God as a Unity

By Mitch Forman

1

I. Thesis
This paper focuses on the unity of God and what that means.  It is the Church who 
originated the term, Trinity.   So, this paper discusses how to contextualize the message 
of the unity of God, or Trinity, to the Jewish community­­who considers the Trinity a 
pagan concept.   In doing so, an examination of God's expression of His unity in the 
Jewish Scriptures is necessary.  Then, based on the Scriptural evidence, one can conclude
how these passages composed a foundational picture of Father, Son and Holy Spirit, the 
Christian concept of Trinity.   Finally, Jesus, Himself reveals the secret of this unity in 
the New Testament.

II. Word Study
A.  The Lord is One
Everyday, Orthodox Jewish men pray and recite the Yigdal, "The Thirteen 
Principles of Faith,” as founded by Rabbi Moses Maimonides.  The closest that Judaism 
comes to the CREEDS are these thirteen principles.  As a matter of fact, one of the 
principles of Maimonides is: 
I firmly believe that the Creator, blessed be His Name, Is One; that there is no 
oneness in any form like His; and that He alone was, is, and ever will be our 
G*d.
This is how Jewish people understand who God is. God is one. The first prayer that any 
Jewish person learns from birth is the Shema.  Taken from Deuteronomy 4:9, it reads in 
Hebrew:  "Shema Yisrael, Adonai Elohanu Adonai echad."  Translated in English, this 

2

means, "Hear O Israel, the Lord our God the Lord is One."  So, echad means one.  The 
Hebrew word, echad, is found in over five hundred passages in the Old Testament, or the 
Jewish Scriptures. In a personal word study of echad, amazingly enough, only one 
passage exists stating, “the Lord is One." 
In actuality, there are two Hebrew words expressing oneness, echad and yahid.  A
further examination of the Scriptures confirm that the word, echad, can mean either an 
absolute one or a compound one.  While, yahid is always used for singular one.
There are passages in the Old Testament that describe one as echad, a compound 
one.  For example, the writer of Genesis 1:5 describing the combination of evening and 
morning, the concept of one day, uses the Hebrew word, echad.  Also, Genesis 2:24, the 
writer explains the union between a man and a woman as "The two shall become one 
(echad) flesh."  Finally, Ezra, in chapter 2:64, writes regarding a whole assembly as an 
echad.  So, the main idea of echad is a composite one. Like a team, separate members 
together make up one entity.  Interestingly, the word echad is the way that God illustrates
and characterizes His Oneness. 
The Hebrew word, yachid, means an absolute unity.  Seen many times in 
Scripture, (i.e., Genesis 22:2&12; Judges 11:34; Psalm 22:21: 25:16; Proverbs 4:3; 
Jeremiah 6:26; Amos 8:10; and Zechariah 12:10) these passages demonstrate one as 
meaning "only."  So, if Moses intended to teach God's Oneness as only one, then Moses 
would have used yachid instead of echad.  In fact, Maimonides struggled with this issue 
so much that, when he wrote out his "Thirteen Articles of Faith,'' he described God’s 

3

Oneness in the Shema with the word yachid and not echad.  Surprisingly enough, though,
in Deuteronomy 6:4 (the statement of the Shema), the Hebrew word for one is echad.
 

Not only did the Jewish community write a creed in order to describe God's 

Oneness, but also did the Christians.  The creed most Christians know from Sunday 
school is called the “Nicene Creed.”  It formulated at the council of Nicea 345 C.E. 
starting out this way: 
We believe in one God, the Father, the Almighty, maker of heaven and earth, of
all that is, seen and unseen.1
 So, again, this creed perpetuates the thought of God's Oneness.
In fact, the Greek word for one is "Els."  This Greek word is found in seven places in the 
New Testament as describing God:  Romans 3:30, I Corinthians 8:6, Galatians 3:20, Ephesians 
4:6, I Timothy 1:17 and 2:5 and finally, James 2:19.  So, the New Testament supports the 
Oneness of God again and again.
If someone expands the word study for one God, then someone would find this 
idea expressed many times, in such terms as: “None like God," (Exodus 8:20, 9:14 
and15:11, Psalm 86:8, Isaiah 40:18 and Jeremiah 10:6­7)  and "One true God," (II 
Chronicles 15:3, Jeremiah 10:10, John 17:3, I Thessalonians 1:9 and John 5:20).  
Substantiating this, Robert Bowman writes: 
Over 7000 times God speaks or is spoken of with singular pronouns (I, 
He, etc.); but this is proper because God is a single individual being.2 
So, clearly both the Old and New Testament writers attest to the Oneness of God. 

B.  The Lord as Plurality
4

In addition to the idea of one God, there are other verses illustrating God as a 
plurality.  What does this mean?  Well, quite a few times in Scripture, God describes 
Himself using plural pronouns.  For example, "…God said, 'Let us make man in our 
image, after our likeness,"  (Genesis 1:26).  He repeats this two other times in Genesis 
3:22 and 11:7.  Again, Isaiah reiterates the plurality of God when Isaiah is commissioned 
into service:  
“Also I heard the voice of the Lord, saying, Whom shall I send, and who will go
for us? Then said I, Here [am] I; send me,” (Isaiah 6:8).
Another word, surprising in its use, is Elohim.  As a matter of fact, the very first 
verse in the Bible God is called, "Elohim," in Genesis 1:11.  "In the beginning God 
(Elohim) created the heavens and the earth."
The Hebrew word for God is "El."  In fact, Elohim is the word that God refers to 
Himself as when He creates.  This name of God is used over two thousand times in the 
Old Testament.  Elohim is the plural form of "El."  
So why would the Scriptures, which is adamantly clear about the oneness of God, 
begin with using the plural form of God?  Well, the Hebrew word for created as found in 
Genesis 1:1 is "bara," a singular verb denoting an interesting sentence construct. Why 
does Genesis 1:1 place a plural noun, Elohim, with a singular verb, bara?   The reason 
being that the reader might know about the specific nature of God, that while He is plural 
in His nature, God is still yet one.
Moreover, the plurality of God is further illustrated in the Hebrew Scriptures.  
The adjective characterizing the nature of God is consistently plural. Some examples are 

5

as follows:  First of all, Ecclesiastes 12:1 states, "Remember now your Creator."  The 
Hebrew word for Creator literally means "Creators."  Secondly, In Psalm 149:2, the 
writer says, "Let Israel rejoice in their Maker."  Again, the Hebrew word for Maker is 
"Makers."  Thirdly, Joshua in his book describes God as, "…holy God,.." (24:19).  
Holy God is literally holy Gods.  Finally, Isaiah exclaims, "For your Maker is your 
husband,"  (54:5).  Maker and husband are both plural.  Over and again, the Hebrew 
choice of words is plural.
Then, inferred through Scripture, God is not only the ultimate, true One, unlike 
any other­­but He is also a plurality, a unity.  To be sure, further examination is 
necessary.

III. How can God be One and Yet Three?
Some fifty years ago Jacob Jocz wrote, 
At the center of the controversy between Church and Synagogue stands the 
Christological question. This is not a question whether Jesus is the Messiah, but 
whether the Christian understanding of the Messiah is admissible in view of the 
Jewish concept of God. Here lies the dividing line between Judaism and The 
Church.3. 
The Trinity has always been at the center of debate between Jewish people and Christians. 

"Tertullian (c. 150 ­ c. 225 A.D.) was the first person recorded by history to use the words 
Trinity (Latin: trinitas), substance (substantia), and person (persona) in relation to God."

4

Later in 325 C.E., the Council of Nicea solidified the Trinity as a major tenant of the 

6

Christian faith.  The reason for its formulation was to retort the pagan Arian thought of 
trinity.    
However, the Christian concept of the Trinity later would hugely impact how 
Jewish people would hear and respond to the gospel message.   Interestingly enough, three
hundred eighteen bishops attended the Council of Nicea, none of whom were of Jewish 
extraction.  In fact, not one Jewish believer in Jesus was present at this critical council, 
even though many Jewish believers and Gentile God­fearers were living in the same 
community during that time. 
Was it possible Jewish people were not invited to discuss the Trinity because of 
their objection?  Afterall, the Jewish community believed the Trinitarian thought as pagan.
Or was there an underlying prejudice against the Jews­­even Jewish Christians­­from the 
beginning of Christianity, so the Gentiles used the idea of the Trinity to further divide 
Jewish people and Gentiles?  It did not appear so, because in early Jewish­Christian 
dialogues about the Trinity, Christians stressed the importance of Old Testament Scripture
in order validate the Trinity, thus showing it as a Jewish concept and not pagan.  
However, there existed bitterness about how Jewish people saw Christians who 
believed in the Trinity.  Origen and Justin discuss that Jewish people curse the Christians. 
In the Paris Disputation of 1242, the Pope was still concerned that the Jewish community 
saw Christians as heretics, deviating from the truth.  The Pope inquired, “Are the 
Christians cursed in the Jewish prayer of the 18th Benediction?”5   In Hebrew, this prayer is
called the Amida.  Specifically, the 12th benediction is called, Birkit Ha –Manim.  It 
states:  

7

For the apostates let there be no hope and let the arrogant government be 
speedily uprooted in our days. Let the nosrim and minim (heretics); be destroyed
in a moment. And let them be blotted out of the Book of Life and not be 
inscribed together with the righteous.6 
The Birkit Ha –Manim is still read everyday in synagogues.  The prayer was first 
instituted in order to weed out those who might have sided with Israel's enemies. 
However, after the Temple is destroyed, Rabbi Gamaliel had this prayer reformulated for 
the purpose of speaking against heretics.7   The debate, as indicated by the question from 
the Pope, confirmed the prayer's purpose­­and why he asked "Whom do Jews consider 
heretics?"  
As in indicated in the gospel of John, Jewish people were already being expelled 
from the synagogues, (9:22).  Why?  Was it heretical to believe that Jesus was Messiah? 
No, but it was obvious to the rabbis whom Jesus claimed to be, God.  After Jesus 
exclaims in John 10:30, "I and the Father are one," the Jewish response was: "[They] 
picked up stones again to stone Him, (John 10:30).  This was their intercourse:  
Jesus answered them; "I showed you many good works from the Father; for 
which of them are you stoning Me?"
The Jews answered Him, "For a good work we do not stone You, but for 
blaspheme; and because You, being a man, make Yourself out {to be} God," 
(John 10:30).
Note the Jewish response.  Jesus claimed to be God.
So during the recitation of the Benedictions, Jewish individuals observed other 
Jewish people.  If one saw another not citing this particular Benediction, that person might
have been a believer in Jesus, thus branded as a heretic. 

8

Christians, on the other hand, did not worship in synagogues.  It seems apparent, 
then, this prayer bothered the early church Fathers,8 and this may be why there was a 
backlash from the church moving away from Jewish practice?  Did the council of Nicea 
use the basis of the benedictions as a formula against their own heretics?  Whatever the 
reason, the idea of the Trinity firmly established very early in church history.  This begs 
the question:  Is the Trinity a Jewish concept? 
The Trinity can be seen as a Jewish concept: 
Hear, O Israel, Adonai Eloheinu Adonai is one."  These three are one.  How 
can the three Names be one?  Only through the perception of faith; the vision of
the Holy Spirit, in the beholding of the hidden eye alone. So it is with the 
mystery of the threefold Divine manifestations designated by Adonai Eloheinu 
Adonai—three modes which yet form one unity.9 
In this quotation from the Zohar, attempting to argue how can three be one, it is apparent 
that Jewish minds have had this insight, and have struggled to understand it. 
Jesus, a teacher, revealing more about this profound mystery, declares, “Before 
Abraham was born, I Am."  In response, the Jewish people picked up stones to stone 
Him for blasphemy.  In other words, they understood what Jesus was declaring.  Yet, all 
Jesus did was point to truth already existent in Jewish Scriptures. 

IV.  Plurality of God as Revealed in the Old Testament
A.  Genesis 1:26
In the early Jewish­Christian Dialogues, the meaning of Genesis 1:26, "Let us 
make man in our image," has been debated over and over again.  Since Jewish scholars 

9

were confused as to why the Lord referred to Himself this way, the rabbis came up with 
some thoughts on this subject.   First of all, some rabbis object by stating that God was 
talking to ministering angels.10  Others attested God was talking to the earth as He made 
man from dust and Spirit.11  Still others explained the plurality of God as meaning the 
"plurality of His majesty" as further confirmed in 1 Kings 12:9.
Furthermore, additional commentary is found in the Babylonian Talmud written 
between 200­450 C.E., such as: 

      
       
       
      
      
      
       

 

Rabbi  Samuel  bar Nahman in the name of  Rabbi  Jonathan 
said, that at the time when Moses wrote the Torah, writing a 
portion of it daily, when he came to this verse which  says, 
“And Elohim said, let us make man in our image after our 
 Likeness,” Moses said, Master of the Universe why do you 
give herewith an excuse to the sectarians (who believe in 
 the  trinity  of G*d), G*d answered Moses,  You  write  and 
whoever wants to err let him err.12

It seems from a Jewish perspective, there was no room for God as a Trinity. However,
the early Church fathers had no problem accepting this especially since Jesus instructed
believers to baptize in the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit, (Matthew
28:19). So, the Church understood the mystery of Genesis 1:26 in light of Jesus'
teaching. For example, a debate between Athanasius and Zacchaeus began with
Zacchaeus stating, “You Christians are deceived. First you think that there are other gods
besides the one and only God."13 Athanasius replies: "Do you desire I show you what is
written in Scripture that Messiah is God? If Moses has spoken, 'Let us make man in our
image,' to whom do you say that God has spoken?14 Many early Church fathers from
Justin Martyr15 to Origen used this Scripture to make their point.

10

The word Elohim was such a difficult word to get around from a Jewish 
perspective, as it clearly characterized God as a plurality.  So how did Jewish writers 
contend with this dilemma?  Well, they replaced Elohim with Word of God.  There are 
two great examples found in Jewish writing to demonstrate this.  First, in order to explain
Genesis 1:26, the Targum Pseudo Jonathan (an early Aramaic paraphrase of the Hebrew 
text) translated verse 27 as:  "And the Memra (Word) of the Lord created the man in his 
(own) likeness."16  Another example is the Targum Onkelos commentary on 
Deuteronomy 33:27 translating the Hebrew "Underneath are the everlasting arms" as 
"And by His 'Memra' was the world created."  
This concept of Memra carried over into interpretation of other passages such as 
Proverbs 8:22­31.  This passage described Wisdom as being with God during the 
creation.  In the same way rabbis personified Wisdom, they personified the Word or 
Memra, assigning divine attributes and implying divine status.  The Rabbis used Memra 
to describe God Himself, as illustrated by this statement:  "The Memra has a place above 
the angels as that agent of the deity who sustains the coarse of nature."17  
The same rabbinical thoughts or reasoning serves as a bridge from the Messiah to 
this Memra.  John, a New Testament gospel writer, associates the Word in creation with 
the Messiah.  "And God said, Let there be light,.." (Genesis 1:3).  John explains more 
about who this Word is:
In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was 
God. He was in the beginning with God. Through him all things were made; 
without him nothing was made that has been made. In him was life, and that 
life was the light of men. (John 1:1­3)  

11

Then further in the passage, John assigns the role of the Word to the person of Jesus:  
“And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us,”  (John 1:14).  By employing a 
rabbinical process, John implicitly indicated rabbis were in the ballpark, but clarified by 
specifying the Word was involved in creation, the Word was Messiah Himself and the 
Word was God. 

B.  The Angel of the Lord
Who is the Angel of the Lord?  Who is the one who wrestles with Jacob and 
meets Moses on Mt. Sinai:  (“The angel of the Lord appeared to him in a blazing fire 
from the midst of the bush,” (Ex 3:2))?  The Angel of God is revealed again as He leads 
the Jewish people in the wilderness, “Behold, I am going to send an angel before you to 
guard you along the way” (Ex 23:20).  Even Joshua meets Him as the Commander of 
God’s army when Joshua crosses over the Jordan River.  In all four cases, this Angel 
shares some divine attributes with God.  For example, in a 4th Century dialogue between 
Timothy and Aquilla, Aquilla asks Timothy to give symbols from the Law.  Timothy 
responds by quoting Exodus 3:2.18  When the Angel speaks to both Moses and Joshua, He
commands, “"Take your sandals from your feet for the place you are standing is holy."   
Another example is when Justin Martyr challenges Trypo, a Jewish man, to understand 
this same Angel can forgive sin:19  “Do not be rebellious toward Him, for he will not 
pardon your transgression, since my name is in Him."  It seems in both dialogues, this 
Angel is worshipped and is able to forgive sin.  According to the Scripture, God is the 
only one who can be worshipped or forgive sin.  So, God does not share these attributes 

12

with anyone else. The Lord through Isaiah declares: " I am the Lord, that is my Name; I 
will not share my glory with another," (Isaiah 42:7).  How oddly interesting that this 
Angel shares in God’s glory.  Yet, Jacob emphatically states after he wrestles with the 
Angel, "It is because I saw God face to face and yet my life was spared,"(Ex  32:24).  
Jesus gives insight about the Angel of the Lord and that it is Him.  Jesus tells 
Nicodemus that He is the "Son of Man," a reference to Daniel’s vision of the "Son of 
Man," (Daniel 7:13­14).  In this passage, the Son is presented to God and yet, He is given
a kingdom and glory. Why would God give His glory to the Son of Man, if He does not 
share His glory?  Then, Jesus, in John 8:58, tells the rabbis, "Truly, truly I say to you, 
before Abraham was born, I am."  This is an emphatic reference to the Angel of the Lord 
in the burning bush.  There is only one conclusion.  The Angel, the Son and God are all 
one and the same God. 
 
C.  The Shekinah
Another aspect of God is demonstrated in the Shekinah.  The Shekinah means in 
Hebrew, the God­Who­Dwells­Within.  Most certainly, the word derives from "Shakan." 
The first to use the word Shekinah, coined it as a substantive noun form from the verbal 
forms used to describe the "abiding, dwelling, or habitation" of the physical 
manifestations of God, as described in Exodus 24:16, Exodus 40:35, Numbers 9:16­18 
and many places where "shakan" is used.  The Shekinah is used to describe the mystical 
presence in the tabernacle.” 20.  Isaiah sees the Shekinah as the Spirit of God, 

13

Where is he who set his Holy Spirit among them, who sent his glorious arm of
power to be at Moses right hand, who divided the waters before them, to gain
for himself everlasting renown, (Isaiah 63:11­12).
There is a clear understanding about the Shekinah as a third major personality that comes 
through as the Spirit of God, often referred to simply as the Ruach Ha­kodesh.  There are 
a number of references to the Spirit of God, including, Genesis 1:2; 6:3; Job 33:4; Psalm 
51:11;139:7; Isaiah 11:2; 63:10&14. The Holy Spirit has all the characteristics of a 
personality (i.e. intellect, emotion and will) and still is considered divine. Again, it is 
Jesus who gives wonderful insight into The Spirit of God.  In John 16: 7­11, He talks 
about the Spirit in the same way as the Shekinah, who guided the Jewish people in the 
wilderness and who was present with them in the Tabernacle. 
…Unless I go away, the Counselor will not come to you, but if I go, I will send 
Him to you. When he comes, He will convict the world of guilt in regards to sin 
and righteousness and judgement, (John 16:7­8).
As one can see, the Holy Spirit holds all truth, convicts people of sin, and to carry the 
negative tasks of judgement.21

V.  Conclusion
The Trinity was not a concept that the Jewish people understood before Jesus 
came.  Just like the idea of the Messiah coming to save people from their sins, the 
information on the Trinity is there, but needed to be fleshed out and explained.  As one 
can see, the concept of God being one is very clear in the Jewish Scriptures.  While there 
existed compelling evidence the Lord as One, the same was true about the unity of God. 

14

This unity was expressed in the name of God, Elohim; in the Word of God; and the 
Shekinah of God.  
It is apparent to rabbis that the Shekinah and the Word were present at creation 
and yet these rabbis could not see these characterizations or persons sharing in God’s 
glory. When John wrote:  "And the Word became Flesh and dwelt among us, and we saw 
His glory, glory as the only begotten from the Father, full of grace and truth," (John 
1:14), John was pointing to the person who could tell the truth about God.  Could people 
fully understand this concept before Jesus came?  Yet, the rabbis say that when the 
Messiah comes, he will reveal new things about the Torah.22  Could a Jewish person 
embrace the Christian concept of the Trinity? Absolutely, because it was very Jewish.  In 
fact, it was Jesus who commanded believers to baptize in the name of the Father, the Son 
and The Holy Spirit.  It was Jesus who revealed the truth about the Trinity, not the 
Church fathers.  The Trinity was a Jewish concept as we can see from this passage from 
Isaiah and should not prevent Jewish people from embracing Jesus and the Christian 
message of salvation.
Listen to Me, O Jacob, even Israel whom I called; I am He, I am the first, I am 
also the last.  Surely My hand founded the earth, and My right hand spread out the 
heavens; when I call to them, they stand together.  Assemble, all of you, and listen!  
Who among them has declared these things?  The LORD loves him; he will carry out 
His good pleasure on Babylon, and His arm {will be against} the Chaldeans.  I, even I, 
have spoken; indeed I have called him, I have brought him, and He will make his ways
successful.  Come near to Me, listen to this: From the first I have not spoken in secret, 
from the time it took place, I was there.  And now the Lord GOD has sent Me, and His 
Spirit,  (Isaiah 48:12­16).

15

1

 Nicene Creed
 Blueletterbible.com, article by Robert M. Bowman, Jr., “The Biblical Basis of the Doctrine of the Trinity”
3
 “A Theology of Election, London”: Jocz, Jakób, SPCK, 1958, p189
4
 Otto Heick, A History of Christian Thought (Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1965), I, 31­32, 59­63
5
 “Judaism on trial, Jewish Christian Disputation of the Middle Ages” translated by Hyam Maccoby Associated University 
Press, East Brunswick, NJ 1982 p.25 ,
6
 “Jewish and Christian Self Definition” by E.P. Sanders Fortress Press, Philadelphia, PA 1981 p.226
7
 ideb p.226
8
 ideb p.236 
9
 Zohar II:43b (vol. 3, p. 134 in the Soncino Press edition).
10
 TANACH, the Stome Edition published Mesorah Publications,”Rashi’s commentary”, Brooklyn, NY 1996 p.4
11
 “The Jewish Christian Debate in the High Middle Ages a critical edition of the “Nizzahon Vetus," Commentary by David 
Berger Jewish Publication Society
12
 “Midrash Rabbah on Genesis” 
13
 A Dialogue of Athanasius and Zacchaeus I:1­3
14
 ideb
15
 “Dialogue with Trypo” by Justin Martyr chapter 62
16
 “Answering Jewish Objections to Jesus” by Michael Brown Baker Books, Grand Rapids, MI 2000 p. 18
17
 “Recent studies in early Christianity”
18
 “Dialogue with Timothy and Aquila” 19:6
19
 “Dialogue with Trypo” by Justin Martyr Chapter 75
20
 www.ao.net/Shikinah excerpt from.” Zachariah and Jewish Renewal” by Fred Miller
21
 The Trinity in the Gospel of John, by Royce Gruenler, Baker Books, Grand Rapids, MI 1986 p.115
22
 Midrash Talpiyot, 58a
2