Performance Management

 Theme

Design and Re-design of
Performance Management

Content

Vision
Three Main Misconceptions
Development Framework
Design / Redesign – step by step
Design / Redesign - dos and don'ts
Issues
Summary
References







 Intent

Professional:
HR Manager
Personal:
Student
Career
Family

Perfect Performance Management System Exists

Welcoming Employees

Easy Thing

How should it be done?

Culture

Management Style

Structure

Systems

Purpose of your
organisation

Build
Relationship of
TRUST

Participation is
the key

Different World

Empowerment

Conception, Design,
Implementation

Do it for (with)
them

Demotivate

Affect the whole
country or even
Global economy

Danger

Out of business

Cause stress

Context:
 culture and management Style
 work systems
 structure

Content:
 procedures
 guidelines
 documentation

Process:
 objectives setting
 feedback/review
 learning/coaching





Design in 10 stages
Make arrangements and consult at each stage
Involve staff
Get commitment of a line managers through
involvement and communication
Set up project team
Appoint project manager


Why do we need PM?
Business case must be agreed by top management
PM – to develop high-performance culture to
achieve business goals by improving the
performance of individuals and teams and ensuring
that individual objectives are integrated with
corporate objectives.




To improve performance = MOTIVATE
Combination of business and individual needs
To clarify expectations
To develop individuals
To improve relationships by agreement, feedback
and couching
To empower individuals

Of the top management

Of the line managers

Continues process
Clear process
clearly stated objectives
clearly stated standards
use as a day to day management tool




PM should be tested in 2 or 3 departments
Test in real life situations
Test will indicate the changes
Staff will learn about the PM
Ideally allow 3-6 months for the trial
DON’T RUSH IT!


System must be communicated to all concerned
Forms – brochures, intranet, face to face briefing
or



Provide training for line managers
Provide training for staff
One day training is not enough
Managers training through
couching
mentoring
ongoing guidance
formal training courses

Implement the designed, planned and tested plan

Evaluate after first year of operation
Evaluation techniques
written reports
questionares
interviews / focus groups





Get buy-in from senior management from the start
Agree the objectives
Keep employees informed
Ensure the message is consistent throughout
Keep it simple, keep it transparent
Ensure the process is seen as a business one, not a
HR process
Train, train, train
Consider how you will evaluate success







Don’t expect enthusiasm
More forms to fill
Complicated process
It is not an HR responsibility
Don’t underestimate training needs
Don’t underestimate the amount of work involved.
Don’t expect it to work quickly







What scheme types are to be used?
Should there be different objectives for different
staff categories?
Exactly what will be reviewed?
How often should be reviews be conducted?
Is there to be an appeals system?
What documentation should be prepared?
Who will monitor the system?
Who will review whom?
Is there performance-pay link?

Perfect PM for you to copy does not exist

Be prepared for resistance

Half measures lead into failure









Stage 1
Stage 2
Stage 3
Stage 4
Stage 5
Stage 6
Stage 7
Stage 8
Stage 9
Stage 10

Decide on business case
Determine objectives
Gain the line manager commitment
How should the PM system work
Define processes
Pilot test
Communicate
Plan training
Implement
Evaluate
Michael Armstrong

Questions?

Gerry McMahon (2009) Successful Performance
Management: Effective Strategy, Best Practice and
Key Skills, The Liffey Press, Dublin

Michael Armstrong (2009) Armstrong’s Handbook
of Performance Management: An evidence – based
guide to delivering high performance, 4th ed, Kogan
Page, London and Philadelphia