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Unit Plan for Integrated Learning

Science 3: Building with a Variety of Materials


How Can I Demonstrate Good Workmanship?
Teacher: Alex Hutcheon

Science
Building with a Variety of Materials:
GLOs
3-6 Use, safely, a variety of tools, techniques and
materials in construction activities.
3-7 Construct structures, using a variety of
materials and designs, and compare the
effectiveness of the various materials and designs
for their intended purposes.
SLOs

1. Using a variety of materials and techniques, design,


construct and test structures.
2. Select appropriate materials for use in construction
tasks, and explain the choice materials.
3. Select tools that are suitable to particular tasks and
materials, and use them safely and effectively.
4. Understand and use a variety of methods to join or
fasten materials.
5. Identify the intended purpose and use of structures
to be built, and explain how knowing the intended
purpose and use helps guide decisions regarding
materials and design.
6. Understand that simple designs are often as effective
as more complex ones, as well as being easier and
cheaper to build, and illustrate this understanding with
a practical example.
7. Recognize the importance of good workmanship, and
demonstrate growth towards good workmanship.
8. Maintain and store materials and tools safely and
properly.
9. Apply skills of listening, speaking and cooperative
decision-making in working with other students on a
construction project.

Math
SLOs
Measurement:
- Demonstrate an
understanding of
measuring length
Data Analysis:
- Collect first-hand data
and organize it

Social Studies
SLOs
3.14 Examine economic factors that
shape communities in other parts of
the world
3.S.4 Demonstrate skills of decision
making and problem solving
3.S.5 Demonstrate skills of
cooperation conflict resolution and
consensus building

Big Idea/Generative Topic:


How Can I Demonstrate Good
Workmanship?

Health and Life Skills


SLOs
R- 3.8 Develop skills to work
cooperatively in a group
L - 3.5 Examine personal
skills and assets

Language Arts
SLOs
1.1 Explain understanding of
new concepts in own words
1.2 experiment with arranging
and recording ideas and
information in a variety of ways
3.1 Ask topic-appropriate
questions to identify information
needs
5.1 Use appropriate language
to acknowledge and celebrate
individuals and class
accomplishments
5.2 Work cooperatively with
others in small groups on
structured tasks

Art
SLOs
Depiction:
1. Students will perfect forms and develop
more realistic treatments
Composition:
2. Students will create unity interrelating
the parts of a composition
3. Students will improve compositions by
refining, rehearsing and critiquing

Unit Plan for Integrated Learning

Title of Unit

How Can I Demonstrate Good

Grade Level

Grade 3

Time Frame

1 Month (20 Classes)

Workmanship?
Subject
Developed By

Science: Building with a Variety of Materials


Alex Hutcheon

Identify Desired Results


Unit Summary
Students use a variety of tools and simple techniques to build products for specific purposes. Their tasks may require that a bridge be
built between two desks, a model house being constructed, creating a model school playground, or constructing a chair, all from
available materials. Through these projects and experiments, students learn the value of safety and good workmanship and that
different materials and designs can be used to obtain the same result. Students learn that working together on a common task is easier
when ideas and materials are shared.
Unit Rationale
This unit will focus on the students ability to use problem-solving skills in order to accomplish a task. Given the information that they
have gained from Topic C: Testing Materials and Designs, the students will be able to put forth their knowledge and use it when building
a wide range of objects that will be serving many purposes including containers, models of living things, objects or buildings, support
objects, or span gaps. The students will improve their workmanship throughout the unit and various hands on activities and selfassessments (work logs).
To extend the students knowledge of bridges, we will be going on a class field trip to the local museum for a program called Building
Bridges. The students will be exposed to a variety of bridge types, and materials that are used to build bridges, as well as engage in
an activity that will put their knowledge to test. It is important for the students to be able to relate their personal lives as well as the
environment around them to understand the purpose of buildings and why they are built in a certain way. They will be naturally curious
about the topic but also aware of the safety implications that are considered when structures are built.
Learning Outcomes
GLOs
3-6 Use, safely, a variety of tools, techniques and materials in construction activities.
3-7 Construct structures, using a variety of materials and designs, and compare the effectiveness of the various materials and designs
for their intended purposes.
SLOs
1. Using a variety of materials and techniques, design, construct and test structures that are intended to:
Support objects
Span gaps

Serve as containers
Serve as a model of particular living things, objects or buildings
2. Select appropriate materials for use in construction tasks, and explain the choice materials. Students should demonstrate familiarity
with the variety of materials, such as papers, woods, plastics, clay and metals
3. Select tools that are suitable to particular tasks and materials, and use them safely and effectively.
4. Understand and use a variety of methods to join or fasten materials.
5. Identify the intended purpose and use of structures to be built, and explain how knowing the intended purpose and use helps guide
decisions regarding materials and design.
6. Understand that simple designs are often as effective as more complex ones, as well as being easier and cheaper to build, and
illustrate this understanding with a practical example.
7. Recognize the importance of good workmanship, and demonstrate growth towards good workmanship.
8. Maintain and store materials and tools safely and properly.
9. Apply skills of listening, speaking and cooperative decision-making in working with other students on a construction project.
Enduring Understandings
What understandings about the big ideas are desired? (what you
want students to understand & be able to use several years from
now)
Students will understand that...
Good workmanship can foster the skills need to succeed
later in life, and that we should be constantly demonstrating
growth towards good workmanship.

Essential Questions
What provocative questions will foster inquiry into the content?
(open-ended questions that stimulate thought and inquiry linked
to the content of the enduring understanding)
Content specific.
How can I demonstrate good workmanship?
How can I use knowledge from previous experiences to
help me design and build materials?
In what ways can I cooperatively work with other
students?

Assessment Evidence
Performance Task
Through what authentic performance task will students demonstrate the desired understandings, knowledge, and skills? (describes the
learning activity in story form. Typically, the P.T. describes a scenario or situation that requires students to apply knowledge and skills
to demonstrate their understanding in a real life situation. Describe your performance task scenario below)
By what criteria will performances of understanding be judged?
GRASPS Elements of the Performance Task
G Goal
Galt Museum Performance Task
What should students accomplish by
G By successfully designing and building a bridge across a model coulee, students will apply the
completing this task?
knowledge and skills (SLOs) acquired during the teaching and learning of the Building with a
R Role
Variety of Materials unit. Students will also be accomplishing their goal of demonstrating good
What role (perspective) will your
workmanship through cooperative teamwork and application of knowledge and skills in a real-life
students be taking?
situation.
A Audience
R The students will be taking the role of bridge builder (construction worker), architect, and
Who is the relevant audience?
engineer for the CPR.
A The relevant audience is the teacher, staff member at the Galt Museum, and the other
S Situation
students. They will be playing the role of the Canadian government and the bosses of the CPR
The context or challenge provided to
S- The challenge provided to the students is to design and build a bridge that spans over the model
the student.
coulee of Lethbridge. The students are then expected to give a presentation of their model bridge
to the audience, where they will tell what worked well in there design and what was frustrating.
There will also be a stability test to see if the design is perfect. If the bridge passes the test, then
the Canadian government and CPR will approve the design and begin construction.
P The students will create a bridge spanning across a model coulee of Lethbridge.
A more detail description is provided below:
Welcome and Introduction Students will be welcomed to the museum and will review what
a museum is and the expectations of visitors to the museum. The group will also learn about
the development of the CPR High Level Bridge and will be shown the model coulee system
over which they need to build the bridge
Plan the Bridge Students will be divided into groups and will as a group plan what type of
P Product, Performance
What product/performance will the
bridge they are going to build. The bridge must be high enough, long enough, and strong
student
enough.
create?
Choose the Materials Students will choose the materials for the bridge. Students will have
a variety of materials from which to build the bridge. The materials may include, but are not
limited to, straws, paper, Styrofoam cups, paper clips, pipe cleaners, and popsicle sticks.
Build the Bridge Students will work in their groups to build the bridge based on the plans
agreed upon in Activity 2.
Present the Bridge Each group will present their bridge to the rest of the class and explain
what worked well about their bridge and what was frustrating. Bridges will be tested at this
time.
Conclusion Students will review the activities of the program and will be invited to visit the
museum and Archives again.

S Standards & Criteria for


Success

S Rubric Below

Create the rubric for the Performance


Task

Galt Museum Assessment


Project: Bridge Building
Pts
Investigate
0

Team does not


complete work
to standard
discussed in
class

1-2

Team states
problem/challe
nge in general
terms. Students
have difficulty
solving building
problems.

3-4

Team states
problem/challe
nge clearly.
Team shows
evidence of
undertanding
topic to solve
bridge building
problems
independently

Design

Student/ Team:
Plan

Team does
not
complete
work to
standard
discussed in
class
Team
creates a
basic
bridge, but
it does not
satisfy all
requirement
s

Team does
not complete
work to
standard
discussed in
class

Team
creates a
successful
bridge that
is affordable
and
competitive
in the
performanc
e task.

Team
produces a
solid bridge
plan that
results in a
successful
bridge and is
approved by
the CPR.
Adapts
theory of
bridge
building well
to practical
aspects

Team
struggles to
define a
plan,
understand
bridge
building
concepts,
that result in
a successful
bridge.

Create

Evaluate

Group

Team does
not
complete
work to
standard
discussed
in class
Team has
difficulty
building
bridge to
requiremen
ts; is unable
to solve
all/most
problems
independen
tly

Team
does not
complete
work to
standard
discussed
in class
Team
sometime
s
evaluates
resulting
from their
original
plan and
sometime
s cannot
solve
problems
without
assistanc
e
Team
successful
ly
evaluates
problems
in bridge
building
design,
adapts
design to
practical
applicatio
n, and
does
required
research
to solve

Team does
not
complete
work to
standard
discussed
in class
Team has
difficulty
working as
a group
and
remaining
positive
about
problem
solving.

Team
bridge plan
results in a
successful
bridge that
is
competitive
in the
competition
. Able to
solve all
problems
using
strategies
discussed
during the
unit

Team
works well
as a group,
differentiat
es for team
member
strengths,
and seems
to revel in
solving
problems.

problems.
Subtot
al
Total

/20
Other Evidence
Through what other evidence (work samples, observations,
quizzes, tests, journals or other means) will students demonstrate
achievement of the desired results? Formative and summative
assessments used throughout the unit to arrive at the outcomes.
Observation Checklist:
During every class the teacher will complete an observation
checklist for every individual student to ensure they are meeting
the intended targets for the unit. The criteria are as follows (note
not all criteria will be applicable in every lesson)
Can I explain why I chose a certain material?
Do I use tools suitable for particular tasks?
Can I describe my decisions making process for designing
materials?
Am I being safe?
Do I work well with others?
Am I showing good workmanship?

Student Self-Assessment
How will students reflect upon or self-assess their learning?

Work Log:
Throughout the course of the unit, students will be keeping track
of their progress in meeting the intended targets in a work log.
This is intended to mimic what is done when completing a
apprenticeship. Students will be answering the following questions
in their work logs after every class as a form of self-assessment:
What new skills did I learn about design and construction?
How have I displayed good workmanship?
What skills would I like to improve in order to become a
better builder and worker?
The students are also encouraged to write blueprints designs or
any ideas and question that they have during class in the work
log. This can be categorized as assessment as learning.

Unit Calendar
Day 1:
Introduction:
- Key Terms Activity
- Free Exploration
- Explanation of Work
Log and Observation
Checklist

Day 2:
Exploring Different
Structure:
- Neighborhood Walk
- Work Logs

Day 3:
Choosing Materials:
- Testing Materials
- Work Logs

Day 4:
Living Things,
Objects, or Buildings:
- Three Little Pigs
- Building Model Houses
- Work Logs

Day 6:
Living Things,
Objects, or Buildings:
- Creating a Model
School Playground
- Work Logs

Day 7:
Living Things,
Objects, or Buildings:
-Creating a Model School
Playground (cont.)
- Presentation of
Playground
- Work Logs

Day 8:
Containers:
- Container Scavenger
Hunt
- Work Logs

Day 9:
Containers:
- Designing a Package for
Someone
- Work Logs

Day 11:
Support Objects:
- Experiment Learning
Centers (cont.)
- Work Logs

Day 12:
Support Objects:
- Whose Tower is the
Tallest?
- Work Logs

Day 13:
Support Objects:
- Designing and Making
Furniture
- Work Logs

Day 14:
Support Objects:
- Designing and Making
Furniture (cont.)
- Testing Stability of
Furniture
- Work Logs

Day 16:
Span Gaps (Bridges):
- Exploration of Bridge
Building (first attempt)
- Work Logs

Day 17:
Span Gaps (Bridges):
- Painting the Bridge
Experiment
- Dream Bridge
(Engineering Company)
- Work Logs

Day 18:
Span Gaps (Bridges):
- Results and Analysis of
Painting the Bridge
Experiment
- What does the High
Level Bridge mean to
you? (picture and poem)
- Work Logs

Day 19:
Span Gaps (Bridges):
- The Might Bridge
- Work Logs

Day 5:
Living Things, Objects,
or Buildings:
- The True Story of the
Three Little Pigs
- Building Model Houses
(cont.)
- Presentation/ Stability
Test
- Work Logs
Day 10:
Support Objects:
- Experiment Learning
Centers:
1. Reinforcing Structures
2. Testing Foundations
3. Testing Shapes
4. How Strong is a
Dome?
- Work Logs
Day 15:
Span Gaps (Bridges):
- Tug-of-War
- Be a Suspension Cable
Bridge
- Be a Stone in an Arch
Bridge
- Balance Like a Bridge
- Work Logs
Day 20:
Culminating Activity:
- Galt Museum Building
Bridges Performance
Task
- Final Work Log Entry
- Submission of Work
Logs

Learning Plan
What events will help students experience and explore the enduring understandings and essential questions in the unit?
How will you equip them with needed skills and knowledge?
#
Lesson Title
Lesson Activities
CCCs
1

Introduction
to Building

Exploring
Different
Structures

SLOs: 1, 2, 3, 4, & 7
Learning Activities:
Key Terms:
Each student will be assigned a specific key term in which they are to find the
definition via dictionary, glossary, or Internet sources. When the student has
determined the correct definition for the word they can then create a poster that
has the word, the definition, and a picture that represents that word. The posters
will then be displayed on the walls of the classroom for everyone to see throughout
the unit. Once everyones posters are on the wall, the students will then explain
their key term to the class.
Free Exploration:
This open-ended activity allows students to explore ways that familiar materials
can be used in construction. It provides an opportunity to assess students interest
in construction tasks and their skills in selecting and using materials. It can also
provide opportunity to initiate student thinking about purposes for building and
design. Encourage students to think about how their structures could be used and
to identify different techniques used in construction.
Work Logs/ Observation Checklist:
Explain to the students that I will be constantly observing and assessing their
performance throughout class using a checklist. The criteria for this checklist are;
Can I explain why I chose a certain material? Do I use tools suitable for particular
tasks? Can I describe my decisions making process for designing materials? Am I
being safe? Do I work well with others? Am I showing good workmanship?
Hand out work log journals to class and explain to the class that 5 minutes before
the end of each class we will be cleaning up and then answering the questions in
our work logs (much like what an apprentice for a trade would do). These work logs
will be an ongoing activity that will be handed in at the end of the unit. The
questions are as follows; what new skills did I learn about design and construction?
How have I displayed good workmanship? What skills would I like to improve in
order to become a better builder and worker?
Assessments
Observation of student understanding of terms
Pre-assessment of student interest and skills regarding construction tasks
Observation checklist
Self-assessment using work log
SLOs: 5,6, & 7
Learning Activities:
Neighborhood Walk:
Go for a neighborhood walk to look at structures. By focusing on the similarities
and differences among the structures observed, teachers will get insight into

Art & Language


Arts

Health and Life


Skills & Language
Arts

Choosing
Materials

Building
Model Houses

Building
Model Houses
(cont.)

childrens initial ideas about structures. The students should direct the majority of
their focus on the shapes of the structures. If cameras are available, students will
be able to take pictures of the structures and put them into their work logs.
Work Logs:
Students will continue writing in their logs after the walk.
Assessments:
Observation/ observation checklist
Guided questioning
Work log self-assessment
SLOs: 2, 3, 7, 8, & 9
Learning Activities:
Testing Materials:
Students will be testing numerous materials in order to observe the properties of
each material. Students will keep track of their observations using handout
provided (collecting first-hand data).
For the experiment students will be put into groups of 4. 12 materials along with a
file, a pair of pliers, a hammer, and a tank filled with water will be place at different
workstations. The students will be testing the materials by 1. Scratching the
materials with the file to see how hard they are, 2. Tapping them with the hammer
to see if they break easily, 3. Squeezing them with the pliers to see if they are
bendable, and 4. Dropping them into the water to see if they float or sink.
Work Logs:
Students will continue writing in their work logs
Assessments:
Observation/ observation checklist
Experiment results (Evaluation)
Work log self-assessment
SLOs: 1-9
Learning Activities:
The Three Little Pigs:
Read The Three Little Pigs to the class in order to give an idea of different housing
designs and stability ideas.
Building Model Houses:
In groups of 2, have students build a house with a variety of construction materials
that will not blow down. To be a fair test, the houses need to be the same size
(measurements are needed). Brainstorm ways the students can test the stability of
their structures.
Work Logs:
Students will continue writing in their work logs.
Assessments:
Observations/ Observation checklist
Guided questions
Work log self-assessment
SLOs: 1-9
Learning Activities:
The True Story of the Three Little Pigs:
Read The True Story of the Three Little Pigs to give an alternate perspective of the

Math & Health and


Life Skills

Math & Language


Arts

Art & Language


Arts

Creating
Playgrounds

Creating
Playgrounds
(cont.)

Introduction
to Containers

original story.
Building Model Houses:
Groups will continue working on their model houses in order to perfect their design.
Before the stability of the houses is tested, students will verbally explain to the
class the reasons for their design methods. The stability tests will take place at the
end of the lesson.
Work Logs:
Students will continue writing in their work logs.
Assessments:
Did the students house blow over or stay standing? (Evaluation)
Observation checklist
Work log self-assessment
SLOs: 1-9
Learning Activities:
Creating a Model School Playground:
Allow the students to choose to work individually or in pairs or small groups.
Discuss the size of the whole playground, the size of the playground equipment
(measuring) and the materials needed. Students will then create their own
playground using these materials.
Work Logs:
Students will continue writing in their work logs.
Assessments:
Guided questioning of structural and design decisions
Observation checklist
Work log self-assessment
SLOs: 1-9
Learning Activities:
Creating a Model School Playground:
Students will continue building their playgrounds
Near the end of the class, students will then give a brief presentation about their
playground and how they built each structure.
Work Logs:
Students will continue writing in their work logs.
Assessments:
Observation checklist
Work log self-assessment
Presentation Evaluation
SLOs: 7 & 9
Learning Activities:
Container Scavenger Hunt:
Students will first be informed, as a whole group, about the formal definition of a
container and brainstorm some containers that they are exposed to.
In groups of 2, students will go on a scavenger hunt around the school locating and
documenting different containers that they come across. Near the end of the
period, students will then come back to the class where they can present their
findings.
Work Logs:

Math & Art

Art & Language


Arts

Math & Health and


Life Skills

Designing a
Package

10

Experimentin
g with
Supporting
Structure

Students will continue writing in their work logs.


Assessments:
Scavenger hunt documents
Observation checklist
Work log self-assessment
SLOs: 1-9
Learning Activities:
Designing a Package:
In small groups, student will first make a plan that includes a sketches or their
package design. Once they have completed their blueprint, student will then create
their package using a variety of materials. Students can then present their
blueprints and their finished product to the class and discuss how their blueprint
helped in creating their product.
Work Logs:
Students will continue writing in their work logs.
Assessments:
Package products and blueprints (evaluation)
Observation checklist
Work log self-assessment
SLOs: 1-9
Learning Activities:
Supporting Structure Learning Centers:
Students will be participating (small groups) in a series of experiments that will
allow them to understand what shapes and structures are the most appropriate for
supporting structures. This will be done using learning centers, where each group is
conducting different experiments. After approximate 20-30 minute intervals,
students will then move to the next experiment center. The centers are as followed:
1. Reinforcing Structures: Students can see how reinforcing works by trying some
experiments with cardboard. They will be testing the stability of different shaped
cardboard (flat, V-shaped, and U-shaped) by putting as many coins on the surface
until the structure sags. The results will be recorded in work logs.
2. Testing Foundations: Students will test the stability of foundations by trying to
blow an empty bottle over. The students will then add water to the bottle and
figure out home much water is needed until they cannot blow it over (measuring).
The results will be recorded in their work logs.
3. Testing Shapes: Using drinking straws and modeling clay, students will test the
rigidness and stability of different lattice shapes and discover the strength of
triangles. Results will be recorded in work logs.
4. How Strong is a Dome?: Students will test the strength of a dome by cutting
empty egg shells in half and figuring out how many books they can place on top of
the egg shells before they crack. Results will be recorded in their work logs.
Work Logs:
Students will continue writing in their work logs.
Assessments:
Experiment Results and Data
Observation checklist
Work log self-assessment

Art & Health and


Life Skills

Math & Language


Arts

11

Experimentin
g with
Supporting
Structures
(cont.)

12

Whose Tower
is the Tallest?

13

Designing &
Making
Furniture

14

Designing &
Making
Furniture
(cont.)

SLOs: 1-9
Learning Activities:
Supporting Structure Learning Centers:
Students will continue conducting their experiments.
At the end of the learning center cycle, students will then return to a whole class
setting where we can discuss and analyze the results of the tests and discover
what structures are the most effective supporting mechanisms.
Work Logs:
Students will continue writing in their work logs.
Assessments:
Experiment Results and Data
Observation checklist
Work log self-assessment
SLOs: 1-9
Learning Activities:
Building Towers:
Why not have a tower-building competition with your friends? Each student will
start with the same amount of materials. Students are trying to design and build
the tallest free-standing tower possible. While students are constructing, ask
individual students reasoning for their decision making process.
Work Logs:
Students will continue writing in their work logs.
Assessments:
Observation of tower size and supporting structures
Observation checklist
Work log self-assessment
SLOs: 1-9
Learning Activities:
Designing and Making Furniture:
Individually or in small groups, challenge students to use simple materials to make
a chair that is strong enough to sit on. Encourage students to use their work logs to
draw blueprints of their intended product.
Work Logs:
Students will continue writing in their work logs.
Assessments:
Observation Checklist
Work log self-assessment
SLOs: 1-9
Learning Activities:
Designing and Making Furniture:
Continue working on creating a chair that can be sat on. When complete students
will call over the teacher and perform the weight test to see if the chair passes the
safety inspection.
Work Logs:
Students will continue writing in their work logs.
Assessments:
Chair stability tests

Math & Language


Arts

Math & Art

Health and Life


Skills & Art

Health and Life


Skills & Art

15

Becoming
Bridges

16

Exploration of
Bridge
Building

17

Dream
Bridge/
Painting the

Observation checklist
Work log self-assessment
SLOs: 1, 5, 7, & 9
Learning Activities:
Becoming a Bridge:
Tug of War The way a bridge works is a lot like playing tug-of-war when there is no
winner. If both sides are weighted equally, the rope and all the players balance and
stay put. If one side is stronger, down comes the other. The goal in these games is
to stay put and not tug the other side off balance. Choose sides so each team is
about equal in strength.
Be a Suspension Cable Bridge Line up side by side, with everybody holding
hands. Start pulling apart at the center, but dont pull so hard that players fall
down. Remember, you want to stay up, so if one team is stronger, the players on
that team have to pull less. As you pull, feel the tension (stretch) in your arms and
shoulders. Now you know what its like to be a cable on a suspension bridge.
Be a Stone in an Arch Bridge The players on each team line up, one behind the
other, facing the other team. The middle two players place their hands on each
others shoulders. The outside players put their hands on the waist of their
teammate in front of them. Once youre set, start pushing. Again, push equally so
everyone stays up. As youre pushed, fell the compression (pushing) force that
squeezes your body. Thats what its like to be a stone in an arch or a support
under any bridge.
Balance Like a Bridge Line up side by side with some space in between. The two
in the middle lean towards each other so their shoulders touch. They also hold
hands with the players on the outside. All other outside players also hold hands.
While the middle two push against each other, the outside players pull. Can you
push and pull so everyone stays put? Who feels both compression and tension?
Work Logs:
Students will continue writing in their work logs.
Assessments:
Observation checklist
Work log self=assessment
SLOs: 1-9
Learning Activities:
Free-Play Bridge Building:
Organize student into small groups and give them freedom to explore in their first
attempt to build a bridge. Then encourage students to use designs in their building.
Test the bridges capacity to bear a load (small weights).
Work Logs:
Students will continue writing in their work logs.
Assessments:
Observation of bridge design a load bearing ability
Observation checklist
Work log self-assessment
SLOs: 1-9
Learning Activities:
Why Did They Paint the Bridge:

Health and Life


Skills & Social
Studies

Art & Health and


Life Skils

Social Studies &


Language Arts

Bridge

18

The High
Level Bridge/
Painting the
Bridge (cont.)

19

The Mighty
Bridge

In small groups, we will discover why they bothered painting the High Level Bridge
and why they repaint it. Gather 3 small plastic containers and 3 small pieces of
steel wool. Put one piece of steel wool. Put one piece of steel wool in each
container. Bring some water to a boil for a minute or two. Cool. Pour the water into
one of the containers, completely covering the steel wool. In the second container,
cover the steel wool with water from the kitchen faucet. Dont add any way water
to the third container. Get students to make predictions on what will happen. Leave
the containers overnight and see what the results will be next class.
Dream Bridge:
If you could build a bridge anywhere in the world, where would it be? Perhaps you
want to connect two continents or islands? Use a map or globe if you have trouble
finding the perfect place. Once you find where you want to build your bridge,
design, draw, and/or build your bridge using whatever materials you think are
necessary. Explain to students that they are acting as a small engineering
company, so they should be creating a company name and logo to put onto their
dream bridge.
Work Logs:
Students will continue writing in their work logs.
Assessments:
Observation checklist
Work log self-assessment
SLOs: 1, 3, 7, & 9
Learning Activities:
Why Did They Paint the Bridge (results):
Open containers and record the results of what happened to the steel wool. Did
they match your predictions? Ask students why they think the steel wool rusted in
certain containers and explain what occurred.
The High Level Bridge:
The High Level Bridge is just a bridge. Its purpose is to allow trains to get from one
side of the river to the other. And, yet, it is the most photographed and painted site
in Lethbridge. Why do you think people want to photograph, paint and draw the
bridge? What does the bridge mean to you? Students will draw a picture of the
bridge and write a poem on the back of the picture that represents what it means
to them.
Work Logs:
Students will continue writing in their work logs.
Assessments:
Evaluate students pictures and poems
Observation checklists
Work log self-assessments
SLOs: 7
Learning Activities:
The Mighty Bridge:
Watch the video The Mighty Bridge in preparation for the field trip. Listen to the
song that was written about the bridge. What does the bridge mean to the
Lethbridge community? What does it mean to you? Brainstorm any questions that
you would like to ask when we go to the Galt Museum. Write your own song that

Language Arts &


Art

Social Studies &


Language Arts

20

Galt Museum
Field Trip

represents the Mighty Bridge.


Work Logs:
Students will continue writing in their work logs.
Assessments:
Listen to students Might Bridge songs
Observation checklist
Work log self-assessment
SLOs: 1-9
Learning Activities:
Galt Museum Performance Task:
Welcome and Introduction Students will be welcomed to the museum and will
review what a museum is and the expectations of visitors to the museum. The
group will also learn about the development of the CPR High Level Bridge and will
be shown the model coulee system over which they need to build the bridge
Plan the Bridge Students will be divided into groups and will as a group plan what
type of bridge they are going to build. The bridge must be high enough, long
enough, and strong enough.
Choose the Materials Students will choose the materials for the bridge. Students
will have a variety of materials from which to build the bridge. The materials may
include, but are not limited to, straws, paper, Styrofoam cups, paper clips, pipe
cleaners, and popsicle sticks.
Build the Bridge Students will work in their groups to build the bridge based on
the plans agreed upon in Activity 2.
Present the Bridge Each group will present their bridge to the rest of the class and
explain what worked well about their bridge and what was frustrating. Bridges will
be tested at this time.
Conclusion Students will review the activities of the program and will be invited to
visit the museum and Archives again.
Work Logs: Complete last entry in work log and submit them to the teacher.
Assessments:
Student presentations
Observation checklist
Work log self-assessment

Math & Art

Key Terms
Abutment: A structure made of concrete that acts as a support at either end of a bridge.
Arch: A curved structure which acts as a support.
Architect: A person who designs buildings and oversees the construction. He or she must plan for the purpose, weather and the
materials available to construct the building.
Anchorage: The ends of the suspension cables are attached to the anchorages. The anchorages are usually large concrete blocks
that can withstand a pull of 10,000 tonnes on the bridge.
Beam: A long piece of either wood, concrete or metal that lays horizontally. Beams are joined with columns or posts to form the
framework of a building.
Cable: A steel rope that bears the weight and supports the roadway on a suspension bridge.
Cantilever: A structure or framework that is attached at one end only. When two of these frameworks are facing each other and are
either joined or have a connection attachment joining them, it forms a cantilever bridge.
Cement: A powder that when mixed with water, dries to a hard consistency. It consists of alumina, silica, lime, iron oxide, and
magnesia which are burned in a kiln and powdered.
Column: A long piece of wood, concrete or metal that is vertical. Columns attach to beams to form the framework of a building.
Concrete: Building material that is made of sand, gravel, and cement. When these items are mixed with water, it forms a thick paste
which dries very hard. To make the concrete even stronger, builders add steel bars to the paste. This is called reinforced concrete.
Core: A central large area that runs up the middle of a tower or high-rise. This area supports elevators, pipes, etc. Its role is similar to
that of a spinal column.
Deck: The section of the bridge that is the roadway or walkway.
Dome: A structure in which the sides and top curve together to form a spherical shape.
Foundation: The lowest part, or base of a structure which is often below gorund level. The foundation supports and holds a building
to the ground.
Framework: A structure of beams, and columns which are joined and give a building its shape.
Girder: A long beam which is made of concrete or steel.
Keystone: The central stone at the top of an arch. The stones that make up the curved sides of the arch are inserted against the
middle block. This pressure holds the arch up.
Pile: A post or pillar that is driven into the ground to support the footings of a foundation.
Pillar: A firm, vertical support for a structure.
Slab: A type of building foundation consisting of a level, concrete base.
Span: The distance between two abutments or supports of a bridge or roadway.
Strut: A structural piece which gives support and strength to a structure.
Suspension Towers: Tall structures that support the suspension bridge.
Tension: The act of pulling on the two ends of a cable or rope.
Truss: A structure using a series of triangular shapes which are connected. Trusses are used to add strength to parts of a building.
Wind Drift: The distance a skyscraper sways horizontally from its original position when it is very windy.

Resource List
Campbel, S. (1992) Explorations in Science, Level 3, Design, Test, Build!. Toronto, Ontario:
Addison-Wesley.
Crowson, B. (2006). Building Bridges. Retrieved from
http://www.galtmuseum.com/pdf/Building%20Bridges%20Teachers%20Manual.pdf
Galdone, P. (1970). The Three Little Pigs. New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin/ Clairion Books.
Lets Do Science, 3: A teachers guide to the Alberta elementary science curriculum. (2006).
Science Alberta
Foundation.
Peturson, R., McAllister, N. (1996). Innovations in Science Process and Inquiry, Level 3. Toronto,
Ontario:
Harcourt Brice & Company.
Scieszka, J., Smith, L. (1989). The True Story of the Three Little Pigs. New York, NY: Viking Kestrel.
Trueman, R. (NA). Ideas and Investigations for Science and Technology. Exclusive Education
Products.
World Books Young Scientist (Volume 9). (1992). Chicago, ILL: World Book Inc.