You are on page 1of 7

Douglas Liguori

Dr. Cynthia Kosso


History 205
Lesson Plan #2 Final
Finding Causality in World War I
Grade Level: 7th-8th Grades
This lesson plan is built to show students the causality behind World War I. Students will
retain academic knowledge by learning that a historical event can have complex multiple
causes that go beyond the famously known explanation.
Day(s): 1
Focus of This Lesson: The focus of this lesson is to show students the World War I had
multiple causes in addition to the trigger cause of Archduke Franz Ferdinands
assassination in Sarajevo. Students will learn that World War I had a complexity of
causes, which led to a global war. The lesson will focus on the roles of militarism,
imperialism, nationalism, and alliances, before the assassination of Archduke Franz
Ferdinand. Overall, the lesson will use the broad theme of causality and how multiple
factors contribute in shaping past events.
Enduring Understanding: Students will become immersed in why it is important to
realize how multiple factors make contributions to shape past events. Students will
conceptualize how militarism, imperialism, nationalism, and alliances help and in this
particular lesson, World War I. Students will no longer think that one sole event can
cause something so complex as World War I. Instead, students will understand that
complex historical events have various causes beyond the often famously known
explanation.
Essential Questions: What is historical causality? Why should we understand historical
causality? What can we do to think beyond one historical cause? How is World War I a
prime example for exemplifying causality?
Content Objectives: By the end of the lesson students will know the various causes of
World War I, will know how to develop an idea of understanding causality, and will
know that a historical event normally has multiple complex causes that play a critical role
in shaping the occasion.
Skill Objectives: By the end of the lesson, students will be proficient in using causality
when analyzing and interpreting history. Students when analyzing primary and secondary
sources will be able to develop multiple contributing causes that sparked a historical
event or occasion in history. Students will be able to properly decipher varying causes of
a historical event by going beyond the well-known cause.

Common Core CCR Standards:


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2
Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an
accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
Arizona Standards:
PO 7. Analyze cause and effect relationships between and among individuals and/or
historical events.
PO 5. Evaluate primary and secondary sources for:
1. Authors main points
2. Purpose and perspective
3. Facts vs. opinions
d. Different points of view on the same historical event (e.g., Geography Concept 6
geographical perspective can be different from economic perspective)
e. Credibility and validity
NCSS Theme/s x: IX. Global Connections:
The realities of global interdependence require understanding the increasingly important
and diverse global connections among world societies and the frequent tension between
national interests and global priorities. Students will need to be able to address such
international issues as health care, the environment, human rights, economic competition
and interdependence, age-old ethnic enmities, and political and military alliances. This
theme typically appears in units or courses dealing with geography, culture, and
economics, but may also draw upon the natural and physical sciences and the humanities.
DESCRIPTION OF WHAT YOU AS AN INSTRUCTOR NEED TO KNOW TO
TEACH THIS LESSON: In order to provide effective instruction, the instructor will
need a solid background on World War I content. Specifically, the instructor will need to
have a proficient background in understanding causality and the multiple causes of World
War I. Therefore, the teacher will need to know the contributing roles of militarism,
imperialism, alliances, and nationalism. The teacher will need to know the difference
between immediate causes and root causes for a historical event or time period.
ASSESSMENT/s: At the end of class, students will complete one small handout
answering short-answer questions based on causality, World War I causes, immediate
causes, and root causes.
Assessment: (5 questions) (20 points each) = 100 total points

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS: This lesson will involve the following instructional


materials: a whiteboard, a computer to show YouTube video, a PowerPoint presentation,
a small handout with questions, and a PowerPoint handout for IEP students.
USE OF TECHNOLOGY: The lesson will involve multiple technologies. A computer
will be needed to show a YouTube video on the causes of World War I. PowerPoint
software will be used to teach about causality and World War I immediate and root
causes. Students will be able to use their cellphones at the end of class to look up the
definition of historical causality. Students will appreciate and respect that they are
permitted to use their own cellular technology in the classroom setting.
USE OF INQUIRY: The lessons warm-up activity will include thoughtful
interpretation and critical investigation. Students will split into groups to discuss,
question, and examine the following questions: What is causality? What is an immediate
cause of World War I? What were roots causes of World War I? Do multiple factors
shape past events? During the lessons concluding activity, students will discuss how root
causes can be overlooked as emphasis is placed on immediate trigger causes.
ACCOMMODATIONS: To help students with IEP needs, the teacher will utilize a
coinciding handout directly from the PowerPoint presentation prearranged for IEP
students. This handout will be provided to aid IEP students who have difficulty taking
notes. A YouTube video describing the causes of World War I will also be provided for
visual learners.
VOCABULARY: Students will need to know the following vocabulary:
-

Root Cause
Immediate Cause
Militarism
Imperialism
Alliances
Triple Entente
Triple Alliance
Nationalism
Archduke Ferdinand
Causality

LESSON OUTLINE AND DESCRIPTION OF STRATEGIES: The lesson warm-up


will begin with students splitting into groups of 3. In their groups, students will discuss
and answer questions about World War I pertaining to its causality. These questions
include the following: What is causality? What is an immediate cause of World War I?
What were roots causes of World War I? Do multiple factors shape past events? Once
each group is finished discussing these questions, the teacher will begin a short opening
activity with a YouTube video lasting roughly 2 minutes 30 seconds. This video focuses
on the immediate trigger cause of World War I. The video will describe how the

assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria triggered the start of World War I.
Then, the lesson will move on to the main activity a PowerPoint on the root causes of
World War I. The PowerPoint will include militarism, imperialism, nationalism, and the
system of alliances as the root causes of World War I. Each root cause will have its own
slide describing why it was a root cause in starting the war. One slide will include a
primary source cartoon portraying nationalism. Another slide will include a website
showing primary source military photos to portray militarism as a vital cause of World
War I. Finally, the wrap-up activity will involve classroom discussion about the root
causes of World War I compared to the immediate trigger cause. The class will discuss
how history sometimes puts too much emphasis on the immediate causes, yet puts little
emphasis on the root causes. This discussion will tie into causality to show how a
historical event often has multiple contributing factors. Students will be able to use their
cellphones to look up any information about the causes of World War I during the
classroom discussion.
Link to Youtube video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCTIaiiGB4o
STEP-BY-STEP SEQUENCE OF DAILY PLAN: (Next Page)

Time

Activity

WarmUp
Activity
5-10
Minutes

In groups of 3, students will


complete a worksheet with
questions. In their groups, students
will discuss and answer questions
about World War I pertaining to its
causality. These questions include
the following: What is causality?
What is an immediate cause of
World War I? What were roots
causes of World War I? Do multiple
factors shape past events?

Students Learning
Tasks

Teachers Learning
Tasks

Students Will:

The Teacher Will:

- Discuss with their


peers the immediate
and long term causes
of World War I

-Setup the YouTube


video on Franz
Ferdinands
Assassination

- Answer the
questions on the
worksheet

- Go around to each
group to ensure
discussion is taking
place

- Give feedback from


what the students
already know

- Guide students
with IEP needs by
helping those read
and analyze the
worksheet questions
- Keep track of time
to make sure the
causality lesson on
World War I will be
fully covered

Opening Activity

Students Will:

Teacher Will:

3 Minutes

-Watch attentively
while taking notes on
the videos
information

-Play the YouTube


video for students to
view
- Answer and
questions about the
video
- The teacher will
explain the video in
a concise and brief
manner

A YouTube video called The Assassination of


Franz Ferdinand will be shown to the class.
This video covers the trigger cause of World
War I.

-Ask further
questions about the
trigger cause of
World War I

Students Will:

The Teacher Will:

- Take notes on what


the teacher is
describing from the
PowerPoint

- Provide
information from the
PowerPoint

Main Activity
12 Minutes
A PowerPoint on the causes of World War I.
This PowerPoint will describe the immediate
cause of Archduke Ferdinands Assassination in
Sarajevo, but will go into greater depth in
describing how militarism, imperialism,
alliances, and nationalism were root causes of
World War I. Each root cause will have its own
slide with detail. One slide will have a cartoon
primary source to show how nationalism played
a role as a root cause of WW1.

- Analyze the
PowerPoint

- Give background
information on the
root causes of World
War I

-Review the root


causes of World War
I
- Analyze the
Primary Source
cartoon portraying
nationalism

- Define and
describe militarism,
alliances,
imperialism, and
nationalism

- Ask questions at the


conclusion of the
PowerPoint

- Discuss causality
and how it applies in
World War I
-Handout a copy of
the PowerPoint to
students (IEP
students)
-Answer questions
on World War I and
the causality behind
it

Wrap-Up Activity

Students Will:

The Teacher Will:

5-10 Minutes

- Actively listen and


participate in the classroom
discussion

- Ask thoughtful questions about


causality and how it applies to
World War I

- Take turns raising their


hands before speaking

- Discuss with students to show


how there are multiple
contributing factors that cause a
particular historical event or time
period.

The wrap-up activity will


involve classroom
discussion and short
assessment about the root
causes of World War I
compared to its immediate
trigger cause. The class will
discuss how history
sometimes puts too much
emphasis on the immediate
causes, yet puts little
emphasis on the root
causes. This discussion will
tie into causality to show
how a historical event often
has multiple contributing
factors.

- Students will be able to


use their cellphones to look
up any information about
the causes of World War I
during the classroom
discussion.
- Complete a short causality
assessment on World War I

- Discuss that history involves


different interpretations with a
variety of causes.
- Discuss how there is no one
correct cause in history. History
involves interpretation and is
often not concrete