [Type here] [Type here]
There is a general obligation on designers, manufacturers and suppliers of plant and substances for use by people
at work to ensure that their products are not a risk to health and safety when properly used, and to provide
information on the correct use and potential hazards associated with the use of the products in the workplace.
There is a general obligation on employees to take care of others and cooperate with employers in matters of
health and safety. An employee must also co-operate with the employer or other person so far as is necessary to
enable compliance with the relevant OH&S/WHS Act/Regulation.
As employers are in control of the workplace and workplaces can have significant risks to health and safety, employers
are required to organise their workplace and their work systems to ensure people at work are not put in harms way.
(3)
Codes of ethics and codes of conduct set out the relevant principles or standards to guide performance. They help
ensure the organisation is active, open and responsible. A code of ethics defines the important principles (eg respect,
honesty, compassion, accountability, etc) and provides general guidance in terms of ethical and moral responsibility.
Importantly, these principles can be used to guide responses where there is uncertainty or no specific rule in place.
A code of conduct clearly outlines expected standards of behaviour. It is a clear set of unambiguous expectations. The
code of conduct specifies actions in the workplace where a code of ethics is a general guide to decisions about those
actions.
A well drafted code of conduct will be consistent with the primary code of ethics.
Respect each others customs and differencesfor example, language, religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation, preferred
music and foods.
Respect each others feelings, work needs and privacy.
Treat others as you would like to be treated.
Demonstrate integrity in all communication and action by avoiding malicious gossip and undermining
behaviour, and by raising any concerns through the appropriate channels.
http://ncoss.org.au/projects/msu/downloads/resources/information%20sheets/31_Ethical-Frameworks.pdf
(4)
General guidelines for sustainable environmental work practices
All employees can help protect the environment by following the guidelines below:
Reduce
Use goods which stop waste being generated.
Reduce waste by choosing products that have minimal packaging and can be used productively and then recycled.

Re-use
Re-use containers, packaging or waste products, wherever possible.

Recycle
Recycle waste material into useable products, wherever possible.




CHCCS 400C

DHUSHY [Type here] [Type here]
For waste that can't be avoided, reused or recycled
Treat the waste to make it less harmful or reduce the volume of the harmful component.
Dispose of the waste safely.

Strategies to be implemented by the Manager and Supervisors

Employees responsibilities
Identify and manage environmental risks associated with work activities to minimise their impact on the
environment.
Use the Employee Feedback Form to put forward suggestions.

Managing safety risks
Employees
Be aware of workplace health and safety policies and ensure procedures are followed.
Notify the Workplace Health and Safety Officer of specific risks or hazards by completing an Employee
Feedback Form.

A safety risk assessment must be undertaken by the Workplace Health and Safety Officer at least once a year
using the Workplace Safety Checklist.
Environmental purchasing guidelines
Become informed about the environmental impacts of products purchased. Search for environmentally-
friendly products.
Choose products with less packaging.
Choose products with recyclable or reusable packaging.
Re-use plastic bags and all types of containers if possible.
Buy quality goods that will last.
Buy recycled goods which have already saved resources and raw materials, and help reduce the overall
quantity of waste.

Paper wastage
Buy and use recycled paper where possible.
Make double-sided copies when printing and photocopying, wherever possible.
Use the blank side of used paper for notepaper before recycling.
Re-use envelopes for internal mail.

Disposal of waste
Place the following in recycle bins, depending on recycling facilities available in your community.
paper
aluminium
glass
steel
Follow the guidelines for the disposal of these materials to minimise the impact on the environment.

CHCCS 400C

DHUSHY [Type here] [Type here]
Energy
Use these strategies to minimise energy wastage:
o Maintain air-conditioning at a constant temperature of 23-24C.
o Close blinds or curtains to minimise heat build-up.
o Maintain only security lighting after business hours.
o Switch off equipment overnight wherever possible.
o Repair malfunctioning utilities (e.g. leaking taps) as soon as possible.

(05)
It is important to encourage and support clients in making decisions that are consistent with their case plan
or court order if they have one. They need to meet the requirements set down by courts and others and,
whilst you want to encourage them to make their own decisions, it is important that those decisions are
within the boundaries of any conditions placed on them by authorities.
Decision making is the act of expressing choice and preference and being able to act upon that choice. For
people with a disability this particularly relates to being able to choose the supports they need to enable
them to lead a lifestyle of their choice. The types of choices people have are not limitless. A persons
individual circumstances will influence the choices open to them. This includes factors such as environment,
budget, skills, preparation and time. People should be provided with the opportunities required to address
these factors including information and appropriate supports.
(06)
1. Define the problem
Diagnose the situation so that your focus is on the problem, not just its symptoms. Helpful techniques at this
stage include using flowcharts to identify the expected steps of a process and cause-and-effect diagrams to
define and analyse root causes.
The chart below identifies key steps for defining problems. These steps support the involvement of
interested parties, the use of factual information, comparison of expectations to reality and a focus on root
causes of a problem. Whats needed is to:
Review and document how processes currently work (who does what, with what information, using what
tools, communicating with what organizations and individuals, in what time frame, using what format, etc).
Evaluate the possible impact of new tools and revised policies in the development of a model of what
should be.
2. Generate alternative solutions
Postpone the selection of one solution until several alternatives have been proposed. Having a standard with
which to compare the characteristics of the final solution is not the same as defining the desired result. A
standard allows us to evaluate the different intended results offered by alternatives. When you try to build
toward desired results, its very difficult to collect good information about the process.
CHCCS 400C

DHUSHY [Type here] [Type here]
Considering multiple alternatives can significantly enhance the value of your final solution. Once the team or
individual has decided the what should be model, this target standard becomes the basis for developing a
road map for investigating alternatives. Brainstorming and team problem-solving techniques are both useful
tools in this stage of problem solving.
Many alternative solutions should be generated before evaluating any of them. A common mistake in
problem solving is that alternatives are evaluated as they are proposed, so the first acceptable solution is
chosen, even if its not the best fit. If we focus on trying to get the results we want, we miss the potential for
learning something new that will allow for real improvement.
3. Evaluate and select an alternative
Skilled problem solvers use a series of considerations when selecting the best alternative. They consider the
extent to which:
A particular alternative will solve the problem without causing other unanticipated problems.
All the individuals involved will accept the alternative.
Implementation of the alternative is likely.
The alternative fits within the organizational constraints.
4. Implement and follow up on the solution
Leaders may be called upon to order the solution to be implemented by others, sell the solution to others
or facilitate the implementation by involving the efforts of others. The most effective approach, by far, has
been to involve others in the implementation as a way of minimizing resistance to subsequent changes.
Feedback channels must be built into the implementation of the solution, to produce continuous monitoring
and testing of actual events against expectations. Problem solving, and the techniques used to derive
elucidation, can only be effective in an organization if the solution remains in place and is updated to
respond to future changes.
(7)
Advocacy is speaking acting, writing with minimal conflict of interest on behalf of the sincerely perceived
interests of a disadvantaged person or group to promote, protect and defend their welfare and justice by
Being on their side and no-one elses
Being primarily concerned with their fundamental needs
Remaining loyal and accountable to them in a way which is emphatic and vigorous and which is, or is
likely to be, costly to the advocate or advocacy group
(8)
The services of an accredited interpreter are appropriate not only when communication is impossible but
also whenever any party assesses that the client may be disadvantaged without the services of an
interpreter. Interpreters assistance may also be required to ensure complex tasks such as assessments are
carried out correctly. This includes situations where understanding complex information of a medical,
technical or legal nature is required, and during stressful or emotional situations when a clients command of
CHCCS 400C

DHUSHY [Type here] [Type here]
English decreases temporarily. Effective communication can prevent costly mistakes, complaints and reduce
risk of litigation from clients unable to access services. Professional interpreters are highly skilled in English
and a language(s) other than English. They adhere to the AUSIT Code of Ethics, which requires them to act
professionally and impartially, and maintain confidentiality, privacy and accuracy

ASSESSMENT TOOL 03
Most community service organisations will have in place policies and procedures that govern and regulate
privacy and confidentiality of client information. This concept not only applies to what you can disclose
about your clients or your organisations outside of work, but also what can be shared in network meetings.
What information can be shared with other organisations, who shares it and how this information is given
out should be clearly defined in any effective, professional service. It is often incorporated into a workers
duty statement or job description.
All organisations should have written policy and procedures, and staff training in the following areas:
a confidentiality policy
a clearly defined process for identifying and regularly updating a Community Resource Index so that all
workers are aware of what other services are available to refer to (the index contains basis contact
details and information about what each service provides)
processes for networking with other agencies, including attending relevant interagency (meetings of
local service providers)
guidelines for case conferencing (this will be discussed in more detail a bit later)
referral protocols, including how referrals should be made, the kind of information that can be shared
with other services and any ongoing roles and responsibilities of each service with regard to the client
A policy for how long client information is kept after clients are no longer involved with the service. For
example, different government departments produce documents that outline legal requirements for
their staff in relation to storing and maintaining information.
For instance, the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program (providing accommodation support for
homeless people) outlines its policy in the Case Management Resource Kit for SAAP Services, 1997. It states
that all information regarding clients will be kept in the filing cabinet for up to 5 years before being archived.
All information regarding clients will be destroyed 7 years after the client ceases to receive services.

Community service organisations and their employees will need to comply with legislation, regulations and
statutory requirements relevant to:
The prevention of discrimination
Anti-harassment
Privacy (national privacy legislation and principles)
Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO)
Freedom of information
Access and equity
Social justice

CHCCS 400C

DHUSHY [Type here] [Type here]
As members of the Australian community we all have rights and corresponding responsibilities. The word
rights is often used but what does it mean and what are our rights? Rights are our basic entitlements as
members of a community.
Keep clients informed
Clients need to be as informed as possible about their rights and responsibilities. Comprehensive
information about the service should be provided at the referral and assessment stage, including
information about the eligibility criteria (who can use the service), the assessment process, service rules,
services offered, staff qualifications, confidentiality exclusions, client rights and responsibilities, complaints
procedure and any fees involved This can be in the form of an information handbook or pamphlet and
should be in a format accessible to clients. For example, translated into relevant languages or in simple
format for a client with an intellectual disability.
Client participation forums
Agencies need to have a structure in place for clients to have a say about the services being offered and
what needs to be improved. This may be through representation on management committees, holding focus
groups and surveying regularly to seek client feedback.
Monitoring by funding bodies
This varies across government departments and funding programmes; however funding bodies should play a
role in ensuring that services are fulfilling their legislative and funding responsibilities in the area of
upholding client rights. This may be through visiting agencies occasionally or written reports provided every
year as part of the accountability process.
Making sure that clients know how to complain
Basic human rights include the right to be heardbetter still, some rights, like legal rights, mean being able
to take action to recover any lost rights or even seek compensation. Legitimate client complaints also
provide valuable feedback to the service, so that services and staff can improve.
Legitimate client complaints also provide valuable feedback to the service, so that services and staff can
improve.
https://sielearning.tafensw.edu.au/MCS/CHCAOD402A/chcaod402a_csw/knowledge/rights/rights.htm

Project 02 (Placement)

Project 03 (Already done)