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Running head: VIDEO # 2: LESSON PLAN, VIDEO, AND ANALYSIS

Analysis of a Kindergarten Video Math Lesson

This is my reflective analysis of a lesson taught to


a kindergarten class ranging in age from five to six years
old on Write More Subtraction Sentences CC.K.OA.2.
As a prerequisite to the lesson the student would have to
have a basic understanding of counting. Further, they
would need a basic understanding of what it means to take from or take apart two numbers.
Lesson Planning:
Reflecting on my planning and preparation for this subtraction lesson, I see that I was
able to follow the state standards to write a developmentally appropriate lesson for my
kindergarten students. Since I have worked with this group of students for eleven weeks, when
planning and preparing for my lesson I was able to incorporate knowledge of my students into
planning on how best to put together a hands on lesson plan that would keep my entire class
focused on learning. Further, with the knowledge gained from formative assessment data
gathered from teaching this lesson previously I was able to tailor a lesson that all my students
would be able to participate in through differentiating the lesson to include subtracting numbers
within five or greater than ten. I also recognized the need to change the worksheet because it
was not user friendly to the children due to the colors on the sheet causing some of the problems
to be unreadable. This is important because I realized this factor caused the children to be unable
to determine what they were to subtract. Also, differentiated instruction by giving the students
that finished early working the problems to write subtraction problems on the back of their paper

Running head: VIDEO # 2: LESSON PLAN, VIDEO, AND ANALYSIS

to solve. Additionally, interdisciplinary connection was shown by integrating language art into
the lesson with the book Elevator Magic.
The content and standards for the lesson were: CC.K.OA.2 Understand addition as
putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction as taking apart or taking from. The
students also were to solve subtraction problems and subtract within 10, (e.g., by using objects or
drawings to represent the problem). The essential question the students were to understand was,
How can you solve subtraction problems and complete the equation?
Reflecting on the standards, prerequisites, and the essential question, I recognized that the
instructional objective would be an essential factor to the lesson outcome. This been said, my
instructional objective was for the student to understand how to solve subtraction word problems
within 10 and record the equation. My instructional procedure included incorporating
interdisciplinary connections in whole group with reading the book Elevator Magic. The
students were to understand from the reading how various number combinations could be made
from taking apart numbers one ten. The lesson was planned to provide hands on activities rich
with activities in whole and small group to foster the students learning potential.
Quality of Instructions:
The lesson objective was clearly stated
initially with the introduction to the lesson,
reading Elevator Magic. While reading the
book and after the video such questions were
asked while in whole group, (e.g., What was the
book Elevator Magic about? Who writes the

Running head: VIDEO # 2: LESSON PLAN, VIDEO, AND ANALYSIS

words in the story? Who draws the pictures to the story? What does it mean to subtract? Which
floor is 2 floors down from the 10th floor? If you go 3 floors down from the 8th floor, where will
you be? Which floor is 3 down from the 8th floor? Now we are on 5, what is one floor down
from 5? Were on 4, Dads on 1, how many is 4 1 floors down? Show me how you got your
answer.
While viewing the video I was able to see several instances where students asked a
question or made a statement and I didnt respond (e.g., Preston said he gave a thumbs down to a
question, I failed to ask him why he felt the answer was incorrect. Also, Jaycee called to my
attention that I was giving the answer to the question I was asking. Even thou I finally
acknowledged her, I would have acknowledged her sooner had I understood what she was trying
to tell me.) This been said, I realize I have to be more in tuned to my students responses and
reactions while teaching.
The students were engaged in the lesson through actively participating in hands on round
table discussion, working subtraction problems. Further, while interacting as a small group the
children understood they could use a variety of strategies to arrive at their answer from using
their fingers, mental math, cubes, a number line, and tallies. To keep the students engaged while
one student was answering the mathematical concept the other students worked the problem on
their individual worksheets. The lesson was differentiated with the children working ahead to
complete all the problems. Once the student completed his or her problems, the student was
allowed to write subtraction sentences on the back of his or her paper to complete.

Running head: VIDEO # 2: LESSON PLAN, VIDEO, AND ANALYSIS

Reviewing the lesson and analyzing the flow of the


lesson I see the fifteen minute center rotations as providing
enough time for the students to rotate through and complete the
instructions without losing
focus on the lesson. Even
though the other two centers
were supposedly designed to be student centered, there was an
adult at each center. With this been so, I understand the
opportunity this provided me with, to be able to focus on the
group of students at
my table and allow the teacher and TA to manage their
center. I also realize that this will not always be the
case, and that I will have to allow for the other centers
not having an adult present to provide assistance as
needed. With this been said, I realize I will have to
manage the classroom totally, with all that it entails.
This means I will have to move between the student

centered centers to get them started and follow up with


the students to ensure they are performing as they
should be. I will also be responsible for managing the
noise level to prevent any distraction to the other
groups.

Running head: VIDEO # 2: LESSON PLAN, VIDEO, AND ANALYSIS

Was my instructional outcome met? Did the students participate in the lesson? Were
they actively engaged? Did they understand the concept been taught? Yes, the video reflects
this happened. Even thou noise was blending over from the other centers, the artifacts shown
above reflects learning was taking place. The video reflects the students actively participating by
voluntarily taking turns answering questions. The shy students as well were asked if they wanted
to work a problem without any pressure to do so.
Classroom Management:
Even thou each center had an adult present for guided instruction
if needed and to supervise that center, there was still a lot of noise
in the room. As I viewed and reflected on the video I still cant
understand how I missed the level of noise in the room.
However, I dont feel this distracted from the students been
actively engaged in learning, however ongoing I will ensure I ask
all of the students to give me five. I recognize this as a
kindergarten class where the children are active and enjoy hands on activities. Hands on
activities allow for the students talking as they work. One center was designed for the students
to make numbers 1 10 out of play dough. The other center was designed to use water color to
make numbers 1 10. My center was designed to be an interactive group discussion on
subtracting number within 10 or greater. By saying this, even thou the students were active
during the lesson, they were still engaged. Based on my reflection of this lesson, ongoing and in
future lessons I realize the design of the room will play a big part on how noise blends into other
centers by the close proximity of the tables.

Running head: VIDEO # 2: LESSON PLAN, VIDEO, AND ANALYSIS

As an incentive to good classroom behavior, every Friday the students have an


opportunity to participate in a treasure box activity based on the number of Dojo points (15 or
greater) they receive during the week for class participation, their behavior, or for just being
caught doing something right. They can also have points taken away for their behavior or for not
participating in the lesson as applicable.
As to instructional routines to minimize interruptions, even thou several children had to
take a restroom break during the lesson, the interruptions that happened took place seemingly for
the other students. The children are familiar with their daily routine. A schedule is posted on the
class wall with a picture of the activity corresponding to the time and description of the activity
for the children to recognize, make the association, and understand their daily routine.
Professionalism:
Reflecting on my presentation I realize I was available for my students with the exception
of the two instances mentioned earlier under quality of instructions. I was observant to the
students that were not keeping up with the group, as well as I was able to bring them back on
course by showing them how to use cubes or their fingers to arrive at the solution for themselves,
as well as engage their mathematical thinking regarding how they arrived at their solution. At
the end of the lesson the students were given an assessment question to determine if they could
solve a subtraction problem individually. All of the students were able to do so.

Running head: VIDEO # 2: LESSON PLAN, VIDEO, AND ANALYSIS

Corresponding Teachers Analysis of the Lesson


Math lesson: Write More Subtraction Sentences CC.K.OA.2 - 11//19/2014
You did a great job reading the story. Students were struggling to pay attention but I
think that had more to do with the fact that they are about to get a vacation. You did a good job
trying to keep them engaged. Transition went smoothly and I loved the hands on activities you
chose for the small groups. I think adding in fun hands-on activities during math rotations really
helps the students stay focused. One table even incorporated fine motor skills through water
colors. Not only does this seem like a fun activity to them but it is also developmentally
appropriate.

I noticed that even at your center that you had fun activities for the students to

practice subtraction strategies. Overall I think the lesson went really well.
I feel the lesson went well with all of Danielsons Framework for Teaching met with
room for improvement in Classroom Management. This is so because I was able to learn from
previous lessons the importance of ensuring the proper supplies are available for the children to
complete their work (e.g., sharpened pencils with erasers) as well as the importance of finding
creative ways to keep the children fully engaged , and with presenting the instructions clearly.
All in all, I feel it was a good lesson even though the children were counting the days to
Thanksgiving break. I can see that as a good thing because counting allows the children to
practice math. Since continuous practice through repetition allows the children to improve their
mathematical skills, any form of mathematical thinking is supported. I also recognize the
children are learning and growing in their ability to understand and respond to the lesson
activities. Therefore, I have complete confidence in my ability to engage all my students in a
warm, safe, hands on, and informative learning environment, structured with the state standards

Running head: VIDEO # 2: LESSON PLAN, VIDEO, AND ANALYSIS

that will be differentiated and scaffolded as needed to meet my students diverse needs. My take
away from this lesson is to focus on students transitioning between centers and on my ability to
manage the noise level in my classroom while the students are in their centers while still
allowing the students to have fun while learning. This is important because if the students are
happily engaged in their activities they have a better chance of reaching their learning potential.