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Allegany County Judy Center Evaluation, 2006-2007

Allegany County Judy Center Evaluation, 2006-2007

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Published by Terance J. Rephann
This report describes the results of the 2006-2007 annual evaluation of the Allegany County (MD) Judith P. Hoyer Early Child Care and Education Center (i.e., “Judy Center”). The Judy Center offered a wide variety of non-duplicative early childhood services in support of pre-school children and their families in conjunction with a network of area partners including the Allegany County Board of Education, Allegany County Department of Social Services, Allegany County Health Department, Frostburg State University, the Human Resource Development Commission (HRDC), Office of Children, Youth, and Families, and YMCA. The report describes attainment of Allegany County Judy Center goals, the results of parent, teacher, and partner surveys, and pupil learning and developmental outcomes.

Report by Terry Rephann
Graphics and layout by Jim House.
This report describes the results of the 2006-2007 annual evaluation of the Allegany County (MD) Judith P. Hoyer Early Child Care and Education Center (i.e., “Judy Center”). The Judy Center offered a wide variety of non-duplicative early childhood services in support of pre-school children and their families in conjunction with a network of area partners including the Allegany County Board of Education, Allegany County Department of Social Services, Allegany County Health Department, Frostburg State University, the Human Resource Development Commission (HRDC), Office of Children, Youth, and Families, and YMCA. The report describes attainment of Allegany County Judy Center goals, the results of parent, teacher, and partner surveys, and pupil learning and developmental outcomes.

Report by Terry Rephann
Graphics and layout by Jim House.

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01/15/2013

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Sections

July 2006-June 2007

Judy Center Evaluation, July 2006-June 2007

eQuotient, Inc. 803 Trost Avenue Cumberland, MD 21502 http://www.equotient.net e-mail: equinfo@equotient.net July 31, 2007

July 2006-June 2007

Table of Contents

page List of tables, figures, and appendices ....................................................................... i-iii . 1.0 Review of Last Year’s Results ..................................................................................1 2.0 Characteristics and Delivery of This Year’s Training................................................3 3.0 Enrollment, Training, and Validation ..................................................................14 . 4.0 Partner Surveys ....................................................................................................19 5.0 Teacher Surveys ...................................................................................................24 6.0 Parent Surveys .....................................................................................................27 7.0 Child Readiness ...................................................................................................44 8.0 Special Research Questions ..................................................................................51 9.0 Changes Introduced ............................................................................................54 10.0 Summary and Conclusions ................................................................................55 References ..................................................................................................................56 . Appendices .................................................................................................................58

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Judy Center Evaluation

Table of Contents
List of Tables
page Table 2.1 Implementation plan ........................................................................... 6-11 Table 2.2 Evaluation questions ................................................................................12 Table 2.3 Special research questions ........................................................................13 Table 3.1 Enrollment of children by age .................................................................14 . Table 4.1 Activity level of partners ..........................................................................19 Table 4.2 Collaboration success ..............................................................................20 . Table 4.3 Goal success ............................................................................................21 . Table 4.4 Performance area rating ..................................................................... 21-22 Table 4.5 Partner satisfaction with Judy Center .......................................................23 Table 5.1 Years teaching ..........................................................................................24 Table 5.2 Teacher satisfaction ..................................................................................24 Table 5.3 Performance area ratings .................................................................... 25-26 Table 5.4 Feeling of families served by Judy Center .................................................26 Table 6.1 Respondent characteristics ................................................................. 28-29 Table 6.2 Programs used ................................................................................... 30-31 Table 6.3 Learning/reading materials at home .........................................................32 Table 6.4 Activities with children ............................................................................32 Table 6.5 Program interest ......................................................................................33 Table 6.6 Satisfaction with Judy Center Services .....................................................34 Table 6.7 Satisfaction with Judy Center in performance areas............................ 37-38 Table 6.8 Parent participation in Judy Center activities ...........................................40 Table 6.9 Parent rating of Judy Center parent activities ..................................... 40-41 Table 6.10 Reason for not attending parent activities ................................................42 Table 6.11 Improvement in child learning and habits because of the Judy Center ......................................................................42 Table 6.12 Learning/reading materials at home before and after Judy Center, percentage of parents .................................43 . Table 6.13 Activities with children, percentage of parents who did ‘frequently’ before and after Judy Center ....................................43 Table 8.1 Major social and personal development initiatives ...................................52 Table 8.2 Major language and literacy initiatives .....................................................53

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July 2006-June 2007

List of Figures

page

Figure 3.1 Enrollment by race ..................................................................................15 Figure 3.2 Enrollment of targeted groups .................................................................15 Figure 3.3 Health screenings ....................................................................................16 . Figure 3.4 Child daycare attendance .........................................................................17 Figure 3.5 Family training participation ...................................................................18 Figure 6.1 Parent satisfaction ....................................................................................34 Figure 6.2 Top 10 performance areas ........................................................................35 Figure 6.3 Bottom 10 performance areas ..................................................................36 Figure 6.4 Family participation in 3+ activities .........................................................39 Figure 7.1 Kindergarten readiness by domain, 2006 .................................................45 Figure 7.2 Kindergarten readiness by domain, 2003-2006 .......................................46 . Figure 7.3 FARMS kindergarten readiness by domain ..............................................46 Figure 7.4 Special Education readiness by domain ....................................................47 Figure 7.5 Kindergarten readiness, Judy Center, County, and State ..........................48 Figure 7.6 Kindergarten readiness by domain, Judy Center, County, and State .........48 Figure 7.7 Period 4 FARMS readiness by domain .....................................................49 Figure 7.8 Period 4 Special Education readiness by domain ......................................50 Figure 7.9 Head Start observation study results ........................................................50 Figure 8.1 Kindergarten readiness by domain ...........................................................51 Figure 8.2 Kindergarten readiness by domain ...........................................................53

Appendices
A.1 Partner Survey .........................................................................................58 A.2 Partner Comments ..................................................................................60 A.3 Pre-K/Kindergarten Staff Survey ..............................................................64 A.4 First-Grade Staff Survey ...........................................................................66 A.5 Fall Parent Survey ....................................................................................68 A.6 Spring Parent Survey ...............................................................................70 . A.7 Fall Parent Survey Comments ..................................................................72 A.8 Spring Parent Survey Comments .............................................................76

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Judy Center Evaluation

1.0 Review of Fifth Year of Program
The Beall Elementary Judy Center’s fifth year continued the model built during the 2000-2002 period which included pre-k (multi-age and 4-year old), kindergarten classes and on-site services delivered by a variety of local partners. Several new activities were introduced to improve child readiness for certain categories of students (special needs and FARMS) that showed achievement gaps in previous years (eQuotient, Inc. 2006). The year saw curriculum improvements, continued training activities, new family activities, and further refinement of evaluation efforts. New initiatives included an addition of one pre-k and one kindergarten class, new activities to strengthen science learning such as field trips, new curriculum materials, new instructional activities, and a science book club, new activities to strengthen reading such as parent reading workshops and family summer reading night, staff training efforts that included the Ruby Payne framework for understanding poverty, the pre-k Houghton Mifflin reading core program and the DIBELs assessment, improving instructional delivery to encourage scientific exploration and thinking, and expanded training for parents of special needs children on strategies they can use to encourage social and personal development of their children. These activities are described further in the fifth year evaluation report (eQuotient, Inc. 2006). The following findings from the fifth year report are notable:
Y

Enrollment in Judy Center related activities continued to expand. This increased occurred mainly because of an increase in WIC participation. A greater share of children with educational need (83%) were admitted to the Center during the year than the previous year (80%). More children received health screenings (149 had vision and hearing screenings and 82 had dental screenings compared to 107 vision, 104 hearing, and 69 dental screenings the year before). Progress report results from the Allegany County Board of Education and HRDC assessment data indicate that child readiness improved during the year. School readiness for each of the targeted groups (i.e., students receiving free and reduced school meals, students receiving Special Education services) exceeded milestones. For FARMS children, the strategies for the domains of Language and Literacy and Scientific thinking worked with readiness increasing in each of these domains. However, there was no evidence to support the success of the strategy established for children who received Special Education services since readiness in this domain did not improve.

Y

Y

Y

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July 2006-June 2007

Y

Parent, partner, and teacher surveys continue to show a strong level of satisfaction with the Judy Center. In addition, parents recognized sizeable improvements in child learning and development during the year. A before/after study of a panel of parents shows that family learning resources at home and family activities were strengthened during the year. The Judy Center continued to improve its family programming by offering a variety of parent training and family activities Duplicated attendance at these sessions improved from two hundred and thirty during this year to four hundred and sixty-seven. In its third full year of operation at the Judy Center, The Kids Korner Childcare Center continued to see its attendance expand. The daycare center obtained MSDE accreditation during the year. Greater at home parent-child interaction appears to be correlated with child progress at the Judy Center. However, no association was found between involvement in Judy Center activities and parent assessments of child progress during the year.

Y

Y

Y

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Judy Center Evaluation

2.0 Characteristics and Delivery of the Sixth Year
In year six, the Judy Center introduced several new initiatives to improve the effectiveness of the Center. This new agenda was developed using information obtained from student assessment results, external evaluation, self-evaluation, and stakeholder surveys. As in the fifth year of the grant, objectives centered on improvements (detailed in Allegany County Board of Education 2006) for pupils who received Free and Reduced Meals (FARMS) and children who received special educational services. Some changes in the strategies for each of these subgroups were made. An objective for the domain of Scientific Thinking Skills was deleted and replaced with objectives for the domain of Social and Personal Skills for FARMS children. FARMS readiness increased in the Scientific Domain from 74% to 100% during the year which validated this strategy which had not been incorporated into permanent curriculum and programming enhancements. On the other hand, Social and Personal Development for FARMS children continued to lag other domains. Fourth period readiness as measured by the Work Sampling System was 74% which was the second lowest percentage of all the domains (only language and literacy was lower at 71%). For children identified as needing Special Education, social and personal domain continued to be a focus. Evidence could not be found that the activities during the 2005-06 year had been effective. So additional program elements were created to address this area. For FARMS children, emphasis continued to be placed on improving outcomes in the domain of language and literacy. Progress on the WSS had been made during the 2005-06 school year with full readiness moving from 55% to 71% for this subgroup and domain but FARMS children continued to lag considerably other students and this domain continued to be the largest problem area of all the domains. The major changes which resulted from this realignment around the new grant strategies during the 2005-06 school year are arranged into the categories Curriculum and Programs, Professional Development, Family Activities, and Evaluation and Planning are described further below:

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July 2006-June 2007

Curriculum and Programs
Summer programming. The Judy Center will combine summer camps with Head Start. In addition, the City of Frostburg will operate a summer camp out of Beall Elementary and Kids Korner will offer childcare during the summer. Expansion of market area. Beall Elementary will expand its pre-k services into two new elementary school districts, including John Humbird and Westernport. Service Coordination. The Judy Center and its partners will contact pediatricians and childcare professionals to introduce them to Judy Center services and the referral process for families to access services. Health Screening. With a grant obtained from the Save Our Sight Foundation, the Judy Center will be provide free vision screenings to client children and free glasses to children who need them. Student Attendance. The Judy Center will redouble efforts to ensure proper student attendance including the use of phone calls, parent meetings and the services of a Pupil Service Worker and Truancy Officer. Additional Program Funding. Judy Center partners will seek additional funding sources to provide free hearing screenings and family kits that provide tools and games for children to develop early phonetic awareness and phonics skills.

Professional Development
Positive Behavior Intervention Support School (PBIS) training. Judy Center staff will continue ongoing training on the PBIS model and it will be adapted to apply better to pre-k and kindergarten students.

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Judy Center Evaluation

Family Activities
Family literacy. The Judy Center will collaborate with Family Junction in a new “Books for Babies” program that offers every newborn in the county a book and Judy Center brochure. FSU Training. A Frostburg State University professor will provide a workshop on child language and literacy skills.

Evaluation and Planning
Evaluation and Strategic Planning. A new Judy Center program performance and strategic planning framework (Lee 2006) was introduced during the FY 06 fiscal year. This framework will improve interagency collaboration in identifying the variables that affect child readiness, better measure the contributions of Judy Center activities on program inputs, outputs, and outcomes, and improve the linkages between performance measurement and interagency collaborative action plans. Think Tank Sessions. The Judy Center will coordinate an effort bringing together various community agencies to brainstorm about how to improve mental health resources and language/literacy skills and explore future partnerships and new program development. Most features of the program remained basically the same as the fifth year. For instance, reporting and internal evaluation were carried out in much the same manner as the fifth year with a designated Steering Board that met on a quarterly basis and quarterly meetings of statewide and MSDE Judy Center staff. Program marketing was similar to the fifth year, including the use of broadcast, newspaper announcements, website, and print materials. The parameters for evaluation were spelled out in the proposal and are listed in table 2.1. The ultimate goals of the program are to improve child readiness for elementary school. Intermediate objectives involve particular key curriculum components where focused inputs were anticipated to have the greatest potential impact. Strategies describe programmatic improvements and activities include specific program inputs that were to be expanded in order to realize a particular strategy. The final column briefly describes the achievement of each goal, objective, strategy, and activity. To summarize this table, every goal and objective was realized. All but one of the activities (A Frostburg State University professor did not provide parent training on “how to stimulate your child’s language and literacy skills in the home”) was carried out as outlined in the original continuing grant application.

5

Table 2.1 Implementation Plan
Milestone 1. Quarterly MMSR Data generated as progress reports to parents will show full readiness quarterly scores of 65% 1st quarter, 70% 2nd quarter, 75% 3rd quarter, and 80% 4th quarter. 2. Quarterly MMSR Data generated as progress reports to parents will show full readiness quarterly scores of 25% 1st quarter, 30% 2nd quarter, 38% 3rd quarter, and 45% 4th quarter. Strategy Increase the readiness level of FARMS children in the domain of Social and Emotional Development. Activities (1) Provide weekly Second Step lessons in classrooms, (2) Improve communication through a monthly newsletter to the Judy Center community, focusing on mental health issues by providing articles on mental health, social/emotional issues, and behavioral concerns (3) Provide support groups and parent trainings for parents with children who have a mental health diagnosis (ADHD Support Group, BiPolar Support Group, Autism Support Group, Behavior Modification training for Parents), (4) Identify children who have behavioral and/or mental health concerns prior to their entering public school: (a) Educate Childcare providers on how to Achievement Goal and objective realized. Readiness of all children in Social and Emotional Development domain was 95% at end of year. Readiness of FARMS children was 92%. Readiness of students receiving Special Education services was 100%. Activities implemented as follows: (1) Second Step lessons provided for 3rd year in row, (2) Monthly newsletter used to communicate information about variety of mental health issues, (3) Support groups and parent training provided for ADHD, Autism, and Behavior Modification but not Bi-Polar, (4) JC staff worked with Apples for children for childcare training, area pediatricians, and Head Start to identify children

Goal By June 30, 2007, 90% of exiting kindergarten students at the Judy Center will achieve full readiness level in the area of Social and Emotional Development as determined by the Work Sampling System indicators.

Objective 1. By June 30, 2007, 80% of exiting kindergarten students at the Judy Center who receive Free and Reduced Meals (FARMS) will achieve full readiness level in the area of Social and Emotional Development as determined by the Work Sampling System indicators. 2. By June 30, 2007, 45% of exiting kindergarten students at the Judy Center who receive Special Education services will achieve full readiness level in the area of Social and Emotional Development as determined by the Work Sampling System indicators.

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Table 2.1 Implementation Plan
Continued from previous page

make referrals, (b) Inform pediatricians on how to make referrals to Public School Behavioral support, (c) Coordinate with Childfind Clinic to identify children who do not qualify for special education services, but need additional support. Also, coordinate with Childfind to identify children birth to 3 years old who are receiving services in the home, (d) Coordinate with the Infant and Toddler program to identify children who are transitioning either out of their services or into a Judy Center program, (e) Collaborate with the HS Program to identify children who have behavioral concerns which impact their ability to participate in classroom activities, (5) Develop school-wide incentive programs using the PBIS model: (a) Reorientation and continued training in the PBIS model for new people,

with behavioral concerns. Less interaction occurred with Childfind Clinic and Infant and Toddler program, (5) PBIS model was used and PBIS was used in Kindergarten Classroom behavior plan. Coupons (“Golden Star”) were used to reinforce good behavior, (6) APPLES for Children received a grant for this purpose and provided these services, (7) Forty-three children in total received these services, (8) Think tank session was convened with agreements to fill some existing service gaps, (9) Parent Power program was discontinued at Beall Elementary in December due to low attendance. YMCA is attempting to start the program at John Humbird.

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Table 2.1 Implementation Plan
Continued from previous page

(b) Reorganization of the PBIS initiative to better suit pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students, (6) Train childcare providers on behavior management and the referral process, through a contract with Judy Center and APPLES for Children. (7) Provide the following in public schools and HS classrooms throughout the county: behavioral observations, classroom management techniques, individual behavior plans, individual and small group social skill lessons, coordination of family services, (8) Invite current partners from whom Judy Center would like increased collaboration and potential partners to a Think Tank session to explore joint funding possibilities to expand the mental health services to reinstate a ‘direct service’ model

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8

Table 2.1 Implementation Plan
Continued from previous page

to children ages 3-5, (9) Continue with the YMCA Parent Power Program which will provide parent/child activities focusing on social/emotional/behavioral development for children birth to 3 years old. Objective Quarterly MMSR Data generated as progress reports to parents will show full readiness quarterly scores of 62% 1st quarter, 74% 2nd quarter, 80% 3rd quarter, and 88% 4th quarter. Increase the readiness level of FARMS kindergarten children in the domain of Language and Literacy. Milestone Strategy Activities (1) Continue kindergarten curriculum, including use of a core reading program that is based on Scientific based Reading Research (SBRR) as defined by Reading First, (2) Continue the new Pre-k curriculum during the 2006-07 school year, (3) During the 2006-07 school year, a research based intervention program will be provide by kindergarten teachers, (4) Invite current partners to a Think Tank session to explore options as to how to increase the language and literacy skills of children in the community, (5) Educational summer camps will be provided Achievement Goal and objective realized. Readiness of all children in language and literacy domain was 94% at end of year. Readiness of FARMS children was 89%. Activities implemented as follows: (1) HoughtonMifflin program was selected for this purpose and used during the year, (2) HoughtonMifflin program was continued, (3) Reading intervention program ERI was used, (4) Think tank session was convened with agreements to fill some existing service gaps, (5) Educational summer camp was conducted as
Continued on next page

Goal

By June 30, 2007, 88% of exiting kindergarten students at the Judy Center will achieve full readiness level in the Language and Literacy assessed area of the Work Sampling System indicators.

By June 30, 2007, 80% of exiting FARMS kindergarten students at the Judy Center will achieve full readiness in the Language and Literacy assessed area of the Work Sampling System.

Table 2.1 Implementation Plan
Continued from previous page

for Judy Center students enrolled in the 2005-06 school year. Head Start will move their summer camp to the Judy Center. Special Education will also run a 6 week summer camp at the Judy Center for students have been diagnosed with the Autism Spectrum Disorder. Frostburg Parks and Recreation Department will provide an 8 week summer camp at the Judy Center which will focus on gross motor development in children ages 5 to 12 years old. Meals will be provided to all students through the summer food and nutrition program grant, (6) Provide a literacy specialist for summer camp and for Family Literacy nights throughout the regular school year, (7) Provide Literacy Bags in Kindergarten, Childcare, and Head Start classrooms.

reading specialist (paid for by the GED program) was provided once a month at both Beall Elementary and Westernport Elementary, (7) This program was continued, (8) This program was continued in collaboration with Family Junction, (9) This training did not occur because of poor participation rate when offered last year, (10) Staff monitored attendance and performed follow-up.

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Table 2.1 Implementation Plan
Continued from previous page

proposed, (6) A Continue to give away free books to all Judy Center children including those served in the home by partner agencies, (8) Provide a free book and a Judy Center brochure to all newborn babies who are a resident of Allegany County, (9) A Frostburg State University professor will provide a parent training on “how to stimulate your child’s language and literacy skills in the home,” (10) Be proactive with student attendance by using phone calls, Pupil Service Worker, parent meeting, and Truancy Officer.

July 2006-June 2007

In this report, a broader spectrum of measures (see table 2.2) is used to measure program effectiveness. This includes the following elements: (1) marketing and outreach efforts (did the Judy Center meet expectations for program marketing and conduct outreach to other schools in the county?) (2) program enrollment and attendance (were enrollment and attendance expectations for child programs and family activities achieved?), (3) staff training, curriculum resources, and validation (were necessary staff training, program validation, and curriculum materials available as planned?), (4) partner satisfaction (how did partners rate collaboration success?), (5) teacher satisfaction (how did teachers in Pre-K, Kindergarten, and 1st grade view the Judy Center?), (6) parent satisfaction (how did parents view the Judy Center?), (7) child learning (how was school readiness improved according to information from pupil progress reports and other assessment data?), (9) Judy Center component standard ratings (how did parents, staff and partners view accomplishment of Judy Center goals), and (10) answers to special research questions posed in the continuation grant proposal (see table 2.3).

Table 2.2 Evaluation questions.
Issues Marketing and outreach Children enrolled Parent involvement Staff professional development Program accreditation Partner satisfaction Teacher satisfaction Parent satisfaction Child readiness Alignment with Judy Center Goals Special research questions regarding effects of initiatives on social and personal development and language and literacy Measurement public school outreach activities, Parent survey results # children enrolled in Judy Center programs by area #, type, and participation in parent workshops, Parent survey results # and type training workshops attended # programs validated Partner survey results Teacher survey results Parent survey results Pupil Progress Reports, Head Start Observation Study results teacher survey, parent survey

MMSR results

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Judy Center Evaluation

The remainder of the report is divided into seven sections. The next section (3.0) addresses pupil enrollment, family service, training, and validation strategies of the program. Section 4.0 describes the results of a steering board partner survey. Section 5.0 describes the results of an end-of year teacher survey and section 6.0 describes the findings of fall and spring surveys of parents. The fall survey asks mainly questions about parenting practices and family resources for use in designing Judy Center activities during the remainder of the year while the spring survey was designed to provide summative information about the perceived effectiveness of the Judy Center, different strategies, and overall parent satisfaction. Section 7.0 provides information on child learning achievement as revealed by performance on various pupil progress reports and tests using benchmark comparisons. Section 8.0 describes Judy Center Components self assessments and MSDE validation of these components during the last year. Section 9.0 answers special research questions (see table 2.3) introduced in last year’s continuation grant application. Section 10.0 describes changes that are anticipated for next year’s Judy Center. The report ends with a summary.

Table 2.3 Special research questions
Question (1) (2) Is the Judy Center doing the right activities to bring about the desired results or outcomes for the participants in the area of social and personal development? What has happened in the area of language and literacy as a consequence of the implementation of the current pre-kindergarten and kindergarten curriculum?

13

July 2006-June 2007

3.0 Enrollment, training, and validation
A duplicated headcount of seven-hundred and fifty-six (756) was served by programs housed at the Judy Center and its satellite locations during FY 2007. This figure compares to six hundred and thirty-seven (637) during FY 2006, five hundred and thirty-seven (537) students in FY 2005 and four hundred and forty-nine (449) students in FY 2004. The duplicated distribution of children by age is shown in table 3.1 and distribution by race for Pre-K, Kindergarten, and after-school/before school programs in figure 3.1. The surge in four-year old and five year enrollment in 2006-07 can be attributed to the expansion of Judy Center services to John Humbird Elementary and Westernport Elementary. Child enrollment racial demographics from available partners showed that minority enrollment was similar to the service area—7.3% of children were minority versus 7.0% reported in the 2000 U.S. Census for Allegany County.

Table 3.1 Enrollment of children by age.
Birth to 3 3-year old 4 year old 5 year old Total 2003-04 78 75 110 88 351 2004-05 190 135 127 85 537 2005-06 317 88 137 95 637 2006-07 290 91 200 175 756

One strategy identified in the FY 2007 grant was to narrow the achievement gap for children who receive free and reduced price meals (FARMS) and for students receiving special education services. Enrollment of targeted groups for pre-kindergarten decreased slightly to 76% from need categories (automatic enrollment and priority enrollment) versus 83% in FY 2006 (see Figure 3.2). Additional resources were directed to health screenings with 320 children having vision screening, 256 having hearing screening, 113 having dental screenings, and 255 having physical growth and nutritional assessments and 82 having dental screenings during the year. This shows continued growth as observed in the last two years (Figure 3.3) These efforts resulted in additional health service referrals.

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Judy Center Evaluation

Figure 3.1 Enrollment by Race
1% 5% 1%

Asian Black Hispanic White

93%

Figure 3.2 Enrollment of Targeted Groups
85

80

75

Percentage

70

65

60

55

50

FY 2003

FY 2004

FY 2005

FY 2006

FY 2007

15

July 2006-June 2007

Figure 3.3 Health Screenings
350 300 250

# of children

200 150 100 50 0 2004 2005
Year

Dental Vision Hearing Growth and Nutrition

2006

Enrollment in the Kids Korner daycare center continued to increase in FY 2007 to 92 children (versus 80 in FY 2006 and 28 students in FY 2002, its first year of operation). These totals reflect both Judy Center children and other elementary school age children. Scholarships to offset some of the costs associated with childcare were offered to eligible families. Kids Korner uses a curriculum, High Reach, which uses the MMSR Domains and also uses the OUNCE screening tool for two year olds. In a continued effort to improve parent-child connectedness and reinforce positive behaviors learned in school, the Judy Center continued to offer after-school activities and parent workshops/trainings. The Center continued to offer “family fun nights” which attracted 1020 attendances. Family training included parent orientation night (46 participants), parent conferences (40 participants), family literacy home activities (150 participants), Family Literacy nights (94 participants) , Family Math Night (46 participants), an Autism Support Group (6 participants), and Down Syndrome Support Group (9 participants). A duplicated count of six hundred and eighteen attended. This continues a pattern of increases over the last four years (see Figure 3.5). As in previous years activities were announced in the Times-News newspaper, Judy Center flyers and/or calendars distributed to children and parents.

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Judy Center Evaluation

Judy Center staff participated in a variety of professional development sessions during the school year including training on DIBELS, Emergency team planning, MMSR, Sensory integration and behavior, and reporting abuse and neglect, and harassment.

Fig. 3.4 Child Daycare Attendance
100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Percentage

FY 2002

FY 2003

FY 2004

FY 2005

FY 2006

FY 2007

17

July 2006-June 2007

Figure 3.5 Family Training Participation
700

600

500

400

300

200

100

0 FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007

No new accreditations were obtained during the 2006-07 school year. The Judy Center pre-k, kindergarten and childcare programs obtained re-accreditation by the MSDE for a three-year period in summer 2006. The Head Start program received accreditation from both National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and MSDE during 2004. The Kids Korner daycare center obtained MSDE accreditation for its child care program in spring 2006.

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Judy Center Evaluation

4.0 Partner Surveys
Partner surveys (see Appendix A.1) were administered to the Judy Center partners in spring 2007. The survey instrument was the same one administered in spring 2003, spring 2005 and spring 2006 and included questions about partners’ level of participation in the Judy Center, collaboration success, grant achievement, Center performance on a number of features that align with the Judy Center component standards, and satisfaction with the Judy Center. The first two tables indicate that the Judy Center partners have maintained good working relationships but that the level of participation has receded somewhat during the last four years. Table 4.1 shows that two of the partners characterized themselves as being “very active” in the Judy Center while three were somewhat active. Some partners indicated that meeting times were not convenient. All of the partners rated collaboration success highly (see table 4.2). Partners agreed (see table 4.3) that the Judy Center had become more visible in the community, was implementing strategies described in the grant, and was realizing positive results. One partner indicated that they felt the Judy Center did not have enough financial resources to accomplish its charge.

Table 4.1 Activity levels of partners, percentage of partners.
Very Active Somewhat active Not very Active Inactive 2002-03 25 75 0 0 2004-05 50 50 0 0 2005-06 20 70 10 0 2006-07 29 43 14 14

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July 2006-June 2007

Table 4.2 Collaboration success, percentage of partners agreeing.
2002-03 The composition of the Steering Committee members is appropriate for making Judy Center decisions. The Judy Center staff communicated openly and clearly during meetings. The Judy Center staff communicated openly and clearly between meetings. Member of the Judy Center staff established informal communication informal communication networks (e-mail communication, communication, phone calls, etc.) Members of the Judy Center staff have relationships built on trust and mutual respect I understand the goals and objectives of the Judy Center project I understand my roles and responsibilities as a member of this project The Judy Center team has clear and effective decision making procedures. 100 04-05 100 05-06 100 06-07 100

100 87.5

100 100

100 100

100 100

100

100

100

100

87.5 100 100

100 100 100

100 100 100

100 100 100

87.5

100

100

100

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Judy Center Evaluation

Table 4.3 Goal success, percentage of partners
2002-03 Community awareness of the Judy Center has increased in the past year. Resources for this project were adequate to meet objectives The strategies of this grant have been implemented. The strategies of this grant are demonstrating positive outcomes. 100 100 100 100 04-05 100 100 100 100 05-06 100 89 100 100 06-07 100 83 100 100

Table 4.4 shows partner assessment of various features of the Judy Center. The ratings for most characteristics were high. Several features were given lower marks by partners. Two partners gave “space sufficiency” a “minimal” rating and one gave it an “inadequate” rating. Health services, information given about upcoming Judy Center activities, and cleanliness and safety received “minimal” ratings from a partner. The highest ratings were in the areas of the variety of services available for children and families and child care before or after day. Most partners indicated that they were not familiar with how the Center was performing in presenting various elements of the curriculum (e.g., activities for art, music, physical education, language/reading/writing, math, science) and could not judge the quality of school meals, supervision of children/discipline, materials for learning and play, play activities, and progress reports and follow-up conferences.

Table 4.4 Performance area ratings, percentage of partners (4=Excellent, 3=Good, 2=Minimal, 1=Inadequate, 0=NA/Don’t Know).
a. Hours and days of JC operation b. Child care before or after day c. Quality of School meals (lunch, breakfast) d. Family case management e. Array of child and family support services on site f. Array of child services for all ages (e.g., infants and toddlers, pre-k, g. Screening for disabilities (4) 71 86 14 71 86 71 57 (3) 29 0 29 29 14 29 14 (2) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (1) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (0) 0 14 57 0 0 0 29

Continued on next page

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July 2006-June 2007

Table 4.4 Performance area ratings, percentage of partners (4=Excellent, 3=Good, 2=Minimal, 1=Inadequate, 0=NA/Don’t Know). Continued from previous page
h. Provision of services for children with disabilities i. Health services (e.g., immunizations, dental assessment, vision/hearing screening) j. Friendliness/helpfulness of staff and teachers k. Supervision of children/discipline l. Materials for learning and play m. Play activities n. Activities for learning Art o. Activities for learning Music p. Activities for learning Physical education q. Activities for learning language/reading/writing r. Activities for learning Nature/science s. Activities for learning Math t. Activities for learning Computers u. Progress reports and follow-up conferences v. Activities for parents and families (e.g., field trips, picnics) w. Education programs for families (e.g., parenting workshops, GED classes) x. Information provided by Judy Center about upcoming activities y. Judy Center webpage z. Food and nutrition assistance (e.g., WIC) aa. Cleanliness and safety of Judy Center bb. Sufficiency of space 57 71 71 43 43 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 43 57 57 86 50 57 57 17 43 14 29 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 29 43 0 17 43 29 33 0 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 0 0 14 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 0 0 0 57 57 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 57 14 0 0 33 0 0 0

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Judy Center Evaluation

Table 4.5 shows partner satisfaction compared to previous years. All of the partners expressed that they were “satisfied” or “very satisfied” with the Center. Additional written comments are provided in Appendix A.2. Partners indicate that the Judy Center has been beneficial to children, families, and the community. However, they expressed concern about space limitations and funding issues.

Table 4.5 Partner satisfaction with Judy Center, percentage of partners.
Very Satisfied Satisfied Somewhat Satisfied Somewhat Dissatisfied Not Satisfied at All 2002-2003 75 12.5 12.5 0 0 2004-2005 100 0 0 0 0 2005-2006 90 10 0 0 0 2006-07 71 29 0 0 0

23

July 2006-June 2007

5.0 Teacher Surveys
Teacher surveys used to obtain feedback from staff in kindergarten/pre-k and first-grade teachers. The two surveys (included in Appendix A.3 and A.4) are the same as used in last year’s report. They ask about teacher background, satisfaction with school resources and staff and parent involvement, Center performance on Judy Center component standards, and overall satisfaction with the Center. Six teachers in total were surveyed, including four pre-k/kindergarten teachers and two first grade teachers. As table 5.1 shows teacher experience is varied with both newer and more experienced teachers.

Table 5.1 Years teaching, percentage of teachers.
1-2 3-5 5-10 11-15 16 or more 0 50 33 17 0

Table 5.2 shows that teachers are generally satisfied with resources and cooperation at Beall Elementary. However, one teacher is dissatisfied with the size of classes and one teacher is dissatisfied with the level of parental involvement. Teachers also expressed a lower level of satisfaction with professional development opportunities than previous years. Table 5.3 show that only one performance area, case management, received a minimal or inadequate rating from any teacher.

Table 5.2 Teacher satisfaction, percentage of teachers (5=Very Satisfied, 3=Somewhat Satisfied, 1=Not Satisfied)
Quality of classroom equipment Quality of facilities Size of classes Administrative support Professional development opportunities Collaboration with teachers Collaboration with early childhood agencies Level of parental involvement in children’s education (5) 100 33 0 67 0 83 50 0 (4) 0 67 33 33 17 17 50 50 (3) 0 0 50 0 83 0 0 33 (2) 0 0 17 0 0 0 0 17 (1) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

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Judy Center Evaluation

Table 5.3 Performance area ratings, percentage of teachers (4=Excellent, 3=Good, 2=Minimal, 1=Inadequate, 0=NA/Don’t Know).
a. Hours and days of JC operation b. Child care before or after day c. Quality of School meals (lunch, breakfast) d. Family case management e. Array of child and family support services on site f. Array of child services for all ages (e.g., infants and toddlers, pre-k, kindergarten) g. Screening for disabilities h. Provision of services for children with disabilities i. Health services (e.g., immunizations, dental assessment, vision/hearing screening) j. Friendliness/helpfulness of staff and teachers k. Supervision of children/discipline l. Materials for learning and play m. Play activities n. Activities for learning Art o. Activities for learning Music p. Activities for learning Physical education q. Activities for learning language/reading/writing r. Activities for learning Nature/science s. Activities for learning Math (4) 83 100 25 50 67 83 33 33 83 83 67 83 67 67 67 50 67 67 67 (3) 17 0 75 33 33 17 50 67 17 17 33 17 33 17 17 33 17 17 17 (2) 0 0 0 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (1) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (0) 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 17 17 17 17 17

Continued on next page

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July 2006-June 2007

Table 5.3 Performance area ratings, percentage of teachers (4=Excellent, 3=Good, 2=Minimal, 1=Inadequate, 0=NA/Don’t Know). Continued from previous page
t. Activities for learning Computers u. Progress reports and follow-up conferences v. Activities for parents and families (e.g., field trips, picnics) w. Education programs for families (e.g., parenting workshops, GED classes) x. Information provided by Judy Center about upcoming activities y. Judy Center webpage z. Food and nutrition assistance (e.g., WIC) aa. Cleanliness and safety of Judy Center bb. Sufficiency of space 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 17 17 17 33 33 33 17 33 33 83 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 17 17 17 17 17 0 0 0

All teaching staff felt that families served by the Judy Center were either “very satisfied” or “satisfied” with the Judy Center (see table 5.4). In addition, both 1st grade teachers indicated that they were “very satisfied” with the Center and “very satisfied” with the readiness of Judy Center students.

Table 5.4 Feeling of families served by Judy Center, percentage of teachers
Very Satisfied Satisfied Somewhat Satisfied Somewhat Dissatisfied Not Satisfied at All Don’t Know 2002-03 50 50 0 0 0 0 2003-04 62.5 25.0 0 0 0 12.5 2004-05 100 0 0 0 0 0 2005-06 71 29 0 0 0 0 2006-07 50 50 0 0 0 0

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Judy Center Evaluation

6.0 Parent Surveys
Two parent surveys were administered during the school year. The survey instruments were similar to the ones used for last year’s report. The fall survey (see Appendix A.5) collected information on family resources and attitudes for use in designing curriculum improvements and outside activities for the school year. The spring survey (see Appendix A.6) collected information on parent satisfaction with various features of the Judy Center, parental assessments of child development during the school year, and information on family resources and attitudes. Since a continued effort was made to improve family services during the year, the pre-tests and post-tests were constructed to make comparisons for pre-test and post-test responses to see if the program had a positive effect on family attitudes and resources. Survey participants were given the option of providing the last four digits of their social security numbers so that pairwise matching of post-test and pre-test responses could be accomplished. As in previous years, there was a drop off in survey participation between the fall and spring (from 84 collected in the fall to 36 in the spring). Seventeen (17) responses were received in the spring from participants in the fall survey so that comparisons could be made over time. This compares to twenty-seven (27) parent panel respondents last year and sixteen (16) in 2004-05. Table 6.1 shows the characteristics of Judy Center parent respondents to the fall survey based on the 84 respondents. Two-thirds of the responding parents is thirty years or older and ninety-one percent is female. Approximately seven out of ten work (either full or part-time) and seventy percent is married. More than three-quarters has at least some college and about two thirds is homeowners. As in the previous years, the typical Judy Center survey respondent has a higher socioeconomic level than the average Frostburg city or Allegany County resident (see eQuotient 2003). Most parents (81%) have only one child enrolled in the Center. Most children are enrolled in kindergarten, pre-k or multi-age programs (see Table 6.2). Participation in school lunch and breakfast is also high. Enrollment in various day care services remains at high levels. On the other hand, a lower proportion of participants reported that their children received free dental and vision screenings. A lower percentage of survey respondents reported having children with special needs (seventeen percent compared to twenty five percent last year). Among the special needs cited by parents, ten (10) children had speech difficulties, two (2) had vision needs, two (2) have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and two parents identified other special needs.

27

July 2006-June 2007

Table 6.1 Respondent Demographics, percentage of parents.
Age 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40+ NA Total Gender Male Female Employment Status Employed full-time Employed Part-time Not Employed and seeking job Not Employed and not seeking job Homemaker Other Marital Status Married Single Divorced Widowed/Widower # 0 12 17 22 25 8 0 84 # 8 76 % 48 22 5 0 19 6 % 70 17 13 0 % 0.0 14 20 26 30 10 0.0 100.0 % 9 91

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Judy Center Evaluation

Table 6.1 Respondent Demographics, percentage of parents.
Continued from previous page

Educational level Some high school High school diploma GED Some College Associates Degree Bachelor’s degree or higher Own or rent home Own Rent Live with relatives Other Number of children One Two Three Special needs Yes No Don’t know

% 6 17 1 33 13 30 % 67 28 4 1 % 81 17 2 % 17 82 1

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July 2006-June 2007

Table 6.2 Programs used, percentage of parents.
Kindergarten 4-year old Pre-K 2-3 year old Pre-K 3-4-5 year old Pre-K 3 & 4 year old Pre-K Head Start Infant and Toddler Before school childcare After school childcare During school childcare School closing childcare Summer childcare Case Management Computer Classes Preschool Special Education Dental Screening/Services Free Vision Screenings Partners for Success Special Education Services Family Support Network Frostburg Library Family Nights Preschool Partners Family Literacy GED Family Preservation (DSS) Fresh Start WIC Healthy Start (Health Dept) 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 28 42 44 32 46 39 20 32 35 39 40 38 7 11 12 10 28 44 33 32 20 22 22 17 17 18 13 2 2 4 0 6 5 13 18 14 20 3 10 15 24 18 23 5 5 7 9 2 8 7 4 10 17 12 17 10 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 4 3 1 4 3 2 6 0 49 26 62 27 1 1 6 2 3 6 2 6 3 3 2 4 2 4 2 2 1 1 6 2 4 0 0 0 0 12 5 2 0 3 0 7 3 3 1 0 6 3 4 30 28 40 39 34 27 4 3 3 8 9 2
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Judy Center Evaluation

Table 6.2 Programs used, percentage of parents.
Continued from previous page

Adult seminars Nurturing Program Dr. Miller’s “Breakfast Club” Family Junction YMCA—Family Center YMCA class @ Judy Center YMCA Parent/Child activitiesYMCA Fathers & Families YMCA Parent Power English as Second Language Mental Health (Health Dept) Breakfast Lunch Support Groups Other

2 0 3 0 0 1 22 26 -

2 1 0 0 4 1 0 26 29 1

10 6 0 3 38 42 1

2 0 2 0 8 42 41 2

0 0 4 0 0 2 59 52 0

0 2 1 4 52 49 0 2

Parents were surveyed about the availability of learning support materials in the household and parental participation in learning activities (see table 6.3). For the third consecutive year, all of the parents reported that children’s books were available. Seventy-seven percent of households had computers and seventy-one percent had Internet access. These figures are comparable to the last few years. These high levels of home learning resources may, in part, may reflect the success of Judy Center efforts in building family learning resources since some of the parents have multiple children who have been schooled at the Center and many children were enrolled in Judy Center programs during previous years (e.g., Infant and Toddlers, Pre-k, multi-age programs, Kindergarten). All parents reported “frequently” praising their children for doing well and nearly all “frequently” sit and talk with their children about their day (see table 6.4). More than nine in ten parents reported “frequently” eating a dinner together as a family and eight in ten indicated that they read with their children. Seven out of ten indicated that they “frequently” played with their children. Four in ten parents “rarely” or “never” went to a library or museum with their children.

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July 2006-June 2007

Parents identified programming of interest for the upcoming year (see table 6.5). Free vision and dental screenings were the most popular followed by parent child activities and mental health services for children.

Table 6.3 Learning/reading materials at home, percentage of parents.
Children’s books Magazines for children Adult books Newspapers Television Home computer Computer with Internet Access 2002-03 84 41 63 60 83 61 54 2003-04 97 54 68 58 93 74 64 2004-05 100 55 79 67 97 77 68 2005-06 100 57 81 65 96 77 68 2006-07 100 54 77 67 94 77 71

Table 6.4 Activities with children, percentage of parents.
Frequently Read a story Played with toys or played games. Praised your child for doing well. Visited public library or museum. Visited a playground, park, or went on a picnic Eat a meal together as a family Attended an event hosted by a community or religious group Sit and talk to your child about his/her day 79 71 100 14 54 93 35 95 Sometimes 20 26 0 46 42 6 45 4 Rarely 1 2 0 30 5 1 19 0 Never NA 0 0 0 10 0 0 1 1

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Judy Center Evaluation

Table 6.5 Program interest, #/% of parents.
2004 % 2 6 2 3 12 14 23 12 2 3 2 2 6 2005 % 1 10 0 9 1 13 5 19 3 2 1 2 1 5 2 17 2006 % 4 7 2 4 1 8 6 23 2 1 2 1 7 3 29 11

GED Childcare Family Preservation Family Literacy Programs MCHIP (children’s health insurance) Educational programs for 3, 4, or 5 year olds Parenting classes Parent/child activities Programs for children with disabilities WIC Head Start Fresh Start Healthy Start Adult Training Seminars Fathers & Families Program Free Vision and/or Dental Screenings Mental Health Services for Children

The spring survey received thirty six responses and the answers are tabulated in tables 6.6-6.9. Table 6.6 and Figure 6.1 show that parent satisfaction with the Judy Center reached the highest level since the Center’s first year in 2001-2002. Furthermore, the ninety-seven percent satisfaction rating (combining “very satisfied” and “satisfied”) is higher than the eighty-nine percent state-wide average satisfaction reported for all Maryland Judy Centers (MGT of America, Inc. 2003).

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July 2006-June 2007

Table 6.6 Satisfaction with Judy Center services, percentage of parents.
Very Satisfied Satisfied Somewhat Satisfied Somewhat Dissatisfied Not Satisfied at All Don’t know/Confused or uniformed about the services provided Don’t know/No feeling about the center 2001-02 79 19 2 0 0 0 0 2002-03 60.7 36.1 3.3 0 0 0 0 2003-04 72.7 21.2 6.1 0 0 0 0 2004-05 75.5 18.9 1.9 1.9 0 0 1.9 2005-06 73.5 22.5 3.1 0 0 0 0 2006-07 80 17 0 0 0 0 3

Figure 6.1 Parent Satisfaction
Very Satisfied

Satisfied

Somewhat Satisfied

Somewhat Dissatisfied

5/1/07 May-06 May-05 May-04 May-03 May-02

Not Satisfied at All

Don't Know

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

Percentage

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Judy Center Evaluation

Table 6.7 shows parent satisfaction with features of the Judy Center that align with the Judy Center Component Standards. Figure 6.2 displays the top 10 rated areas and figure 6.3 shows the bottom 10 rated areas as determined by weighting the responses by the following scale: (4=excellent; 3=good, 2=minimal, 1=inadequate). As in previous years all of the features were rated above 3 (good). The top rated features were “array of child services for all ages” and “friendliness/helpfulness of staff and teachers.” These features have regularly appeared in the top 10 over the past six years. Also rated highly were “array of child and family support services on site” and “hours and days of JC operation.” The former feature did not appear in last year’s top 10. Also new to the top 10 were the “Judy Center Summer Camp” which was expanded during summer 2006 and the Kids Korner Childcare Center which has continued to serve more children. Rounding out the top 10 were “information provided by Judy Center about upcoming activities.” “play activities,” “health services,” and “food and nutrition assistance.” These also appeared in last year’s top 10.

Figure 6.2 Top 10 Performance Areas
Array of child services for all ages Friendliness/help fulness of staff and teachers Array of child and family support services on site Hours and days of JC operation Judy Center Summer Camp Kids Korner Childcare Center Information provided by Judy Center about upcoming activities Play activities

Health services Food and nutrition assistance (e.g., WIC)

3.50

3.55

3.60

3.65

3.71

3.76

3.81

3.86

Mean Rating

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July 2006-June 2007

Figure 6.3 Bottom 10 Performance Areas
Sufficiency of space Quality of School meals (lunch, breakfast) Activities for learning Physical education Activities for learning Computers Activities for learning Art Activities for learning Music Family case management Progress reports and follow-up conferences Activities for learning Nature/science Cleanliness and safety of Judy Center 2.9 3 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6

Mean Rating

There were some changes from last year’s bottom 10 features. Six of the lowest rated features also appeared in last years list. These include: “Sufficiency of space”, “Quality of school meals,” “Family Case Management,” “Activities for learning computers,” “Activities for learning art,” and “Progress reports and follow-up conferences.” In part, these lower ratings may simply reflect lower levels of awareness for parents who do not need to use the specified service. New to this list were curriculum related activities such as “Activities for learning physical education,” “Activities for learning music,” and “Activities for learning nature/science.” Although “cleanliness and safety of the Judy Center” rounded about the bottom 10, all respondents rated this feature as “good” or “excellent.” In open-ended comments, several parents also identified a desire for additional parent and child activities (e.g., ESL, fieldtrips, plays, autism support group, Mom’s night out) (see Appendices A.7 and A.8).

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Judy Center Evaluation

Table 6.7 Satisfaction with Judy Center in performance areas, percentage of parents (E=Excellent, G=Good, M=Minimal, I=Inadequate, A=Not applicable/Not available).
Hours and days of JC operation Kids Korner Childcare Center Quality of School meals (lunch, breakfast) Family case management Array of child and family support services on site Array of child services for all ages (e.g., infants and toddlers, pre-k, kindergarten) Screening for disabilities Provision of services for children with disabilities Health services (e.g., immunizations, dental assessment, vision/hearing screening) Friendliness/helpfulness of staff and teachers Supervision of children/discipline Judy Center Summer Camp Materials for learning and play Play activities Activities for learning Art Activities for learning Music Activities for learning Physical education Activities for learning language/reading/writing Activities for learning Nature/science (E) 69 28 39 20 56 80 38 35 57 78 56 36 53 56 42 42 39 50 44 (G) 28 16 39 26 21 17 35 18 37 22 44 15 44 36 50 47 47 44 50 (M) 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 8 0 0 (I) 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (NA) 3 56 8 54 24 3 27 44 6 0 0 49 3 8 6 8 6 6 6

Continued on next page

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July 2006-June 2007

Table 6.7 Satisfaction with Judy Center in performance areas, percentage of parents (E=Excellent, G=Good, M=Minimal, I=Inadequate, A=Not applicable/Not available).
Continued from previous page

Activities for learning Math Activities for learning Computers Progress reports and follow-up conferences Activities for parents and families (e.g., field trips, picnics) Education programs for families (e.g., parenting workshops, GED classes) Information provided by Judy Center about upcoming activities Food and nutrition assistance (e.g., WIC) Cleanliness and safety of Judy Center Sufficiency of space

50 40 47 61 47 34 34 49 31

44 40 39 33 39 17 17 51 49

0 6 6 0 0 3 3 0 17

0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0

6 14 8 0 14 46 46 0 3

Table 6.8 shows that eighty-three percent of the parents “frequently” read flyers and newsletters which are sent home with the children. This is somewhat lower than the previous year. Fifty-three percent reported that they “frequently” attended parent-teacher conferences which was a slight drop from the previous year. The same percentage of parents as last year indicated also that they had attended Judy Center after-school special events or field trips (sixty-four percent at least “sometimes” compared to sixty-four percent for 2004-05 and 2005-06 and thirty-five percent for the 2003-04 school year). Nearly four in ten parents participated in parent education or workshops during the year (either “frequently,” “sometimes,” or “rarely”) which was a slight improvement over 2004-06. Table 6.9 shows parent ratings of various parent-child activities that were held during the year. Levels of participation in the activities can be determined by computing the percentage of respondents who were able to rate each of the activities. The number of parents that participated in at least three activities (94%) continued to improve (see Figure 6.4). Several new activities were offered, including Bullying workshop/Developmental Assets training, Letter of Intent workshop for special needs students, Family Support Group Summer Picnic, Donuts for Dads, Family Support

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Judy Center Evaluation

Figure 6.4 Family Participation in 3+ Activities
100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Percentage

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

Group Mom’s Night Out, Family Game Night, and Make-and-take activity. The proportion of parents who reported attending continued activities increased for some events including Family Literacy Night, Family Movie Night, Easter Hat Decorating Day, Volunteer Workshop, Veteran’s Day Program, Reading @ Home/Free Book Initiative, Meet the Teachers night, Pre-K, Multi-age and/or K orientation, PTO Open House, and Classroom Thanksgiving Feast. Table 6.10 indicates that when parents were not able to participate in Judy Center activities, it was generally not because of a lack of interest in the topics, but rather because of work schedules and the time of the scheduled activity.

39

July 2006-June 2007

Table 6.8 Parent participation in Judy Center activities, percentage of parents.
Frequently Sometimes Volunteered at the Judy Center Observed child’s classroom during the day Attended Judy Center afterschool special events or field trips Attended parent education meetings or workshops about job skills or parenting? Attended a parent-teacher conference Read a Judy Center flyer/ newsletter 6 26 22 19 46 42 Rarely 8 11 8 Never 64 17 22 NA 3 0 6

6 53 83

17 28 14

14 3 0

56 17 0

8 0 3

Table 6.9 Parent rating of Judy Center parent activities.
Excellent Bullying workshop/ Developmental Assets Letter of Intent workshop for special needs students Fall Family Fun Fest Family Literacy Night Program Grandparent’s Day Family Movie Night Easter Hat Decorating Day Pumpkin Carving Day Volunteer Workshop Veteran’s Day Program 9 9 27 21 20 21 36 15 15 21 Good 12 3 18 12 17 6 12 6 12 3 Minimal 3 3 0 0 0 3 0 3 0 0 Inadequate 0 0 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 NA 76 85 52 64 63 70 52 76 73 76
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Judy Center Evaluation

Table 6.9 Parent rating of Judy Center parent activities.
Continued from previous page

Reading @ Home/ Free Book Initiative Meet the Teachers night Pre-K, Multi-age and/or K orientation PTO Open House Infant massage class Family Support GroupSummer picnic Down Syndrome Support group Head Start Parent meetings/ Family activities/Programs Donuts for Dads Shriner’s Circus Family Support Network Christmas Party Classroom Thanksgiving Feast Family Support Group Mom’s Night Out Family Game Night @ Beall Elementary Make-and-take activity for Pre-K and Multi-age

50 32 49 18 3 6 3 18 29 33 9 35 15 27 32

21 21 34 9 0 3 0 6 3 6 3 15 0 3 10

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

29 47 14 70 97 91 97 76 68 61 88 50 85 70 58

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July 2006-June 2007

Table 6.10 Reason for not attending parent activities, percentage of parents.
Work schedule Time of activity was not convenient Not interested in topics Lack of transportation Other 2003-04 61 58 18 6 27 2004-05 48 44 17 6 23 2005-06 37 51 14 10 16 2006-07 42 42 14 6 8

Table 6.11 indicates that parents recognize improvements in most child learning and habits because of the Judy Center. Four in five parents report “much” improvement in counting numbers, writing, and recognizing letters of the alphabet. Seven in ten observed “much” improvement in vocabulary, drawing and speaking and articulation. Over half saw improvements in child hygiene, including washing hands and brushing teeth. These improvements were comparable to last year.

Table 6.11 Improvement in child learning and habits because of the Judy Center.
Much Counting numbers Recognizing letters of the alphabet Writing Drawing Speaking and articulation Vocabulary Eating nutritious and healthy meals Exercising Washing hands before meals after using toilet Brushing teeth 80 83 77 71 68 74 43 54 62 56 A little 11 11 17 23 23 17 40 26 32 26 Not at All 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 11 0 9 NA 9 6 6 6 9 9 12 9 6 9

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Judy Center Evaluation

A before and after study of a cohort of 17 respondents who had replied to both fall and spring surveys was conducted in order to analyze the effect of the Judy Center on family resources and interaction in the home. Table 6.12 shows changes in learning/reading materials and table 6.13 shows changes in parent-child interaction. Statistically significant changes using a pairwise t-test of means are indicated by asterisks. Although parent resources increased in two areas (magazines for children and adult books), none of the differences was statistically significant. Five of the parent-child interaction factors increased but only one positive result was statistically significant–parents were more likely to have visited a playground, park, or go on a picnic after involvement with the Judy Center. On the other hand, they were less likely to praise their child “for doing well.” These findings are the same as last year. The increasingly higher initial levels at which parents begin each year may be attributable to previous exposure to Judy Center services, making it harder over time to demonstrate additional incremental improvements.

Table 6.12 Learning/reading materials at home before and after Judy Center, percentage of parents.
Children’s books Magazines for children Adult books Newspapers Television Home computer Computer with Internet Access Before 100 53 76 65 94 76 71 After 100 65 94 65 94 82 71

Table 6.13 Activities with children, percentage of parents who did ‘frequently’ before and after Judy Center.
Read a story Played with toys or played games Praised your child for doing well Visited public library or museum Visited a playground, park, or went on a picnic Eat a meal together as a family Attended an event hosted by a community or religious group Sit and talk to child about his/her day *α=.10, ** α =.05, *** α =.01 Before 65 71 100 12 35 94 53 94 After 76 71 94 24 65* 94 59 100

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July 2006-June 2007

7.0 Child Readiness
The ACBOE 2006-07 Judy Center Continuation Grant proposal outlined several child development objectives and milestones for FY 2007. They are as follows:

Goal #1
By June 30, 2007, 90% of exiting kindergarten students at the Judy Center will achieve full readiness level in the area of Social and Emotional Development as determined by the Work Sampling System indicators. Objectives 1. By June 30, 2007, 80% of exiting kindergarten students at the Judy Center who receive Free and Reduced Meals (FARMS) will achieve full readiness level in the area of Social and Emotional Development as determined by the Work Sampling System indicators. 2. By June 30, 2007, 45% of exiting kindergarten students at the JC who receive Special Education services will achieve full readiness level in the area of Social and Emotional Development as determined by the Work Sampling System indicators

Goal #2
By June 30, 2007, 88% of exiting kindergarten students at the Judy Center will achieve full readiness level in the Language and Literacy assessed area of the Work Sampling System indicators. Objective By June 30, 2007, 80% of exiting FARMS kindergarten students at the Judy Center will achieve full readiness in the Language and Literacy assessed area of the Work Sampling System.

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Judy Center Evaluation

The data source for these indicators is the Allegany County Board of Education Kindergarten Pupil Progress Report which uses the Work Sampling System (WSS) and is aligned with 30 MMSR indicators that are divided into seven domains (Social and Personal, Language and Literacy, Mathematical Thinking, Scientific Thinking, Social Studies, The Arts, and Physical Development) and that measure pupil readiness with three levels of progress: (3) “Proficient,” (3) “In process,” or (1) “Needs Development.” Individual domain scores are obtained from aggregating domain indicators and a composite score is an aggregation of all 30 MMSR indicators. Three readiness categories are assigned based on the aggregated score: “full” readiness, “approaching” readiness, and “developing” readiness. Beall Elementary Judy Center pupils arrived at school with high readiness levels (see figure 7.1). FARMS and Special education readiness lagged behind other students. Figure 7.2 shows this year’s kindergarten performance compared to the previous five years’ classes after the first period for each domain. Overall readiness dropped for the third consecutive year but increased over last year for the domains of scientific thinking and physical development. Overall Readiness levels dropped for the third consecutive year also for FARMS and Special education students (See Figure 7.3). The results for individual domains vary.
Figure 7.1 Kindergarten Readiness by Domain, 2006
Social and Personal

Language and Literacy

Mathematical Thinking

Scientific Thinking

Social Studies

All FARM Special Ed.

The Arts

Physical Development

Composite

0

10

20

30

40

50 Percentage

60

70

80

90

100

45

July 2006-June 2007

Figure 7.2 Kindergarten Readiness by Domain
100 95 90 85

Percentage

80 75 70 65 60 55 50 2001 2002 2003 Year 2004 2005 2006

Social and Personal Language and Literacy Mathematical Thinking Scientific Thinking Social Studies The Arts Physical Development Composite

Figure 7.3 FARMS Kindergarten Readiness by Domain, 2003-2006
Social and Personal Language and Literacy Mathematical Thinking Scientific Thinking Social Studies TheArts Physical Development Composite

2003 2004 2005 2006

0

10

20

30

40

50 Percentage

60

70

80

90

100

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Judy Center Evaluation

Figure 7.4 Special Education Kindergarten Readiness by Domain, 2003-2006
Social and Personal Language and Literacy Mathematical Thinking Scientific Thinking Social Studies TheArts Physical Development Composite

2003 2004 2005 2006

0

10

20

30

40

50 Percentage

60

70

80

90

100

Figures 7.5 and 7.6 indicate that Judy Center pupils outperformed their peers in the County and State. However, the gaps are narrowing. After the first progress report (see Figure 7.5) period, eighty-three percent of children was fully prepared compared to seventy-three percent for Allegany County and sixty-seven percent for the State. Two percent of students was categorized as “developing” whereas five percent of the County and five percent for the State was so designated. Among individual domains, Beall Elementary Judy Center pupil readiness levels exceed the State and County in every area. Pupil progress report results for students who began and ended the year at the Judy Center were also high (the composite score was 98% at the end at the end of the year) and met or exceeded benchmarks established in the grant application. For students who received Free and Reduced Meals (FARMS), overall readiness was 97% at the end of the year (see Figure 7.7). For students who received special education services, readiness was 100% at the end the year (see Figure 7.8). These final readiness levels exceeded levels observed over the past four years. The specific strategies of increasing the readiness level of FARMS children in the domains of Social and Personal and Language and Literacy and Scientific Thinking were realized. For FARMS students, Social and Personal readiness improved from 73% to 92%. Language and Literacy readiness improved from 68% to 89%. For Special Education students, Social and Personal readiness improved from 75% to 100%.

47

July 2006-June 2007

Figure 7.5 Kindergarten Readiness, Judy Center, County, and State

Beall Elem.

Allegany

Full Approaching Developing

Maryland

0

20

40 Percentage

60

80

100

Figure 7.6 Kindergarten Readiness by Domain, Judy Center, County, and State
Social and Personal Language and Literacy Mathematical Thinking Scientific Thinking Social Studies TheArts Physical Development Composite

Md Allegany Beall Elem.

0

10

20

30

40

50 Percentage

60

70

80

90

100

48

Judy Center Evaluation

Figure 7.9 shows final readiness of children enrolled in the Head Start Pre-Kindergarten program during the past four school years (2002-03, 2003-04, 2004-05, and 2005-06) according to the eight development dimensions. These dimensions include: (1) Language—Listening and Understanding/ Speaking and Communicating, (2) Literacy, (3) Mathematics, (4) Science, (5) Creative Arts, (6) Social and Emotional Development, (7) Approaches to Learning, and (8) Physical Health and Development. Three rating categories are used: C-consistently observed (more than 80% of the time), O=Occasionally Observed (between 40% and 79% of the time), and NY=Not yet observed (less than 39% of the time). The figure shows that child readiness at the end of the year was slightly lower than the high level obtained for the 2005-06 child cohort with the exception of the areas of science and physical/health development.

Figure 7.7 Period 4 FARMS Readiness by Domain
Social and Personal

Language and Literacy

Mathematical Thinking

Scientific Thinking

Social Studies

2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07

The Arts

Physical Development

Composite

0

10

20

30

40

50 Percentage

60

70

80

90

100

49

July 2006-June 2007

Figure 7.8 Period 4 Special Education Readiness by Domain
Social and Personal

Language and Literacy

Mathematical Thinking

Scientific Thinking

Social Studies

2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07

The Arts

Physical Development

Composite

0

10

20

30

40

50 Percentage

60

70

80

90

100

Figure 7.9 Head Start Observation Study Results
Physical/Health Development Approach to Learning
Percentage "Consistently"

Social/Emotional Creative Art Science Math Literacy Language

2007 2006 2005 2004 2003

0

20

40

60

80

100

50

Judy Center Evaluation

8.0 Special Research Questions
As part of the 2006-07 Judy Center continuation grant application, the Allegany County Board of Education posed two questions about the procedures and effectiveness of the Center. The questions and answers are arranged as follows: • Is the Judy Center doing the right activities to bring about the desired results or outcomes for the participants in the area of social and personal development? Figure 8.1 indicates that there has been no clear pattern of improvement in the social and personal development domain as a result of Judy Center activities. However, parent assessments of child personal and social development show that children have shown improvements in communication and affective skills as well as cognitive skills. The social and personal domain has been the focus of a variety of initiatives and the most important ones are indicated in table 8.1. They include staff training in Ruby Payne methods, use of the Second Step Violence Prevention Curriculum, parent training and support, and improved child screening and referral.

Figure 8.1 Kindergarten Readiness by Domain
90 88 86 84
Percentage

82 80 78 76 74 72 70 2001 2002 2003
Year

2004

2005

2006

51

July 2006-June 2007

Table 8.1 Major Social and Personal Development Initiatives
Initiative Ruby Payne workshop training for staff in working with children from low-income families Fresh Start sessions for children Incorporate Second Step Violence Prevention Curriculum Parent support groups and trainings for special needs children (ADHD, Autism, Preemie, etc.) Improve identification and referral of children who have behavioral and/or mental health concerns prior to their entering public school Develop school-wide incentive programs using the PBIS model: FY04 X X X FY05 X X X X X X X FY06 X FY07

X

X

• What has happened in the area of language and literacy as a consequence of the implementation of the current pre-kindergarten and kindergarten curriculum? Figure 8.2 shows that the language and literacy domain has shown a general upward trend during the period that the Beall Elementary Judy Center has operated. The language and literacy domain has been the focus of much attention. Major program initiatives during the last four years are documented in table 8.2 and include new pre-k and summer classes, new curriculum incorporation, new training for teachers and staff, book giveaway programs for parents, and parent training and activities to improve family literacy

52

Judy Center Evaluation

Figure 8.2 Kindergarten Readiness by Domain
85 80 75

Percentage

70 65 60 55 50 2001 2002 2003
Year

2004

2005

2006

Table 8.2 Major Language and Literacy Initiatives
Initiative Implement core reading program based on Scientific Based Reading Research as defined by Early Reading First/Reading First Ruby Payne workshop training for staff in working with children from low-income families Increase the number of books available to children in their homes Family Reading Night at the Allegany County Library Parent training on reading strategies and child growth and development Additional pre-k or summer session activities Implement core reading program FY04 X X X X X X FY05 X X X X FY06 X X X X X X X X FY07 X

53

July 2006-June 2007

9.0 Changes Introduced
The Judy Center will basically maintain the programming and activities that were continued and/or introduced during the fiscal year 07 funding cycle. The basic model and areas of emphasis on FARMS will continue (details can be found in Allegany County Board of Education 2007) because of the significant gaps in readiness that continue to exist between FARMs children and other children. As in most previous years, the strategies will focus on the domains of Language and Literacy and Social and Emotional development. The curriculum initiatives described in last year’s report (e.g., MMSR, Houghton-Mifflin/Dibels) will continue. In addition, Judy Center services will continue to be offered to John Humbird Elementary and Westernport Elementary. Partnerships begun during the FY2007 year, such as free dental screenings for students at John Humbird Elementary, free vision screenings for students at Beall Elementary, John Humbird Elementary, and Westernport Elementary, and Family Literacy Programs at Beall, John Humbird, and Westernport Elementary schools, will continue.

54

Judy Center Evaluation

10.0 Summary and conclusions
The sixth funding cycle (FY 2007) for the Beall Elementary Judy Center improved service delivery to enhance child readiness in targeted categories of students (FARMS and Special Education) that showed proficiency gaps in previous years. New initiatives included expansion of Judy Center services to John Humbird and Westernport elementary schools, summer activities coordinated with Head Start, Kids Corner and the City of Frostburg Department of Parks and Recreation, free vision screenings for children and glasses for needy children, and collaboration with Family Junction in a new “Books for Babies” program. The goal and objectives established in the grant continuation application were met. One activity (having a Frostburg State University professor provide a workshop on child language and literacy skills) was not carried out in the manner described in the grant application because of expectations of low attendance based on a pilot seminar offered the previous year. Partner surveys indicate a relatively high degree of participation and cooperation. Staff and parent surveys continue to show a strong satisfaction with the Beall Elementary Judy Center. Teachers continue to agree that the amount of resources and cooperation available at Beall Elementary were good and that teachers were satisfied with the Judy Center. Parent satisfaction levels remained high in the current survey and are above state Judy Center statewide averages. Parents were much more likely also to participate in Judy Center family activities than in previous years. Parents recognized improvements in their children’s learning and development during the year. A before/after study of parental responses shows that family learning resources at home and family activities were strengthened during the year. Progress report results from the Allegany County Board of Education and HRDC assessment data indicate that child readiness improved during the year. School readiness for each of the targeted groups (i.e., students receiving free and reduced school meals, students receiving Special Education services) exceeded milestones. For FARMS children, the strategies for the domains of Social and Personal and Language and Literacy worked with readiness increasing in each of these domains. For children receiving Special Education services, readiness reached 100% in each of the domains by the fourth marking period. These results are the most positive since Judy Center funding was secured.

55

July 2006-June 2007

REFERENCES
Allegany County Board of Education. 2002. Continuation Grant Application for Judith P. Hoyer Early Child Care and Education Center Grants (Judy Centers). (June 3, 2002) Allegany County Board of Education. 2003. Continuation Grant Application for Judith P. Hoyer Early Child Care and Education Center Grants (Judy Centers). (May 25, 2003) Allegany County Board of Education. 2004. Continuation Grant Application for Judith P. Hoyer Early Child Care and Education Center Grants (Judy Centers). (June 2, 2004) Allegany County Board of Education. 2005. Continuation Grant Application for Judith P. Hoyer Early Child Care and Education Center Grants (Judy Centers). (June 2005) Allegany County Board of Education. 2006. Continuation Grant Application for Judith P. Hoyer Early Child Care and Education Center Grants (Judy Centers). (June 2006) eQuotient, Inc. 2002. Allegany County Judy Center Evaluation: January 2001-June 2002. Cumberland, MD: eQuotient, Inc. eQuotient, Inc. 2003. Allegany County Judy Center Evaluation: July 2002-June 2003. Cumberland, MD: eQuotient, Inc. eQuotient, Inc. 2004. Allegany County Judy Center Evaluation: July 2003-June 2004. Cumberland, MD: eQuotient, Inc. eQuotient, Inc. 2005. Allegany County Judy Center Evaluation: July 2004-June 2005. Cumberland, MD: eQuotient, Inc. eQuotient, Inc. 2006. Allegany County Judy Center Evaluation: July 2004-June 2005. Cumberland, MD: eQuotient, Inc. Lee, Phil. 2006 Results and Performance Accountability. University of Maryland, School of Public Policy. Mimeograph. Maryland State Department of Education. 2006. Children Entering School Ready to Learn: School Readiness Information. Baltimore: MSDE. MGT of America, Inc. 2004. Judith P. Hoyer Early Child Care and Education Enhancement Program Evaluation: Final Results Brief. University of Maryland School of Public Affairs and Maryland State Department of Education. 2003. A Guide for Results and Performance Accountability and Evaluation in Judy Center Partnerships.

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A.1 Partner Survey Instrument

58

Judy Center
Allegany County Public Schools 3 College Ave. Frostburg, Md. 21532 301-689-8489

Partner Survey 1. How active have you been with the Judy Center team? _____ Very active _____ Somewhat active _____ Not very active _____ Inactive

Spring 2007

2. If you have not been very active, is there a specific reason, or is there something that could be changed that would allow you to be a more active participant?

3. The following factors have an effect on collaboration success. Please indicate whether you agree or disagree with the following statements: (A) Agree (D) Disagree

_____ The composition of the Case Management team was “right” for this program _____ The composition of the Steering Committee members is appropriate for making Judy Center decisions. _____ The Judy Center staff communicated openly and clearly during meetings _____ The Judy Center staff communicated openly and clearly between meetings _____ Member of the Judy Center staff established informal communication networks (E-mail communication, phone calls, etc.) _____ Members of the Judy Center staff have relationships built on trust and mutual respect. _____ I understand the goals and objectives of the Judy Center project _____ I understand my roles and responsibilities as a member of this project _____ The Judy Center team has clear and effective decision making procedures 4. Indicate whether you agree or disagree with the following statements (A) Agree (D) Disagree

_____ a. Community awareness of the Judy Center has increased in the past year. _____ b. Resources for this project were adequate to meet objectives _____ c. The strategies of this grant have been implemented. _____ d. The strategies of this grant are demonstrating positive outcomes

If you indicated that you disagree, please explain: ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________

5. How do you rate the Judy Center in each of the performance areas listed below? Please use the following scale: (4) Excellent (3) Good (2) Minimal (1) Inadequate (0) NA/Don’t know

_____ a. Hours and days of JC operation _____ b. Child care before or after day _____ c. Quality of School meals (lunch, breakfast) _____ d. Family case management _____ e. Array of child and family support services on site _____ f. Array of child services for all ages (e.g., infants and toddlers, pre-k, kindergarten) _____ g. Screening for disabilities _____ h. Provision of services for children with disabilities _____ i. Health services (e.g., immunizations, dental assessment, vision/hearing screening) _____ j. Friendliness/helpfulness of staff and teachers _____ k. Supervision of children/discipline _____ l. Materials for learning and play _____ m. Play activities _____ n. Activities for learning Art _____ o. Activities for learning Music _____ p. Activities for learning Physical education _____ q. Activities for learning language/reading/writing _____ r. Activities for learning Nature/science _____ s. Activities for learning Math _____ t. Activities for learning Computers _____ u. Progress reports and follow-up conferences _____ v. Activities for parents and families (e.g., field trips, picnics) _____ w. Education programs for families (e.g., parenting workshops, GED classes) _____ x. Information provided by Judy Center about upcoming activities _____ y. Judy Center webpage _____ z. Food and nutrition assistance (e.g., WIC) _____ aa. Cleanliness and safety of Judy Center _____ bb. Sufficiency of space _____ cc. Other (please describe _______________)

6. Has involvement as a partner with the Judy Center been cost-effective for your organization? _____ Yes _____ No

7. How satisfied are you overall with the Judy Center? _____ Very Satisfied _____ Satisfied _____ Somewhat Satisfied _____ Somewhat Dissatisfied _____ Not satisfied at all

8. Is there anything that could be done differently regarding the education of children? 0-5, and family services?

9. We have now expanded the Judy Center services into John Humbird and Westernport schools. GED classes, behavior support services, family literacy projects, and vision screenings are currently being offered in each Judy Center school. Dental screenings were conducted in Beall and John Humbird. a. Do you have any suggestions as to what additional services we should offer these schools?

b. If appropriate, would your agency be willing to provide services in these Judy Center schools?

10. Do you think that your families who have had children involved with the Judy Center benefited more than families whose children were not involved with the Judy Center? If so, how? If not, why?

11. Do you have any additional comments or suggestions?

________________________________________ Name & Agency

________________ Date

A.2 Partner Comments

60

Is there anything that could be done differently regarding the education of children, 0-5, and family services? Great job. State should fund expansion to all sites serving pre-school and kindergarten. Although I know the Judy Center has been dealing with this issue and bringing people together to discuss options, I feel we need to continue discussing mental health concerns. I can’t think of anything. They are even working on community mental health services. We have now expanded the Judy Center services into South Penn, John Humbird and Westernport schools. GED classes, behavior support services, family literacy projects, and vision screenings are currently being offered in each Judy Center school. Dental screenings were conducted in Beall and John Humbird. Do you have any suggestions as to what additional services we should offer these schools? No. I think addressing the mental health issues was very important. I like the parenting-type classes/ family literacy. I think parent involvement is important. Child care? Need funding from county. Do you think that your families who have had children involved with the Judy Center benefited more than families whose children were not involved with the Judy Center? If so, how? If not, why? I can only comment on families attending our program--some do participate in other Judy Center services, others do not. Families who attend our Frostburg clinic site do appreciate the convenience of the location, however, several have chosen NOT to attend (and come to Cumberland for services) due to little privacy during appointments. Space provided is often used as entrance/exit of others during WIC clinic. Yes! Yes. I think anytime programs are available and families take advantage of those programs, they have benefited. The Judy Center allows access to many services in one location making it easier for families. Yes. Daycare. I recently came to your facility, but students were outside playing, so I didn’t see the space full of students. I do think you could use more administrative space and nursing time.

62

Do you have any additional comments or suggestions? All WIC staff working at the Judy Center site, including myself, have experienced frustration at one time or another. The two most common issues among staff (other than computer connectivity problems) include frustration with parking and room arrangement. Acknowledging that the space is a multipurpose room, it is challenging to have people passing through during WIC clinic. This, along with the open-space of the room does not provide the best environment for confidentiality. Our staff is currently discussing ideas to possibly address this problem. We have a great collaborative locally around the Judy Center concept. Early intervention is key to preventing more intensive service needs in the future. The services provided by the Judy Center have a definite impact on students, schools, and communities. That can only be positive in outcomes. Congratulations for all your hard work! Terrific staff. Excellent program!

63

A.3 Pre-K/Kindergarten Staff Survey

64

The Judy Center Allegany County Beall Elementary School 3 College Ave. Frostburg, Md. 21532 301-689-8489

Teacher Survey, 2007 (Pre-K, Multi-age and Kindergarten) 1. Years Teaching - How many years have you been teaching? _____ 1-2 _____ 3-5 _____ 5-10 _____ 11-15 _____ 16 or more

2. Please indicate your level of satisfaction with the following using the following numerical scale: (5) (4) (3) (2) (1) Very Satisfied Somewhat Satisfied Not Satisfied _____ Quality of classroom equipment _____ Quality of facilities _____ Size of classes _____ Administrative support _____ Professional Development opportunities _____ Collaboration with other teachers _____ Collaboration with early childhood agencies _____ Level of parental involvement in children’s education. _____ Other (please indicate _______________)

3. How do you rate the Judy Center in each of the following performance areas? Please use the following scale: (4) Excellent (3) Good (2) Minimal (1) Inadequate (0) NA/Don’t know

_____ a. Hours and days of JC operation _____ b. Child care before-or-after day _____ c. Quality of School meals (lunch, breakfast) _____ d. Family case management _____ e. Array of child and family support services on site _____ f. Array of child services for all ages (e.g., Infants and Toddlers, Pre-K, Kindergarten, Head Start, Multi-age, Childcare, WIC) _____ g. Screening for disabilities

_____ h. Provision of services for children with disabilities _____ i. Health services (e.g., immunizations, dental assessment, vision/hearing screening) _____ j. Friendliness/helpfulness of staff and teachers _____ k. Supervision of children/discipline _____ l. Materials for learning and play _____ m. Play activities _____ n. Activities for learning Art _____ o. Activities for learning Music _____ p. Activities for learning Physical education _____ q. Activities for learning language/reading/writing _____ r. Activities for learning Nature/science _____ s. Activities for learning Math _____ t. Activities for learning Computers _____ u. Progress reports and follow-up conferences _____ v. Activities for parents and families (e.g., field trips, picnics) _____ w. Education programs for families (e.g., parenting workshops, GED classes) _____ x. Information provided by Judy Center about upcoming activities (fliers) _____ y. Judy Center newsletter _____ z. Food and nutrition assistance (e.g., WIC) _____ aa. Cleanliness and safety of Judy Center _____ bb. Sufficiency of space _____ cc. Other (please describe _______________) 4. What do you feel is the most common feeling of the families you serve in regards to the Judy Center? Please choose one that best represents the feeling of the population you serve. _____ Very Satisfied _____ Satisfied _____ Somewhat Satisfied _____ Somewhat Dissatisfied _____ Not Satisfied at All _____ Don’t Know 5. What activities could be added to the Judy Center to further its goal? ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________

A.4 First-Grade Staff Survey

66

The Judy Center Allegany County Beall Elementary School 3 College Ave. Frostburg, Md. 21532 301-689-8489

Teacher Survey 2007, First Grade Teachers

1. Years Teaching - How many years have you been teaching? _____ 1-2 _____ 3-5 _____ 5-10 _____ 11-15 _____ 16 or more

2. Please indicate your level of satisfaction with the following aspects of Beall Elementary using the following numerical scale: (5) (4) (3) (2) (1) Very Satisfied Somewhat Satisfied Not Satisfied _____ Quality of classroom equipment _____ Quality of facilities _____ Size of classes _____ Administrative support _____ Professional Development opportunities _____ Collaboration with other teachers _____ Collaboration with other early childhood agencies _____ Level of parental involvement in children’s education. _____ Other (please indicate _______________)

3. How many of your current students were enrolled in Beall Elementary kindergarten last year? __________

4. How satisfied are you with the readiness of these students for first grade (check one). _____ Very Satisfied _____ Satisfied _____ Somewhat Satisfied _____ Somewhat Dissatisfied _____ Not Satisfied at All _____ Don’t Know Please explain ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________

5. From what you know about the Judy Center, how do you rate it in each of the performance areas listed below? Please use the following scale: (4) Excellent (3) Good (2) Minimal (1) Inadequate (0) NA/Don’t know

_____ a. Hours and days of JC operation _____ b. Child care before or after day _____ c. Quality of School meals (lunch, breakfast) _____ d. Family case management _____ e. Array of child and family support services on site _____ f. Array of child services for all ages (e.g., infants and toddlers, pre-k, kindergarten) _____ g. Screening for disabilities _____ h. Provision of services for children with disabilities _____ i. Health services (e.g., immunizations, dental screenings, vision/hearing screening) _____ j. Friendliness/helpfulness of staff and teachers _____ k. Supervision of children/discipline _____ l. Materials for learning and play _____ m. Play activities _____ n. Activities for learning Art _____ o. Activities for learning Music _____ p. Activities for learning Physical education _____ q. Activities for learning language/reading/writing _____ r. Activities for learning Nature/science _____ s. Activities for learning Math _____ t. Activities for learning Computers _____ u. Progress reports and follow-up conferences _____ v. Activities for parents and families (e.g., field trips, picnics) _____ w. Education programs for families (e.g., parenting workshops, GED classes)

_____ x. Information provided by Judy Center about upcoming activities _____ y. Judy Center webpage _____ z. Food and nutrition assistance (e.g., WIC) _____ aa. Cleanliness and safety of Judy Center _____ bb. Sufficiency of space _____ cc. Other (please describe _______________)

6. What do you feel is the most common feeling of the families you serve in regards to the Judy Center? Please check one that best represents the feeling of the population you serve. _____ Very Satisfied _____ Satisfied _____ Somewhat Satisfied _____ Somewhat Dissatisfied _____ Not Satisfied at All _____ Don’t Know 7. How do you feel about the Judy Center? _____ Very Satisfied _____ Satisfied _____ Somewhat Satisfied _____ Somewhat Dissatisfied _____ Not Satisfied at All 8. What activities could be added to the Judy Center to further its goal? ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________

A.5 Fall Parent Survey

68

The Judy Center
Allegany County Public Schools 3 College Ave. Frostburg, Md. 21532 301-689-8489 (Last Four Digits of the Social Security Number of the Person Completing this Form – for tracking purposes only) JUDY CENTER PARENT SURVEY A. Family Background Information: 1. Age of person completing this form: ________ 2. Gender: 3. Employed: Male Female

Employed full-time Employed Part-time Not employed, but currently seeking work Not employed and not seeking work Homemaker Other (Please describe _____________) Married Single Divorced Widowed/Widower Some high school High school diploma GED ______Some College Associates Degree Bachelor’s degree or higher

4. Marital Status:

5. Educational level:

6. Does your family: ____Own your home? Rent _____ Live with relatives Other (Please describe ____________________________________) B. Program Use Information: 1. Number of children enrolled in Judy Center programs: _________ (Pre-K, Multi-age classroom, Kindergarten, Kids Korner Childcare, Head Start, Infants & Toddlers Program) Ages of children enrolled in Judy Center Programs: ________________________

2. My child/children/family use the following Judy Center programs: (check all that apply) Kindergarten 4-year old Pre-K 3 & 4-year old Multi-age classroom Head Start Infant and Toddler ____ Frostburg Library Family Nights ____ Family Junction ____ Family Literacy Programs _____Healthy Start (Health Dept) _____YMCA Parent Power ____ Computer Classes Preschool Special Education Free Dental Screenings Free Vision Screenings ____ Family Preservation (DSS) ____ Special Education Services Family Support Network Preschool Partners (Autistic Classroom) GED ______ Mental Health Programs (Health Dept.) WIC __School closing childcare _ During school childcare __Before school childcare __After school childcare ______Summer Childcare ______ Family Preservation (DSS) English as Second Language School Lunch School Breakfast ______ Support Groups (ADHD, Preemie Babies, Downs Syndrome) Other (Please describe) _______________ ________________________________________

C. Family Resources: 1. Check all of the following learning/reading materials that you have at home: a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. Children’s books (Please let the Judy Center know if you need more children’s books) Magazines for children Adult books Newspapers Television Home computer Computer with Internet Access Other (please describe _______________________)

2. How often do you participate in the following activities with your child (children)? Frequently(F) Sometimes(S) Rarely(R) Never(N) Does Not Apply (NA) a. Read a story with your child b. Play with toys or play games with your child Praise your child for doing well c. d. ____ Visit the public library or museum with your child e. ____ Visit a playground, park, or go on a picnic or walk with your child f. ____ Eat a meal together as a family g. ____ Attend an event with your child that is hosted by a community or religious group h. ____ Sit and talk to your child about his/her day i. Other (please describe ___________________________________)

3. How often do you anticipate participating in the following? Frequently (F) Sometimes (S) Rarely (R) Never (N) Does Not Apply (NA) a. b. c. d. e. f. ____Visit your child’s school ____Volunteer at your child’s school ____ Attend Parent/Teacher Conferences ____ Communicate with your child’s teacher ____ Attend a parent activity during school hours at the Judy Center ____ Attend an evening parent activity at the Judy Center

D. Child information: 1. Do any of your children have special needs or disabilities (e.g., physical, emotional, speech or language, hearing, vision, learning problems, serious health problems)? Yes* No I don’t know *If so, please describe: ____________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ 2. 3. 4. 5. In the past week, how many hours a day did your child watch TV? _________ Does your child have a library card? __________ Approximately how many children’s books do you have in your home? __________ Would you like to find out how you can get free books for your children? ________

E. Judy Center Information: 1. I would like information on the following Judy Center services: ______ GED/Adult Education Classes _____ Mental Health Services for Children Childcare _____ Adult Training Seminars Family Preservation _____ Fathers & Families Program Family Literacy Programs _____ Education programs for 3, 4, or 5 year olds ______ Parenting classes _____ Healthy Start (birth – 3-yr. old program) ______ Parent/child activities _____ Fathers & Families Program ______ WIC _____ Free Vision and/or Dental Screenings ______ Head Start _____ Programs for children with disabilities ______ MCHIP (children’s health insurance) ______ Other (Please identify __________________________________________________) 2. I would like to see the Judy Center provide: ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ 3. Do you have any comments or questions about the Judy Center? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ My name is: ____________________________ Phone number: __________________
ONLY NECESSARY IF YOU WOULD LIKE ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Thank you for taking the time to complete this survey!

A.6 Spring Parent Survey

70

Judy Center
Allegany County Public Schools 3 College Ave. Frostburg, Md. 21532 301-689-8489

JUDY CENTER PARENT SURVEY

Spring 2007

(Last Four Digits of the Social Security Number of the Person Completing this Form – for tracking purposes only) 1. How satisfied are you with the services at the Judy Center? (check one) _____ Very Satisfied _____ Satisfied _____ Somewhat Satisfied _____ Somewhat Dissatisfied _____ Not Satisfied at All _____ Don’t know/Confused or uninformed about the services provided _____ Don’t know/No feeling about the center

2. How do you rate the Judy Center in each of the following performance areas? (E) Excellent (G) Good (M) Minimal (I) Inadequate (NA) Not Applicable _____ a. Hours and days of Judy Center operation _____ b. Kids Korner Childcare Center, if applicable _____ c. Quality of school meals (lunch, breakfast) _____ d. Family case management _____ e. Array of child and family support services on site _____ f. Array of child services for all ages (e.g., Infants and Toddlers Program, Pre-K, Multi-age, Kindergarten, Head Start, Kids Korner Childcare Center) _____ g. Screening for disabilities _____ h. Provision of services for children with disabilities _____ i. Health services (e.g., immunizations, dental assessment, vision/hearing screening) _____ j. Friendliness/helpfulness of staff and teachers _____ k. Supervision of children/discipline _____ l. Judy Center Summer Camp _____ m. Materials for learning and play _____ n. Play activities _____ o. Activities for learning Art _____ p. Activities for learning Music _____ q. Activities for learning Physical Education

_____ r. Activities for learning Language/Reading/Writing _____ s. Activities for learning Nature/science _____ t. Activities for learning Math _____ u. Activities for learning Computers _____ v. Progress reports and follow-up conferences _____ w. Activities for parents and families (e.g., field trips, picnics, family literacy activities, circus tickets) _____x. Education programs for families (e.g., parenting workshops, GED classes) _____ y. Information provided by Judy Center about upcoming activities (Judy Center newsletter) _____ aa. Food and nutrition assistance (e.g., WIC) _____ bb. Cleanliness and safety of Judy Center _____ cc. Sufficiency of space _____ dd. Other (please describe ___________________________________)

3. Family participation. How often have you done the following? (F) Frequently (S) Sometimes (R) Rarely (N) Never (NA) Not applicable _____ a. Volunteered at the Judy Center _____ b. Observed in your child’s classroom or participated in a parent/child activity during the day _____ c. Attended Judy Center after-school special events or field trips _____ d. Attended parent education meetings or workshops about job skills or parenting? _____ e. Attended a parent-teacher conference _____ f. Read a Judy Center flyer, newsletter or information in the Beall-a-Bration newsletter _____ g. Other (Please describe _______________________________________)

4. Have your child’s habits and/or abilities improved at home in the following areas because of the Judy Center? (M) Much (L) A little (N) Not at All (NA) Not applicable _____ a. Counting numbers _____ b. Recognizing letters of the alphabet _____ c. Writing _____ d. Drawing _____ e. Speaking and articulation _____ f. Vocabulary _____ g. Eating nutritious and healthy meals _____ h. Exercising _____ i. Washing hands before meals and after using toilet _____ j. Brushing teeth _____ k. Other (please describe __________________________________________ 5. Check any of the following learning/reading materials that you have at home:

_____a. _____b. _____c. _____d. _____e. _____f. _____g. _____h.

Children’s books Magazines for children Adult books Newspapers Television Home computer Computer with Internet Access Other (please describe ____________________)

6. How often do you participate in the following activities with your child (children)? (F)Frequently (S)Sometimes (R)Rarely (N)Never (NA)Does Not Apply _____a. Read a story with your child _____b. Play with toys or play games with your child _____c. Praise your child for doing well _____d. Visit the public library or museum with your child _____e. Visit a playground, park, or go on a picnic or walk with your child _____f. Eat a meal together as a family _____g. Attend an event with your child that is hosted by a community or religious group _____h. Sit and talk to your child about his/her day _____i. Other (please describe ___________________________________)

7. Please rate the following Judy Center parent activities offered during this year: (E) Excellent (G) Good (M) Minimal (I) Inadequate (NA) Not Applicable/ Did not attend _____ a. Bullying workshop/Developmental Assets training _____ b. Letter of Intent workshop for special needs students _____ c. Fall Family Fun Fest _____ d. Family Literacy Night Program _____ e. Grandparent’s Day _____ f. Family Movie Night _____ g. Easter Hat Decorating Day _____ h. Pumpkin Carving Day _____ i. Volunteer workshop _____ j. Veteran’s Day Program _____ k. Reading @ Home/Free Book Initiative _____ l. Meet the Teachers night _____ m. Pre-K, Multi-age and/or K orientation _____ n. PTO Open House _____ o. Infant massage class _____ p. Family Support Group summer picnic _____ q. Down Syndrome Support group _____ s. Head Start Parent meetings/Family activities/Programs _____ t. Donuts for Dads

_____ u. Shriner’s Circus _____ v. Family Support Network Christmas Party _____ w. Classroom Thanksgiving Feast _____ x. Family Support Group Mom’s Night Out _____ y. Family Game Night @ Beall Elementary _____ z. Make-and-take activity for Pre-K & Multi-age _____ aa. Other (please identify _____________________________)

8. If you did not attend any parent activities during the year, please indicate below any reasons that you did not attend. (Check all that apply) _____ a. Time of activity was not convenient _____ b. Work schedule _____ c. Not interested in topics _____ d. Lack of transportation _____ e. Other (please describe _________________________________)

9. In what ways has the Judy Center helped your child?

10. In what ways has the Judy Center helped you and/or other members of your family?

11. What activities would you like to see added at the Judy Center for your child and/or family?

Thank you for taking the time to complete this survey. It has been a pleasure to work with you and your child! Do not hesitate to contact us if we can be of further assistance to you. Have a wonderful summer!

A.7 Fall Parent Survey Comments

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I would like to see the Judy Center provide Training for parents with special needs children. Autism support group (I am interested in helping start this). ESL classes for children. Sometimes the children have dirty hands and faces. If the school could make sure they are kept clean that would be nice. Continue to provide health positive activities with parents and children. Great job--thank you. Excellent M/A and pre-K programs. Expect the same great services in Kindergarten. It’s a wonderful center with services to meet the needs of many. Field trips for young children. Nothing else. They are doing an excellent job. Adult training seminars in the evenings if possible. Plenty of opportunities for parent involvement in the classroom. Very positive experience overall. More employment classes. Head start. Transportation. I’m satisfied with the Judy Center already. Already does a good job. Infant childcare. We enjoy family literacy night. Healthier snacks and food.

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Do you have any comments or questions about the Judy Center? I have been very pleased with everything you provide for my child. She has come a long way and you deserve a pat on the aback for making this happen. Thank you from the bottom of my heart. Please encourage parents to not participate in violent role play for boys (i.e., Superheroes, guns, fighting). These things are not okay. It offers a lot of great programs. I think it’s a wonderful program. My daughter absolutely loves it! The teachers and all staff members are great! No, I love the programs. ADHD group. Everything has been great! I am willing to help in any way I can. However, I have a childcare in my home and I need to work around that. I also have a 2 year old of my own. Meghan benefited from being at the Judy Center last year. She truly enjoys school at Beall Elementary.

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A.8 Spring Parent Survey Comments

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In what ways has the Judy Center helped your child? Mason has gone from being completely dependent upon others to enjoying to do things on his own and to be extremely proud of his accomplishments. She is not shy anymore. He has grown socially and cognitively. His teachers have given confidence in himself. They made school a positive experience and my son is enjoying learning and being successful. In all ways, coming from foster care system he was a little delayed (or it seemed to me). Now he’s on target in most areas. Every day my daughter comes home and tells me how much she has learned. The summer camp helps with the boredom of summer. He has learned to be more caring and share with other kids. My two boys love Kindergarten and the friends they have made. Also, they have learned so much. My daughter is in Pre-K and Multi-Age. She has also learned so much and she is starting to read sight words. Took time to work with him in a weekly workshop which helped build his confidence in doing things. Helped develop social skills in Pre-K and K by forcing her to interact with other children. Helped to develop positive attitude toward education by making learning fun. Free books and healthy snacks are greatly looked forward to. His social skills have improved as well as his behavior. He can count to 100. Knows days of week. Prepared him for kindergarten. I can’t believe how much he has learned this year. My child is going to be able to attend kindergarten at her home school with a class reduction aide. She is also going to be in all inclusion to whole day. Without you, our child wouldn’t be high functioning like she is. They you!! We could never be able to repay you! Learned how fun it can be to come to school and learn and meet new friends, and respect for the staff as well as other adults.

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WIC, Summer Camp, Circus. Giving her more books to add to her library. Socialize. Giving her an early start in education. She is more outgoing, improved speech, is excited about school, knows majority of letters and some numbers. Phonics, 3-letter words, letter recognition, social skills, following directions, manners. It has adequately prepared him for kindergarten. Learning math, letters, numbers. Good introduction to school environment-structure. It helped my child get ready for his year in Kindergarten. He has learned to be around different kids and the way the kids act together as well as #s, letters, etc. In what ways has the Judy Center helped you and/or other members of your family? I can understand Mason now. Also, I cannot express how impressed how much progress Mason has made, both socially and intellectually, due to the nurturing and encouragement of everyone at the Judy Center. She is learning about writing, letters, etc. They helped me gain confidence in my son. I was concerned that he would not be able to attend to a full day’s worth of structure and the teachers worked well with my son to make this happen. Deb did a lot of juggling to get my kid in Am instead of PM. Above and Beyond. Answered all my questions very cordially. They have been there for childcare, WIC, pre-k and more. They were there when my family was going through a financial crisis. Without the Judy Center, my family would not have had a Thanksgiving one year. Thank you! Provided excellent before school care from 7:00-8:00 AM daily. My son enjoys his time spent at Kids Korner. WIC. It creates a social context to meet other parents. You have helped my family deal with the day to day situations with autism by offering the support and education needed. 79

Given us the opportunity to enroll our children for a full day of learning and helping us as parents be involved. WIC. Circus. Help us get things together for Pre-K and being friendly with us! Keeps us updated on things going on in school or other areas. Child Care. Multi-age. Free books and free circus tickets. Daycare for when I am in school. They bought my child a winter coat when his was old and needed one and we didn’t have the money to get it for him at that moment. What activities would you like to see added at the Judy Center for your child and/or family? I have been amazed at the progress my son has made the past year at Beall Elementary. I did not ever envision this at the beginning of the year. Everyone at the school seems to be incredibly supporting and nurturing, without individual preference. Mason is at Beall on an out-of-district permit, and he will go to Frost next year. We will miss you. None–I look forward to sending my other 2 children to your program. Art/music activities. An autism group with parents that would actually show up! Maybe a babysitter or two would help with this? Maybe a few plays for the kids (for them to act it out). A Mom’s night out for Moms of Pre-K and Kindergarten kids. More holiday activities (i.e., caroling at the nursing home). Anything real fun for the coming school year. Info on mood disorder in kids. More advance notice for activities inviting parents into classroom. Nothing.

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