Secondary Unit – Rugby

9th Grade
Erin Vander Hoff
MOV 309 – 04
April 21, 2014

Assessment Plan:
Because Rugby is a novel sport for the majority of students in physical education, this
unit will not have a diagnostic assessment during the first class period; the instructor will observe each
student’s performance but no data will be recorded in regards to ability levels or prior knowledge. Due
to the aerobic nature of the sport, students will be wearing heart rate monitors as a method of keeping
track of activity performed in individual target heart rate zones and for working on improvement in
health-related fitness area of cardiovascular endurance. Students will be assessed based on ability to
reach and maintain a heart rate within his/her target heart rate zone. Students will be assessed
consistently over the course of the unit in regards to target heart, and informally assessed 5 times, not
counting the target heart rate monitoring, over the course of the unit. Students will be assessed both by
the instructor, their peers, and self assessment as a method for feedback, and data gathering to provide
evidence of achievement in the skills and strategies related to the sport of rugby. Assessments will take
place in the middle and/or end of the week after students have had the chance to practice the skills being
assessed. A summative assessment will be given at the end of the unit to gage student learning of game
concepts. Students will be asked to take on the roll of coach for a rugby team, and plan several “plays”
for both defense and offense and provide rationales for each.
Unit Objectives:
1. TSW demonstrate the key elements for performing the rugby skills of the lateral pass, the two
hand carry, and kicking a rugby ball in the correct order in game play settings
2. TSW apply offensive strategies and tactics used in the game of rugby to assist his/her team to
score points during game-play
3. TSW demonstrate a health-enhancing level of physical activity for age and gender by working
within his/her target heart rate zone via use of a heart rate monitor 80% of the time during
physical education class periods
4. TSW demonstrate characteristics of good sportsmanship both towards opponents and teammates
while engaging in constructive competition
Benchmarks/standards
M.1.MS.4 Apply all elements of the mature form of the manipulative skills of catch, kick, foot dribble,
and strike with hand and implements in dynamic settings.
A.4.HR.2 Meet the criterion-referenced cardiorespiratory health-related fitness standards for age and
gender (e.g., PACER, Step Test, One-Mile Run, Walk Test, Handcycle Test).
A.4.AN.4 Analyze and evaluate the physiological indicators associated with moderate to vigorous
physical activity to monitor and/or adjust participation/effort (e.g., palpating pulse, using pedometers,
and/or heart rate monitors to train in target heart rate zones).
K.2.IG.1 Analyze game play, synthesize skills or tactical problems of the game, or evaluate player
performance of tactical problems, including off-the-ball movements (e.g., maintaining possession,
attacking goal, creating space, using space in attack), preventing scoring (e.g., defending space,
defending goal), and starting/restarting play during modified (e.g., 5 vs. 5, 6 vs. 6, or 11 vs. 11) invasion
games (e.g., compare/contrast soccer and basketball).
K.2.IG.2 Analyze game play, synthesize skills or tactical problems of the game, or evaluate player
performance of tactical problems, including on-the-ball movements or scoring g (e.g., passing,

Receiving, shooting, attacking the goal, creating, and using space), preventing scoring (e.g., defending
space, defending goal, winning the object), and starting/restarting game play (e.g., to initiate play or
from sideline) during modified (e.g., 5 vs. 5, 6 vs. 6, or 11 vs. 11) invasion games (e.g.,
compare/contrast lacrosse and field hockey).
B.5.PS.2 Exhibit behaviors which exemplify each of the personal/social character traits of constructive
competition, initiative, and leadership in dynamic settings.
Assessment Tools and Point Scale:
Psychomotor – 15pts
Skills (3) 5pts each
Cognitive – 50pts
Open-response (2) – 10pts each
Student project – 30 pts
Fitness – 25 pts
Daily use of heart rate monitors to help maintain physical activity level within target heart rate
zone – 2pts/day
Affective – 10
Journal (2) 2.5pts each
Peer evaluation (2) 2.5pts each
Grading Scale:
I will be grading students based on performance in all four learning domains: psychomotor,
cognitive, affective, and fitness. Fitness principles and cognitive aspects, such as strategies and tactics,
are weighted more heavily for this age group. By this stage in their developmental levels students should
be able to perform all basic locomotor and non-locomotor skills which form the basis for all skill
performance. In addition, this age level is where students being to stop, or greatly lessen their physical
activity, and increase their likelihood for developing chronic health-related illnesses, such as diabetes.
For this reason there is greater emphasis placed on assessments of fitness principles and evidence of
maintaining health-enhancing levels of physical activity.
Psychomotor– 15%
 Skill Performance assessments
Cognitive assessments 50%
 safety/ rules
 strategies and tactics related to offense/defense/scoring for a variety of sports and
activities
 problem-solving/ critical thinking
Affective assessments – 15%
 effective communication
 cooperation
 sportsmanship
 self reflections
Fitness – 20%

 goals/logs
 assessments of fitness principles
 evidence of health-enhancing levels physical activity
 evidence of improvement over course of the year in all areas of fitness
Scale:
94-100 – A
90-93 – A87-89 – B+
84-86 – B
80-83 – B77-79 – C+
74-76 – C
70-73 – C67-69 – D+
64-66 – D
60-63 – D00-59 – F

Assessments:
Psychomotor – 5pts
Objective: TSW demonstrate the rugby skill of the lateral pass by performing the skill a minimum of 3
times during game play.
Name

Pass 1

Pass 2

Pass 3

Total

Comments:

Type: Checklist, formative assessment, criterion referenced
Assessor: instructor/ peer assessed
Relevance: for most students in the USA rugby is a novel sport, with several novel skills, such as the
lateral pass, so it is necessary to assess those skills because they are an integral part of the game.
Objectivity: high, the criteria for success is clear and the use of a checklist makes scoring easy to carry
out; either a pass is made or it is not
Administrability: easy, this can be completed during a single lesson, and can use peer assessors to
reduce the amount of time the instructor has to spend away from instruction.
Measure: learning of the skill being taught and whether students can apply that knowledge to a game
play setting.

Useful and appropriate: the assessment is useful because it allows students to demonstrate their learning
in a real-world setting rather than as a closed skill. It allow allows students multiple attempts to be
successful, so students who have lower ability levels still have the opportunity to be successful and
demonstrate their learning.
Fitness – 2pts
Objective: TSW practice cardiovascular endurance by using a heart rate monitor to monitor and
maintain a level of physical activity within his/her individual target heart rate zone for 80% of the class
period,
How to Calculate your Target Heart Rate Zone:
1. Calculate Maximum Heart Rate
MHR = (220- age)
MHR = 205
2. Calculate Target Heart Rate Zone
THRZ = (MHR x .5) and (MHR x .7): 102.5 and 143.5
The range between these two numbers is your Target Heart Rate Zone
Name:
Date:

Target Heart Rate Zone met?
Check-in 1

Check-in 2
Check-in1
YES

Check-in 2
NO

YES

NO

Target Heart Rate Zone met?
Date:

Check-in 1

Check-in 2
Check-in1
YES

Check-in 2
NO

YES

NO

Target Heart Rate Zone met?
Date:

Check-in 1

Check-in 2
Check-in1
YES

Check-in 2
NO

YES

NO

Type: Checklist, formative assessment, criterion referenced
Assessor: instructor/ peer assessed
Relevance: for most students in the USA rugby is a novel sport, with several novel skills, such as the
lateral pass, so it is necessary to assess those skills because they are an integral part of the game.
Objectivity: high, the criteria for success is clear and the use of a checklist makes scoring easy to carry
out; either a pass is made or it is not
Administrability: easy, this can be completed during a single lesson, and can use peer assessors to
reduce the amount of time the instructor has to spend away from instruction.
Measure: learning of the skill being taught and whether students can apply that knowledge to a game
play setting.

Useful and appropriate: the assessment is useful because it allows students to demonstrate their learning
in a real-world setting rather than as a closed skill. It allow allows students multiple attempts to be
successful, so students who have lower ability levels still have the opportunity to be successful and
demonstrate their learning.
Cognitive – 10 pts
Objective: TSW demonstrate understanding of offensive tactics and scoring as they relate to the sport of
rugby by providing evidence of learning in written form in response to a scaffolded, open-response
question.
Open-Response Question
You are the captain of your high school rugby team. When the coach has to take a leave of
absence due to illness, you are asked to step in and lead the team during practices.
1. What is the goal for teams participating in the sport of rugby?
2. Identify several methods that a player could use to achieve that goal
3. Using one or more of the methods mentioned above, please describe an offensive strategy
that could be utilized by a player/s to achieve the goal of the game.
Rubric
Question 1
The goal of rugby is to score
more points than the opposing
team

Question 2
 Throwing
 Kicking
 running

The goal of rugby is to score more
points than the opposing team by
scoring tries (a try = 5 pts) which
happens when a player touches the
ball down in the opposing team’s
“try area.”


5 pts are awarded when a
player scores a try.
An extra 2pts are awarded
when a player makes a
conversion
3pts are awarded for a dropgoal

The goal of rugby is to score more
points than the opposing team by
scoring tries (a try = 5 pts) which
happens when a player touches the
ball down in the opposing team’s
“try area.” The ball must be run
across the line and set down by
hand, not kicked or thrown.

Tries are worth 5 points and a
earned when a player runs the
ball over the opposing team’s
“try line” and then sets the
ball down on the ground.
When a try is scored, the
same team can earn 2 extra
points, for a total of 7, by
making a conversion play. A
conversion is scored when the
scoring team kicks the ball
though the goal posts
3pts are scored when a player

performs a drop-goal. A dropgoal is when a player kicks the
ball during a play, just after
the ball has touched the
ground, and the ball travels
through the goals posts.
Question 3
The hooker wins the ball
from the scrum, and passes
it to another forward player.
This player then runs
towards the opposing team’s
goal line as fast as possible
to try to get as close to the
line as possible before having
to pass the ball off to
another player. This rush is
important because players in
rugby cannot pass the ball
forward, only laterally.

Players can perform a loop pass
down the field towards the
opponents try line. A loop pass is
performed when the player with
the ball performs a lateral pass to
the player running parallel, then
runs behind that player and to the
side to receive the ball again.
Players continue to pass the ball
down the line, so it’s a good idea to
practice this formation. You can
also change up the player who is
performing the “loop” to help
confuse the opposing team.

The players perform a switch
pass with a dummy, or decoy. The
player with the ball passes to the
first receiver and the “dummy”
runs diagonally across the field
passing in front of the first
receiver. The first receiver then
fakes a hand-off of the ball and
keeps running forward, before
handing the ball off to the
second receiver who is on the
outside. It is important that this
second receiver remains at depth,
meaning that he/she remains
slightly behind the line of the
first receiver so that a forward
pass does not occur.

Type: formative assessment, open-response
Assessor: instructor
Relevance: In order to actively participate in any sport you have to understand how to score, and in
order to score you have to know how to move the ball up the field. This assessment is looking at student
learning and understanding of scoring and offensive concepts related to the sport of rugby.
Objectivity: low, this form of assessment is more subjective than objective because it is harder to know
exactly what students will write in their response, and therefore creating a comprehensive rubric is more
of a challenge.
Administrability: This assessment is easier to administer since it can be given as a take home
assignment. However it will take more time outside of class on the instructor’s part in regards to
grading. To make it simpler for the students’ the questions can be given during class, however it will
take a large amount of class time for students to respond.
Measure: learning and understanding of the offensive and scoring concepts being taught. Instructor can
use this assessment to gauge the level of student learning, and determine if there are any areas that need
to be reviewed/ re-taught.

Useful and appropriate: the assessment is useful because it allows students to demonstrate their learning
in a manner that may allow him/her to be more successful. Students who are less athletic may not
perform as well, or participate to the same extent as their peers, so providing a different way for them to
demonstrate their learning is useful for the instructor to see if they really have learned the concepts
being taught. The assessment can also be modified in level of complexity so that all students can
respond, and can be administered with the help of an aid if required to meet students needs.

Affective – 2.5 pts
Objective: TSW demonstrate characteristics of good sportsmanship, both towards opponents and
teammates during game play.

Student:

Peer Evaluator:
Criteria
Follows
rules of
the game

Excellent

Proficient

Satisfactory

Non-satisfactory

Student consistently
follows the rules of the
game to the best of
his/her ability so game
play is not disrupted,
and acknowledges
when a mistake has
been made.

Student frequently
follows the rules of the
game, to the best of
his/her ability so game
play is not disrupted,
but does not always
acknowledge a mistake
has been made.

Student inconsistently
follows the rules of the
game, resulting in
multiple instances of
disrupted game play.
Student does not
acknowledge when a
mistake has been made.

Respects
teammates

Student consistently
offers encouragement
and support to
teammates, both when
on the “field”
participating in the
game and when on the
sidelines. The student
never verbally attacks
teammates for
mistakes in play,
and/or a lost game.
Student consistently
demonstrates respect
for opponents by not
engaging in “trash
talk” during game play
and offering words of

The student frequently
offers encouragement
and support to
teammates, both when
on the field and on the
sideline. The student
occasionally verbally
attacks teammates for
mistakes in play and/or
a lost game.

The student offers
support only when on
the sidelines. The
student occasionally
verbally attacks
teammates for mistakes
in play and/or a lost
game.

Student does not
follow the rules of the
game resulting in
constant disruption of
game play. Student
does not
acknowledge when a
mistake has been
made
The student never
offers support or
encouragement to
teammates either
during game play or
when on the sideline.
The student
frequently verbally
attacks teammates for
mistakes in play
and/or a lost game.

Student frequently
demonstrates respect
for opponents by not
engaging in “trash talk”
during game play and
offering words of

Student occasionally
disrespects the opposing
team by engaging in
“trash talk” during game
play. Offers words of
encouragement at the

Respects
opponents

Student frequently
engages in “trash
talk” during game
play, does not offer
encouragement at the
end of the game and

Team
Player

encouragement at the
end of the game.
Student does not tease
the losing team.
Student consistently
works with teammates
to make plays and help
score points.
Communicates on the
field with teammates,
and is willing to play
defense as well as
offense.

encouragement at the
end of the game.
Student does not tease
the losing team.
Student frequently
works with teammates
to make plays and help
score points.
Communicates on the
field with teammates,
and is willing to play
defense as well as
offense.

end the game and does
not tease the losing
team.

harasses the members
of the losing team.

Student inconsistently
works with teammates
to make plays and help
score points. Student is
willing to play defense
as well as offense, but
rarely communicates on
the field to teammates.

Student does not
work with teammates
to make plays and
score points (ball
hog). Student does
not communicate
with teammates and
is unwilling to play
the role of defense.

Type: formative assessment, rating scale, criterion referenced
Assessor: peers
Relevance: Sportsmanship and working as a team is an important part of participating in a team sport
such as rugby. Students need to see physical evidence, as well as receiving feedback, about their
performance in the area of sportsmanship and often the words/opinions of a peer is more powerful than
those of the instructor for this age group.
Objectivity: high, the same criteria for everyone being assessed, and students have been taught how to
assess their peers.
Administrability: easy, peer evaluators can assess their assigned peer when they are sitting out of the
game waiting to be rotated in. Students can complete their peer evaluations during a single class period.
Measure: achievement in the area of sportsmanship; can the student work with teammates to achieve a
common goal, can he/she demonstrate respect to all those individuals in class no matter their level of
ability.
Useful and appropriate: This assessment is useful, because it demonstrates to the instructor the ability of
students to keep their cool in a higher intensity situation, and also demonstrates ability to
work/cooperate with others. Because these are all skills that students should have learned at lower
grades, it is important for the instructor to know which areas need to be worked on , or which students
need a little more help in achieving this unit goal. It will also let the instructor know to what degree
he/she needs to incorporate those skills into the everyday lessons so that students can continually
practice those skills. It is also appropriate since teamwork and sportsmanship are an integral part of team
sports and are skills students need to practice.

Resources:
http://www.auburn.edu/student_info/rugby/rugby_guide.pdf
Performance-based Assessments for Middle and High School Physical Education
http://www.teachpe.com/rugby/techniques/dummy.php
http://www.teachpe.com/rugby/techniques/loop_pass.php
Tim Sena