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ocial  skills  are  socially    

acceptable  patterns  of  behaviors  
that  allow  students  to  gain  social  
reinforcement  and  acceptance  and  
avoid  aversive  social  situations  
(Johns,  Crowley  &  Guetzloe,  2012)  

Who  benefits  from  Social  Skills  
Training?  Students  identified  as  
Emotionally  Disturbed  and  
students  identified  as  having  

Autism  

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Research  generally  concludes  that  
children  classified  as  ED  have  the  
worst  prognosis  in  terms  of  high  
school  graduation,  academic  
achievement,  and  future  problems  
with  anti-­‐social  behavior    
(Adams,  2013).  

“A  socially  skilled  person  is  capable  
of  managing  his  or  her  social  
environment  by  understanding  and  
responding  to  social  situations  
effectively.”  (Johns,  Crowley  &  
Guetzloe,  2012)  

Students  identified  early  in  elementary  school  
are  much  less  likely  to  develop  chronic  behavior  
problems  if  PBIS  and  social  skills  are  
implemented  (Riney  &  Bullock,  2012)  

We  can  no  longer  assume  that  all  
children  come  to  school  knowing  
how  to  behave  and  how  to  
respond  appropriately  in  varying  
social  situations.  (Johns,  Crowley  
&  Guetzloe,  2012)  

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For  learning  to  occur  efficiently,  barriers  should  
be  removed  and  preventative  measures  [e.g.  
social  skills  training,  P BS  strategies]  should  be  
consistently  implemented  (Riney  &  Bullock,  2012)  

nfo  &  statistics  on  target  
population  (Adams,  2013)  
Children  with  ED  are  more  l  ikely  to  be  economically  
disadvantaged  (33.2%),  male  (80%),  and  from  
single  parent  households  (38%)  
 
There  has  been  a  rapid  increase  (78%)  from  2002  –  
2008  of  children  diagnosed  with  Autism  

All  grades,  gender  and  ethnicities  
benefit  from  early  intervention  (Riney  
  &  Bullock,  2012)  
 
There  is  long-­‐standing  evidence  
showing  how  social-­‐emotional  skills  
supports  academic  a chievement  
(Adams,  2013).  

Direct  teaching  of  social  skills  is  a  best  practice  because  it  teaches  clear  behavior  
expectations  and  manipulates  environmental  variables;  therefore,  teaching  social  
skills  is  essential  to  learning  appropriate  behavior  (Riney  &  Bullock,  2012).  
 

Steps  (as  outlined  by  Johns,  Crowley  &  Guetzloe,  2012)  
1. Teach  the  skill  by  breaking  it  into  small  steps.  
2.
3.
4.
5.

Demonstrate  and  model  the  skill.  
Have  the  students  practice  the  skill  using  role-­‐playing.  
Provide  feedback  and  reinforcement  for  practice.  
Systematically  provide  a  program  for  generalization  of  social  skills.  

Poor  social  skills  in  school  are  related  to  the  following  factors  (1)  limited  opportunities  to  learn;  (2)  
negative  academic  and  social  self-­‐concept;  and  (3)  social  isolation  (Johns,  Crowley  &  Guetzloe,  2012)  
 
Will  teaching  social  skills  do  the  opposite?  Researchers  argue  that  the  cost  of  not  teaching  social  skills  is  
extremely  high  (Johns,  Crowley  &  Guetzloe,  2012)  

References  
 
Adams, D. (2013). The application of social-emotional learning principles to a special education
environment [Special issue]. KEDI Journal Of Educational Policy, 103-118.
Johns, B. H., Crowley, E., & Guetzloe, E. (2012). The central role of teaching social skills.
Counseling & Human Development, 44(8), 1-8.
Riney, S., & Bullock, L. (2012). Teachers' perspectives on student problematic behavior and
social skills. Emotional & Behavioural Difficulties, 17, 195-211.
doi:10.1080/13632752.2012.675136