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Marvaye Payton

Lesson Reflection Guiding Prompts Lesson #2 and #3
Lesson 2:
To what extent did the students reach the learning objective(s)?
For lesson one, my lesson objective was after reading a text and watching a
live version of the text, students will be able to have a discussion comparing and
contrasting between the two examples of texts. I started my lesson by giving a preassessment to understand if my students had enough prior knowledge and could tell
me how a person’s perception of a written text changes after hearing/viewing a
presentation of that text. Like always, there were hands that waved to answer.
Although, I am sure majority could have answered the question to some extent I
called on Sam and he gave me the correct answer. After allowing students to read
the text A Turn To Love on the Smart Board, I asked them to give me their opinion on
how the text made them feel, some key ideas that stood out to them, and any
questions they had. I did not stop there, I continued to ask students questions of my
own deepening their understanding like how would you rate the aesthetic quality of
the text, what can be extrapolated or extended from this particular meaning of the
text that may have more general or universal value, and how would you translate
text into a visual form? For some students their answers were accurate within
reason and for others their answers were accurate beyond measure. After analyzing
the text, we then looked at a movie clip form the movie Coach Carter where an actor
verbally performed A Turn To Love. Then, I had students do the same thing they did
previously with the text with the clip. When asking basic questions and questions
that made them think deeper about the clip I could tell that many students made a
connection by show of hands wanting to participate. When summarizing my lesson,
I conducted an open class discussion where students could demonstrate their
knowledge of this concept. I assessed them by checking off students’ names when
they told me something they learned.

Reflect on your instructional strategies:
For this lesson, I used different types of instructional strategies. One of the
instructional strategies I used was direct instruction where I taught the lesson from
in front of the classroom off of the Smart Board. With direct instruction the students
could see and hear me tell them what was most important for them to know.
The other strategy I used was active learning. Using active learning, students
were not only listening to my lesson, but also having to pay close attention in case I
called on them to finish my sentence, tell their opinion, or give an example.
During the lesson, I also used critical thinking as a stagey. After teaching
about the text and movie clip, I asked students questions that were intended to
make them think deeper, reflect, clarify, connect, and infer before giving me an
answer.

Marvaye Payton

Interaction with the students:
Effective interaction with students is what I try to make happen with every
lesson I teach. In order to do that with this lesson, I frequently stopped teaching and
ask students if they understand what I just said. I also interact with students by
judging their facial expressions. One of the students had a confused look on their
face so, I stop teaching and asked her if she understood it or did she need me to
explain it in another way.
Classroom-management strategies:
Managing the classroom with this lesson was not difficult as I thought I
would be. For most of my lesson many students stayed on tasks. The three times
students got off task I quickly redirected their attention by calling their name or
putting their name in my example. Doing this reinforces students that I am not only
teaching, but I am watching to see if they are learning. While teaching, I would
occasionally remove my self from the front of the classroom and walk around the
classroom and teach from there. Doing this, students could only hear me making
them pay attention in case they were called on.
Some Revisions I would make if I were to teach the lesson again:
Some areas I would revise would have to be…
• When I asked students questions to force them to think deeper. I believe I
failed the students because I did not know how to get the correct answer out
of them when they gave me an answer that was not correct. If I were to teach
the lesson again I would definitely make revisions to the questioning at the
end of the lesson. When creating the lesson I just thought of questions that
would provoke the students to think deeper, but I did not think about having
answers for the question they would ask me in return. Even though I feel like
there was no way I could have planned for the answers they would ask me,
the teacher inside me wished that I could. I now have an idea of what kind of
questions the students will ask, I will now be prepared to answer their
questions; allowing them to deeper their knowledge.

Marvaye Payton

Lesson Reflection Guiding Prompts Lesson #2 and #3
Lesson 3:
While planning this lesson, I reflected on my two previous lessons that I have
taught this class in hopes to make sure I did not leave anything out.
To what extent did the students reach the learning objective(s)?
From observation of the students’ productivity during their postassessment, I thought students did reach the learning objective, which was by the
end of the lesson; the 6th grade students will be able to identify and use irony,
situational irony, verbal irony, dramatic irony, and allusion.
Cite examples from the lesson plan and/or video to support your conclusion.
Examples that support students reaching the learning objective can be noted
within my lesson plan and can be noted in my recording of this lesson as well. At the
beginning of my lesson I asked students if they could tell me what irony meant and
could they give me some examples. Many students showed that they understood
irony and could provide me with examples of it, but the wording of their replies
were not a positive correlation of their intelligence and their grade level, which
made me realize that students did not fully understood the meaning of irony. After
showing my definition of irony and my examples on Prezi, I believe, students now
fully knew what irony meant and could give me examples. Continuing my lesson I
taught students the three different types of irony, which are verbal, situational, and
dramatic irony. I also taught students the literary element allusion. I taught each
type of irony and allusion one at a time and gave examples of each. For each term I
had a definition of each that students wrote down in their notebooks. By reading the
definition students could tell me what they thought each term meant and some
possible examples. It was not until after I taught about each and given examples to
students that they truly understood what each meant and how each was used. At
the end of my lesson, students were instructed to get in groups and come up with
their own examples. They could either construct sentences or draw pictures to show
that they understood the meanings of irony, allusion, verbal, situational, and
dramatic irony. Observable in the video, you can hear students coming up with their
own examples of each. The groups of students wrote excellent sentences and drew
entertaining pictures to demonstrate their understanding of my lessons objective.

Marvaye Payton

Reflect on Instructional strategies:
One of the instructional strategies I used to teach this lesson was direct
instruction; students took notes while I taught from in front of the classroom. This
strategy worked well because it allowed me to tell the students what to write down
in their ELA notebooks due to its importance.
The other instructional strategy I used was visual leaning tools. Thought my
Prezi, I placed videos that would intrigue students and deeper the understanding of
the content. I believed this worked best because instead of students hearing my
voice for the whole lesson, they could learn from the animated video. Observable in
the video, students interest in the lesson greaten when watching the videos, which
allowed me to stand to the side and only make connections and reiterate what was
important.
Interaction with the students:
For this lesson my interaction with the students, I believe, was the best it has
ever been compared to previous lessons. Unlike previous lessons, this lesson I
created a chance for my interaction with students to be more personable rather
than me just teaching form the Smart Board. Their post-assessment allowed me to
communicate with each group and look at their sentences and drawings. When
communicating with each group, I took this time to point out examples within the
classroom of irony and allusion. It was also nice to have my cooperating teaching
helping me work with students and meet with groups because I could not be
everywhere at one time.
Classroom-management strategies:
My classroom-management strategy was the same as the previous lessons. If
students were off tasks or having small conversations while I was teaching,
noticeable in the video as well, I would walk near them while teaching or seat down
beside them. Doing this allows me to keep teaching and also redirect students being
off tasks. Although my classroom-management was good, I did snap at a group of
students off task. I have taken note that that is not the best way to redirect students
and I am working on not doing it.

Marvaye Payton

Some Revisions I would make if I were to teach the lesson again:
Overall I felt that the lesson went well, I do believe it could have been better.
Some components I noticed that I would do better next time are…
• Before going to the next term, I will have students tell me the important
information about the current term. Although I did do this at the end of the
lesson, doing it at the end of ever term would have allowed me to see if
students understood before I continued.
• When the students in the groups I felt like I should have given them a
worksheet with the directions on it. I say this because I found myself
repeating the directions too many times.
• I should have started with a real world problem to get the students
interested. Maybe next time I could have the Taylor Swift song playing while
students are coming in the classroom. Having that song playing would have
made the students wonder why is this circular song playing.
• To reassure myself that students did understand the lesson I should have
kept their examples to look over and give back to them.