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Day 2 Lesson Plan: Estimating Length

SOL: 3.9 The student will estimate and use U.S. Customary and metric units to measure
a) length to the nearest 1/2 inch, inch
Lesson Objective: The student will be able to estimate the length of an object using length
benchmarks for an inch and inch.
Teacher Preparation:
Collect objects of various lengths (i.e. stapler, pair of scissors, pencil, book, notebook,
etc.) to be measured
Print the Inch Benchmarks recording worksheet for each student
Materials:
Large sheet of paper for anchor chart
Markers
Objects for measuring
Rulers
Writing utensil
Quarters
Snap cubes
Inch Benchmarks recording worksheet
Time: 1 hour and 20 minutes
*Whole Group- 20 minutes
*4 rotations- 25 minutes per rotation
Implementation
Opening: As a whole group, the class will create an anchor chart about measuring length.
Anchor chart can include:
Definition of Length- the distance from one end to another; how long something is
Standard vs. Nonstandard units
Measurement Benchmarks for Inches- width of a quarter, tip of thumb to first joint, snap
cube, small paper clip
Tools for Measuring Length- ruler, yard stick, meter stick, tape measure (plastic and
retractable)
Words Associated with Measuring Length- inch, centimeter, meter, foot, yard, mile
Explain that for this unit, we will be focusing on measuring to the nearest inch and inch.
Highlight words on the anchor chart that they will be using in the upcoming unit (inch, ruler,
measuring tape, and measurement benchmarks).
The teacher will explain that the benchmarks are NON-STANDARD units of measure. Nonstandard units of measure are objects that we can use to measure something, but are not typically

used. Have students give more examples of non-standard units of measure. Then discuss
STANDARD units of measure and that they are what we use to accurately measure something.
Have students give more examples of standard units of measure.
Give an example of why we might want to know some measurement benchmarks (needing to
know about how long something is but do not have a measuring device). Demonstrate to
students how to estimate how long something is using your thumb, quarters, and snap cubes.
Explain that it is important to line these objects straight and so that they are touching.
Activity: Students will break into their math rotations.
Explain to students that today we will use our new knowledge of some measurement benchmarks
we can use for inches. Review some of the benchmarks with emphasis on tip of thumb to first
joint, quarter, and snap cubes.
Using one of the recording sheets as an example, tell students that they are going to try
estimating how long objects are by using benchmarks to measure. Once they have estimated the
length of all of the objects, they will be given a ruler to measure the objects again to see how
close they were when estimating.
Put students in groups of 2 to 3 and give them the objects to be measured, quarters, and snap
cubes. Rulers will be handed out after the groups have finished estimating their objects.
Closing: Have groups sit close to the teacher. Ask students:
Were your estimates close to the actual length?
Why might some of the estimates be different in each group? (size of thumb might be
different)
Collect recording sheets, rulers, and objects.

Day 3 Lesson Plan: Measuring to the Nearest Inch and Inch


SOL: 3.9 The student will estimate and use U.S. Customary and metric units to measure
a) length to the nearest inch, inch
Lesson Objective: The student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of measuring to the
nearest inch and inch.
Teacher Preparation:
Collect various objects that students could use to blow across a desk (i.e. marker,
crumpled paper, Legos, unifix cubes, dice, crayon, etc.)
Select a large, flat surface for the activity
Materials:
Measurement SMART board activity
Drinking straws
Various objects to blow
Writing utensils
Straw Sliding record sheet
Rulers
Time: 4 rotations- 25 minutes per rotation
Implementation
Opening: As a whole group, the students and teacher will go through the Measurement SMART
board activity together. This activity will help to introduce students to measuring to the nearest
inch and inch and measuring with a broken ruler.
Activity: The teacher will introduce the lesson as being an experiment to see which object can
travel the farthest when blown with a straw across a flat surface.
The teacher will give the directions of the activity: Students will work in groups of two to three.
The students will place the item they have selected at the end of the flat surface they are working
on (i.e. desk, table). The students will then take a straw and give ONE blow through the straw
toward to object in order to move it forward. The students will then measure how far the object
travelled using a ruler and measuring to the nearest inch or inch. The goal is to see which item
travels the farthest.
The teacher will select an object to model what (s)he expects the process to look like. The
teacher will also place particular emphasis on teaching students that some rulers have a small
amount of space before the zero mark. The teacher will explain that students should always
measure starting from the actual zero mark.

The teacher will place students in groups of two to three to conduct the experiment. Ask students
which object they believe will move the farthest and which will move the least. Have students
record their predictions.
Instruct students that they make only select one object to work with at a time. When they are
finished with an object, they should return it to the teacher and select a new one. The students
will continue to test objects.
Closing: As a group, the students and teachers will complete the questions on the bottom of the
worksheet and compare answers. Discuss why some groups may have different answers.
Collect Straw Sliding worksheets.

Day 4 Lesson Plan: Jumping Olympics!


SOL: 3.9 The student will estimate and use U.S. Customary and metric units to measure
a) length to the nearest inch, inch
Lesson Objective: The student will be able to apply knowledge of measuring to the nearest inch
and inch for lengths longer than 12 inches.
Teacher Preparation:
Print Jumping Olympics! worksheet for each student
Select an area that in long and open to do the activity (i.e. a hallway)
Place two long pieces of scotch tape down several yards apart to serves as starting lines
Materials:
Scotch tape
Jumping Olympics! recording sheet
Writing utensils
Rulers and/or tape measures
Time: 4 rotations- 25 minutes per rotation
Implementation
Opening: Explain to students that there will be times when the length that is being measured will
be longer than a standard ruler. Have students think of some times when this might occur.
Explain to students that today they will be doing a series of jumps and will need to measure how
far they jump. The teacher will then demonstrate how the students will be expected to measure
their jumps (stacking rulers or an introduction to using a measuring tape).
Activity: The teacher will hand out the Jumping Olympics! recording sheet to each student
and briefly review each type of jump. The teacher will explain that the pieces of scotch tape on
the floor are the starting lines where they will begin their jumps.
At the beginning of the first four rounds, the teacher will model how to correctly do the standing
broad jump, backwards jump, one-leg hop, and longest step. Then the group will divide in half
and go to one of the two starting lines.
After each jump/hop/step, a student or the teacher will be responsible for placing a piece of tap
where the student landed. After each attempt, the student that jumped will be responsible for
measuring and recording their results. Each student will be allowed to jump three times per
round. Each student will look at their three recorded jumping lengths and record their personal
best. After the students have completed the first four rounds, they may select one of the four
jumps to continue working on.

Closing: Have students share their personal best length for each jump to find out who jumped
the furthest in each category. Collect Jumping Olympics! recording sheets from each student.

Day 5 Lesson Plan: Measuring Length with a Broken Ruler


SOL: 3.9 The student will estimate and use U.S. Customary and metric units to measure
a) length to the nearest inch, inch
Lesson Objective: The student will be able to measure to the nearest inch and inch using a
broken ruler.
Teacher Preparation:
Printed and cut task cards (laminated, if desired)
Use opaque tape to cover the ends of the rulers at various lengths to create broken
rulers
Materials:
Measurement task cards
Broken rulers
Measurement Tasks worksheet
Writing utensils
Drinking straws
SMART Board
Broken Ruler and Non Standard Measurement SMART Board activity
Dry erase boards for each student
Dry erase marker for each student
Clipboard, optional
Time: 15-20 minutes for SMART Board activity, 4 rotations- 25 minutes per rotation
Implementation
Opening: Begin the lesson by completing the Broken Ruler and Non Standard Measurement
SMART Board activity as a whole group. For each question, have the students write their
answer on their dry erase board and share their answers as a whole group. Briefly discuss how to
find the correct answer after each question is asked and answered.
Explain that we can still accurately measure length even if we need to begin measuring at a point
on a measuring device that is not at the beginning. The teacher will model how to measure using
a broken ruler.
Activity: Explain to students that they will be working individually to measure the objects they
are given from the Measurement Tasks cards. Review directions for the activity- these cards
will name an object found in the classroom that the students are responsible for measuring to the
nearest inch or inch. Once the object has been measured, the student will record the length.
After all of the objects have been measured, the student with the largest total wins!
The teacher will give each student their task card to work on. Once this task is completed, the
student will return to the teacher to receive a new measurement task.

Closing: Students will hand in their completed recording sheets.