I believe the proper question of a spiritual autobiography is how did Christ lead me to

know and accept His grace? My journey to a biblical faith in Christ is exactly that: a journey from
one place to another, a journey of mind, of body, of soul, and, thankfully, a journey guided by the
power of the Holy Spirit.
I was born and raised in New Orleans, Louisiana by non-practicing Roman Catholic parents, who were divorced, but eventually became the best of friends by putting aside their own
issues for the sake of their only son. By “non-practicing” I mean that we rarely attended worship.
Christmas and Easter probably with mom, but never with dad. Living in New Orleans provides
parents with two educational choices: unsafe and unheralded free public schools or a plethora of
private Catholic schools. There are enough Catholic high schools in the New Orleans area to create a Catholic football division, and that’s just the boys’ schools (yes, there are separate and co-ed
schools). There are also other private school choices, but the Catholic schools are definitely in the
overwhelming majority. I was fortunate enough to experience a variety of these options. Immediately following my parents’ divorce, I attended a Lutheran school and an Episcopal school. When
my parents were told by the counselor we all went to see that I needed to be in a gifted and talented program, they found a public school with a good program, so I spent third through seventh
grade in public school.
I started Jesuit High School in the eighth grade. I still can’t remember why I chose to attend there, but it was definitely my choice to leave public school to attend this Catholic high
school, which was also one of the best schools in the state. After five years at Jesuit, I was more
Catholic than when I began, and I definitely knew more about Catholicism. I frequently attended
mass, went on group retreats, and had formal theology classes. When I graduated, I decided to
attend Spring Hill College, which is a small Jesuit-affiliated college in Mobile, Alabama. At
Spring Hill, I learned even more about Catholicism and religion in general. I became involved in
Campus Ministry, and was one class shy of a minor in Theology. I performed in and/or directed a
dramatic performance of Christ’s passion each year for four years. One of the most eye-opening
experiences I had was performing the role of Christ himself, trying to imagine the pain and agony,

yet compassion and mercy that he was feeling all at the same time. I knew what Christ went
through for us, but I had no biblical faith and had never accepted Christ’s grace (I was technically
not even Catholic because I had not been officially confirmed).
During my senior year at Spring Hill, I decided that all the struggles I had with tenets of
the Catholic faith were telling me something didn’t feel right, so I began searching for what was
right. I tried to worship with several different tribes, but nothing felt right, so I stopping going
anywhere. I began reading the Bible on my own at home. During the summer after I graduated
from college, after months of searching and reading, I decided I needed to get away from work (I
was working for Eddie Bauer at the time) and focus on my relationship with God. I needed some
questions answered. I needed to discover where I belonged. I scheduled a retreat for myself at the
Abbey of Gethsemane, the Kentucky home of a group of Trappist monks. The Abbey offers individual and group silent retreats. I spent several days praying, reading, reflecting, writing, wondering through the woods around the property, and trying to figure out the proper questions to ask
because if you don’t ask the right question, you may get the wrong answer. I vividly remember
associating my faith with my ability to get a little rubber duck I found lying on its side in a waterfall pond to sit up straight. I tried placing the duck in different sections of the fountain. I tried tying something to it. Eventually, I discovered that by placing the duck on the rocks under the waterfall, he would still be in the water, but would be safe and secure and upright on the rock. When
I got back home, I was more eager to find a place to worship.
Ironically, my mom suggested that I try going to a Church of Christ. I didn’t know much
about it, but I picked one and showed up. The congregation of University Church at Alpine Hills
showed so much interest in me and so much love that I kept going. I began studying the Bible
more with Tony Wallace, the campus minister there. During our studies, I told him, “Look, if and
when I decide to be baptized, I want to do it in a river or lake like the early Christians would have
done it because that’s what we’re trying to be like.”
One night I decided I was ready, so we drove to a river at a campground at midnight, and
Tony baptized me. Soon after, I decided to become more prepared to serve my Lord, so I enrolled

in Freed-Hardeman University to get my Master’s in Ministry. (In my very limited knowledge of
Church of Christ higher education, I was advised to go there.) Along the way, I realized the need
and importance of counseling, so I focused on that as well. Before graduating I was blessed to
meet my future wife, Callie, who was quite instrumental in my future spiritual growth and continues to balance me. We spent two years together living on ACU’s campus while she worked as a
Residence Director and I tried to discover how to use my newfound Masters of Ministry. I came
to love ACU and was spiritually enriched by my presence there during that time. In fact, had I
known nine years ago what I know now about ACU, I probably would have chosen to pursue my
Masters degree there.
Since 2006, Callie and I have worked in ministry. The experience has been valuable and
has given me a more laser-like focus on my spiritual gifts. God wants us to maximize the gifts he
gives us and align them with His will for our lives. The economy may be bad, tragedy, disease,
war surround us, but we rest in the palm of God’s hand. We know that he can and does do amazing things if we just step back and let him. We continue to pray to know more clearly his will for
us, when to stay and set down roots, when to go elsewhere, and how to be effective for Him while
here.
I would not be where I am today without Christ pulling me to Him. He truly led me to
His word, led me to the glorious gift of my wife, and led me to the desire to serve Him. The Lord
led me when I searched during my college years, now it’s my turn to guide other seekers in the
name of the Lord.
I left many details out of my journey in order to focus on the broader strokes, but I hope
this brief look into my life provides an understanding into whom I am and how I have been
shaped.