You are on page 1of 96

Sapphos Poems

This is an attempt to collect Sappho's entire work together in one page with Greek
originals, succinct translations, and commentary.

When I first searched for Sappho's poems on the web, I found that most sites used out-ofdate translations and numberings, with no original Greek. I wanted a complete work to
peruse at leisure, with annotations and explanations throughout.
Whilst this page is still far from acheiving the goal of being a complete and readable edition
of Sappho, it's still hopefully quite useful.
If you're new to Sappho, it's worth reading Wikipedia's introduction to her before starting
on the poems. There's an awful lot of misinformation out there, so getting a good feel for
the biographical and textual issues before you start on the poems will probably help you to
enjoy them more.

Notes and Background


This document has been derived from various web documents and books, cobbled together
after a lot of research. I'm not an expert on Aeolic Greek, so if you want to point out any
mistakes, suggested emandations, further commentary, and so on, please contact the author
who will be very happy to hear from you.
Some more information on the sources, and further reading and stuff, can be found in the
supplementary material of this document. Apologies for the rather tacky presentation of the
poems at the moment.
When I say the "Complete Poems", I obviously mean an attempt to gather the complete
surviving poems, which is sadly a small fraction of what we know her to have written.

Maybe somebody will find the remainder in a rubbish dump somewhere with Love's
Labour's Won, The Isle of Dogs, and the key to the Voynich MS.

The Poems
I've used the standard Lobel-Page numbering (in the text, LP = Lobel-Page, D = Diehl), and
given cross references to the numbers in other editions where I could find them.

Lobel-Page 1 / Voigt 1 / Diehl 1 / Bergk 1 / Cox 1


' ,
, ,
' ' ,
, ,
' ',

,

' '

' '
' ', ,
'
'



' ; ',
]', ;
, ,
', ,
,
.
,
,
, , '
.

Glittering-throned, undying Aphrodite,


Wile-weaving daughter of high Zeus, I pray thee,
Tame not my soul with heavy woe, dread mistress,
Nay, nor with anguish !

But hither come, if ever erst of old time


Thou didst incline, and listenedst to my crying,
And from thy father's palace down descending,
Camest with golden
Chariot yoked: thee fair swift-flying sparrows
Over dark earth with multitudinous fluttering,
Pinion on pinion, through middle ether
Down from heaven hurried.
Quickly they came like light, and thou, blest lady,
Smiling with clear undying eyes didst ask me
What was the woe that troubled me, and wherefore
I had cried to thee:
What thing I longed for to appease my frantic
Soul: and Whom now must I persuade, thou askedst,
Whom must entangle to thy love, and who now,
Sappho, hath wronged thee?
Yea, for if now he shun, he soon shall chase thee;
Yea, if he take not gifts, he soon shall give them;
Yea, if he love not, soon shall he begin to
Love thee, unwilling.
Come to me now too, and from tyrannous sorrow
Free me, and all things that my soul desires to
Have done, do for me, queen, and let thyself too
Be my great ally!
(J. Addington Symonds, 1893)
(Snell 1 / Gallavotti 1)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: P. Oxy. 2288.

Lobel-Page 2 / Voigt 2 / Diehl 5, 6 / Bergk 4, 5


...
...[
.[ ]
, [ ]
[], []

,
,
[]

,

[
[]
[] ,

[]

or, from fairfield:


. [ [ ].
[ ]
[], []

,
,


. . . ,
[
[
]
][]

[]

[Come]
to me from Crete to this holy dwelling,
where your lovely grove
of apple trees is, and your altars smoking
with frankincense
herein cold water rushes through the apple branches,
and the entire space is overshadowed by roses,
and from the shimmering leaves
sleep pours down.
Here a horse-nourishing meadow blooms
with spring flowers, and the winds
blow gentle [
[
In this place, you, Kupris, taking up garlands
pour nectar gracefully

in golden cups and mix it


with our festivities.
(Gregory Nagy and Casey Du)
Leave Kriti and come here to this holy
temple with your graceful grove
of apple trees and altars smoking
with frankincense.
Icy water babbles through apple branches
and roses leave shadow on the ground
and bright shaking leaves pour down
profound sleep.
Here is a meadow where horses graze
amid wild blossoms of the spring and soft winds
blow aroma
of honey. Afroditi, take the nectar
and delicately pour it into gold
wine cups and mingle joy with
our celebration.
***
-- Bergk 4 / Cox 5 - '
,

(This is the end of verse two, which Carson, 2000, translates:
And in it cold water makes a clear sound through
apple branches and with roses the whole place
is shadowed and down from radiant-shaking leaves
sleep comes dropping.)
Source:
Hermogenes about A.D. 170,
and Demetrius, about A.D. 150.
-- Bergk 5 / Cox 6 -. . .


.
Cox:
. . . , ,


.

(This is the final verse.)


(Gallavotti 20, someone says Diehl Supp p.30)
(Also translated by Powell, who mentions an LP 2.1A too)
Sources:
Ostracon Flor., ed. M. Norsa PSI XIII 1300
Hermog. p. ideon II 4 (p. 331 Rabe)
Athen. XI, 463e

Lobel-Page 3 / Diehl 23
..........
..........
..........
. . . . . ]
. . . . . ] [. . .
. . . . . ] [. . .
. . . . ], [. . .
. . . . . ]
. . . . . ]. [. . .
[] . []
[] [. . . . .
. . . . . ]
. . . ] , [. . . . .
. . . . . ], [ . . . . .
. . . . . ] [ . . . . .
. . . . . ]
. . . . . . . ] [. . . . .
. . . . . ] , [. . . . .
. . . . . ] [. . . . .
..........

. . . Therefore not only dost thou hover


about the notable rather than the good and
noble, and biddest thy friends go about their
business, but dost grieve me by saying in
thy swelling pride that I am become a
reproach to thee. Go to, glut thy heart with
this thy insolence; for, as for me, my mind
is not so softly disposed towards the anger of
a child. Go thy way, nor . . .
(J. M. Edmonds)
(Edmonds (1909) 3)

Source:
P. Berol. 5006 + P. Oxy. III (1903) 424 (nunc P. Graz I, 1926)

Lobel-Page 4 / Diehl 24
. . . . . ]
. . . . . . . ]
. . . . ]
....]
. . . . . ]
. . . . . ]
. . . . ]
......]
. . . . . ]
. . . . . . . . ].[. .]
Source:
P. Berol. 5006

Lobel-Page 5 / Voigt 5 / Gallavotti 23 / Diehl 25 / Bergk


'

,
'




.
,

, ,
,

.
, , ,
, , ,

.
or, fairfield:
] [
] [] [
]

],
] [
]
. . . . . . . ],
. . . . . . . ]
]
] []
] []
].
].[]
][. . .]
][. . .]
][
][ ][ ].
]..[.] [] [. .]. .[. . .]
][] [
].

O Kypris and Nereids, undamaged I pray you


grant my brother to arrive here.
And all that in his heart he wants to be,
make it be.
And all the wrong he did before, loose it.
Make him a joy to his friends,
a pain to his enemies and let there exist for us
not one single further sorrow.
[presumably a partial translation only]
(Anne Carson, 2000)
Kyprian and Nereids, I beg you
to bring my brother home safely,
and let him accomplish whatever
is in his heart.
Let him amend his former errors
and be a joy to his friends but
a terror to enemies- though never
again to us.
Let him do honor to his sister,
and be free of the black torment
which in other days of sorrow
ravaged his soul.
(Willis Barnstone)
Kupris and the Nereids, grant that my brother arrive here unhurt
and that everything he desires be fulfilled, and that he pay for all

the mistakes he made in the past and that he be a blessing to his


friends and a pain for his enemies; and let no-one be a grief for us.
Let him wish to bring honors to his sister and bitter pain . . . formerly grieving. . .
(Campbell?)
(Also translated by Powell)

Lobel-Page 6 / Diehl 16
fr. 1a
..........
..........
.[. . . . .
[. . . . .
[. . . . .
[. . . . .
fr. 1b
[. . . . .] . [. . . . .
[. . . . .
[. . . . .
[. . . . .
[. . . . .
[ ] = D. 16
[ . . . . .
[. . . . .
.[. . . . .
.[. . . . .
[. . . . .] . [. . . . .
Source:
P. Oxy. XXI (1951), 2289

Lobel-Page 7 / Diehl 16

fr. 2
..........
] [. . . . .
. . . . . ] , [. . . . .
. . . . . ]
. . . . . ] [. . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . ]
. . . . . ]. [][. . . . .
. . . . . ] . [.] .[ . . .
Source:
P. Oxy. XXI (1951), 2289

Lobel-Page 8 / Diehl 16

fr. 3
. . . . . . . . . .] ...[. . . . .
. . . . . . . . . .].[. . . . .
. . . . . ] [. . . . .
. . . . . . . . . .] ..[. . . . .
. . . . . . . . . .] . [. . . . .
Source:
P. Oxy. XXI (1951), 2289

Lobel-Page 9 / Diehl 16

fr. 4
...............
. . . ] .[. . . . .
. . . . ] [. . . . .
. . . . . ] [. . . . .
. . . . . ] [] [. . . . .
. . . . . . . . . ].[. . . . .
[
. . . . . . . . . ]. . .[. . . . .
. . . . . . . . . ] [. . . . .
. . . . . . . . . ]. [. . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . ] .[. . . . .
...............
...............
Source:
P. Oxy. XXI (1951), 2289

Lobel-Page 10 / Diehl 16

fr. 5
..............
. . . . . . . . . . .][. . . . . .
. . . . . . . ][. . . . . .
. . . . . ].[. . . . . .
. . . . . . . ][. . . . . .
. . . . . . ].[. . . . . .
. . . . . ][. . . . . .
..............
@@ fr. 6
Source:
P. Oxy. XXI (1951), 2289

Lobel-Page 11 / Diehl 16

fr. 7
..............
. . . . . . . . . . ]..[. . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . ][. . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . ]..[. . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . ].[. . . . . .
..............
Source:
P. Oxy. XXI (1951), 2289

Lobel-Page 12 / Diehl 16

fr. 8
..............
. . . . . . . . . .]. . .[. . . . . .
. . . . . . . ].[. . . . . .
. . . . . . . . ] [. . . . . .
. . . . . . . ].[. . . . . .
. . . . . . ].[. . . . . .
. . . . . . . ].[. . . . . .
. . . . . . . . ] [. . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . ]. . .[. . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . ].[. . . . . .
..............
..............
Source:
P. Oxy. XXI (1951), 2289

Lobel-Page 13 / Diehl 16

fr. 10
..............
. . . . . . . . ].[. . . . . .
. . . . . ].[. . . . . .
. . . . . . . ]. .[. . . . . .
..............
Source:
P. Oxy. XXI (1951), 2289

Lobel-Page 14 / Diehl 16

fr. 11
. . . . . . . ]. [. . . . . .
. . . . . . . ][. . . . . .
. . . . . ]. .[. . . . . .
. . . . . ].[. . . . . .
. . . . . . ].[. . . . . .
..............
Source:
P. Oxy. XXI (1951), 2289

Lobel-Page 15 / Diehl 26

..........
..........
..........
..........
. . . . . ] [. . . . .

. . . . . ].[. . . . .
. . . . . ]. [. . . . .
.....]
[ ][ ] [ ]
. . . . . ] [][. . . . .
[ ] [] [. . . . .
. . . . . ].[. . . . .
], [ ] [] []
[] [] []
[], [] []
[] .
the second verse, on it.wikipedia.org, is almost identical:
[], [ ] [] [].
[] ' []
[], [] []
[] .
and is translated there as:
Cipride, molto amara ella ti trovi!
Fa che Dorica non si vanti mai
d'aver colto l'amor desiderato
un'altra volta.
which is automatically translated, rather badly, as:
cipride, much bitter it finds to you!
it makes that dorica never does not go
you to have cultured the amor
wished an other time.
(Also translated by Powell)
Source:
P. Oxy. X (1914) 1231 fr. 1, 1 - 12 et fr. 3

Lobel-Page 15b / Voigt 15 / Gallavotti 24 / Diehl 26 / Bergk ...

Lobel-Page 16 / Diehl 27a 27b / Cox 3 / Voigt 16

, ,

,

]
] []
] []

/ [ ]

/ ] [ ][,

/ ] [] []
,
/ ] , []

/ ]

] . . . . . .

/ . ] [ ]
] [ ].
] , [, ]
] ,



.
/ ]
]

]
[Cox:] ]
] , ,
[ ]
[ .]
A troop of horse, the serried ranks of marchers,
A noble fleet, some think these of all on earth
Most beautiful. For me naught else regarding
Is my beloved.
To understand this is for all most simple,
For thus gazing much on mortal perfectino
And knowing already what life could give her,
Him chose fair Helen,
Him the betrayer of Ilium's honour.
The recked she not of adored child or parent,
But yielded to love, and forced by her passion,
Dared Fate in exile.

Thus quickly is bent the will of that woman


To whom things near and dear seem to be nothing.
So mightest thou fail, My Anactoria,
If she were with you.
She whose gentle footfall and radiant face
Hold the power to charm more than a vision
Of chariots and the mail-clad battalions
Of Lydia's army.
So must we learn in world made as this one
Man can never attain his greatest desire,
[But must pray for what good fortune Fate holdeth,
Never unmindful.]
(Cox)
Powell (1915) has a fragment of verse two, which he gives the source as:
Sappho, Oxyrh. Pap. x. p. 23; Frag. i. col. i. l. 18.
(Also translated by Powell, 2007)
(Gallavotti 25 / Bergk -)
-- Bergk 13 - ' .
But that which one desires I ...
Source:
Apollonius

Lobel-Page 17 / Diehl 18

[
' [
[
[
[
[

[
[ .
[
[

[
][
] [
[]
[]
[] [
[
[ ] [.
(Translated by Powell)

Lobel-Page 18

[
[
[
[
.[
[

Lobel-Page 19 / Diehl 30

..........
..........
..........
..........
. . . . . ][. . . . .
. . . ] []
. . . . . ] [.]
.....]
. . . . . ] [.]
. . . . . ]
. . . . . ]
.....]
. . . . . ]
. . . . . ][.]
. . . . . [.]
.......
Source:
P. Oxy. (1914) 1231, fr. 2

Lobel-Page 20 / Diehl 31

..........
. . . . . ] []
. . . . ] .[. . .
.....]
. . . . ]
. . ]
. . . . ]
.....]
. . ]
. . . . . ] []
. . . . . ]
.....]
. . . . ] .[. . . . .
. . . . . ] [. . . . .
. . . . . ] [. . . . .
.....]
. . . . . ] [. . . . .
. . . . . ] [. . . . .
. . . . . . . ]
.....]
. . . . . ]
. . . . . ][. . . . .
. . . . . ].
.....]
.....]..[......
.....]
.....]
.....
Source:
P. Oxy. X (1914) 1231, fr. 9
P. Oxy. XXI (1951) add. p. 122

Lobel-Page 21 / Diehl 32

.....]
.....]
.....]

.....]
. . . . . ][.]
. . . . . ] [. . . .]
. . . . . ] .[. .]
.....]
. . . . . ]
. . . . . ]
. . . . . ]
.....]
. . . . . ]
. . . . . ]
[ ]
[ ]
. . . . . ]
. . . . . ] []
..........
..........
Sources:
P. Oxy. X (1914) 1231, fr. 10 (vv. 1-15)
Apollon. Dysc. de pron. 1, 97, 2 Schneider (vv. 12-13)

Lobel-Page 22 / Diehl 33, 36

[Diehl 33]
. . . . . ][. . . . .
. . . . . ], [. . . . .
. . . . . ] [. . . . .
. . . . . ]
[ ] .[. . . . .
] , [. . . . .
[ ^ ] .[. . . . .
. . . . . ]
[Diehl 36]
[.]..[. . . . . ] [
[] [] .[. .]
[], .[. . . .

[
,
[] [
[][,

[. . . . .
[. . . . .
[][. . . . .
.....
(Translated by Powell)
Sources:
P. Oxy. X (1914) 1231, fr. 12
Cf. P. Oxy. XXI (1951) add. p. 125, 11

Lobel-Page 23 / Diehl 35

..........
..........
. . . . . ] [. . . . .
.....]
[ ^ ] [
[ ] [
[,] []
[ ]
[ ] , []
[, ]
. . . . . ] [..].[.]
.....]
. . . . . . . . . . . ]
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ]
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ][]
(Translated by Powell)
Source:
P. Oxy. X (1914) 1231, fr. 14

Lobel-Page 24a / Diehl 34a

. . . . . ] [. . . . .
[ ] [. . . . .
[] [
[].
[ ] [

[], [. . . . .
[ ][] [. . . . .
.....
Source:
P. Oxy. X (1914) 1231, fr. 13

Lobel-Page 24b / Diehl 34b

. . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . ] ..[ . . . . .
. . . ][ . . . . .
. . . ][ . . . . .
. . ][ . . . . .
. . . ][ . . . . .
. . ][ . . . . .
. . ][ . . . . .
Source:
P. Oxy. X (1914) 1231, fr. 13

Lobel-Page 24c / Diehl 34c

. . . . . ].[ . . . . .
. . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
.......]
. . . . . . . . . ].[ ].
. . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . ]..[ . . . . .
Source:
P. Oxy. X (1914) 1231, frr. 22+25

Lobel-Page 25

...
[ ].[
[ ][
[][
[ ]

[]' [
[ ][
[][
...

Lobel-Page 26 / Diehl 37

. . . . . . . . . ][ ^ ^]
. . . . . . . . ][ ]
[ , ] []
[ ^ ].
. . . . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . ] [. . . . .
. . . . . . . . . ]. [. . . . .
. . . . . . ]
. . . . . . . . . ] [. . . . .
. . . . . . ] [. . . . .
. . . . ] []
[ ]
. . . . . . . . . . ][. . . . .
. . . . . . . . . ][. . . . .
. . . . . . . . . ][. . . . .
.........
(Partly translated by Powell)
Sources:
P. Oxy. X (1914) 1231, fr. 16
Etym. Magn. 449, 36 (vv. 2-4)

Lobel-Page 27 / 38D

] [] [
] [
] , [
]
] [
] , [
][] [], [
[ ]
[ ] [] [

[ ][ ] [
...
(Translated by Powell)

Lobel-Page 28

(a)
. . . ][. .].[ . . . . .
. . . . . ].[ . . . . .
. . . . ].[ . . . . .
. . . . ][ . . . . .
(P. Oxy. X (1914) 1231, fr. 21)
(b)
. . . . ][.].[ . . . . .
. . . . ] [ . . . . .
. . . . . ] [. .][ . . . . .
. . . . ].[ . . . . .
. . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
(P. Oxy. X (1914) 1231, fr. 26)
(c)
. . . . . ]. . .[ . . . . .
. . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . ].[ . . . . .
(P. Oxy. X (1914) 1231, fr. 27)

Lobel-Page 29

(Lots of little fragments from P. Oxy. X (1914) 1231, / cui accedunt eiusdem
p. frr. 2081 (c) / XVIII 2166 (a) 1 / P. Oxy. XXI (1951) add. 2166 apparently)
(1) 1231 fr. 4
. . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . ][ . . . . .

. . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . ].[ . . . . .
(2) 1231 fr. 5
. . . . . . . .].[ . . . . .
. . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . ]a[ . . . . .
. . . . . . ][ . . . . .
(3) 1231 fr. 6
. . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . ][ . . . . .
.....]
. . . . . ][ . . . . .
(4) 1231 fr. 7
. . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . ].[ . . . . .
. . . . . ][ . . . . .
(5) 1231 fr. 11
.........]
. . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . ].[ . . . . .
. . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . ]
(6a) 1231 fr. 19 + XXI add. 2166
. . . . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . ].[.][.][ . . . . .
. . . . . ].[. . .].[.]
. . . . ].[. . .].[. .][ . . . . .
. . . . . ].[. . . .][ . . . . .
. . . ].[. . .]. .[. . . . . .].[ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . ].
. . . ].[.][ ].[.].[ . . . . .
. . . . . ]. . .[.].[ . . . . .
. . . . . . ] [ ]. .[. .].[ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
(6b) XXI add. 2166
. ]..[ . . . . .
.[ . . . . .
.[ . . . . .
[ . . . . .
..[.....
(7) 1231 fr. 20

.......]
. . . . . . ]
......]
......]
. . . . . . ]
. . . . . . ]
. . . . . . ]
(8) 1231 fr. 23
. . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . ]. [ . . . . .
.......] [.....
(9) 1231 fr. 28
. . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . ] [ . . . . .
. . . . . . . ].[ . . . . .
(10) 1231 fr. 30
. . . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
(11) 1231 fr. 31
. . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
.......] [.....
. . . . . ] [ . . . . .
. . . . . ] [ . . . . .
(12) 1231 fr. 35
......
......
[. .].[ . . . . .
. .[ . . . . .
[ . . . . .
[ . . . . .
[ . . . . .
......
......
(13) 1231 fr. 38
. . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . ] [ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . ].[ . . . . .
(14) 1231 fr. 41

. . . . . . . ]. .[ . . . . .
. . . . . . ][ . . . . .
(15) 1231 fr. 43
. . . . . . . ].[ . . . . .
. . . . . . ][ . . . . .
......] [.....
(16) 1231 fr. 44
. . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
(17) 1231 fr. 45
. . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . ].[ . . . . .
(18) 1231 fr. 48
. . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
(19) 1231 fr. 49
. . . . . . . ].[ . . . . .
(20) 1231 fr. 55
........]
. . . . . . . ] [ . . . . .
. . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . ].[ . . . . .
.......]
. . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
(21) 2081 (c) 1 (= 1231 frr. 29 + 42 + novum)
........] [.....
. . . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . ] [ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
(22) 2081 (c) 2
. . . . . . . . ]. .[ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . ].[ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
(23) 2081 (c) 3
........][.....

. . . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
(24) XVIII 2166 (a) 1
........][.....
. . . . . . . ].[.]. [ . . . . .
. . . . . . ]
[.....
. . . . . . ].
[.....
......]
[.....
. . . . . . ] [ . . . . .
. . . . . ]
[.....
. . . . . . . . ].[ . . . . .
(25a) XXI 2166 (a) 7
............
. . . . . ].[ . . . . .
.][ . . . . .
.[ . . . . .
.. . .[ . . . . .
[]. . ..[ . . . . .
.][ . . . . .
.]. .[.]. .[ . . . . .
(25b) XXI 2166 (a) 7
............
............
............
.[.....
.[ . . . . .
[.]. .[ . . . . .
[ . . . . .
]..[ . . . . .
(26) XXI 2166 (a) 8
. . . . . . . . ]..[ . . . . .
. . . . . . ]. [ . . . . .
. . . . . . ]. . .[ . . . . .
(27) XXI 2166 (a) 9
. . . . . . . . ]..[ . . . . .
. . . . . . . ] .[ . . . . .
.......] [.....
. . . . . . . . ].[ . . . . .
(28) XXI 2166 (a) 10
. . . . . . . . ].[ . . . . .
. . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . ][.].[ . . . . .

. . . . . . . . ]. . . .[ . . . . .
(29) XXI 2166 (a) 11
. . . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . ].[ . . . . .
. . . . . . ]..[ . . . . .
. . . . . ][.][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . ].[.]. .[ . . . . .
(30) XXI 2166 (a) 12
.[ . . . . .
[ . . . . .
.]
[ . . . . .
[ . . . . .
[ . . . . .
[ . . . . .
[ . . . . .
.[ . . . . .
[ . . . . .
(31) XXI 2166 (a) 13
........] [.....
........] [.....
........] [.....
........] [.....
. . . . . . . . . ] [ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . ]. .[ . . . . .
(32) XXI 2166 (a) 14
. . . . . . . . ].[ . . . . .
. . . . . . . ] [ . . . . .
. . . . . . ] ..[ . . . . .
(33) XXI 2166 (a) 15
. . . . . . . . ].[ . . . . .
. . . . . . ] [ . . . . .
(34) XXI 2166 (a) 16
. . . . . . . . ].[ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
........] [.....
. . . . . . . . . . .][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . ].[ ][ . . . . .
(35) XXI 2166 (a) 17
. . . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
. . . . . . . . ][ . . . . .

. . . . . . . . ].[ . . . . .
. . . . . . . ][ . . . . .
- www.hs-augsburg.de

Lobel-Page 30 / Diehl 39

..........
..........
..........
[. . . ]. [ ]
[. . . . . . . . . .
[][. . . . .
[ -]
.
[]
[, ]
[ ]
[].
( )

3. Cf. Sappho, Frag. 30: mellichothnais, gentle-voiced, Trans. Edmonds,


Lyra Graeca I. The other epithets in this passage are also familiar in the
poets.
- http://www.theoi.com/Text/PhilostratusElder2A.html
(Translated by Powell)
Source:
P. Oxy. X (1914) 1231, fr. 56
P. Oxy. XXI (1951) add. p. 123

Lobel-Page 31 / Voigt 31 / Gallavotti 2 / Diehl 2 / Bergk 2

Cf. e.g. http://www.stoa.org/unicode/texts/sappho31.html


Wharton:

,
, -


,

,
'
, '
,
' ', ' .
,
,
, ' '
[].
, [ ].
STOA:

' ,

, '
,
' '
' ,
+,
' ,
' ' ', ' ,

,
, ' '
', .
/ stoa: ' ,
,
, ' '
' ' .
.
/ Augustana: , +
He seems to me equal to the gods that man
whoever he is who opposite you
sits and listens close
to your sweet speaking
and lovely laughing oh it
puts the heart in my chest on wings
for when I look at you, even a moment, no speaking

is left in me
no: tongue breaks and thin
fire is racing under skin
and in eyes no sight and drumming
fills ears
and cold sweat holds me and shaking
grips me all, greener than grass
I am and dead or almost
I seem to me.
But all is to be dared, because even a person of poverty
(Anne Carson, 2002)
Peer of the gods, the happiest man I seem
Sitting before thee, rapt at thy sight, hearing
Thy soft laughter and they voice most gentle,
Speaking so sweetly.
Then in my bosom my heart wildly flutters,
And, when on thee I gaze never so little,
Bereft am I of all power of utterance,
My tongue is useless.
There rushes at once through my flesh tingling fire,
My eyes are deprived of all power of vision,
My ears hear nothing by sounds of winds roaring,
And all is blackness.
Down courses in streams the sweat of emotion,
A dread trembling o'erwhelms me, paler than I
Than dried grass in autumn, and in my madness
Dead I seem almost.
(Cox)

(T1) I am paler than grass


(T2) I am greener than grass
(T3) I am more moist than grass
Sappho's Supra-Superlatives
(Also translated by Powell)
Note that Wikisource uses Lobel-Page 2 as the Greek text for
this, which is quite funny: underlines the numbering problems.

Lobel-Page 32 / Diehl 10 / Bergk 10 / Cox 10

augsburg.de prefaces with: ( )




Who gave me their gifts
and made me honoured.
(H. T. Wharton)
] they have honored me with
the gift of their works
(Powell)
Source:
Apollonius
Apollon. Dysc. de pron. 1, 113, 8 (Schneider)

Lobel-Page 33 / Diehl 9 / Bergk 9 / Cox 9

' , ' ,
[^ ^ -] .
This lot may I win,
golden-crowned Aphrodite.
(H. T. Wharton)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source:
Apollonius.
Apollon. Dysc. de synt. 2, 350, 4 (Uhlig)

Lobel-Page 34 / Voigt 34 / Diehl 4 (10?) / Bergk 3 / Cox 4

(Gallavotti 15)

,

[ ]
... ...

/ Cox:
,


The stars about the fair moon in their turn hide their bright
face when she at about her full lights up all earth with silver.
(H.T. Wharton)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Eustathius of Thessalonica in the twelfth century.
(Eustath. in Iliad. 729, 20 - augsburg.de)

Lobel-Page 35 / Diehl 7 / Bergk 6 / Cox 7

(Lobel-Page?)
...
(Cox)
Or Cyprus and Paphos, or Panormus [holds] thee.
(H. T. Wharton)
If thee, Cyprus or Paphos or Panormos [holds].
(Cox)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source:
Strabo, about 19 A.D.
Strabo, 1st century AD.
(Strabo 1, 2, 33 (p. 40) - augsburg.de)

Lobel-Page 36 / 20D

...
I miss and yearn after
(Powell)

Lobel-Page 37 / 14D / Wharton 17 / Cox 17

... ...
' '
.
According to my weeping: it and all care let buffeting winds
bear away.
(H. T. Wharton)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Etymologicum Magnum

Lobel-Page 38 / 9D

Lobel-Page 39 / 17D / Wharton 19 / Cox 19

...
, .
A broidered strap of fair Lydian work covered her feet.
(H. T. Wharton)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Scholiast on Aristophanes' Peace, 1174;
and also by Pollux, about 180 A.D.

Lobel-Page 40 / Diehl 8 / Bergk 7, 8 / Cox 8

'
and augsburg.de has:


..........
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cox:
'
...
...
But for thee will I [lead] to the altar [the offspring] of a
white goat ... and add a libation for thee.
(H. T. Wharton)
Source:
Apollon. Dysc. de pron. I p. 81, 24 ss. Schneider
Adduced by Apollonius of Alexandria, about 140 A.D

Lobel-Page 41 /12D / Wharton 14



To you, fair maids, my mind changes not.
(H.T. Wharton)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Apollonius

Lobel-Page 42 / Wharton 16 / Cox 16

[] ,
' ...
But their heart turned cold and they dropt their wings.
(H. T. Wharton)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Pindar, Pyth. i. 10

Lobel-Page 43 / 54D

]
]
]
][]
]
]
] []
] , ,
], .
(Translated by Powell)

Lobel-Page 44 / Voigt 44 / Diehl 5a,b? 55? / Bergk -

(Gallavotti 52)
[ .... ].
[ ][...]
[] []
[]
' []
[] '
' [][]

[]
[] [], ,
[] [][] .
[]
.
[]
, []
[] [],
[] [,
[] [
[] , [] [
[ ] [][
[ ][
[]
] [
[ ] [
][ ] [
[][.. ] [
[][ ][ ] [
[ ] [

[
[
[][][][

[
]
,
[.
...Cyprus...
...The herald Idaios came...a swift messenger
...and the rest of Asia...unwilting glory (kleos aphthiton).
Hektor and his companions led the dark-eyed
luxuriant Andromache from holy Thebes and...Plakia
in ships upon the salty sea. Many golden bracelets and purple
garments..., ornaments with many different patterns,
countless silver cups and ivory.
Thus he spoke. And his dear father quickly leapt up.
And the story went to his friends through the broad city.
Straightaway the Trojans joined mules to smooth-running carriages,
And the whole band of women and...maidens got on.
Separately, the daughters of Priam...
And the unmarried men led horses beneath the chariots
and greatly...charioteers...
[
[
[
...like the gods
...holy
set forth into Troy...
And the sweet song of the flute mixed...
And the sound of the castanets, and then the maidens
sang a sacred song
and a wondrous echo reached the heavens...
And everywhere through the streets...
Mixing bowls and cups...
And myrrh and cassia and frankincense were mingled.
And the older women wailed aloud.
And all the men gave forth a high-pitched song,
calling upon Paon [Apollo] the far-darter who is skilled in the lyre, to sing
of Hektor and Andromache, like to the gods [theoeikelois].
(Gregory Nagy and Casey Du)
Cf. http://www.uh.edu/~cldue/3307/sappho/sappho.html
the sweet sounding flute and cithara were mingled
and sound of castanets, sweetly the maidens sang
a holy song, and a marvelous echo reached the
sky ...
(Jennifer Goodall Powers, 1997)
(Also translated by Powell)

Lobel-Page 45

'

Lobel-Page 46 / 42D

'

(Translated by Powell)

Lobel-Page 47 / Voigt 47 / Diehl 50 / Bergk 42

'
, .
Eros d' etimaxe moi
frenas, s anemos kat' oros drusin empetn.
Now Eros shakes my soul,
a wind on the mountain falling on the oaks.
(H. T. Wharton)
(Gallavotti 113)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Maximus Tyrius, about 150 B.C.

Lobel-Page 48 / 48D

, , ,
.
(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 49 / Voigt 49 / Gallavotti 43 / Diehl 40, 41 / Bergk 33, 34

, , ....
.
-- Cf. Cox 31 - , , .
I loved thee Atthis, once long ago.
(Cox)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Hephaestion, about A.D. 150
-- Cf. Cox 32 - .
To me thou didst seem a small and ungraceful child.
(Cox)
Source: Plutarch and others.

Lobel-Page 50 / 49D

[],
.
Wer ein Schner ist, ist nur, so weit man ihn siehet, schn;
Wer auch gut ist, der wird unverweilt auch ein Schner sein.
(source)
<[bjoern]> literally it'd be more like:
Who is a beauty, is only in as far as he's seen, beautiful.
(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 51 / 46D

'
(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 52 / 47D / Cox 35

' '
/ .
With my two arms, I do not aspire to to touch the sky.
(Cox)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Herodian

Lobel-Page 53 / 57D / Bergk 65


(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 54 / 56D / Cox 61

' ...
/ Cox: []
.
Coming from heaven, clad in a purple mantle.
(Cox)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Pollux, 180 AD, (xlamu's)

Lobel-Page 55 / Voigt 55 / Diehl 58 / Bergk 68 / Cox 65



' '

'

'

/ Cox: ,
.

.
But thou shalt ever lie dead,
nor shall there be any remembrance of thee then or thereafter,
for thou hast not of the roses of Pieria;
but thou shalt wander obscure even in the house of Hades,
flitting among the shadowy dead.
(H. T. Wharton)
(Gallavotti 58)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Stobaeus, 500 AD. Plutarch too.

Lobel-Page 56 / 60D / Cox 66

'

/ Cox:
.
I think that no maiden shall ever see the sunlight,
who shall have thy wisdom.
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Chrysippius. Cf. Cox 65?

Lobel-Page 57 / 61D / Cox 67 / Bergk 70

' .....
' .....
' ;
/ Cox: ,

;
What rustic girl bewitches thee who knows not how
to draw her dress about her ankles?
(Cox)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Athenaeus, and others.

Lobel-Page 58 / West (2004) / Bergk 79?

, ,


,
, ,
.
;
.

,
,
, .
***
][]
]
] []
]
[] []



[]
[
[]
[]

***
In 2004 Michael Gronewald and Robert Daniel announced the
discovery of a fourth poem from a Papyrus from the University
of Cologne (Kln) in Germany.
In 2004, Michael Gronewald and Robert Daniel
announced that a dismantled cartonnage (plaster and fiber mummy
casing) which had been languishing in the archives of Cologne
University contained fragments of text corresponding to verses
gleaned from gravedigging excavations in the garbage dumps of
Oxyrhynchus (now Al Bahnasa, Egypt). The largest portion of the
reconstructed, nearly complete poem was copied early in the third
century BCE, making this the earliest manuscript of her work so far
known.
img
img2
[You for] the fragrant-blossomed Muses lovely gifts
[be zealous,] girls, [and the] clear melodious lyre:
[but my once tender] body old age now
[has seized;] my hairs turned [white] instead of dark;
my hearts grown heavy, my knees will not support me,
that once on a time were fleet for the dance as fawns.
This state I oft bemoan; but whats to do?
Not to grow old, being human, theres no way.
Tithonus once, the tale was, rose-armed Dawn,
love-smitten, carried off to the worlds end,
handsome and young then, yet in time grey age
oertook him, husband of immortal wife.
or...
[For you] the fragrant-blossomed Muses' lovely gifts
[be zealous] girls, [and the ] clear melodious lyre.
[but my once tender] body old age now
[has seized] my hair's turned [white] instead of dark.
My heart's grown heavy, my knees will not support me,
that once on a time were fleet for the dance as fawns.
This state I bemoan, but what's to do?
Not to grow old, being human, there's no way.
Tithonus once, the tale was, rose-armed Dawn
love smitten, carried him off to the world's end
handsome and young then, get in time grey age
o'ertook him, husband of immortal wife.

(Martin West)
Live for the gifts the fragrant-breasted Muses
send, for the clear, the singing, lyre, my children.
Old age freezes my body, once so lithe,
rinses the darkness from my hair, now white.
My hearts heavy, my knees no longer keep me
up through the dance they used to prance like fawns in.
Oh, I grumble about it, but for what?
Nothing can stop a persons growing old.
They say that Tithonus was swept away
in Dawns passionate, rose-flushed arms to live
forever, but he lost his looks, his youth,
failing husband of an immortal bride.
(Lachlan Mackinnon)
It is you who must pursue the violet-scented Muse with her gifts of beauty,
my young students, as well as continue to play a clear and melodious lyre.
I was lithesome once, but time and age have taken my body in their grasp,
and from glossy blackness my hair has been turned by them to brittle white.
Heavy my heart has become; my knees no longer can carry me; nor do I
dance as I did, in my once upon a time, as quick and supple as a fawn.
These things I bewail with every groaning breath, but what is there to do?
Agelessness is not a fate that comes to humans. Even, they say, the rosy arms
of goddess Dawn stretched to embrace handsome Tithonus. Madly
in love, she carried the virile young man all the way back to her home
at the edge of the world. Yet old age managed to get hold of him even there;
zealous, hoary-bearded Time finds even the bed partners of the immortals.
(Mary Maxwell)
Seek the gifts in the violet clad arms of the Muses.
Cultivate the excellence of the turtle shell harp.
For me its over, my once delicate skin has been blemished by
The sands of time; my hair ripen, brittle white from blazing dark.
Burdensome spirit, for my knees too heavy to bear,
That once would whirl me, dancing, like deer.
Often I mourn, howling but what can be done:
Nothing, immortal men are never born
And Tithonus, the tale holds, that rose-breasted Dawn
Love-smitten, carried off to the ends of the worlds,
Tithonus, alluring and youthful, still subdued into time
Despite sharing an eternity with amaranthine Dawn . . . .
(Jesus Kalergis)
(65aD / 58LP (P.Oxy.1787 fr.1 und 2))
(Also translated by Powell)
Source:
Papyrus from the University of Cologne.

Lobel-Page 59

][ ].[...].[
].[ . . .
][

Lobel-Page 60

[]
[ ] ' '
[].
[]
[]
[ ] [
[ ] [
[] [
[ ], '
[ ] [.]...
[ ][
...

Lobel-Page 61

...
.[
[

Lobel-Page 62

[
[
' [
[
[
[....]..[
' [
' .[
[
' [

[
' [

Lobel-Page 63? / Voigt 63

O Dream on your dark wings / [etc.]


(Powell)

Lobel-Page 64

(a)
...
[ ][
[]
[].[
[][
[]
[ ][
[ ]
[]
[]
[ ][
[].[
[] [
[ ]
[ ] [
[ ][
...
(b)
...
[].[
[][
[ ]..[
[ ][
...

Lobel-Page 65

O Sappho, I love you / [etc.]


(Powell)

Lobel-Page 66

(a)
. . .
[
' [
.][
. . .
(b)
. . .
[][
[.][
[][
[].[
5. . .
(c)
. . .
[] [
[].[
[ ][
. . .

Lobel-Page 67

(a)
. . .
..] .[
[]] ' .[
] .[
[] [
' [
' [
[.].[
.]' [
. . .
(b)
. . .
[ ].[
[ ].[
[][
[ ].[

[]' [
[]..[
[ ].[

Lobel-Page 68

(a)
[ ] ' .[
[] ' [
[ ]
[] [
5[ ][.].[
[ ][...]....[.]
[] [.].[
[ ] ..[
[][.....].[
10[][.]...[.] ' .[
[ ]' [] [
[ ].[..][...] [
. . .
(b)
. . .
[ ]....[
[ ].[.]' .[
[] .[
[ ][
5[]. [
[][
. . .

Lobel-Page 69

. . .
[]..[.][
[] [
[ ]' [
. . .

Lobel-Page 70

. . .
[ ]..[

[ ][
[ ] ' ' [
[ ][
[]' [
[]...[.][
[] [
[] ' [
[ ] [
10[] , [
[ ] .[
[ ] [
[][
[][.].[
15. . .

Lobel-Page 71

[ ]
[][....] '
[] ['] [
[] []', [
5[ ] [] .[
[ ] [
[ ], ' [
[] [][
. . .

Lobel-Page 72

. . .
[][
[][
[][
[][
[] [
[].[
[ ][
[].[
. . .

Lobel-Page 73

(a)

. . .
[ ].[.].[.]
[ ]
[ ] [
[] ' [
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]. [
[ ]
[] [
10. . .
(b)
. . .
[ ].[
[ ][
[]' [
. . .

Lobel-Page 74

(a)
. . .
[] [
[][
[].[
[][
5[ ].[
[][
. . .
(b)
. . .
[ ][
[][
[].[
. . .
(c)
. . .
[ ].[
[ ][
[]..[
[][
. . .
(d)
. . .
[].[.].[
[].[
[ ][

. . .

Lobel-Page 75

(a)
. . .
[ ]..[.].[
[ ].[
[ ].[
[][
[].[
[][
[][
[].[
. . .
(b)
. . .
[ ][
[].[
[ ][
[].[
[] [
. . .
(c)
. . .
[ ].[
[ ][
[ ]...[
[].[
[].[

Lobel-Page 76

. . .
[][
[] [
[][
[] [
[][
[] .[
[][
. . .

Lobel-Page 77

(a)
. . .
[ ].[
[ ][
[ ]..[
[][
[] [
[] [
[] ' [
[ ].[
[].[
(b)
. . .
[ ]. [
[ ][
[] [
[ ] [
[ ][
[ ].[
. . .
(c)
. . .
[ ][
[]
[]
[]
. . .

Lobel-Page 78

. . .
[].[
[] [
[ ] [
[]. ' [
[].[
[][
[][
. . .

Lobel-Page 79

. . .
[][
[][
[].[
[]' .[
[] [
[ ][
. . .

Lobel-Page 80

. . .
[ ].[
[ ]..[
[][
[] ' [
[ ][
[].[
. . .

Lobel-Page 81

And you, my Dika, [etc.]


(Powell)

Lobel-Page 81b / Voigt 81 / Gallavotti 71 / Diehl 80 / Bergk ...

Lobel-Page 82 / 80D / Cox 75

, , '
'

, ' .
Do thou, O Dica, set garlands upon thy lovely hair,
weaving sprigs of dill with thy delicate hands;
for those who wear fair blossoms may surely stand first,
even in the presence of Goddesses who look without

favour upon those who come ungarlanded.


(Cox)
Source: Athenaeus.
Lobel-Page 82a / 63D

Mnasidika is more well-shaped than soft Gurinna.
Sappho's Supra-Superlatives

Lobel-Page 91

Never yet, O rana, [etc.]


(Powell)

Lobel-Page 92

This version is from http://www.b3ta.cr3ation.co.uk/data/doc/safopoemas.doc


With some amendations to make it more like Carson's Greek text.
[
[
...
[.........][
[...][
[ ] ..[
[
[ ........],
[
[
[. ][
..
[...

[
[
augsburg.de:
............
............
[

[. . . . . . . . .][
[. . .][
[. .]
[
[. . . . . . .][.]
[
[
[.][
[
[[
[
[
***
This corresponds to Edmonds Frags. (1909) beta:
. . . Sappho, I swear, if thou come
not forth I will love thee no more. O rise
and shine upon us, and from thy bed set
free thy beloved strength, and then with
water by the bank, like the lily that dwells
in the marsh, hold aloof thy Chian robe
and wash thee. And Cles for thy adorning
shall cast down from thy press saffron smock
and purple robe. . . .
(Edmonds, 1909)
Carson's translation is very different!
robe
and
colored with saffron
purple robe
cloaks
crowns
beautiful
]
purple
rugs
(Carson, 2000, p.181)
Here's a version annotated with apparent Edmonds line correspondances:
[01] [
[02] [
[03] ...
[04] [.........][
[05] [...][

[06] [ ] ..[
[07] [
[08] [ ........],
[09] [
[10] [
[11] [. ][
[12] ..
[13] [...
[14]
[15] [
[16] [
I'm surprised at how much of Edmonds's text is missing.
E.g. [04] in Edmonds starts (flower, lily).
Source:
P. Berol. 9722 fol. 1 (BKT V, 2 p. 12)

Lobel-Page 94 / Voigt 94 / Diehl 96

. . . . . . . . .
,


,
, .


,
,
. . .






.






. . . .
,
. . . . . .
. . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . .
So my Atthis is not come back, and in
sooth I would I were dead. And yet she
wept full sore to leave me behind, and said,
'Alas! how sad our lot, Sappho; I swear
'tis all against my will I leave thee.' To
her I answered, 'Go thy way rejoicing and
remember me; for thou knowest how I
doted upon thee. And if thou rememberest
not, O then I am fain to remind thee of
what thou forgettest, how dear and beautiful
was the life we led together. For with many
a garland of violets and sweet roses mingled
thou hast decked thy flowing locks by my
side, and with many a woven necklet made
of a hundred blossoms thy dainty throat; and
with many a jar of myrrh both of the precious
and the royal hast thou anointed thy fair
young skin before me, and lying upon the
couch hast taken thy fill of dainty meats
and of sweet drinks. . . .'
(Edmonds, 1909)
(Gallavotti 78 / Bergk -)
This is given as "new" in Edmonds (1909) 1.
(Also translated by Powell)

Lobel-Page 95 / Diehl 97

[
[
.[
.[
.[
.[

.[
, .[
] [
] [
[
[[] [
.]. . .[
. .[
. . . And Gongyla [asked me '.....]
or what sign wilt thou show thy children?'
'Yea, I will tell you,' I answered; 'Hermes
came in unto me, and looking upon him I
said "O master, I am altogether undone.
For by the holy mistress I swear to thee, I
care nothing any more that I am exalted
unto prosperity, but a desire hath taken me
to die. I would fain have thee set me in
the dewy meadow wither aforetime thou
leddest Atreus' son Agamemnon. ..."'
(Edmonds, 1909)
]
]
Gongyla
surely a sign
for children mostly
came in [
I said, O master
I swear no
I take no pleasure
but a kind of yearning has hold of meto die
and to look upon the dewy lotus banks
of Acheron
(Anne Carson, 2000, p.189)

Was this inspiration for Pound's Papyrus?

Lobel, via Bolling (1926), supplies [.


(Also translated by Powell)

Lobel-Page 96 / Voigt 96 / Diehl 98

....
. . . . . . .
. . . .
. . . .
,

;


,


. . . .
or, augsburg.de:
....................
^ ^ ] [
^ ] [] .
[] []
<> , .
,
<>
,
.
, .

, <> .

[. .]. .
[] [. .]
[ . .] [. . . ] .
[][][ ] [.] [] [. .] [. . .]
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ][. . .] [. . . . . . . . . . . . ]
[.][. . . . . . . . . . . ]
[. . . . . . . . . . ]
[. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ]
[. . . .][. . . . . . . . . ]
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ][. .]
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ]
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ]
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ] []
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ] [ ^ ]
...................
...................
(Edmonds actually prints a bit more of this:

[
[
or so; and in Carson it goes on for a whole page more!
e.g. .
... .
)
Atthis, our loved Mnasidica dweels at faroff Sardis, but she often sends her thoughts
hither, thinking how once we used to love
in the days when she thought thee like a
glorious goddess, and loved thy song the
best. And now she shines among the dames
of Lydia as after sunset the rosy-fingered
moon beside the stars that are about her,
when she spreads her light o'er briny sea
and eke o'er flowery field, while the good
dew lies on the ground and the roses revive
and the dainty anthrysc and the honey-lotus
with all its blooms. And oftentime when
our beloved, wandering abroad, calls to mind
her gentle Atthis, the heart devours her

tender breast with the pain of longing; and


she cries aloud to us to come thither; and
what she says we know full well, thou and I,
for Night, the many-eared, calls it to us
across the dividing sea.
(J. M. Edmonds)
]Sardis
often turning her thoughts here
]
you like a goddess
and in your song most of all she rejoiced.
But now she is conspicuous among Lydian women
as sometimes at sunset
the rosyfingered moon
surpasses all the stars. And her light
stretches over salt sea
equally and flowerdeep fields.
And the beautiful dew is poured out
and roses bloom and frail
chervil and flowering sweetclover.
But she goes back and forth remembering
gentle Atthis and in longing
she bites her tender mind
***
But to go there
]much
talks[
Not easy for us
to equal goddesses in lovely form
etc.
(Carson, 2000, pp.1903)
= rosy-fingered moon
= many-eared night
= calls across the sea
in Carson, is talks
she has for , and is missing
Carey (1978) gives some intepretation on this.
(Gallavotti 80 / Bergk - / Edmonds (1909) 2)
(Also translated by Powell)

Source:
a sixth century parchment (P. Berol. 9722)
P. Berol. 9722 fol. 5 (BKT V, 2 p. 16 s.)

Lobel-Page 98 / Diehl 98a, 98b

img 1
img 2
...................
...................
[. . ]. [
[] [
[] []
[] [
[] . [ ^ ]
[] [] []
[][] [] []
[] [
[]
[] [] [ ^ ^ ]
[
]
[^^^^^^^]
, ,

[]; [][]
[. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ].[. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ]
++ []
[.] . . .[
[]
+ +
[] []
***
[/]
has hair more yellow than a torch
. . . she who bore me [said?]
to those in her prime [it was] greatly
fitting, if someone had hair
wrapped in a purple headband, . . .

but [for her] with hair more yellow than a torch,


[it is preferable to have] crowns of flowers in bloom.
For you, Kleis, I have no place
from which a coloured headband will come . . .
Sappho's Supra-Superlatives
(Also translated by Powell)
Source:
(a) vv. 1-12: P. Hauniens. (Papyrus Hauniensis)
(b) vv. 14-22: P. Mediol., ed. Vogliano, Mediol. 1942

Lobel-Page 100 / Diehl 85 / Cox 86

[ . . ] [] . (Lobel-Page)
. (Cox)
She wrapped herself well in gossamer garments.
(Cox)
Source:
Pollux.
Pollux VII 73 (II p. 73 Bethe)

101LP/99D

'

Lobel-Page 102 / Voigt 102 / Diehl 114 / Bergk 90

,
'
Sweet Mother, I cannot weave my web, broken as I am
by longing for a boy, at soft Aphrodite's will.
(H. T. Wharton)
(Also translated by Powell)

(Gallavotti 83)

Lobel-Page 103 / (Treu S. 14-17)

][
] [
] [] [] [][
] [] [
] [
] [] [
] [] [
] [ ] [
]' [][
] []
], [
] <> [
] [][] [
]....[] [ ]
] [
] [
]<>
[ ] [
[]
[ ][][
augsburg.de:
] . [
] . [
] . () [
] . [.] [
] . [
] [][
] . [] [
] . . [ ] [
] . [ . ] [ . . .] . [
] []
], [
] . [
] . . <>[]

] () [ ]
]
[
]
[
]
] [

translation in Spanish:
....................
....................
. . . .porque habla
. . . .a la novia de hermosos pies
. . . .hija del Cronida, a la cubierta de violetas . . .
. . . .que enfurece dispuesta, cubierta de violetas
. . . .las sagradas Gracias y las Musas de Pieria
. . . .cuando canta, el alma
. . . .oyendo el sonoro canto
. . . .al novio, pues desdea
. . . .teme, dejando la lira
. . . .la Aurora, de sandalias de oro.
(Carlos Montemayor)
which automatically translates to:
because it speaks
to the fiance of beautiful feet
daughter of the Cronida, to the cover of violets
that it infuriates arranged, covered with violets
[sagradas] thanks and the [Musas de Pieria]
when it sings, the soul
[oyendo] the sonorous song
to the fianc, because it scorns
it fears, leaving the [lira]
the Aurora, of gold sandals
Source: P. Oxy. 2294.

Lobel-Page 104a / Voigt 104a / Diehl 120 / Bergk 95 / Cox 92

, , ' ,
, , .
/ Cox: , , ,
, , .
Evening, thou that bringst all that bright morning scattered,
thou bringst the sheep, the goat, and the child back to its mother.
(Cox)
(Gallavotti 84)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Etymologicum Magnum.

Lobel-Page 104b / Cox 120?


the most beautiful of all the stars
(Carlos Montemayor, ed., 1986, translated automatically)
-- Cf. Cox 120? -Himerius, apparently quoting, says "Thou are the evening star, of all
stars the fairest I think," and he says that the line comes from Sappho's
song to Hesperus. Again, he says, quoting: "Now thou didst appear like
that fairest of all stars; for the Athenians call thee, Hesperus."
(Also translated by Powell)

Lobel-Page 105a / Voigt 105a / Diehl 116 / Bergk 93 / Cox 90

/ ' ,
' , / ,
', ' ' /
Cox:

,
, .
As the sweet apple blushes on the end of the bough,
the very end of the bough which gatherers missed,
nay, missed not, but could not reach.
(Cox)
(Gallavotti 85)
Source:
Scholiast on Hermogenes and elsewhere
(Also translated by Powell)

Lobel-Page 105b

. . .

- fairfield.edu (SAPPHUS CARMINA SELECTA)
. [...]

- Elena Pallantza's dissertation

Lobel-Page 105c / Voigt 105b / Diehl 117 / Bergk 93 / Cox 91



,
...
[.]
/ Cox: .
, .
As on the hills the shepherds trample the larkspur (?)
under foot and the flower lies empurpling in decay on the ground.
(Cox)
(Gallavotti 85)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Demetrius.

Lobel-Page 106 / 115D

, '
(Powell has a translation)

107LP/53D / Cox 99

' ;

/ Cox: ;
Do I still long for maidenhood?
(Also translated in Powell)
Source: Apollonius.

Lobel-Page 108 / 116aD

,
(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 109 / 122d

,
(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 110a / Voigt 110 / Diehl 124 / Bergk 98

,
...
(Gallavotti 90)

Lobel-Page 110b / Diehl 124

....
,
'
(Powell has a translation, as LP 110)

Lobel-Page 111 / 123D / Cox 88


.
,
<>
.
Raise high the roof beams, Workmen!
Hymenaeus!
Like Ares comes the bridgroom!
Hymenaeus!
Taller than all tall men!
Hymenaeus!
(Cox)
Up with the roof,
Hymenaon!
Seize it, carpenters,
Hymenaon!
The bridegroom is coming, equal to Ares,
far bigger than a big man
Sappho's Supra-Superlatives
Source: Hephaestion.
(Also translated by Powell)
Cf. Kirk (1963), who gives some interpretation of this.

Lobel-Page 112 / 128D

,
', ...
, ' <, ,>
', ' '
......... ' ' .
-- Cf. Cox 96 - , ,
, .
Happy bridegroom! Now has come thy wedding as thou wished,
and thou hast the maiden of thy desire.

(Cox)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Hepaestion

Lobel-Page 113 / 130D


(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 114 / 131D / Cox 104

[]. , , ;
[]. , .
/ Cox: A. , , ;
B. , .
Maidenhood, maidenhood, whither art thou gone from me?
Never, O, never again, shall I return to thee.
(Cox)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Demetrius.

Lobel-Page 115 / 127D

', , ;
' .
(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 116 / 128D

, , , , ..
(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 117 / 129D

, '

Lobel-Page 118 /103D

<,> ,

(Powell has a translation of Voigt 118)

119LP/153D / Cox 110


/ Cox: .
A napkin dripping.
Source: Scholiast on the Plutus of Aristophanes.

120LP/108D / Cox 69


, ' ' ...
/ Cox:
, .
I am not of a malign nature but have a calm temper.
(Cox)
(Powell also has a translation)

Source: Etymologicum Magnum

Lobel-Page 121 / 100D

'

' ...
(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 122 / 111D

' '
(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 123 / 15D / Cox 18


/ ' .
Me just now the golden-sandalled Dawn ...
(H. T. Wharton)
(Powell also has a translation)
Source:
Ammonius of Alexandria, at the close of the fourth century A.D.

124LP/155D

Lobel-Page 125LP / 101D


(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 126 / 134D


(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 127 / 154D

...
(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 128 / 90D


(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 129 / 146D,18D

.... ' ...


' ...
-- Cf. Wharton 21 / Cox 21 -... '
... Me thou forgettest.
(H. T. Wharton)

Source: Apollonius
-- Cf. Wharton 22 - '
[] .
Or lovest another more than me.
(H. T. Wharton)
(Also translated by Powell)

Lobel-Page 130 / Diehl 137 / Voigt 130 / Bergk 40

' ,

....
Eros, again now, the loosener of limbs troubles me,
Bittersweet, uncontrollable creature
(A.S. Kline, via Moreno, Greek and Latin Amatory Motifs in owyn's ...)
= sweetbitter, according to Bonnie MacLachlan (1989)
= creature who crawls (a creepling!)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: The four lines are consecutive in MS S ADI of Hephaestion.

Lobel-Page 131 / Diehl 137 / Voigt 130 / Bergk 41

, '
, '
/ Voigt: , ' []
But to you, Atthis, the thought of me is hateful
You flit to Andromeda.
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: The four lines are consecutive in MS S ADI of Hephaestion.

132LP/152D / Cox 82


,
' ...
I have a fair daughter with a form
like golden flowers, Cleis the belovedest
whom I cherish more than all Lydia or lovely [Lesbos].
(Cox)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Hephaestion.

Lobel-Page 133 / 144a,bD

...
, ...
<>;
(Also translated by Powell, as LP 133 a & b)

Lobel-Page 134 / 87D

...
(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 135 / 86D

, , ...;
(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 136 / Diehl 121 / Cox 37

(Lobel-Page)
. (Cox)
The messager of spring, the sweet voiced nighingale.
(Cox)
Sappho calls the nightingale, in Ben Jonson's paraphrase,
'the dear good angel of the spring'
( )
- http://icarus.umkc.edu/sandbox/perseus/shore.hor_eng/page.0.a.php
(The Sad Shepherd, Act ii.)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source:
Scholiast on the Electra of Sophocles, 149
Schol. Soph. El. 149 (p. 110 Papageorg.)

Lobel-Page 137 / 149D

' ,
...............
'
' ' ,
' '
-- Cf. Cox 26 - ,
,

.
Hadst thou wished for things good or noble
and had not thy tongue formed evil speech,
shame would not have shown from they eyes,
but thou hadst spoken frankly about it.
(Cox)
(Also translated by Powell)

Lobel-Page 138 / 151D


' '
(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 140? / Bergk 62? / Voigt 140? / Cox 59

, , ,
.
Gentle Adonis is dying, O Cythera, what shall we do?
Beat your breasts, O maidens, and rend your garments.
(Cox)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Hephaestion
Cf. 140aLP/107D
[], ', ;
Cf. 140(b?)LP/107D
, , .

Lobel-Page 141 / 135D,136D / Cox 47

'
'
' ' .
'
'

.
/ ,
.


.
And there the bowl of ambrosia was mixed

and Hermes took the ladle to pour out for the gods;
and then all held goblets and made libation,
and wished good fortune to the bridegroom.
(Cox)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Athenaeus, in two fragments, joined by Lachmann

Lobel-Page 142 / Cox 29


Lato and Niobe were most dear friends.
(Cox)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Athenaeus.

Lobel-Page 143 / 118D

' '
(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 144 / 19D

(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 145 / 113D / Cox 108


/ Cox: .
Stir not the pebbles.
(Cox)
Source: Scholiast on Apollonius Rhodius.

Lobel-Page 146 / 52D / Cox 107


/ Cox: .
Neither honey nor bee for me.
(Cox)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Various.

Lobel-Page 147 / Cox 30


I think men will remember us even hereafter.
(Cox)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Dio Chrysostom, writing about A.D. 100.

Lobel-Page 148 / 92D


'
(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 149 / 125D


(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 150 / 109D


' '
(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 151 / 106D

...
(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 152 / 142D / Wharton 20 / Cox 20


/ - .
Shot with a thousand hues.
(H. T. Wharton)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Scholiast on Apollonius of Rhodes, i. 727

Lobel-Page 153 / 91D


(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 154 / 88D / Cox 49

'
'
/ Cox:
.
The moon rose full, and as around an altar,
stood the women.
(Cox)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Hephaestion

Lobel-Page 155 / 150D


(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 156 / 138D / Cox 115

...
...
Than the lyre, far sweeter in tone, than gold, more golden.
(Cox)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source: Demetrius.

Lobel-Page 157 / 16D (cf. 6LP)


Mistress Dawn
(Powell)

Lobel-Page 158 / 126D / Cox 25



/ Cox:
.
When anger spreads through the breast
keep thy tongue from barking foolishly (or idly).
(Cox)
(Also translated by Powell)

Lobel-Page 159 / 110D

...
(Powell has a translation)

Lobel-Page 160 / Diehl 11 / Cox 11


.
or, from augsburg.de:
^ ^
.
This will I now sing deftly

to please my girlfriends.
(H.T. Wharton)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source:
Athenaeus.
Athen. 13, 571d

161LP/130aD

[] []

Lobel-Page 162 / 156aD

[];
(Powell has a translation)

163LP/147D

164LP/112D

Lobel-Page 165 / Diehl 3
[...]
Source: Apollon. Dysc. de pron. 1, 82, 17 (Schneider)

Lobel-Page 166 / Diehl 105 / Bergk 56



Wharton:

[' ]

.
Leda they say once found an egg hidden
under hyacinth-blossoms.
(H. T. Wharton)
(Also translated by Powell)
Source:
Etymologicum Magnum, Athenaeus, and others.

167LP/139D

or wiw polu etc.
far whiter than an egg
Sappho's Supra-Superlatives
168LP

(Powell has Voigt 168B and 168C)
169LP

170LP

171LP

172LP

173LP
[, ]
174LP
[]
175LP

176LP

. . .
177LP

178LP

179LP

180LP

181LP

182LP

183LP
s.
184LP

185LP

186LP

187LP

Lobel-Page 188

(Powell has a translation)

189LP

190LP

191LP

192LP

210LP

211LP

213LP / (M.Treu S.10)


...
[ ][][
[] ' [ [] []
[]
[ ] [] [] [][ ] [ ] []
[] [][]
[ ][] [- ][ ]
[ ]
...

Lobel-Page i.a. 16 / Diehl 93 / Cox 50

Cox:


.

augsburg.de:


.
Thus sometimes, the Cretan women, tender footed,
dance in measure round the fair altar,
crushing the fine bloom of the grass.
(Cox)
Source:
Hephaestion
vv. 1-2: Hephaest. Ench. 11, 3 (p. 35 Consbruch)
v. 3: Hephaest. Ench. 11, 5 (p. 36 Consbruch)

Diehl 94 / Voigt 168b / Cox 48



, ,

Cox:

,
,
.
augsburg.de:


,
.
The sinking moon has left the sky,
The Pleiades have also gone.
Midnight comesand goes, the hours fly
And solitary still, I lie.
(Cox)
(Fragm. adesp. 976 Page)
Source:
Hephaestion
Hephaest. Ench. 11, 5 (p. 36 Consbruch)

157D/A.P.6,269 / Cox 112

, ' , ,

"
,
,
."
Maidens, although I am dumb, yet thus I speak,
if any ask and place at your feet one with an untiring voice:
To Aethopia the daughter of Leto was I consecrated by Arista,
daugther of Hermocleides Saonaiades, thy servent,
O queen of women; whom mayest thou bless
and deign to glorify our house.
(Cox)
Source: Greek Anthology.

158D/A.P.7,489
,
,

.

159D/A.P.7,505

, .

Wharton 12 / Cox 12

{
[] []



[]
[]
[ ]


}

, ....
For they whom I benefit injure me most.
(H.T. Wharton)
Source: Etymologicum Magnum

Bergk 15

'
.
.

[ ]
And this I feel in myself.
(H.T. Wharton)
Source: Apollonius

Bergk 23

.
Ye are nought to me.
(H. T. Wharton)
Source: Apollonius

Bergk 24

' .

While ye will.
(H. T. Wharton)
Source: Apollonius

Lobel-Page i.a. 5,2 / Diehl 45 / Cox 33

++ <> (Lobel-Page)
. (Cox)
Foolish woman! Have no pride about a ring.
(Cox)
Source:
Herodian about A.D. 160.
Herodian. p. mon. lex. II 932, 23 ss. Lentz

Lobel-Page (Alcaeus) 304 / Cox 93 / Diehl 102 / Campbell 44a

.
Ever shall I be a maid.
(Cox)
Apparently from a poem by Alcaeus:
[ ], (= D. 102)
[ ]
(something about high on the mountains?)
Source:
Paris manuscript, ed. Cramer.
P. Fuad nr. 239 (Lobel-Page, Class. Quart. 46, 1952, 1-3)

Tables
???
Ca. Ba. Po. LP

Diehl

Book Bergk

Cox

Other

Y
Y
Y
Y

Y Y 1
Y Y 2
Y
3
Y
4

1
5, 6
23
24

A
A
A
A

Y Y Y 5

25

Y Y
Y Y
Y
Y Y

16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
26
27 a, b
28
29
30
31
32
33, 36
35

A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A

Y Y Y 24

34

Y Y
25
Y Y Y 26
Y Y Y 27
28

37
38
-

A
A
A
A

29

30
31
32
33
34
35
36

39
2
10
9
4
7
20

A
A
A
A
A
A
A

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y

Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y Y

6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23

1
4, 5

1
5, 6

Voigt 1
Voigt 2

Voigt 5, Gallavotti 23, Barnstone


incerta

3, 13

Voigt 15 a, b
Voigt 16, Barnstone incerta
Barnstone incerta

LP 24 a = Voigt 24 a, b = c, c = d
(P uses V too)
Barnstone incerta
12, 15
Barnstone incerta
LP 29.2 = V A, 29.5 = B, 29.6a =
C, 29.24 = H
2
10
9
3
6

2
10
9
4
7
24

Voigt 31, Gallavotti 2

Voigt 34

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y 37
38
Y 39
40
Y 41
Y 42
Y 43

14
19
17
8
12
13
54

A
A
A
A
A
A
B

Y Y Y 44

55 a, b

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

44
42
50
48
40, 41
49
46
47
57
56
58
60
61
65a
65b
84

B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
C
C
C
C
C
D
D
D

66
67

D
D

68

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y

69
71

D
D

76
70

D
D

74

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y Y
Y Y

Y
Y

Y Y

45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73

7, 8

17

Wharton 17

19
8
14
16

Wharton 19
Barnstone incerta
Wharton 14
Wharton 16
Voigt 44; @@ 44 Aa, Ab; @@ P
& B too

23 b
42

Voigt 47
[@@ extra line not in Carson]
Voigt 49, Gallavotti 43

33, 34

Schumann?
35
65
68
70
79?

61
65
66
67
West (2004)

Powell uses Voigt

Voigt 67 a, not b
Voigt 67 a, not b

Voigt 73 a

Y Y

74
75
Y Y
76
77
Y Y
78
79
Y
80
Y Y Y 81
Y Y
82
Y
83
Y Y
84
Y Y
85
Y Y
86

75
79
73

D
D
D

77b
80
63
81
82
83

D
D
D
D
D
D

Y Y

87

77a

Y Y

64
95

D
E

96
97
98?

E
E
E

Y Y
Y Y
Y Y Y

88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102

98 a, b?
85

E
E
E
E
G

Y Y

103

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y Y
Y
Y Y
Y Y
Y Y

Y Y Y

114

120

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

116, 117
115
53
116 a
122?

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

105
106
107
108
109

Voigt 87 a [@@ b-f]; Barnstone e,


f
Voigt 88 a, b; Barnstone a, b

Voigt 98 a, b; Barnstone a, b
86
90
(Treu S. 14-17), Voigt Aa and Ab,
B, Ca, Cb
95

I
I
B
I

Voigt 82 a, Barnstone a

Voigt 85 b

Y Y Y 104
Y
Y
Y
Y

75

93

92,
120?
90, 91
99

LP 105 a, c = Voigt A, B

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y Y Y
Y Y Y

110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147

124
123
128
130
131
127
128
129
103
153
108
100
111
15
101
134
154
90
18, 146
137
137
152
144 a, b
87
86
121
149
151

98
88

104

E
110
69

E
E
E
A

18

E
A

21, 22
40
41
82

E
E
37
26
27
E
I
I

59?
47
29
28

E
B
C

108
107
30

135, 136
118
19
113
52

Voigt has a, b too


Powell uses Voigt

62?

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
Y 162
163
164
165
Y Y 166
Y
167

Y Y Y 168
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184

92
125
109
106
142
91
88
150
138
16
126
110
11

E
E
E
20
E
E

Wharton 20

49
115
25

E
A

Cf. LP 6
Barnstone has a Diehl number too
Barnstone has a Diehl number too

11

156 a

105

E
A
E
A

56
Voigt has A, B, C; Powell uses
Voigt 168 B, C
Voigt has A

Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y

185
186
187
Y 188
189
190
191
192
Y
201
Y
204
Y
214
Y Y 5 i.a.

Y
Y Y
Y

Y Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Extra:
[none]
(Carson)

11
i.a.
13
i.a.
16
i.a.
18
i.a.
21
i.a.
23
i.a.
24
i.a.
25
i.a.
26
i.a.
27
i.a.
-

Voigt 103c
LP 5.2 = D 45, 141, B 5a; 5.3 = D
140; B 5.c = P 5.4

45, 140,
141
62

Barnstone incerts this at 40


93

50?
Barnstone has b, c

148
145
132 a, b

107,
108

51
Voigt 103b
Treu, D. fr. mel. adesp. 1a
158
159
-

EG, Sappho II

Incert. 5 a, b, c
Incert. 16
Incert 18 b, c
Incert. 25
Incert. 27 (I)
Incert. 40 (13)
Diehl 158
Diehl 159
(Barnstone)
Incertum 5.3
Incertum 5.4
Incertum 16 a & b
Incertum 23
Incertum 25
EG, Sappho II
(Powell)
Barnstone 5.c = Powell 5.4
Barnstone 16 = Powell 16 a, b
Barnstone 25 = Powell 25

Sources
Some of the sources consulted include:

http://www.sacred-texts.com/cla/usappho/index.htm
http://www.hsaugsburg.de/~Harsch/graeca/Chronologia/S_ante06/Sappho/sap_me01.html
http://faculty.fairfield.edu/rosivach/gr327/sappho.htm
Eva-Maria Voigt, Sappho et Alcaeus: Fragmenta (Amsterdam, Athenaeum-Polak
and Van Gennep, 1971)
http://216.239.59.104/search?q=cache:cGqVjQ4U9r8J:classicaljournal.org/Numero
rum%2520Tabulae%2520for%2520Campbell.xls

Other things:

http://home.infionline.net/~ddisse/sappho.html
http://www.baymoon.com/~ariadne/poets/sappho.htm

Sean B. Palmer