Pass The Mic

:
Using Critical Media Literacy to Empower Student Voices

Christopher Glover
Derrick Robinson
International Conference on Urban Education
#icue
@cm_glover
@MrD_Robinson

ICUE 2014

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Old Model= Active Teacher, Passive Learner

New Model= Orchestrator Teacher, Active
Learner

Passing the Mic…
 Agent-izing

the student
 Connecting Community and Schools
 Incorporating the Third Space

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The learning environment that extends beyond the
classroom and the home, while holding an allegiance to
traditional literacies. (Morrell, 2012; Morrell, et al., 2013)

All informational inputs that do not come from family or
school

Examples (TV, Radio, Internet, Advertising,
Neighborhood, Friends, etc.)

W H AT I S C R I T I C A L M E D I A
P E D A G O G Y ?

Critical media pedagogy= critical media literacy and
critical media literacy pedagogy (Choudhury & Share,
2013; Morrell, 2012; Morrell et al., 2013; Garcia et al.,
2013; Paul, 2000; Tisdell, 2008).

Empowering of students with the skills needed to
consume, construct, deconstruct, and produce
messages in print and non-print media (Choudhury &
Share, 2013; Morrell, 2012; Morrell et al., 2013; Garcia
et al., 2013; Paul, 2000; Tisdell, 2008).

WHY USE CRITICAL MEDIA
P E D A G O G Y ?

Marginalized students are uniquely positioned to benefit primarily
from critical media pedagogy (Choudury & Share, 2013; Paul, 2000)

Redefines what it means to be literate (Morrell, 2012)

Students question the social construction of media messages
(Choudhury & Share, 2013)

43% gain in Reading Literacy for ELLs after implementing Critical
Media Pedagogy (Choudury & Share, 2013)

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Critical for success in today’s diverse and
globalized world
 Youth are just as likely to produce media,
as they are to consume it (Morrell, et al, 2013).

Beyond entertainment:
 Coping

 Youth

culture identification/Belonging
 Identity formation

HOW CAN WE USE CRITICAL MEDIA
P E D A G O G Y ?

Gain knowledge of media and pop culture
relevant to students
Practice “problem-posing” by asking students
to interrogate and critique media production
Encourage students to produce their own
products
 Shares

their voices and perspectives
 Helps them learn valuable technology and media
production skills

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#1

To Tell a Vision

ELA Focus: CCS-RL-9-10.3- Reading Literature; CCS-W- 9-10.3 Narrative writing
Literary Focus: Director’s purpose, themes, setting, tone, motif, symbols, climax,
plateaus, targeted audience, and character complexity over time

Critical Media Focus: General, Cinematography

Goal: Analyze overt and convert media messages in pop television culture

Basics:

Students choose a current television series (approved by parent)

Student provide a weekly analysis of each episode”

Technology needed

TV, Computer or any means to watch television

Smartphone or video camera

Website (teacher created for blog/vlog submission)

Youtube (account for easy transmission of vlog)

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#2

Historical Comparison

Goal: Identify biases, interpretations, and discrepancies in the reporting of an event by comparing
historical portrayals in print or non-print media with contemporary portrayals of the same event.

Basics

Students research and find print or non-print reporting from the time period of the studied event.
Students then research print or non-print media on the same subject from contemporary sources (ex.
newspaper articles, magazine articles/clippings, or radio advertising from the 1920s versus how the
items are portrayed in textbooks, newspapers, or media today).

Students evaluate why the discrepancies occur and what this means for the study of history. Teacher
creates several questions to force students to critically analyze.

Students create their own media presentation of the event they studied, explaining their argument for
their account of history and why it should be accepted (teaches students to be historians).

Technology Needed

Computers with various forms of creative production software

Access to historical research archives (print media or digital)

Extension

Have students relate this project to their everyday lives by creating a project showing how others may
report on an event in their personal lives and how it may change over time or differ from that student’s
reality.

H OW D O W E S CALE C RITICAL
MEDIA SCHOOLWIDE?

Six characteristics to consider: reform type,
duration, collective participation, active
learning, coherence, and content focus
(USDOE, 2006)
Know teachers’ current belief systems,
acknowledge complexity, keep program
voluntary, peer-led, standards oriented, and
open-ended (Sullivan, 1999)
Concrete, practical suggestions (Fountas et
al., 2000)

CONCLUSIONS/SOLUTIONS

Train teachers in Critical Media Literacy

Engage students in the Third Space

Give time to adapt
Give space and collaboration to brainstorm lessons

Intellectualize the third space
Home and School engagement

Engage Teachers current pedagogical philosophy

Uncover challenges
Build efficacy

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D E L I V E R

http://criticalmediapedagogy.weebly.com

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