You are on page 1of 5

All Divestment Resolution Suggestions from Feedback Form & Townhall  

(Condensed and Summarized) 
 
The following is a compiled and condensed  list of commendations, concerns, and suggestions regarding the 
Divestment resolution submitted via SJP’s online feedback form during the feedback period in the making of 
this resolution. The online feedback form and subsequent town hall meeting to discuss said feedback was 
made available for the sake of transparency and discussion concerning the resolution in an effort to make the 
drafting process conducive to  inclusivity, communal participation, and sensitivity to the concerns of 
community members at UCLA. With each listed feedback is further information on how participants in the 
town hall meeting felt regarding a particular suggestion and what steps SJP took to address or incorporate 
said suggestion.  
 
Sincerely,  
Divestment Organizers at UCLA 
 
  
(STUDENT CONSENT FOR INVESTMENT) 
1.    Talk about how we, the students, have had no input as to how OUR money is being invested. It is our right and 
responsibility to decide how our fees are being used. (mentioned five times) (Group 2 liked more) (Group 3 
liked)(might not actually be a “right” – figure out their language) (Group 5 liked) (Group 7 liked – also distrust 
regents) (Group 9 liked, also ties in to tuition increase) (Group 10 liked) 
● Student consent was incorporated into resolution in clause 4 
 
2.    While UCLA does have the right to generate revenue, it must do so in an objective manner and must not 
compromise ethical values for profit maximization. (ethical is a grey area) (Group 4 liked) (Group 6 – does UCLA 
have a statement about its own investments and its values on those investments?) 
● This seems to be implied in the resolution, also covered in the clauses about the UC’s recent adoption of 
PRI 
  
(CONTEXT) 
3.    Focus on how these companies are enabling the conflict, and steer conversation away from previous 
Israeli­Palestinian wars. 
● Took this into account throughout resolution, not mentioning any specific wars 
  
4.    Also mention the failed peace talks, and the summer attack on Gaza and the subsequent building of new 
settlements in the West Bank.  
● Did not incorporate this into the resolution because most students at the townhall did not like this 
suggestion. Students said that this strayed from the companies and that we should steer away from specific 
events. 
  
5.    The resolution should mention that there are Palestinian students on the campus whose tuition funds the 
oppression of their families back home.  
● Incorporated this more generally in clause 3, as students at the townhall said this is too specific and applies 
to multiple groups. Students also suggested that this be contextualized, so we spoke of Palestinian students 
in clause 17.  
  
6.    Talk about ground conditions: homelessness, water, healthcare, checkpoints that limit movement, etc.  

Addressed most of these issues when discussing the actions of the targeted companies, specifically in the 
case of Caterpillar in clause 8.  

  
 
(INTERSECTIONAL STRUGGLES/OPPRESSION) 
7.    Perhaps briefly mention that Afrikan immigrants are also affected negatively by these checkpoints, as well as 
students from other oppressed backgrounds.  
● Did not incorporate this into the resolution. This suggestion received mixed feedback at the townhall. It 
ultimately was not included because students felt it may be polarizing and that it was overly focused on 
Israel. However, many students expressed support for the struggles of communities such as Afrikan 
immigrants. 
  
8.    Emphasize that these are American companies that are invested in many other human rights atrocities outside of 
Palestine.  
● Somewhat incorporated this into the resolution, with reference to HP’s actions on the US­Mexico border 
and in ICE detention centers in clause 13. This was discussed at greater length during our campaign.  
  
9.    Focus on setting a precedent for student political agency that will empower students to divest from 
humans­rights violating companies in the future and will push for democratizing the UC.  
● Incorporated student power and political agency in clause 5.  
  
10. Endorse divestment as a tactic against rights violations directed towards other communities and give examples of 
how this tactic has been previously used to aid other social groups represented by student organizations. 
● Incorporated this suggestion in clause 5, listing concrete examples of the history of divestment at the UC. 
  
(SPECIFYING THE IMPORTANCE OF THESE ISSUES TO PEOPLE’S LIVES) 
11. Emphasize that these companies affect actual people whose lives are valuable. List specific struggles of 
Palestinians­­and whomever else is negatively affected by the things these companies are doing­­in order to 
personalize the situation. For instance, you could include that women have been forced to give birth at checkpoints 
because they couldn't access hospitals. (mentioned twice) (Group 2 liked) 
● Unable to include full lists of specific harms, though many of these can be found by reading citations 
  
12. Mention how the international community and human rights organizations have repeatedly condemned the 
Israeli Occupation of Palestinian Territory. 
● Incorporated this in clause 15, but tied the suggestion more closely to the actual target companies. 
  
13. Explain that we have Palestinian students who are funding violence against their own families. (mentioned twice) 
● Similar to suggestion above (#5). Incorporated in clause 17 by discussing how Palestinian students and 
their families are directly affected by these companies’ actions. 
  
(DEFINITION, HISTORY, POTENTIAL OF DIVESTMENT) 
14. Do not assume prior knowledge from readers, and give a clear, explicit definition of “divestment” to avoid 
confusion or misinterpretation.  
● Everyone at the townhall agreed clearly defining divestment is very important, so we added footnote 3 with 
the definition of divesting. 
  
15. State that these companies can be invested in again once their human rights abuses are over.  

Students thought this was a good idea as it clarifies the goals of divestment. Some students raised the 
concern that corporations may cease human rights violations in Palestine but may continue human rights 
violations in other parts of the world. We incorporated this suggestion and added language to address the 
concern in clause 21. 

  
16. Describe how divestment has been used as a tool to create change in many other previous situations (e.g. South 
Africa fossil­fuel divestment, Prison industrial complex).  
● Incorporated in clause 5. This suggestion was raised many times. 
  
17. Mention that 5/9 UCs have divested from occupation.  
● Did not incorporate this into the resolution because this resolution is separate from other universities and 
campaigns. What other universities do should not determine what UCLA does or does not do. 
  
(COMPLICITY/NEUTRALITY) 
18. Also say how we're not neutral right now because our money is invested, so divestment actually makes us more 
neutral. 
● Discussing neutrality was very important to many students, so we incorporated this suggestion in clause 18. 
We recognize that “neutrality” may appear ambiguous and that different people may have different 
understandings of what is neutral, so we focused specifically on financial neutrality because it is more 
objectively defined. 
  
19. Emphasizing that we should be against oppression of ANY ethnic community is very important and I feel that 
focusing on that will allow people to keep their own opinions about the conflict to themselves and understand that 
this is an issue of not being complicit in the oppression of Palestinians. 
● Incorporated this by opening the resolution with general clauses defining our values, applicable to all 
communities. 
  
20. Make the moral basis the following: UCLA is a public university, and a public university should not take 
political stances in foreign conflicts. Divesting from [x, y z] companies will put UCLA in a neutral stance regarding 
the Israeli­Palestinian conflict. 
● Same as above. We incorporated this suggestion in clause 18.  
  
(STUDENT VOICE) 
21. Also mention that this bill is a student motivated student initiated campaign and should be read as such. (Group 2 
liked) (Group 9 liked) 
● Should be reflected in the listing of co­sponsoring organizations, which will be updated as it grows 
  
22. Call on the Regents to respect our voices as students and integral members of the U.C. institution.  
● Incorporated greater student oversight in clause 24.  
  
23. Emphasize need for additional student oversight of investment affairs. Also, be more clear about what student 
investment oversight would look like.  
● Students stressed that there should me more student input and more student oversight over the Regents and 
our investments, so we incorporated this in clause 24. 
  
24. This issue is not only limited to Israel­Palestine. We are invested in socially irresponsible companies that affect 
other communities as well. As such, students should be given oversight over our investment policies to ensure that 
future students don't also fund the oppression of their families and communities.  

● Same as above. We incorporated greater student oversight into clause 24.  
  
25. If the university wishes to make all of its students feel comfortable it needs to divest from the aforementioned 
companies. Otherwise, a clear message is sent: only certain lives matters. And if that is the case, this institution 
which has made a name for itself by creating one of the most intelligent and diverse student bodies stands on 
nothing more than superficial principles. (Group 5 didn’t like, not great wording. “Comfortable”) 
● Did not incorporate into resolution because students at the townhall did not like the wording of the 
suggestion, and “comfortable” is very ambiguous and subjective. 
  
26. Point out that the message that the Regents are sending by prioritizing money over human rights is not the 
message we want to be sending, and explain that this mentality may lend itself to further human rights violations in 
the future. (mentioned twice)  (group 1 liked) 
● Also seems to be covered through other suggestions, can be discussed separately.  
  
(WHAT IS END GOAL/CONTEXT) 
27. Make it clear that this bill neither condemns a country, a people, or a community nor takes a stance on a solution 
to the Israeli­Palestinian conflict, but is solely aimed at improving the quality of life for Palestinians and not 
supporting companies that enable human rights violations.  
● Students were very receptive to this suggestion and really liked stating this explicitly, so clause 19 was 
added. 
  
28. Explain that the liberation of the Palestinians will bring peace for both Israelis and Palestinians. (Group 9 didn’t 
like) 
● Did not include because students weren’t very receptive to this suggestion, and it is not very relevant to the 
resolution. This resolution might or might not liberate any peoples, but it will end our complicity in 
violence against people. 
  
29. Acknowledge that both the Israelis and Palestinians have a right to self­determination respectively.  
● Students thought this could be a digression and may be headed towards imposing a solution, which this 
resolution does not aim to do. Did not include in the resolution because of student reaction to the suggestion 
and our guidelines to stay away from political solutions. 
  
30. If giving Palestinians their human rights, as stipulated by the UNDHR, is a threat to Israel, then what does that 
say about the State of Israel?  
● Did not incorporate because this resolution is not about the state of Israel, it is about companies. 
  
31. Make it explicit that you are aiming to divest from what is hurting and open to investing in what helps, and 
define divestment very clearly to avoid misinterpretation. 
● Incorporated our openness to invest in what helps in clause 25 and defined divestment in footnote 3. 
  
32. Make a statement that everyone can agree on as the closing sentence (even the people that are against the 
resolution). Give the end of the resolution an optimistic tone. (this is doable, efficient, within our power) 
● Incorporated by closing the whereas clauses with a positive statement about uniting the campus (clause 20) 
and ending the resolution with a clause against all discrimination (clause 26). 
  
33. Encourage dialogue after this resolution. Ultimately, SJP wants to divest and once that is achieved and 
complicity has been symbolically removed it should be easier to engage in conversations on campus in a more 
organized way without feeling an obvious power struggle. 

● Groups did not express interest in this suggestion, so it has not been added at the moment 
  
34. Also make sure to avoid triggering buzz words in the resolution and public comments. Be as sensitive as possible 
while still making a point. Try not to seem like you’re attacking people’s identities or their right to 
self­determination. Be clear that while there is a community that differs from you in opinion they still have every 
right to hold the opinions they have. 
● Incorporated by adding clause 19, about how this resolution does not aim to condemn a country, a people, 
or a community. Also generally incorporated by being careful about wording in overall resolution. 
  
35. The citations are excellent. Can you print an information packet for each council member with the citations for 
their reference at the table? So they don't have to search on the internet and they will be right there for them.  
● Created packet of all citations compiled and published on website.