Prefixes and suffixes

PREFIXES
Prefixes are letters added to the beginning
of existing or root words to make a new word.

Examples: engage manageable


regular legitimate



PREFIXES
Prefixes are letters added to the beginning
of existing or root words to make a new word.

Examples: engage manageable
disengage

regular legitimate



PREFIXES
Prefixes are letters added to the beginning
of existing or root words to make a new word.

Examples: engage manageable
disengage unmanageable

regular legitimate
irregular illegitimate


Common prefix meanings
un = not inter = between
dis = opposite de = opposite
re = again semi = half
pre = before fore = before
mis = wrong mid = middle
in = opposite sub = under
anti = against tri = three
When adding a prefix to a word it changes
its meaning.

Examples: happy


credit

When adding a prefix to a word it changes
its meaning.

Examples: happy
unhappy

credit
discredit
Prefix general rules

Usually add the prefix that ends with the
first letter of the root word’s first letter.

Examples: mobile


reversible

Prefix general rules

Usually add the prefix that ends with the
first letter of the root word’s first letter.

Examples: mobile
immobile

mature
immature
‘IR’ and ‘IL’ – the prefix
non-negotiables
The prefix ‘IL’ is always
used before words starting
with the letter L.

Examples: legal legible
illegal illegible
‘IR’ and ‘IL’ – the prefix
non-negotiables
The prefix ‘IR’ is always
used before words starting
with the letter R.

Examples: resistible relevant
irresistible irrelevant
Some exceptions to the rule:
mis, dis, de, un, in, im, re, sub

misconstrue inappropriate
disassemble impatient
deregulate regenerate
unintelligent substandard

EXCEPTIONS
SUFFIXES
Suffixes are letters or words added to the
end of existing or root words to make a
new word.

Examples: change
flat
laugh
open
SUFFIXES
Suffixes are letters or words added to the
end of existing or root words to make a
new word.

Examples: changeless
flat
laugh
open
SUFFIXES
Suffixes are letters or words added to the
end of existing or root words to make a
new word.

Examples: changeless
flatten
laughable
openly
TWO common types of suffixes



Inflectional suffixes can change the tense of
a word, or make a word plural.

Derivational suffixes make a new word that
is ‘derived’ from the original word





INFLECTIONAL SUFFIXES

I walk a long way to get here.
I walked a long way to get here.

My cat drank a lot of beer.
My cats drank a lot of beer.

DERIVATIONAL SUFFIXES
teach - teach
care - care
music - music
sad - sad
jealous - jealous
arrive -- arrive
hyphen - hyphen
DERIVATIONAL SUFFIXES
teach - teacher
care - careful
music - musician
sad - sadness
jealous - jealousy
arrive - arrival
hyphen - hyphenate
Words with both prefixes
AND suffixes?
Dis-appear-ed
Un-comfort-able
Im-proper-ly
Dis-organise-ed
Dis-proportionate-ly
Un-confident-ly
Dis-respect-ful-ly


Prefix and suffix brain buster
I was eat a lot of pickles last night and then I
start to drink some milk to wind from my day,
and my mum said ‘Member what happen when
you eat too many pickle and drink too much
milk?’
Prefix and suffix brain buster
I was eating a lot of pickles last night and then I
started to drink some milk to unwind from my
day, and my mum said ‘Remember what
happens when you eat too many pickles and
drink too much milk?’