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PSII Classroom Management Plan Template

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PSII Classroom Management Plan
Name: Trevor Harder School: Wilson Middle School
University Consultant: ___________

Teacher Associate: ___________

1. ORGANIZATIONAL CHECKLIST
Curriculum Planning
 Bring lesson plan
 Confirm learning objectives are clear and will be met
 Alberta music Program of Studies
Unit Plan

Learning Students Names, Other Information
 Seating plan (sections for music, seating plan for social studies)
 Greet students as they come into the room, either at the door or as they take a seat.
 Review files for coding.

Classroom Rules and Procedures
 Make sure the rules are easily accessible.
 Review rules and procedures with students.

School Facilities and Equipment
 Figure out where photocopy machine is.
 Confirm check photocopy code.

School Policies and Procedures
 Confirm procedures align with school policies.

Organizing Classroom, Materials and Supplies
 Make sure handouts are organized.
 Mouthpiece sanitation spray can be accessed

2. RELATIONSHIP/COMMUNITY BUILDING PLAN
Strategies for Building Positive Relationships
1. Learn names of students as soon as possible. I will greet the students as they enter the
room. For those I was unable to greet, I will try to learn their names throughout the first day.
While I may not learn all of their names, I will remind students that I have to learn many
names and to be patient with me.
2. Learn interests of students, this can be beneficial when relating information.
3. Greet students as they enter the classroom.

Strategies for Building Classroom Community
1.
2.
3.
4.

Joke with the students throughout the lesson.
Congratulate when students have succeeded and encourage when struggle.
Encourage students to take a chance and not be afraid to make a mistake.
Open door policy and stress that confidentiality.

Version 3.0
Keith Roscoe, 2010, modified from Bosch, K. (2007). Planning classroom management (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press

PSII Classroom Management Plan Template

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3. RULES AND PROCEDURES PLAN
Classroom Rules

1. When one person is talking, everyone is listening.
2. Offer constructive feedback, rather than negative feedback (i.e. that sucks)
3. When I am talking, cell phones need to be put away. As is the protocol with Wilson middle
school, students are allowed to use their cell phones in class. However, I will remind the
students that while I am talking or one of their peers are talking, the cell phones need to be
put away.
4. If you have a question or comment, please raise hand.

Explanation of Classroom Rules:
My rules are similar to that of my Teacher Associate’s. When someone is talking, I
expect everyone to be listening. A student could be asking a question that a peer may have,
or they could be providing an answer that is important. My fourth rule, raising your hand,
compliments my first rule in regards to not speaking at once. If multiple people are talking at
one time, a crucial question or answer may be unheard. As well, by having students raise
their hands it allows me to keep track of students as they raise their hands. I believe rule
number two to be a crucial. For many students, they may only say that something is good or
bad, but do not say why. This rule allows students to provide positive feedback (i.e. next
time, try to speak a little louder). My third rule, no cell phones when I am talking, is
contextual. At the middle school that I am student teaching at, students are allowed to be on
their cell phones. While I do not have a problem with students being on their phones when
they are done their work, I expect students to not have their cell phones out when I am
instructing.
I will introduce students to my rules on the first day of class. After the bell has rung
and attendance has been taken, I will introduce the rules to the students. Once I have
informed the students as to what I expect, I will ask if they have any questions and inform
me of some of the prior rules. If there are some different rules that I agree with, I will add
them to my list. Throughout my practicum, I will remind students of my expectations if they
forget.

Classroom Procedures
1. Attention-Getting Procedure
I will raise my hand and ask for their attention. If this does not work, I will do a certain action
and say “If you can hear me, do this”. I will continue to do this until I have the attention of
the class.
2. Start-of-Class Procedure
I will go to the front of the class and greet of the students. I will also raise my hand into the
air so that it also provides a visual prompt for students to settle down and to listen.
3. End-of-Class Procedure
I will inform the class that there are X-minutes remaining in the period. At this point, I will
ask the students to start cleaning up the work/instruments. I will ask students if they have
any questions about what we covered in class. This can be administered using a question
period, exit slips, a four-corner exercise. If students do not have any questions, I will ask
students questions based on the information to confirm they were paying attention or not.
4. Question-Answering Procedure

Version 3.0
Keith Roscoe, 2010, modified from Bosch, K. (2007). Planning classroom management (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press

PSII Classroom Management Plan Template

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When I ask the students questions, I expect students to raise their hands, rather than
shouting. Once I acknowledge a student, it is their turn to talk. While one student is talking, I
expect the other students to listen to what is being said.
5. Safety Procedures
As in many classrooms, I expect students to not run through the band room. When students
have their instruments out, they should not horseplay. If possible, students should leave
their cases either off to the side of in the storage areas. When it is time to pack up, students
should pack up their instruments and clean up stands and chairs.
6. Other Procedures:
If there is homework assigned, I expect students to complete their homework. Electronic
devices, such as iPods, cell phones and other devices should only be used during work time
or free time. If I need to interrupt the students while they are working, they should turn off
their devices and listen to what needs to be said. If a student is not completing their work
and playing on their devices, they may lose their privilege to use their devices.

Explanation of Class Procedures:
Many of my procedures are already implemented by my Teacher Associate. I chose my
attention procedure to be a hand raise because I have found this to be effective at the
middle school age group. In the cases that it has not been effective, the mimic procedure
has worked. This technique can continue until all attention is up at me. Generally I have no
had to do more than three actions, however I have had to go to five occasionally. The hand
raise will be taught by me approaching the board while raising my hands. Some students will
notice and they will begin to quiet down and listen. With the latter option, by repeatedly
saying “if you can hear me” students will begin to notice and follow along.
I chose my start-of-class procedure to be similar to my attention procedure because it
allows the students to see a routine. By starting the period using this procedure, it allows
students to remember that when I raise my hand, it is my turn to speak. Also, by greeting
them at the beginning, I believe that it allows the class to start on a good note. This is
implemented in a similar fashion as the attention procedure. Once students have quiet
down, that is when I will greet the students as a whole.
I chose my end-of-class procedure to be based in a non-band room setting; however it
can be used in a band room. By asking the students if they have any questions about what
was covered in class, it allows them to take control of their learning. I also believe that it is
important to take control of asking questions if students are not asking. This will help me
confirm that students were paying attention.
I chose my question-answer period to be very basic. I have experience success with this
procedure; however when implementing this technique, I have to do the occasional reminder
that students should not shout out answer. Much like how successful it was in previous
semesters, I believe that it should work.
I chose these safety procedures because I believe them to be common sense. While
many students will automatically act in this manner, it is essential to remind students of
these safety procedures, as some will forget. While I believe this procedure has already been
implemented, I will remind students throughout the practicum. If they are not followed, then
I will talk with the students first. If it continues to be an issue, I will dismiss students by
sections.
Finally, I chose these procedures based on my personal learning styles. I enjoyed
listening to music while I was working and when it was time to listen to the teacher, I would
take the head phones either out of my ears or off my head. It is important to remind
students that it is a privilege to have devices in the classroom, and if they abuse the
privilege they can be taken away.

4. INTERVENTION PLAN
Strategies for Responding to Misbehaviour:
1. Stand beside the student.
Version 3.0
Keith Roscoe, 2010, modified from Bosch, K. (2007). Planning classroom management (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press

PSII Classroom Management Plan Template

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2. Use the teacher look.
3. Address student by name.
4. Remind the student of the rules.
5. Once the group has started working, talk to the student.
6. In cases that students are continuously misbehaving, I will ask the students to enter the
hallway and within a few seconds, inform the student that I will be out shortly to talk to
them. While the student is waiting, I will inform the other students to work on a particular
topic while I speak to the student.

Justification/Explanation of Strategies:
I chose these strategies because they have all been successful for me. For many
students, knowing that the teacher is standing near them, it will deter most of the
misbehavior. While you cannot always stand beside the child that is misbehaving, many of
the other strategies are interchangeable. I have used a teacher look a few times, many
times it has been as simple as making eye contact and the student has responded. Most of
these strategies are subtle, as they will not embarrass the student in front of their peers.
While number three may seem more aggressive, the important thing to take into
consideration is the tone of voice. If you use an aggressive tone in your voice, it is more
likely to be taken aggressively. It is a fine balance between too harsh and too passive.

Relation of Strategies to School Policies and Procedures:
As described in the staff handbook, I will also account to the “Wilson Way”, which represents
empathy, respect, responsibility, compassion, perseverance, citizenship, fairness, honesty.
As I was given an incomplete handbook on my orientation day, I am not fully aware of the
school’s intervention plan.

5. FIRST DAYS LESSON PLANS
Lesson Plan #1
Date: March 5, 2014
Objectives: Pre-assessment of key signatures and scales
Materials: Pre-assessment sheet
Procedure:
Introduction:
-

Body:
-

I will introduce myself to the class.
At this time I will establish my expectations to the class
To give the students an opportunity to have their voices heard, I will ask them if they
have any questions or concerns with my rules.
o If a student address an issue that I will agree with, I will take it into
considerations (ie. In Mr. Griffioen’s class we are allowed to do ____)
I will administer the pre-assessment to the students.
They will be given time in class to complete the assessment.
After all students have completed, we will review in class.
o Students will be able to make corrections as needed.

Closure:
-

I will ask the students if they felt comfortable with the pre-assessment.
I will inform them that we will be talking more about key signatures.

Assessment:
-

I will collect the pre-assessments from the students as they leave the classroom.

Version 3.0
Keith Roscoe, 2010, modified from Bosch, K. (2007). Planning classroom management (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press

PSII Classroom Management Plan Template

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Lesson Plan #2

Date: March 6, 2014
Objectives: Students will be able to build an F major scale using WWHWWWH.
Materials: key signature info sheet.
Procedure:
Introduction:
-

I will inform the students that I have reviewed their tests.
Reinforce that it was not for marks, it was a formative assessment to see how much
everybody knew.
At this time I will inform the students that we will be starting to look at how a scale is
made based off of a key signature.

Body:
-

-

-

At this time I will distribute the worksheet among the group.
I will begin by discussing how a scale is built
o Made up of steps called “whole steps” and “half steps”
 Use the analogy of a stair case, some steps being bigger than others
o Use a scale that they already know
 Bb major
o To build a scale, we use WWHWWWH
 Whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half steps
I will then apply this WWHWWWH formula into the F major scale
o Talk about how many flats the F major scale has
 1 flat (Bb)
o Starting on F, we will build a scale
 Ask students directing questions such as (what would the next note be
if we need to go up a WHOLE step?)
o Make sure the students notice the half steps on Bb and E
After students have gone through the scale, they will then circle the notes affected by
the key signature.
At this time, students will attempt to recreate an F major scale.
o After a few minutes, we will review what students have created.

Closure:
-

For closure, we will review the WWHWWWH steps to create a major scale.
I will ask the students:
o The steps to create a major scale
o How many sharps does F major have?
o What notes in the F major scale are the HALF steps on?

Assessment:
-

Verbal formative assessment

6. REFLECTIONS ON CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT*
(*completed at the end of the practicum)

Successes/Strengths
Problem Areas/Areas for Growth
Alternative Strategies/Things to Try

Version 3.0
Keith Roscoe, 2010, modified from Bosch, K. (2007). Planning classroom management (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press

PSII Classroom Management Plan Template

Version 3.0
Keith Roscoe, 2010, modified from Bosch, K. (2007). Planning classroom management (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press

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