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GREAT LAKES WORM WATCH DATA SHEET

Use this form when documenting the presence or absence of earthworms,
(may or may not use a formal plot) in your site or location.

Great Lakes Worm Watch
Resources:
Clip Board
Map of school ground (general idea)
Lined paper
Graphing paper
Colored Pencils/markers/crayons
Pencil
Grade Level: 2nd
Subject: Science/Math
Number of Learners: 1-35
Instructional Goals:
In this lesson, students will participate in a citizen science project. The Great Lakes Worm Watch is trying to sample the
United States to figure out where there are earth worms. Students will search for earth worms, count the earth worms, measure
them and then graph their findings. We will then send our collaborative information to the GLWW study.
ISTE 1b. Engage students in exploring real-world issues and solving authentic problems using digital tools and resources
ISTE 1d. Model collaborative knowledge construction by engaging in learning with students, colleagues, and others in face-toface and virtual environments
ISTE 5a. Participate in local and global learning communities to explore creative applications of technology to improve
student learning
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.MD.A.1 Measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools such as rulers,
yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring tapes
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.MD.D.10 Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to represent a data set
with up to four categories. Solve simple put-together, take-apart, and compare problems1 using information presented in a bar
graph.
Instructions:

1) Plan to do this lesson on a day after it has rained so that the worms are easier to spot and students do
not have to go digging for the worms
2) Prep the student by explaining that “Today, we are going to search for and measure earth worms. The
University of Minnesota is trying to get more information about earth worms around the country and
they asked us to help them to get more information about the worms in our area. We are going to put on
our jackets and go outside with our rulers, clipboards and lined paper. Like scientists, we are going to
collect data about the worms that we see at school. When outside, you will search the pavement for
worms. Once you find one, mark on your map where you found the worm. Then, measure the worm
with your ruler (Model how to do this) and then record your data on your lined piece of paper. Continue
to search for worms until I call the class to come inside.”
3) Ask comprehension questions to make sure that the students understand the procedure, “What do we do
first when we find a worm?”
4) Review with students proper etiquette, such as what to do when two students find a worm at the same
time
5) Take the students outside and have them find and measure worms
6) After 20 or so minutes, have the students come back inside, take off their jackets and take the data that
they collected to their desks.
7) Instruct the students to make a bar graph and picture graph depicting length of worms and frequency
8) When students are done with the assignment, collect their data. Then, as a teacher average the number
of worms found by the class and fill out the attached document (a worm sample is not necessary)
Mail form and preserved earthworms to:

Great Lakes Worm Watch
The Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota Duluth
5013 Miller Trunk Hwy., Duluth MN 55811
Questions? Email: greatlakeswormwatch@gmail.com ; Phone: 218-720-4379
Visit our website at http://www.nrri.umn.edu/worms/default.htm

GREAT LAKES WORM WATCH DATA SHEET

Use this form when documenting the presence or absence of earthworms,
(may or may not use a formal plot) in your site or location.

9) When the data is collected and the data sheet is filled out, mail the information to the address at the
bottom of the data sheet.
Adaptations: Different methods can be used in order to find the worms,
(http://greatlakeswormwatch.org/research/methods_worms.html.) Students may want to work with partners in order to
keep each other on track or to limit the eyes looking for worms. Accommodations may need to be made for students of
varying abilities.

Mail form and preserved earthworms to:

Great Lakes Worm Watch
The Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota Duluth
5013 Miller Trunk Hwy., Duluth MN 55811
Questions? Email: greatlakeswormwatch@gmail.com ; Phone: 218-720-4379
Visit our website at http://www.nrri.umn.edu/worms/default.htm

GREAT LAKES WORM WATCH DATA SHEET

Use this form when documenting the presence or absence of earthworms,
(may or may not use a formal plot) in your site or location.
Section 1 (Essential Data) – This section of the data sheet is a list of essential variables that must be filled in before you
submit and send you samples to GLWW. Section 2 is optional and contains additional sections for habitat information.
Checklist – use the check list below to ensure you have included all essential data when you send in your sample.
 General Site Information
 Sampling method(s) used
 Geographic Information
 Area sampled
 Earthworms found in site?
 Send this form to GLWW; (optional – also preserved earthworms)
1.
General Site & Sampling Information
Your Site Name:

Date of Sampling:

Address:
Phone:

Email:

Observer(s) Name(s):

2.
Geographic Location of the habitat being sampled:
Method used to determine location (circle one) : Hand Held GPS Unit
; iTouchMap (online)
Latitude: N
.
°
Longitude: W .
°
Latitude & Longitude need to be given in Decimal Degrees (e.g. N 46.78667, W -92.10048) if your GPS is not set in this
format you will need to change its settings. For help see “An Introduction to Locating Sample Points” on the GLWW
website <http://www.nrri.umn.edu/worms/team/Intro-LocatingPoints.html>
Accuracy of your location coordinate, indicated by your GPS unit (not relevant for iTouchMap):
meters
What was the “Datum” used when collecting the plot geographic location (circle appropriate):
NAD83 ;
WGS84 ;
Other:
If you don’t understand what “datum” means see “An Introduction to Locating Sample Points” on the GLWW website
<http://www.nrri.umn.edu/worms/team/Intro-LocatingPoints.html>; NOTE: iTouchMap uses the WGS84 datum.
3.

Does your site contain Earthworms (circle appropriate):
YES
If YES, how many Earthworms were found:

4.

Earthworm sampling method used (circle all that apply):
Midden Counts
Flip and Strip

NO

Hand Sampling

Mustard Extraction

If you don’t understand the difference between these sampling methods, see the “Earthworm Sampling Methods”
section of the GLWW website http://greatlakeswormwatch.org/research/methods_worms.html.
5.
Describe the area in your habitat that was sampled: (circle or describe below)
Fixed plot (33cm x 33 cm square recommended);
Other: (please describe):
6.

Mail in the completed form.
(Optional) Also send any preserved earthworms (be sure to label the vial(s) with site name and date collected).
For preservation instructions see <http://www.nrri.umn.edu/worms/research/methods_worms_preserve.html>

Mail form and preserved earthworms to:

Great Lakes Worm Watch
The Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota Duluth
5013 Miller Trunk Hwy., Duluth MN 55811
Questions? Email: greatlakeswormwatch@gmail.com ; Phone: 218-720-4379
Visit our website at http://www.nrri.umn.edu/worms/default.htm

GREAT LAKES WORM WATCH DATA SHEET

Use this form when documenting the presence or absence of earthworms,
(may or may not use a formal plot) in your site or location.
Section 2 (Optional Data) – This is a section for additional habitat and soil features of you study site. This data is
not essential, HOWEVER can add further details of your study site for our database.
Habitat Type being surveyed (circle the best match for the habitat surveyed in one of the 3 columns below)
UPLAND – sites that are dry or
LOWLAND – sites that are wet,
HUMAN DOMINATED – Cities,
moist.
permanently or periodically.
villages, farmstead and rural homes.
- Agricultural crops
- Agricultural Field or Pasture
- Hedgerow Old / Fallow Fields
- Dry Prairie, Grassland, or Open
Barrens
Shrubland and Savanna
- Deciduous Shrubs
- Trees Coniferous Shrubs
- Trees Mixed Shrubs

- Open Water and Wetland Marsh
- Lake, Pond, Reservoir, or
Impoundment
- River or Stream
- Agricultural crops
- Agricultural Field or Pasture
- Hedgerow Old / Fallow Fields
- Wet Meadow, Prairie, or Open
Sedge Bog

Urban Areas
- Roadway or Ditch
- Residential Area Open Space
- Commercial or Industrial Area
- Waste Water Treatment Site
Rural Areas
- Roadway or Ditch
- House or Farmstead and Lawn
- Park, Golf Course, Mowed
- Recreation Area Commercial or
Industrial Site

Shrubland and Savanna
- Deciduous Shrubs
- Trees Coniferous Shrubs
- Trees Mixed Shrubs

Forest and Woodland
- Deciduous Trees
- Coniferous Trees
- Mixed Trees

Forest and Woodland
- Deciduous Trees
- Coniferous Trees
- Mixed Trees

Habitat Size: (circle the best match for the habitat you are sampling)
0-2 acres

2-5 acres

5-20 acres

20-40 acres

40-100 acres

Disturbance: (circle all that apply for the habitat you are sampling)

100+ acres

Historic grazing/farming

Historic logging

Current grazing/farming

Current logging

Recreation-motorized

Recreation nonmotorized

Fishing

Unknown

Other: (please describe)

_

Surrounding Land Use: (circle all that apply for the habitat you are sampling)

Urban Development

Suburban Development

Rural Development

Wetlands

Forested

Lakes

Mostly similar to the habitat
sampled
Streams and Rivers

Basic Soil Features: Pretend that any fresh, or whole dried leaf litter from last fall is not there. Now, tell me what
percent of the surface is composed of bare or exposed soil: (circle the best match for the habitat sampled)
0-5%
5-25%
25-50%
50-75%
Is there any Forest Floor layer (spongy partially decomposed leaf material) present? (Circle one) YES
If yes, what is the average thickness? (Circle one) 0-2 cm

2-4 cm

4-6 cm

6-10 cm

NO

10+ cm

If yes, is layering of the forest floor apparent? (fresh litter on top of a layer of fragmented and partially
decomposed litter and perhaps even a layer of very decomposed litter beneath that?) YES
NO
Soil Texture: use the Simplified Key to Mineral Soil Texture provided on GLWW website
<http://www.nrri.umn.edu/worms/research/methods_soils.html>,
Circle one:
Sand
Loamy sand
Loam or sandy loam
Silt loam
Sandy clay loam - clay loam
Silty clay loam – silt
Sandy clay - clay
Silty - clay
Mail form and preserved earthworms to:

Great Lakes Worm Watch
The Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota Duluth
5013 Miller Trunk Hwy., Duluth MN 55811
Questions? Email: greatlakeswormwatch@gmail.com ; Phone: 218-720-4379
Visit our website at http://www.nrri.umn.edu/worms/default.htm