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Robert Green

Fall 2014 Internship

Subject:

Math

Grade Level:

Sixth Grade

Title of Lesson:

Area Formulas at the Sports Complex

Amount of time:

2 46-Minute Periods

Goals:

By the end of the course, student will be able to recall and explain
mathematics concepts using academic language.
By the end of the chapter, student will be able to evaluate and write
algebraic expressions and statements, indentify and utilize algebraic
properties, and solve real-world problems using expressions and
formulas.
By the end of the lesson, students will be able to evaluate area formulas
given the dimensions of a triangle, square, and rectangle.

Standards:

LAFS.68.RST.1.3: Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying
out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.
MAFS.6.EE.1.2: Write, read, and evaluate expressions in which letters
stand for numbers.
a. Write expressions that record operations with numbers and with
letters standing for numbers. For example, express the
calculation “Subtract y from 5” as 5 – y.
b. Identify parts of an expression using mathematical terms (sum,
term, product, factor, quotient, coefficient); view one or more
parts of an expression as a single entity. For example, describe
the expression 2 (8 + 7) as a product of two factors; view (8 + 7)
as both a single entity and a sum of two terms.
c. Evaluate expressions at specific values of their variables. Include
expressions that arise from formulas used in real-world problems.
Perform arithmetic operations, including those involving wholenumber exponents, in the conventional order when there are no
parentheses to specify a particular order (Order of
Operations). For example, use the formulas V = s³ and A = 6 s² to
find the volume and surface area of a cube with sides of length s
= 1/2.

Objectives:

After direct instruction on evaluating area formulas, students will explain
the steps they took to solve two area problems from their poster with a
score of eight out of twelve points according to the rubric.
Given six geometric objects, students will calculate the area correctly by

Robert Green

Fall 2014 Internship
using the appropriate area formula for four out of six geometric objects.

Materials (including
technology):

Area Formulas at the Sports Complex PowerPoint presentation,
Promethean Board, interactive math journal, student whiteboards, dry
erase markers, dry erasers, color pencils, markers, rulers, construction
paper, pencil, “The Donut Hike” worksheet and key, “Final Destination:
Poster Central” handout, and “Sport Complex Poster Checklist &
Rubric” handout.

Questions:

How does the area formula of a triangle differ from the area formula of a
rectangle? How does it differ from the area formula of a square?
Why are area formulas classified as algebraic equations instead of
algebraic expressions?
How are area formulas used in real-world applications?

Prior Knowledge:

Students must know how to:
Identify area formulas for triangles, squares, and rectangles
Identify dimensions of triangles, squares, and rectangles
Use the order of operations
Evaluate algebraic expression

Reading Strategies
(Vocabulary):

Highlighting Important Details: During the anticipatory activity, the
students will highlight the important details to help them develop their
expression for the story.
Vocabulary: The students will create their own definition for each
vocabulary word based on their understanding of the textbook’s
definition and write it in their interactive math journal. In addition, they
will include an example of each.
Formula – an equation that tells you how one variable is related to one or
more other variables.
Solving a Formula – to find the value of one variable by substituting
numbers for the other variables.

Anticipatory Set:

Bell Ringer
The teacher will instruct the students to get out a pencil and a highlighter
while he hands out “The Donut Hike” worksheet. The teacher will go
over the following directions:
1. Read through the story once without marking your paper with a pen or

Robert Green

Fall 2014 Internship
pencil.
2. Read the story again, but this time highlight the important number
facts in the story.
3. Next, tell the students that they will use these number facts to create an
expression to find out how many donuts were eaten.
4. Finally, explain to the students that they will have to justify how they
obtained their expression in a minimum of two sentences.
After providing the instruction to the bell ringer, allow the students to
start. Give the students five to ten minutes to complete the assignment.
After five or ten minutes, have the students stand up. Ask one student
what they put as their expression. Announce to the students if they had
the same answer to sit down. Repeat this process until the entire class is
seated. Reveal the correct answer to the students. If one of the students
arrived at the correct answer, allow him or her to explain how they
obtained their answer. If no one arrived at the correct answer, provide an
explanation to the answer.

Class Procedures
(Including guided
practice,
independent
practice, and closure
activity) :

Direction Instruction
Have the students get out their interactive math journals. Tell them to
open to their personal math glossary. Go over the definitions of formula
and solving a formula and provide an example of each. After reviewing
the vocabulary, have the students create their own definitions of formula
and solving a formula in their interactive journals. Allow the students
five minutes to write their definition. After five minutes, tell the students
that they will complete the example portion of their new entries once
they see more examples in the lesson.
Before moving on, hold a brief discussion to discuss why area formulas
are considered algebraic equations and not algebraic expressions.
(Review from lesson 1.1)
Set the stage, by having the students close their eyes. Describe to them
that they are going on a field trip to the sport complex. List some of the
sports or activities that could be found at the sport complex. Have the
students open their eyes. Explain to the students that in order to obtain
admission to the sport complex, they would have to recall the area
formulas of triangles, squares, and rectangles they learned in elementary
school. Select a student to provide the area formula for a square (Area =
sides squared or Area = side times side). Provide praise if the student
remembers the formula correctly. If the student does not provide the
correct answer, allow them to ask a friend or provide guidance for the
student to come to the correct answer. Repeat the process for the area
formulas for triangles and rectangles.

Robert Green

Fall 2014 Internship

Ask the following questions:
How does the area formula of a triangle differ from the area formula of a
rectangle? How does it differ from the area formula of a square?
Anticipated answer: The product in the area formula for triangles is
multiplied by one-half or divided by two and the product in the area
formulas for squares and rectangles is not.
Now explain to the students that they will take a tour of the sports
complex. Each field or sports area will contain one of the shapes. Show
the students that they can evaluate area formulas like they evaluated
algebraic expressions two weeks ago.
The following are problems used for direct instruction:

A = s2
A=s∙s
s = 24 in
A = (24) ∙ (24)
A = 576 in2

Robert Green

Fall 2014 Internship

A=l∙w
l = 33 m w = 16 m
A = (33) ∙ (16)
A = 528 m2

A = 1/2 ∙ b ∙ h
b = 10 in h = 16 in
A = 1/2 ∙ (10) ∙ (16)
A = 5 ∙ 16
A = 80 in2
Guided Practice
Continuing with the sport complex theme, the teacher will tell the
students that they are now in the aquatic center. The teacher will present
a computer generated poster of a swimming pool to the students. As a
group, the teacher and students will identify two square figures, two
triangle figures, and two rectangle figures in the poster. Using the think
aloud strategy, the teacher will ask the students to help him find the area
of the following shapes using the appropriate formulas and variables:

Robert Green

Fall 2014 Internship

A = 1/2 ∙ b ∙ h
b = 36 cm h = 35 cm
A = 1/2 ∙ (36) ∙ (35)
A = 18 ∙ 35
A = 630 cm2

A = s2
A=s∙s
s = 26 in
A = (26) ∙ (26)
A = 676 in2

Robert Green

Fall 2014 Internship

A=l∙w
l = 48 in w = 26 in
A = (48) ∙ (26)
A = 1248 in2
Independent Practice
Have the student get their whiteboard, dry erase marker, and dry eraser
out of their desks. Continuing with some of the shapes found in the
computerized poster, the students will use the whiteboards to find the
area of each shape. Each shape and its dimensions will be revealed one at
a time.
For each shape, the students will have three to five minutes to find the
area of the shape. After three to five minutes the teacher will ask the
students to hold up the whiteboards. After reviewing the students answer,
the teacher will provide the students with praise for a job-well done. This
will be repeated two more times.

Robert Green

Fall 2014 Internship

A = 1/2 ∙ b ∙ h
b = 13 in h = 18 in
A = 1/2 ∙ (13) ∙ (18)
A = 13 ∙ 9
A = 117 in2

A = s2
A=s∙s
s = 36 cm
A = (36) ∙ (36)
A = 1296 cm2

Robert Green

Fall 2014 Internship

A=l∙w
l = 5 ft w = 3 ft
A = (5) ∙ (3)
A = 15 ft2
As the teacher explains to the students that they are headed to customer
service, the teacher will pass out the “Final Destination: Poster Central”
handout and the “Sports Complex Poster Checklist and Rubric” handout.
The teacher will go over the directions for the poster and show an
example. The teacher will also go over how the students will show their
work when they find the area for the geometric objects in the poster. The
student will have the rest of the period to work on the poster.
Closure
With ten minutes remaining, the teacher will inform the students that
they are leaving the sport complex and heading back to the classroom.
The teacher will instruct the students to put their posters and area
formula work away and complete the assignment for homework. For the
remainder of the period, the students will discuss the real-life
applications of area formulas.
Adaptations for ELL

Level 1
During Lesson (Instruction):
- Use visuals and/or realia during direct instruction and guide practice.
- Allow the student to answer questions using visual illustrations or ask
“yes or no” questions to the student.
During Homework and/or Classwork:
- Translate all handouts and worksheet for the student as appropriate.
- Provide the student a modified version of the anticipatory activity by
providing the words of the algebraic expression on index cards and

Robert Green

Fall 2014 Internship
have the student put the index cards in sequential order.
During Assessment:
- Show a student example from a previous to help guide the student
when he or she is make his or her poster.
- Allow the student to complete an alternative assessment for part III of
the poster assignment. The student can explain his or her steps using
illustrations or demonstrate the steps using manipulatives.
Level 3
During Lesson (Instruction):
- Allow student more time to respond to questions during direct
instruction and guided practice.
- Adjust rate of speech during instruction to enhance the student’s
comprehension of the lesson.
During Homework and/or Class work:
- Provide students with clear directions during the lesson. Simplify and
chunk the directions as needed.
- Model additional examples of area formula problems for the student.
During Assessment:
- Require the students to show their work after find the area of the first
object.
- Allow the student to work with a friend in the class or another ELL
student who speaks the same language.

Adaptations for ESE

During Lesson (Instruction):
- Orally check for understanding.
- Write key points on the board.
- Provide student with extra wait time.
During Homework and/or Class work:
- Using modeling techniques to explain to the student how to show their
work when answering area problems.
- Have the student use the think aloud strategy when answering a
question.
- Use kinesthetic activities to allow the students to move around.
During Assessment:
- Ensure oral directions are understood.
- Provide student with an example of the final product.
- Allow students to work with a friend or a positive role model.

Assessment:

Formative:

Robert Green

Fall 2014 Internship
The teacher will check the students understand from the previously by
having the student write an algebraic expression statement based on
information in a short story. This assignment will count towards their
class participation grade. During the lesson, the teacher will circulate the
room while students work independently. The teacher will assess the
students understand of the lesson by asking questions, using the think
aloud strategy, and view their work on the whiteboards.
Summative:
The students will create a poster to remember their imaginary visit to the
sport complex. The students can choose any sports room, court, or field
as the theme for their poster. The poster must include two triangles, two
squares, and two rectangles with the given dimensions (See “Final
Destination: Poster Central” handout.). On a separate sheet of notebook
paper, the students will calculate the area. To receive full credit for
calculating the correct answer for each shape, the work must be shown;
otherwise, the student will lose one point for each question without work.
On another sheet of notebook paper, the students will write a paragraph
explaining the steps they took to solve the area formula for two of the six
geometric objects in their poster. Students will be graded on content,
vocabulary, convections, and organization (See rubric.).
Sports Complex Poster (20 points)
- Drawing the Geometric Shapes (6 points)
- Calculating the Area & Showing Work (12 points)
- Originality and Creativity (2 points)
Grading Scale
18 – 20
16 – 17
14 – 15
12 – 13
0 – 11

A
B
C
D
F

Please refer to the parts I and II of the Sports Complex Poster Checklist
and Rubric. (Attached)
Explanation of Area Problems (12 points)
- Content (3 points)
- Vocabulary (3 points)
- Convections (3 points)
- Organization (3 points)
Grading Scale

Robert Green

Fall 2014 Internship

11.0 – 12.0
9.5 – 10.5
8.5 – 9.5
7.5 – 8.0
0.0 – 7.0

A
B
C
D
F

Please refer to the part III of the Sports Complex Poster Checklist and
Rubric. (Attached)

Robert Green

Fall 2014 Internship

Name: _______________________ Period:______ Date:____________

The Donut Hike
I am a donut lover. I love chocolate donuts and
strawberry donuts. I love donuts with purple
icing and donuts with cream cheese filling in the
center. I recently organized a new event, the
Donut Hike. Over a course of three miles, we
hike from one donut shop to another. At each
stop we eat one donut more than the last place. We started at Jason’s Donut
Den. I ate four donuts. We then went to seven more places, ending up at
Christina’s Donut Palace. I think my favorite donut for the day was the Hot
Carmel Apple Donut. That was amazingly delicious!
Write an expression that describes how to determine how many donuts were
eaten. Evaluate your expression.
_________________________________________________________
Describe how you determined what the expression would look like for the
number of donuts eaten.
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________

Adapted from 50 Fill-In Math Word Problems: Algebra by Bob Krech and Joan Novelli

Robert Green

Fall 2014 Internship

Name: _______________________ Period:______ Date:____________

The Donut Hike Answer Key
I am a donut lover. I love chocolate donuts and
strawberry donuts. I love donuts with purple
icing and donuts with cream cheese filling in the
center. I recently organized a new event, the
Donut Hike. Over a course of three miles, we
hike from one donut shop to another. At each
stop we eat one donut more than the last place. We started at Jason’s Donut
Den. I ate four donuts. We then went to seven more places, ending up at
Christina’s Donut Palace. I think my favorite donut for the day was the Hot
Carmel Apple Donut. That was amazingly delicious!
Write an expression that describes how to determine how many donuts were
eaten. Evaluate your expression.
4 + d d = 7 4 + 7 = 11
Describe how you determined what the expression would look like for the
number of donuts eaten.
Answers May Vary
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________

Adapted from 50 Fill-In Math Word Problems: Algebra by Bob Krech and Joan Novelli

Robert Green

Fall 2014 Internship

As the manager of the Sports Complex, I would like to thank you for your visit today! I
just have one more request before you head home. I would like you to create a poster to
remember your visit to the Sport Complex. You can choose any sports room, court, or
field as the theme for your poster. There are some requirements that my supervisor
requires for all visitors to incorporate into their poster. First, you must include the
following objects in your poster:
A triangle with a base of 4 cm and a height of 6 cm
A triangle with a base of 3 cm and a height of 4 cm
A square with sides of 5 cm
A square with sides of 4 cm
A rectangle with lengths of 12 cm and widths of 2 cm
A rectangle with lengths of 9 cm and widths of 3 cm
Second, you must calculate the area for each object. You may be as creative as you
want when you create the poster. If you need assistance, please ask Mr. Green for help.
Finally, choose two of the area problems you solved. In one or two paragraphs, explain
what steps you took to solve the area expression for each problem. Good luck!

Robert Green

Algebraic Lesson Plan

Name: _______________________ Period:______ Date:____________

Sports Complex Poster Checklist & Rubric
___ The poster is original in terms of design and creativity. (2 pts.)
Part I: The poster project included the following objects:
___ A triangle with a base of 4 cm and a height of 6 cm (1 pt.)
___ A triangle with a base of 3 cm and a height of 4 cm (1 pt.)
___ A square with sides of 5 cm (1 pt.)
___ A square with sides of 4 cm (1 pt.)
___ A rectangle with lengths of 12 cm and widths of 2 cm (1 pt.)
___ A rectangle with lengths of 9 cm and widths of 3 cm (1 pt.)
Part II: Finding the area for the following objects:
___ The triangle with a base of 4 cm and a height of 6 cm (2 pts.)
___ The triangle with a base of 3 cm and a height of 4 cm (2 pts.)
___ The square with sides of 5 cm (2 pts.)
___ The square with sides of 4 cm (2 pts.)
___ The rectangle with lengths of 12 cm and widths of 2 cm (2 pts.)
___ The rectangle with lengths of 9 cm and widths of 3 cm (2 pts.)
The student will lose a point per object if he or she does not show his or her work for
calculating the area for each object.
Grading Scale
18 - 20
16 - 17
14 - 15
12 - 13
0 - 11

A
B
C
D
F

Robert Green

Algebraic Lesson Plan

Name: _______________________ Period:______ Date:____________

Part III: Explanation of Area Problems (12 pts.)

Content

Vocabulary

3 Points

1 Point

I completely
explained how I
found the answer to
two of the area
problems.

I partly explained
how I found the
answer to one of the
area problems.

I used a minimum of
three vocabulary
words from Chapter
1 on algebraic
expressions.

I used at least one
vocabulary words
from Chapter 1 on
algebraic
expressions.

0 Points
I did not write an
explanation.
- Or –
I did not turn in my
explanation.
I did not use any
vocabulary words
from Chapter 1 on
algebraic
expressions.
- Or –

Conventions

Organization

My paragraph(s)
contain(s) a few
grammar or spelling
errors. (0 – 2)

My paragraph(s)
contain(s) several
grammar or spelling
errors. (3 – 4)

I did not turn in my
explanation.
My paragraph(s)
contain(s) many
grammar or spelling
errors. (5 or more)
- Or –

My paragraph(s)
contain(s): a topic
sentence,
supporting details,
and a conclusion
sentence.

My paragraph(s)
is/are missing one
of the following : a
topic sentence,
supporting details,
or a conclusion
sentence.

I did not turn in my
explanation.
My paragraph(s)
does/do not contain
any of the following:
a topic sentence,
supporting details,
or a conclusion
sentence.
- Or –
I did not turn in my
explanation.

Grading Scale
11.0 – 12.0
9.5 – 10.5
8.5 – 9.0
7.5 – 8.0
0.0 – 7.0

A
B
C
D
F