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Bradley/Webb/Willis JCPS Gheens Academy

Adapted from Kentucky Marker Papers Revised June, 2004


SHORT STORY AMPLIFIED CONTINUUM
Early Beginning
Skills
Beginning Skills Developing Skills Higher Developing Skills Competent Skills Proficient Skills
Topic and
Purpose
Draws/writes a
fictional entry by
experimenting with
marks on a page
(writing requires
translation )
Writes a fictional story or
a part of a story using some
conventions of print
(writing may require
translation.)
Writes a fictional story using some
of the following story elements:
character, setting, problem, and
solution. (story elements may not be
developed)
Creates a fictional story with the
following story elements: character,
setting, and plot with a problem and
solution
Creates a focused, fictional story with the
following story elements: character,
setting, a developed plot with
problem/solutionfor a clear purpose to
entertain, to amuse, to touch readers heart,
to scare, to teach a lesson, etc.
Creates a focused, fictional story using the
story elements: character, setting, a
developed plot with problem, climax, and
solutionfor a clear and maintained purpose
to entertain, to amuse, to touch readers
heart, to scare, to teach a lesson, etc.
Voice Begins to use individual voice
through dialogue, thoughts, insights,
word choice, descriptive/figurative
language, sentence structure, etc.
Uses some individual voice through
dialogue, thoughts, insights, word choice,
descriptive/figurative language, sentence
structure, etc.
Uses more individual voice
through dialogue, thoughts, insights, word
choice, descriptive/figurative language,
sentence structure, etc.
Uses individual voice throughout the piece
through dialogue, thoughts, insights, word
choice, descriptive/figurative language,
sentence structure, etc.
Title Writes a title that labels the event
(When Jack and Tim Went to a
Haunted House)
Writes a title that labels the event and
attempts to create reader interest
(The Haunted House)
Writes a title creates reader interest and
relates to the narrowed topic
(Trapped in the Haunted House)
Writes a title that creates reader interest and
captures the essence of the piece (No One
Leaves This House)
Ideas and
Details
Uses symbols, letter-
like marks to represent
words
Draws picture to
communicate ideas
Uses print including word
attempts, sight words, other
known words, or phrases to
attempt to relate a story
Draws picture to support
print
Creates a story line with a series of
undeveloped events
Creates story line and develops some
events with specific details, but may leave
some gaps or confusion for the reader.
Creates story line and develops most
events with relevant, specific details that
support the purpose, yet may leave some
minor gaps or confusion for the reader.
Creates clear story line and develops events
with elaborated and relevant details that
support the purpose and leave no gaps or
confusion for the reader
Characters Uses marks on a
page and pictures to
tell about a character
Uses picture or a few
words to develop a
character
Creates and attempts to develop a
character ( character is identified
and/or given a name; attempted
development may not be meaningful
to story)
Creates and meaningfully develops
character(s) in one or two of the following
ways: thoughts, actions, spoken words,
description, or background information
Creates and meaningfully develops
character in two or three of the following
ways: thoughts, spoken words, body
language, actions, description, or
background information
Creates and meaningfully develops
character in a variety of the following ways:
thoughts, spoken words, body language,
actions, description, or background
information
Weaves character development
meaningfully into the story line
Setting Uses picture or a few
words to indicate a setting
Identifies the setting for the story Attempts to develop the setting with
description or details
Develops setting with relevant details
and description
Develops setting with relevant details and
description that are woven into the story line
Plot with
Problem/
Solution
Uses picture or a few
words to indicate a
problem/solution
Attempts to create a plot with a
problem and solution
(Problem is undeveloped; may not
be important to the plot. Solution is
undeveloped; problem is solved
instantly or not solved at all.)
Creates a plot with a problem and
solution (Problem is important to the plot;
problem is resolved; writer attempts
satisfactory conclusion.)
Creates a plot with a developed problem
and a satisfactory solution
(Problem or conflict is developed and vital
to the plot; character struggles to solve the
problem; problem is resolved
satisfactorily.)
Creates the plot with a well-developed
problem, a climax, and a satisfactory solution
(Problem or conflict is developed and vital to
the plot. The character may struggle to
resolve the problem, which leads to a climax
and a satisfactory resolution.)
Dialogue Uses pictures or speech
bubbles to represent spoken
words
Begins to use dialogue Uses some dialogue
Attempts to use dialogue to develop the
character
Uses some dialogue to develop the
character(s) or move the plot
Uses relevant dialogue effectively to
develop the character(s) or move the plot.
Bradley/Webb/Willis JCPS Gheens Academy
Adapted from Kentucky Marker Papers Revised June, 2004
SHORT STORY AMPLIFIED CONTINUUM
Early Beginning Skills Beginning Skills Developing Skills Higher Developing Skills Competent Skills Proficient Skills
Logical
order
Shows evidence of
directionality (top to
bottom, left to right)
Demonstrates directionality
in print
Begins to demonstrate a
story line with pictures and/or
print
Places some events in logical order Places most events and details in
logical order
Places events and supporting details in
logical order
Places events and supporting details in
a meaningful order that maintains
coherence and unity (arrangement is
tight; no gaps, no confusion)
Employs literary devises, such as
foreshadowing, flashback, etc.
Lead Writes a beginning for the story Attempts an engaging lead that
begins the story
Writes an engaging lead that provides a
logical beginning for the story
Writes an engaging lead that provides
a meaningful beginning for the story
and the necessary context for the reader
Conclusion Writes an ending for the story
(ending may be abrupt)
Attempts to write a conclusion that
satisfactorily ends the story
Writes a conclusion that effectively ends
the story
Writes a conclusion that enhances and
effectively ends the story
Transitions Begins to use transitions between
events
Uses some transitions between
events and/or details
Uses more transitions between events and
supporting details
Uses a variety of transitions between
events and supporting details that guide
the reader through the story
Paragraphs Attempts to use paragraphs to organize
the story
Uses some paragraphs to organize
the story
Uses most paragraphs correctly to organize
the story
Uses paragraphs correctly and
effectively throughout to organize the
story
Sentences Uses some letters,
strings of random letters,
and /or unrelated words
to resemble a sentence
Uses word attempts, sight
words, other known words, or
phrases to represent a
sentence or two
Writes some complete sentences Writes many complete sentences
Begins to write sentences of various
lengths and/or structures
Writes mostly complete sentences
Writes some sentences of various lengths
and structures
Writes complete sentences consistently
Writes sentences of various lengths
and structures throughout the piece
Language Labels pictures or
produces simple text
using symbols or letter-
like marks
Uses word attempts, sight
words, or other known words,
to communicate about the
story
Begins to use a variety of words
Begins to use descriptive language
Uses some variety of words
Uses some descriptive or figurative
language to create a picture in the
readers mind
Begins to use strong verbs or
concrete nouns
Uses more variety of words including some
strong verbs or concrete nouns
Uses more descriptive or figurative
language effectively to create a picture in
the readers mind
Uses a variety of words, including
strong verbs and concrete nouns,
throughout the piece
Uses effective descriptive or figurative
language, as appropriate, throughout
Correctness Uses scribbles, letter-
like marks, and/or
strings of random letters
Uses some spaces between
words
Uses one or two letters, or
other inventions to represent
words
Begins to show sound letter
correspondence
Attempts to use capitals
Attempts to use end
punctuation
Attempts additional
punctuation
Uses spaces between words
Uses sight words as well as inventions
Inventions show some understanding
of sound/letter
correspondence
Uses some capital letters correctly
Uses some end punctuation correctly
Uses some additional punctuation
correctly
Shows some evidence of correct word
usage
Uses more correct spelling, less
invention
Inventions show understanding of
sound/letter correspondence
Often uses capital letters correctly
Often uses end punctuation
correctly
Often uses additional punctuation
correctly
Often demonstrates correct word
usage
Generally uses correct spelling
Generally uses capital letters correctly
Generally uses end punctuation correctly
Generally uses additional punctuation
correctly
Generally shows correct word usage
Makes few or no errors in spelling
Makes few or no errors in
capitalization
Makes few or no errors in punctuation
Makes few or no errors in word usage