Flowchart

Plant transpiration Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions Light and Photosynthesis Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions

Flowchart

Plant transpiration Introduction Methodology Summary and Conclusions Results and discussion Light and Photosynthesis Introduction Methodology Summary and Conclusions Results and discussion

Plant Transpiration
Lateral Movement And Path of Water Rise

Flowchart

Plant transpiration Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions Light and Photosynthesis Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions

Definition

Transpiration

evaporation of water from plants. It occurs chiefly at the leaves while their stomata are open for the passage of CO2 and O2 during photosynthesis.

Factors Affecting Transpiration
• • • • • •

Light Humidity Temperature Wind Soil moisture Internal Conc. Of CO2

light

Plants transpire more rapidly in the light than in the dark.

light stimulates the opening of the stomata. Light warms the leaf.

Temperature

Plants transpire more rapidly at higher temperatures

Temperature affects humidity

Humidity

When the surrounding air is dry, diffusion of water out of the leaf goes on more rapidly. Humidity is affected by temperature

Wind

no breeze air is humid thus reducing the rate of transpiration breeze  humid air is carried away and replaced by drier air.

Internal Concentration of CO2

If CO2 concentration decreases  stomata opens Reverse is also true

Underlying Principle of the Experiment

Rate of transpiration

= Rate of water absorption

Transpiration decreases the water potential in the mesophyll cell, and thus, pulls water up from the roots and stems in vessels and xylems

Xylem
  

Consists of tracheids and vessel cells Transport water Have pits at the side to allow lateral movement

Flowchart

Plant transpiration Introduction Methodology Summary and Conclusions Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions Light and Photosynthesis Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions

Methodology

Control set-up
 

 

Kept inside the room 120 (botany lab) Away from electric fans and windows One branch covered with plastic Held by iron clamps Experiment lasts for 2 hours

Under bright light set-up

Kept inside the room 120 (botany lab) Away from electric fans but BESIDE THE WINDOWS Held by iron clamps Experiment lasts for 2 hours

Moving air set-up

Kept inside the room 120 (botany lab) BESIDE the electric fan but away from the windows Held by iron clamps Experiment lasts for 2 hours

Blocked stomata setup
 

  

Kept inside the room 120 (botany lab) Away from the electric fan and from the windows Held by iron clamps Experiment lasts for 2 hours Stomata were blocked by Petroleum jelly

Lateral movement setup

Lasts for 24 hours

Flowchart

Plant transpiration Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions Light and Photosynthesis Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions

Results and Discussion
Control Under strong sunlight Covered stomata With Moving air mL of H2O left unabsorbed 3.2 1.5 4.5 2.4

Versus control

Plants absorb more water if exposed to strong light and moving air More water transpires from the leaves if the plant is exposed to strong sunlight or moving air

Versus replicates

Less water is absorbed if the stomata are blocked Less water is transpired when the stomata are blocked

Covered branch in Control

Water droplets form at the walls of the plastic

Begonia setup

A tube like structure was observed when begonia absorbed the dye

Flowchart

Plant transpiration Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions Light and Photosynthesis Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions

Summary and Conclusion

Plants transpire more if exposed to strong light and moving air Plants transpire less if the stomata are blocked

Conclusion

Plants transpire more if the moisture content of air (humidity) is less than the concentration of water inside the leaves Humidity of air adjacent to the plant leaf (or stomata) is inversely proportional to heat, light and wind Plants transpire more if there is more heat, light, and wind

Presence of water droplets

Presence of water droplets indicate that water was released from the branch Specifically H20 was released from the stomata and accumulated in the walls of the plastic

Begonia setup

Water travels through the xylem Xylary elements are hollow

Flowchart

Plant transpiration Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions Light and Photosynthesis Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions

Light and Photosynthesis

Flowchart

Plant transpiration Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions Light and Photosynthesis Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions

Photosynthesis

Uses photons to eject electrons from the trap molecules in photosystems I and II Thus, the presence of light affects photosynthesis

Flowchart

Plant transpiration Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions Light and Photosynthesis Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions

Methodology

Hydrilla setup

Bubbles came out from the shoot when the setup was exposed to bright light

Coleus setup

Pigments being extracted using 95% ethanol Coleus leaf starts to lose its greenish color

Coleus setup

IKI dropped to the coleus sample IKI is an indicator for the presence of starch

Coleus sample

Flowchart

Plant transpiration Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions Light and Photosynthesis Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions

Results and Discussions
Coleus setup  Bluish coloration on the uncovered leaf was greater compared to that of the covered leaf Hydrilla setup  Bubbles were released upon exposure to sunlight

Time interval Dim light 1 minutes 0 2 0 3 0 4 0 Hydrilla 5 0 6 0 7 0 8 0 9 0 10 0

Bright light 20 17 14 12 setup 12 10 11 14 13 12

Hydrilla setup
no. of bubbles per minute interval
no. of bubbles per minute 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 20 17 14 12 12 10 11 14 13 12

0 1

0 2

0 3

0 4

0 5

0 6

0 7

0 8

0 9

0 10

bright light dim light

minute interval

dim light

bright light

Flowchart

Plant transpiration Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions Light and Photosynthesis Introduction Methodology Results and discussion Summary and Conclusions

Hydrilla graph

The number of bubbles seems to be diminishing as time passes by Dissolved CO2 may have been used up No evidence (bubbles) for the occurrence of photosynthesis in dim light

Summary and Conclusion

Light is needed in photosynthesis

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