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Running head: CLINICAL PRACTICUM

Clinical Leadership Practicum Proposal


Lisa A Morrill
Ferris State University

CLINICAL PRACTICUM
Abstract
A clinical practicum is meant to enhance a students educational experiences. This clinical
leadership practicum proposal will be completed during fall of 2014 at Spectrum Health
Ludington Hospital. The preceptor will be Helen Johnson, RN, MSN, Chief Nursing Officer.
Goals and objectives towards the learning experience have been identified and outlined
throughout this proposal. Assessment tools have been developed to use both mid-semester
(formative) and at semester end (summative) to evaluate both student and preceptor. A detailed
resource list has been included for supplemental use throughout this practicum. During this
learning experience focus will be directed toward defined nursing standards to elevate the
students awareness and participation in activities toward recognized weaknesses.

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Clinical Leadership Practicum Proposal
A clinical leadership practicum by my personal definition would be; application of
knowledge gained through education to a setting or situation chosen for professional
development and involvement. According to Merriman Webster (2014) a practicum is usually
for the professions of teachers and clinicians to apply the knowledge they have learned in class,
working in the chosen area of study under supervision of a preceptor. This application could
include either or both an observational aspect or a hands on/experience portion. Standards and
objectives for an advance practice nurse can be found in literature developed by nursing
organizations, research articles, and even regulatory bodies. American Nurses Association
(ANA) has published a book, Nursing Administration: Scope and Standards of Practice which
summarizes suggested standards of practice and related competencies for a nursing
administrator. These standards published for a nursing administrator are not all inclusive
however; they provide a framework for assessment and growth in a nursing leader.
In my thoughts, this takes nursing back to grass roots of nursing education. It describes
the critical thinking process which is nurtured during formal and informal education yet could be
considered basic common sense to many. The following quote sums up this conceptual thought
in a very basic level of understanding, the nurse, drawing on a vast and expanding knowledge
base, is sensitive to gathering every cue, every sign, and every hunch, and reflects on the
meaning of these in each particular situation (Boykin & Schoenhofer, 1997, p. 98). Each stage
of the process requires use of reflection to assess, plan, implement and evaluate nursing care that
is developed, provided, and overseen.
Learning Plan

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While developing a learning plan, a reflection of my current level of competency was
performed using ANAs standards of practice. Assessment of my current needs and weakness
was somewhat difficult to achieve. While studying standards of nursing administration practice
it was hard to choose only four standards and measurement criteria that would enhance my
professional practice. There is always room to grow and learn with professional development,
could we ever be an expert? Many of these standards and criteria can be seen as interwoven and
comparable to each other however, the following four are ones that I felt would provide the most
benefit in my personal practice at this time:

Assessment
Identifies gaps and necessary mechanisms to address and resolve missing or insufficient
data, information, and knowledge resources (ANA, 2009, p. 25)

Health Promotion, Health Teaching and Education


Evaluates health information resources, such as the internet, within the area of practice
for accuracy, readability, and comprehensibility to help individuals, families, healthcare
providers, and others access quality health information (ANA, 2009, p.31)

Ethics
Demonstrates a commitment to practicing self-care, managing stress, and connecting with
self and others (ANA, 2009, p. 40)

Leadership
Promotes advancement of the profession through participation in professional
organizations (ANA, 2009, p. 43)
A learning plan was then developed to focus on the above four standards of practice with

corresponding objectives and resources to assist in fostering of growth during the leadership

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practicum. The plan was developed to use as a guide, outlining direction for the practicum, as
well as providing goals for completion. Please see Appendix A for formal learning plan.
Literature Review
During the fall clinical practicum I have identified two practice theories to help guide
my professional development. The nursing theory being used will be Carpers (1978) Four
Patterns of Knowing, and the non-nursing theory will be Transformational Leadership (Marshall,
2011). In addition, Standard 1; Assessment and Standard 15; Leadership will be two nursing
administrative standards I will focus on during time spent throughout the practicum and with my
preceptor (ANA, 2009). Using these standards, in addition to the theories listed above, I hope to
work towards meeting listed objectives within the proposal and learning plan. Following is a
brief literature review supporting these said theories and objectives.
To support the importance of using nursing theory to guide practice, Hatlevik (2011)
describes a correlational study of the relations of nursing students acquired reective skills,
practical skills and theoretical knowledge on their perception of coherence between theory and
practice (p.1). The research study summarizes, by using concepts of a nurses practical skill,
theory knowledge, and reflection will help to yield a greater understanding and coherence in
their fulfilment toward their educational objectives (Hatlevik, 2011). Although the study does
have its limitations it does show promise towards the support of using theory in nursing.
Carper (1978) has identified four patterns of knowing from the structure of nursing
knowledge and nursing practice. These four patterns are identified as 1. Empirics, the science
of nursing; 2. Esthetics, the art of nursing; 3. The component of a personal knowledge in
nursing; and 4. Ethics, the component of moral knowledge in nursing (Carper, 1978, p. 23).
According to Carper (1978), Each pattern may be conceived as necessary for achieving mastery

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in the discipline (p. 31). Using this theory outlines the necessary practice concepts nurses need
to provide in order to give whole nursing care. Not one of these four patterns of knowing can be
used exclusively when providing nursing care; they must be used in conjunction of each other.
Each of us will use them in different ways with changing emphasis for each individual patient or
situation. Carper, (1978) indicates that connections occur with each piece of knowledge learned
and further can be applied to our nursing practice.
Marshall, (2013) describes the Transformational Leadership theory as one that is used to
develop followers and supporters and to build leaders into change agents. In todays complex
healthcare environment, care providers are being challenged to increase the quality of care that
they provide. Frederickson & Nickitas (2011), indicate transformational leaders will learn to
lead with evidence, providing for development of higher quality and improvements in healthcare
delivery. Nursing and transformational leadership literature has shown support toward
transforming healthcare compared to past leadership characteristic of managing change
(Luzinski, 2011). A transformational leader should continually attempt to grow and assess their
practice for behaviors which will provide support, understanding, motivation and collaboration
with the patient and healthcare team. Encompassing the use of Carpers nursing theory by
adding knowledge and evidence to everyday practice; and transformational leadership concepts
by using reflection to grow followers and act as a change agent, I chose to focus on two of the
identified four nursing standards identified as my weaker areas of performance.
Assessment of weak links and work toward eliminating the potential for errors and harm
is the scope I hope to strengthen during my practicum. Involvement with quality programs, error
investigation, development, and implementation of innovative solutions are several of the
objectives which I have established and hope to accomplish. Several of the listed competencies

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of Standard 1, Assessment focus on increasing quality of care provided to healthcare consumers
by striving to recognize potential gaps in process and collaborating with others on the
interdisciplinary team to eliminate identified gaps by creating change in beliefs and processes
(ANA, 2009). In one article it is indicated, a nurse specifically a Registered Nurse is an
excellent choice to take lead in a quality program (Bakerjian & Zisberg, 2013). In addition to
using a nurse, using evidenced based guidelines, a strong administrative support and
collaboration with other members of the healthcare team will elevate levels of success for such a
program (Bakerjian & Zisberg, 2013). A nursing leader should be vigilant at assessing the
surroundings of their practice and working towards providing the highest quality of care to the
population they serve. Questions should continually be asked, how can we do this better, how
can we obtain excellence, how can we prevent a patient from being harmed? I would like to
develop a higher level of competency towards using the skill of assessment to create
opportunities and process changes focused on safer, higher quality of care.
The second competency objective identified for growth is Standard 15 of the ANA
nursing administrator standards; leadership (ANA, 2009). An abundance of literature can be
found on the topic of nursing leadership. Commonalities of professional characteristics in the
advance practice nurse have been identified for the nurse leader. Rao and Rich, (2012) identify
one function of a nursing leader would be to represent the profession, to be an ambassador both
locally as well as globally. Nurses have continual opportunities to make positive impact toward
the nursing profession by acting as advocates toward professional development (Tomajan, 2012).
Supporting nursing as a profession is important to developing a stronger more vocal group who
can actively speak and support needed change in a complex healthcare environment. Nurses
need to become involved and educated in chaotic environments we serve in order to help make a

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difference, have a part in developing solutions, and acting as strong change agents. I hope
through my clinical practicum I can witness nursing at a higher level of professional practice and
find solutions to improve process as well as assist in leading effective change management.
One additional area of self-development that deserves mention from my project plan is
the area of ethics and self-care. I personally feel that this can be evaluated along with an
evaluation of ethical behaviors and moral knowledge (Carper, 1978). According to Marshall,
(2011) one most know themselves as a spiritual being to be able to discover themselves, you
must inspire and model yourself. Marshall, (2011) goes on to say, When you find your spiritual
center, you will be amazed at your abilities to positively influence others (p.70). When one
cares about themselves, as well as caring for everyone as a whole, the positivity will influence
positive reactions. Iacona (2010) indicates that it is imperative to create a balance with yourself
in order to be committed to provide whole nursing care to others. These concepts will be
invaluable while working to increase my professional practice as well as striving to provide the
highest quality of care to all healthcare consumers.
Setting
The setting/organization that will be used for this practicum experience will be Spectrum
Health Ludington Hospital (SHLH) formally known as Memorial Medical Center (MMC). It is
an 87 bed acute care rural hospital in Ludington, Michigan. The hospital offers; an emergency
room, surgery department, inpatient nursing unit, obstetrics, critical care, and an inpatient
psychiatric unit along with traditional outpatient services. This hospital has recently gone
through integration to become part of the Spectrum Health System within the last year. As a
standalone entity it provides healthcare services primarily to Mason, Oceana, and Lake Counties.
There are approximately 600 employees working at SHLH at any given time. SHLH is one of the

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top five employers in Mason County; all other businesses ranked in the top five are industrial in
nature. The focus of my Masters program is toward administrative tract; SHLH supports an
organizational chart that allows for several levels of management opportunities. During this
practicum I will be working with the highest nursing administrative position within the
organization, the Chief Nursing Officer.
Preceptor
The preceptor who I have chosen to collaborate with for the clinical practicum is the
Chief Nursing Officer (CNO), Helen Johnson, RN, MSN. Helen Johnson is a strong nursing
advocate and excels at supporting nurses at all levels of their practice. She has progressed
through her career with various clinical positions as well as several levels of nursing
management. In her current role as CNO she oversees all clinical areas, quality, risk
management and pharmacy services. Helen Johnson has also been instrumental in our recent
integration with Spectrum Health. Supporting her commitment to lifelong learning she has
obtained certification by the American Nurses Credentialing Center as an Advance Nurse
Executive (NEA-BC) as well as being appointed a Fellow of the American College of Health
Executives (FACHE). She also strives to encourage growth, development and promotion from
within. In closer alignment with my goals, Helen Johnson is actively involved with quality and
risk management both internally at SHLH as well as regionally within the system as a whole.
She is part of a CNO collaborative which meets routinely to elevate care and services provided to
Spectrum Health patients. Currently, the main focus of this group is a Lean project aimed at
aligning regional Spectrum Health hospitals in several areas, such as staffing, safety procedures,
titles, and areas of responsibility.

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Her personal drive and involvement toward nursing as a whole is very energetic and
contagious. She supports the profession by engaging in growth and development of her own
personal practice as well as encouraging others to elevate their own professional practice. She
has sought out individual strengths in staff and capitalized on those strengths to lead work
groups, inspire others, and promote succession planning throughout the hospital. I believe Helen
Johnson will be an excellent preceptor for my practicum.
See Appendix B for preceptor and organizational agreements.
Evaluation Tools
Standard 6 of the American Nurses Associations, Standards of Nursing Administration
Practice for Nursing Administrators, is the standard of evaluation (ANA, 2009). Evaluation can
be defined as to judge the value of conditions of (someone or something) in a careful and
thoughtful way (Merriman & Webster, 2014). According to Boswell and Long, (2011) the
expectation of a nursing program is to ensure that students understand what is being taught and
to be able to use the new knowledge and skills effectively. Furthermore, Lis, Hanson,
Burgermeister and Banfield, (2014) indicate;
In order for nurses, particularly those in advanced practice roles, to contribute to the
transformation of the health care system, it is essential that educational programs prepare
their graduates with the requisite knowledge, skills and abilities to perform at their best in
todays rapidly changing health care systems (para 2).
During this time of our last semester is a good the time to sit back and reflect on
knowledge we have gained throughout the program and synchronize with what we have already
learned in our past to become a stronger professional and healthcare advocate. Utilizing
feedback from our mentors as well as our peers allows one to grow stronger in their own

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practice. We must be open to new concepts, new practices, and interested in personal growth
and the ever-changing environment we have chosen to practice in. Continual evaluation and
change of our practice behaviors can help to support said growth.
As important as our own professional development, it is also important to assist others in
their own development as mentors. Providing feedback to our mentors will allow them to also
reflect on their responses during learning encounters. Leaders must help in development of their
followers and should be aware of the effectiveness of their personal practice (Marshall, 2011).
Using the developed tools, objectives are identified to promote growth and awareness in
both myself as the student and my preceptor throughout the practicum experience. The first
attached tool will be used mid semester as a formative evaluation as well as at the end of the
practicum as a summative assessment. It will be utilized by both myself as a reflective tool to
assess my growth and attainment toward listed objectives, as well as by my preceptor for
evaluation of my identified goals and progress towards meeting those goals. The formative
aspect of the evaluation will help to identify progress toward meeting the practicum objectives
and aid to guide the direction for the remaining educational experience (Lepi, 2014). The
summative evaluation provides opportunity for the student and preceptor to assess the overall
attainment of knowledge or completion of set objectives (Lepi, 2014). The second tool will be
used by the student (myself) as an experimental process assessing the preceptor, and in addition,
to assess the usefulness of this type of tool and feedback.
See Appendix C-Evaluation Tools
Summary
In summary, during my clinical leadership practicum I plan to work with my preceptor
Helen Johnson to meet goals and objectives listed in my learning plan. Two of my main focus

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areas will be to strengthen my practice in increasing awareness, knowledge, and ability to
identify, and then work to solve process issues by incorporating change management skills
within the organization. Additionally, I would like to gain further knowledge in promoting
nursing to a higher level of involvement and professionalism. I hope to accomplish these
objectives through direct observations as well as active participation in administrative activities.
A full learning plan is included to help guide the practicum experience. Evaluation of practice
will be assessed midterm and semester end to gage levels of attainment toward listed objectives.
Evaluation tools were developed to coincide with set objectives in the learning plan; these tools
are also included within the proposal. A preceptor who is my up line in the organization was
chosen that will help to elevate my level of understanding regarding the Chief Nursing Officer
position, guide my development toward objectives listed in the learning plan, and help to raise
my level of awareness toward the CNO responsibilities to the organization as a whole.

References
American Nurses Association. (2009). Nursing administration: Scope and standards of practice.
Silver Spring, MD: American Nurses Association.

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Bakerjion, D., Zisberg, A., (2013). Applying the advancing excellence in America's nursing
homes circle of success to improving and sustaining quality. Geriatric Nursing, 34(5),
402-411. doi: 10.1016/j.gerinurse.2013.06.011
Benner, P. (1982). From novice to expert. The American Journal of Nursing, 82(3), 402-407.
Retrieved from: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3462928?origin=JSTOR-pdf
Boswell, C., & Long, J. (2011). Validating graduate student programmatic outcomes. Nursing
Education Perspectives, 32(2), 107-109.
Boykin, A. & Schoenhofer, S. (1997). Reframing outcomes: Enhancing personhood. In Cody, W.
K. (Ed.), Philosophical and theoretical perspectives for advanced nursing practice. (pp.
95-103). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.
Carper, B. A. (1978). Fundamental patterns of knowing in nursing. In Cody, W. K. (Ed.),
Philosophical and theoretical perspectives for advanced nursing practice. (pp. 23-33).
Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.
Cody, W. K. (2013). Philosophical and theoretical perspectives for advanced nursing practice.
(5th ed). Jones & Bartlett Learning.
Frederickson, K., & Nickitas, D. (2011).Chief nursing officer executive development a crisis or a
challenge? Nursing Administration Quarterly, 35(4), 344353.
Hatlevik, I. (2011). The theory-practice relationship: reflective skills and theoretical knowledge
as key factors in bridging the gap between theory and practice in initial nursing
education. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 68(4), 868-877. doi: 10.1111/j.13652648.2011.05789.x

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Iacono, M., (2010). Nurses' Self-Care: A Question of Balance. Journal of Peri-Anesthesia
Nursing, 25(3), 174-176. doi: 10.1016/j.jopan.2010.03.007
Lepi, K. (2014). The key differences between summative and formative assessments.
Edudemic, Febuary, Retrieved from: http://www.edudemic.com/summative-andformative-assessments/
Lis, G., Hanson, P., Burgermeister, D., & Banfield, B. (2014). Transforming graduate nursing
education in the context of complex adaptive systems: Implications for Masters and
DNP curricula. Journal of Professional Nursing, May, doi:
10.1016/j.profnurs.2014.05.003
Luzinski, C. (2011). Transformational leadership. The Journal of Nursing Administration,
41(12), 501-502. doi: 10.1097/NNA.0b013e3182378a71
Marshall, E. (2011). Transformational leadership in nursing: From expert clinician to influential
leader. (1st Ed.). New York: Springer Publishing Company, LLC.
Merriman & Webster Dictionary (2014). Retrieved from: http://www.merriamwebster.com/dictionary/evaluate
Merriman & Webster Dictionary (2014). Retrieved from: http://www.merriamwebster.com/dictionary/practicum
Rao, A. & Rich, V. (2012). Service and scholarship: An evolutionary examination of nursing
administration. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 36(2), 107114. doi:
10.1097/NAQ.0b013e31824a583
Tomajan, K. (2012). Advocating for nurses and nursing. The Online Journal of Issues in
Nursing, 17(1), doi: 10.3912/OJIN.Vol17No01Man04

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Appendix A
Clinical Practicum II Learning Plan
Lisa A Morrill
Ferris State University
Nursing 712

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ANA or NLN
Standards of
Practice: Specialty
role
Nurse
Administration
Standard 1:
Assessment
(ANA, 2009, p. 25)

Outcome Criteria:
(taken from the ANA
Standards/NLN
Competencies)
Identifies gaps and
necessary mechanisms
to address and resolve
missing or insufficient
data, information, and
knowledge resources
(ANA, 2009, p. 25)

Activities to Achieve
Outcome

Resources needed
to be successful

Research, assess and


assist with process to
resolve errors or
develop process
improvement changes
for identified gaps or
inefficiencies

Synthesizes available
data, information, and
knowledge relevant to
the situation to identify
patterns and variances
(ANA, 2009, p. 25)

Use change
management
strategies to
successfully assist
with a process change

Print and online


material focused
toward activities
involved with
during practicum:
Problem solving
and identification
of improvement
strategies, change
management, etc.

Experiment with
various
communication
techniques; enhancing
communication to
clinical staff members

Nurse
Administration
Standard 5B: Health
Promotion, Health
Teaching, and
Education
(ANA, 2009, p. 31)

Evaluates health
information resources,
such as the internet,
within the area of
practice for accuracy,
readability, and
comprehensibility to
help individuals,
families, healthcare
providers, and others
access quality health
information
(ANA, 2009, p.31)
Creates opportunities

Information
Services staff
Preceptor
Access to various
materials for
communication,
with approval to
communicate-I.E.
email, bulletin
boards, possibly
development of
informational
newsletter.

Assess, evaluate and


collect healthcare
Work with
educational
preceptor on
information to be used obtaining approval
for patient teaching
Information
Obtain approval for
services for
dedicated patient
development of
tablet for use in
usable folders
educational activities
Access to evidence
Collaborate with
based patient
Information Services
teaching materials
on developing folders available for use
for various patient

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for feedback and
evaluation of the
effectiveness of the
educational content and
teaching strategies used
for the continuing
education and
professional
development programs
necessary to implement
the plan
(ANA, 2009, p. 31)

education information
Work with Medical
Records to identify
top medical diagnosis
and top surgical
procedure

Medical records to
identify top
diagnosis
Communication
channel for staff
education and
training

Search, evaluate and


save evidence based
teaching videos and
written documentation
on top medical
diagnosis and top
surgical procedure in
initial stage
Work with nursing
staff to educate of
availability and
process for use

Nurse
Administration
Standard 12: Ethics
(ANA, 2009, p. 40)

Demonstrates a
commitment to
practicing self-care,
managing stress, and
connecting with self and
others (ANA, 2009, p.
40)
Informs administrators
or others of the risks,
benefits, and outcomes
of programs and
decisions that affect
healthcare delivery
(ANA, 2009, p. 40)

Build and apply


practices aimed at
self-care to everyday
routines
Create time in daily
schedule to reflect on
day to day activities
Take 30 minutes 3x
weekly to engage in
physical activity
Find application that
is user friendly to help

Time
Application for
smart phone

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track activity,
calories, hydration
and stress releasing
interventions

Nurse
Administration
Standard 15:
Leadership
(ANA, 2009, p. 43)

Promotes advancement
of the profession
through participation in
professional
organizations (ANA,
2009, p. 43)
Influences decisionmaking bodies to
improve patient care,
health services, and
policies
(ANA, 2009, p. 43)

Search out and


identify professional
organization that fits
closely to my personal
goals and interests
Evaluate joining
requirements and area
chapter availability

Print and online


material for
evaluation
Preceptor and peer
feedback
Access to attend
leadership growth
activities

Appendix B
Preceptor and Agency Agreements
Student-Preceptor Agreement
The overall objective of this experience is to provide an on-site setting in which a student, with the
preceptor (professional employee of a health care agency), will complete a quality improvement
project.

Agency representative
Date

c)c))

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The following goal(s), objectives, and activities will be completed by the student during this
project/practicum.
Research, assess and assist with process to resolve errors or develop process improvement
changes for identified gaps or inefficiencies
Use change management strategies to successfully assist with a process change
Experiment with various communication techniques; enhancing communication to clinical staff
members
Search out and identify professional organization that fits closely to my personal goals and
interests
Evaluate joining requirements and area chapter availability
Agency name ____________ Spectrum Health Ludington Hospital
Student name____Lisa Morrill __________________________________________
Student Telephone # ________ 231-510-7516 ________________
Preceptor name ____ Helen Johnson ______________
Preceptor's Title_________ RN, MSN CNO ________
Preceptor Telephone #__231-845-3661 ______________________
Preceptor email______ helenj@mmcwm.com ____________
ahle.....1
Studen
Date
4111

Precep r
Date

SIGNATURE SIGNIFYING AGREEMENT TO THE TERMS OF THIS PRECEPTOR


AGREEMENT

Student Agency Agreement


Agency name _____ Spectrum Health Ludington Hospital
-

Student name Lisa Morrill


Student Telephone #
231-510-7516 ____________________
Agency representative _Helen Johnson_____________________________
Agency representative Title _____ CNO ___________
Agency representative Telephone #231-845-3661 _____________________
email_helenj@mmcwm.com ______________
SIGNATURE SIGNIFYING AGREEMENT TO THE TERMS OF T IS AGRE MENT:

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Stude

411 Amp

Date

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Appendix C
Evaluation Tools

Student Evaluation Tool


Ferris State University
The purpose of this evaluation is to assess the progress towards attainment of standards/knowledge/skills/attitudes listed as students goals. This
evaluation will be conducted both midterm and end semester by both student as a self-reflection of progress and preceptor as an assessment of growth.
Please rate student on a score of 1-5.
1-Novice
2-Advance Beginner
3-Competent
4-Proficient
5-Expert
(Benner, 1982)

Standards/Knowledge/Skills/Attitudes
ANA Standard 1-Assessment
a. Able to identify gaps, missing, or
insufficient data
b. Utilizes information in a format
appropriate for project
c. Identifies root cause of problems
presented
d. Demonstrates knowledge and
familiarity in change process
e. Identifies and utilizes available
channels of communication

Student Name:
Date:

Midterm
Score

Comments

Final Score

Comments

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ANA Standard 15-Leadership
a. Demonstrates effective behaviors in
teamwork
b. Works to create relationships in local
and regional professional groups
c. Demonstrates passion for
professional growth
d. Participates in key roles and input
within organization
e. Promotes use of evidence based
practice guidelines
Student Evaluation Tool (con't)
Standards/Knowledge/Skills/Attitudes
f. Exhibits behaviors that encourages
team growth and professionalism

Other Professional Responsibilities


a. Assumes responsibility and
accountability for own actions
b. Demonstrates efficient/appropriate
use of time
c. Engages in self-reflection toward
professional practice

Midterm
Score

Comments

Final Score

Comments

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d. Demonstrates professional
communication with preceptor, dress
code and attendance

Signatures at midterm
Student___________________________________________________Date___________________
Preceptor_________________________________________________Date___________________
Signatures at end of semester
Student___________________________________________________Date___________________
Preceptor_________________________________________________Date___________________

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Preceptor Evaluation Form


Ferris State University
Name of Preceptor______________________________
Site______________________________
Evaluated by______________________________
Date______________________________

Preceptor Practices

Seldom

Often

Frequently

Not Applicable

Preceptor was available to student

Preceptor was a strong professional role model

Preceptor encouraged independence and autonomy

Preceptor demonstrated effective teamwork

Preceptor exhibited effective communication

Preceptor provided professional experiences as available


Preceptor engaged in timely feedback

Comments

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Consideration was given to student's limitations
Preceptor led using evidence base practice guidelines

Would you recommend this preceptor for other students?

YES

NO

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Appendix D
Resource List

American Association of Colleges of Nurses (AACN). Website: http://www.aacn.nche.edu/membership/awards/aone


American Nurses Association. (2009). Nursing administration: Scope and standards of practice.
Silver Spring, MD: American Nurses Association.
American Nurses Association (ANA). Website:
http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ThePracticeofProfessionalNursing/Leadership
Association of Nursing Executives (AONE). Website: http://www.aone.org/
Bakerjion, D .& Zisberg, A., (2013). Applying the advancing excellence in America's nursing homes circle of success to improving
and sustaining quality. Geriatric Nursing, 34(5), 402-411. doi: 10.1016/j.gerinurse.2013.06.011
Benner, P. (1982). From novice to expert. The American Journal of Nursing, 82(3), 402-407. Retrieved from:
http://www.jstor.org/stable/3462928?origin=JSTOR-pdf
Boswell, C., & Long, J. (2011). Validating graduate student programmatic outcomes. Nursing Education Perspectives, 32(2), 107-109
Boykin, A. & Schoenhofer, S. (1997). Reframing outcomes: Enhancing personhood. In Cody, W. K. (Ed.), Philosophical and
theoretical perspectives for advanced nursing practice. (95-103). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.
Bryant-Lukosius, D., DiCenso, A., Browne, G., Pinelli, J. (2004). Advanced practice nursing roles: development, implementation and
evaluation. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 48(5), 519-529.

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