You are on page 1of 16

The Ideology of College­Aged Adults in Regards to 

the Risks Associated with Caffeine Consumption and 
Pregnancy
Erin M. Jacoby 
Bowling Green State University 
November 20, 2013 
 
 

 

Jacoby 1 

Table of Contents 
 
Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………2 
 
Methods…………………………………………………………………………………………...4 
Design……………………………………………………………………………………..4 
Demographic Characteristics……………………………………………………………...5 
Procedure………………………………………………………………………………….5 
Instruments……………………………………………………………………………......5 
Data Analysis Method…………………………………………………………………….6 
Results………………………………………………………………………………………….....7 
 
Discussion……………………………………………………………………………………….10 
 
References………………………………………………………………………………………14 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Jacoby 2 

Erin Jacoby 
FN 4350 
November 16, 2013 
Term Project  
The Ideology of College­Aged Adults in Regards to the 
Risks Associated with Caffeine Consumption and Pregnancy 
Introduction 
Caffeine, which is one of the world’s most frequently consumed substances (1), has 
become a growing area of research and concern. It is consumed on a regular basis by adults, 
children and even pregnant women. Pregnancy can be difficult for women because they have 
regular appointments to see their doctor, are uncomfortable, and have to pay even more attention 
to what they are consuming each and every day. Nutrition is important for pregnant women 
because they are feeding themselves and their unborn babies. However, there are still questions 
about nutrition related to pregnancy that remain unanswered or inconsistent. 
Over the past few decades there has been controversy surrounding whether or not the 
consumption of caffeine during pregnancy negatively affects the children who were exposed to 
higher levels of caffeine during fetal development. Numerous studies have been conducted with 
the hopes of finding a clear and more conclusive answer as to whether or not pregnant women 
should be exposing their unborn children to caffeine. “Studies have shown that maternal caffeine 
intake may be associated with decreased birth weight and fetal growth restriction, though not 
consistently.” 2(p275) With that in mind, numerous studies have been conducted regarding caffeine 
consumption by pregnant women and the adverse effects caffeine might have, which would 

Jacoby 3 

include low birth weight, growth restrictions, premature births, cardiovascular abnormalities, 
attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, gestational length, miscarriage, and stillbirth. The 
evidence from previous studies involving the outcomes of pregnancy and caffeine has yet to 
show strong correlations between the two or were not consistent.  
At this time women are being encouraged to reduce caffeine levels during pregnancy in 
order to avoid any complications that might arise. However, studies have yet to provide clear 
evidence that caffeine consumption during pregnancy is directly associated with any negative 
side­effects to children. Adults should consume between 300mg to 400mg per day (3), whereas 
“the current guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO) recommend a caffeine intake 
below 300mg per day during pregnancy, while the American College of Obstetricians and 
Gynecologists and the Norwegian Food Safety Authority with the Nordic Nutrition 
Recommendations (NNR) recommends a maximum intake of 200mg per day.” 4(p2) As a result of 
current guidelines, healthcare providers are advising pregnant mothers to consume between 
200mg to 300 mg per day. Pregnant women provide a womb for their unborn child to develop, so 
it is important and necessary for mothers to nourish their bodies. With that in mind, although 
there has yet to be any research studies proving caffeine to be harmful when consumed by 
expecting women it is important to take into consideration that it is an unknown territory that 
should be taken into consideration by both pregnant women and healthcare providers. 
College­aged adults, who are entering their years of conception, are influenced by both their 
peers and the media. Therefore, their ideas or opinions regarding pregnancy and caffeine 
consumption might be altered. The aim of this study was to explore the ideology of college­aged 
adults in regards to how much caffeine a pregnant woman should be consuming once presented 

Jacoby 4 

with recommended daily intakes of caffeine for the average adult followed by recommended 
daily intakes for pregnant women. 
Methods 
Design 
The overall design or layout of this research study was to first set an objective, which was 
to  explore the ideology of college­aged adults in regards to how much caffeine a pregnant 
woman should be consuming once presented with recommended daily intakes of caffeine for the 
average adult followed by recommended daily intakes for pregnant women. In order to achieve 
this goal it was necessary to create and compose a survey with a set of questions that was not 
bias or misleading. The survey was handed out to 39 college­aged surveyors, 15 of which were 
male and 24 females. A paragraph was compiled to inform the surveyors of what the 
recommended daily intake of caffeine is for adults and children. The first three questions were 
about the demographic of the surveyor, which included gender, age, and if they have previously 
been pregnant or taken part in a pregnancy as a father. The following questions related to the 
paragraph and what they believed to be a safe or adequate level of caffeine a pregnant woman 
should be consuming on a daily basis. Question #5 explained the actual amount of caffeine a 
pregnant woman is able to safely consume without harming her fetus. After reading this piece of 
information the surveyors were then asked if they believed this to be too much, not enough, or an 
adequate amount of caffeine that is recommended. Finally, the surveyors that believed the levels 
to be too high were asked why they believed that less caffeine should be consumed by pregnant 
women. The overall survey was able to identify what college­aged surveyors believed to be a 

Jacoby 5 

moderate and safe level of caffeine consumption by a pregnant woman and why they believed 
that lower amounts should be advised.   
 
 
Demographic Characteristics 
The demographic of this study were college­aged adults, both male and female. With that 
said, college­age surveyors would be people between the ages of 18 and 25. The study did not 
survey anyone that was already a mother or father as to not drastically alter the data. This 
research study was to discover the ideology of college­aged people and what their thoughts are 
on caffeine and pregnancy. If mothers or fathers of college­ages were surveyed they would have 
potentially had an altered view, be it from their doctor or medical advisors as to how much 
caffeine should have been consumed throughout their pregnancy or their partner’s pregnancy. 
Therefore, mothers and fathers were excluded from this survey. 
 
Procedure 
After the completion of the survey, as described in the design portion, it was necessary to 
distribute the surveys. It was ideal to be located on a college campus as the demographic of this 
study were adults between the ages of 18 to 25. I simply asked several tables of students at the 
Bowen­Thomson Student Union to take the survey, which would last no more than 5 minutes. 
Most of the students seemed more than willing to take the survey about pregnancy and caffeine. 
Since I was looking for the demographic of males and females it was important to try and 
equally distribute the surveys between the two genders.  

Jacoby 6 

 
Instruments Used 
Few instruments were used while conducting this research study. A total of 39 
college­aged subjects were used in the final survey, which was developed specifically for this 
study. The survey was designed according to recommendations provided by references (4) and in 
accordance with the objectives or goals of this research study. With that said, it was necessary 
that gender, age, and pregnancy status be added to the survey in order to achieve the main 
objective.  Calculations and graphs were analyzed or conducted using computer programs.  
 
Data Analysis Method 
The data that was collected through the survey was first broken down by gender. There 
were 15 males and 24 females. Following this procedure the mean, minimum, and maximum 
ages were analyzed. The mean age was 21 with a minimum age of 18 and a maximum age of 24. 
After the demographic of this survey was captured the next step was to analyze the data collected 
for question #4. This data gave the study information as to how much caffeine student­aged 
subjects believe pregnant women should consume. After looking over this set of data it was 
apparent that a majority of subjects, primarily female, believed that pregnant women should be 
consuming less caffeine than the recommend daily intake suggests. Only 1 male and 1 female 
believed that it was safe for women to consumed 300mg to 400mg per day, which is equivalent 
to how much is caffeine is recommended for adults.   
The following question then informed the subjects that the recommended daily intake 
suggests 200mg to 300mg and were asked if they believed that this amount was too high, too 

Jacoby 7 

low, or an appropriate amount. This data was analyzed and it was found that a majority, almost 
67%, believed the recommended daily intake amount to be too high. The 67% believed that an 
appropriated amount of caffeine suggested pregnant women should consume less than 200mg per 
day. The remaining 67% were then asked what they believe the risks are that are associated with 
higher levels of caffeine intake by a pregnant woman.  
The adults remaining, which were composed of the surveyors that believed that the 
recommended daily intake was too high, were then analyzed and divided between male and 
female. More women identified that miscarriage is a major concern of caffeine consumption 
during pregnancy, whereas both males and females equally believed miscarriage to be a risk. 
However, recent studies have evidence supporting the idea that moderate caffeine consumption 
during pregnancy does not affect whether or not the infant will be colicky, be susceptible to 
ADHD, or not be able to sleep. A majority of males believed that ADHD is a concerning risk 
whereas females outnumbered the males as to if high caffeine consumption during pregnancy 
will cause colic or insomnia. Finally, two females chose other. One of the females left a 
comment whereas the other female did not. The comment suggested that if a child should 
consume less than 100mg per day than a pregnant mother should abide by that rule since she is 
pregnant. Altogether, the data analysis was primarily comparing the genders to one another along 
with the overview as to what the general ideology of college­aged subjects are concerning 
pregnancy and caffeine.  
 
 
 

Jacoby 8 

Results 
The total amount of surveyors was 39, which consisted of 15 males and 24 females. The 
average age of the surveyors was 21, whereas the minimum age was 18 and the maximum age 
was 24. All of the surveyors were in the age range, so none of the surveys had to be discarded 
because of age. However, 3 of the surveyors had been involved with pregnancies and those had 
to be discarded from the data analysis.  
Question #4 focused on what the surveyors thought was an appropriate amount of 
caffeine pregnant women should be consuming on a daily basis. Table 1, which is located on the 
following page, explains that most surveyors either believed that pregnant women should only be 
consuming less than or equal to 100mg per day or should be consuming between 100mg to 
200mg per day. However, both of these amounts are below the actual recommended daily intakes 
of caffeine are for women. Table 2 shows that only 2 surveyors believed that pregnant women 
can consume more than the recommended daily intake of caffeine for pregnant women and 
consume the equal amount of caffeine as adults are recommended. Altogether, a large majority 
college­aged people believe that women who are pregnant should be consuming less caffeine 
than is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), which is between 200mg and 
300mg per day. 
 

 

 
 
 
 

Jacoby 9 

 
Caffeine 
(mg/day) 

<100 
100­200 
200­300 
300­400 
>400 

Males 





Female


11 



 
Table 3, as pictured on the following page, explains how many of the surveyors believed 
that 200mg to 300mg per day of caffeine is too high. A majority of the surveyors, about 77%, 
believed the recommended amount of caffeine to be too high and only 23% believed that this 
was an adequate amount for a pregnant woman. More females believed that the RDI of caffeine 
for pregnant women was too high. 19 females believed the RDI to be too high, whereas only 11 
males believed the RDI to be too high. 

 

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

Jacoby 10 

The final question was designed only for surveyors who believed that the recommended 
daily intake of 200mg to 300mg of caffeine to be too high, which was 30 of the surveyors. This 
question asked why they believed the recommended daily intake of caffeine to be too high. Table 
4, on the following page, compares the beliefs of the surveyors to one another. 10 of the 
surveyors, 33%, believed that premature birth was a major risk factor associated with 
overconsumption of caffeine during pregnancy. 7 surveyors, about 23%, believed that caffeine 
during pregnancy would cause an increased risk of ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity 
disorder) in the later years of the child’s life. 8 surveyors, about 27%, believed that too much 
caffeine during pregnancy would cause colic or insomnia in the infant Only 3 surveyors, or 
equivalent to 10%, believed that the consumption of 200mg to 300mg would increase the risk of 
miscarriage or stillbirth. However, 0% of the surveyors believed that there was no risk associated 
with moderate amounts of caffeine intake during pregnancy. Finally, only 2 students, which 
would be about 7% of surveyors, believed there to be another risk factor associated with WHO’s 
recommendations for caffeine. One of the surveyors did not explain what their other was. 
However, the other surveyor did believe that if a child under the age of 12 years should consume 
no more than 100mg of caffeine per day then a pregnant woman should follow this rule.   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jacoby 11 

Discussion 
Although it is commonly thought or assumed that caffeine harms the fetus during 
pregnancy there is yet to be any scientific evidence that caffeine truly poses a threat to pregnant 
women. Physicians and numerous organizations advice women to lower their caffeine intake 
during pregnancy, however “caffeine intake is not associated with a higher risk for behavior 
problems… no evidence was found for mediation by fetal growth restriction or gestational age, 
nor to effect modification by the child’s gender.”  5(p305) As stated, studies that have been 
conducted within the past 5 years have not resulted in any conclusive evidence that caffeine 
directly affects fetal growth and development. However, researchers are still concerned about the 
pregnant mothers because there are still signs that there is a potential that caffeine may harm the 
child. As of now, women who are pregnant are advised to consume between 200mg to 300mg of 
caffeine per day in order to reduce any potential risks to their child.  
The results from this study were collected and analyzed in order to discover the ideology 
and thoughts of college­aged subjects on the issues involving pregnancy and caffeine. Although 
they might not be familiar with recent studies about the risks of caffeine and pregnancy, all of the 
subjects agreed that it was important for expecting mothers to reduce the amount of caffeine 
consumed. It was somewhat apparent that students believe that women should be consuming less 
caffeine than what is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) and other 
organizations around the world. With that in mind, the results varied as to what risks are 
associated with too much caffeine while pregnant. Most students thought that premature birth 
and colic or insomnia were common risks associated with higher levels of caffeine consumption. 
However, it is rare that caffeine consumption affects how colicky a child will be and if they will 

Jacoby 12 

be able to sleep or not (6). This also reflects the idea that ADHD is a major effect on children 
who are exposed to higher levels of caffeine while in the womb. The risks of ADHD are not 
associated with caffeine consumption during pregnancy (7). In theory this sounds appealing and 
logical, but in all actuality there is no correlation between pregnant mothers consuming 
recommended amounts of caffeine and the increased risk of having a child with ADHD.  
The limitations of this study would include the gender ratio that was collected during the 
survey. More females took the survey than males, which could have altered the finding. Males 
tended to believe that moderate amounts of caffeine consumed by expecting mothers to be 
acceptable, whereas more females were hesitant about how much caffeine should be consumed 
by pregnant mothers. The addition of more males to this study would have potentially improved 
the likelihood of having more surveyors believing that the recommended daily intake of caffeine 
by pregnant women to be acceptable. Another limitation that could have affected the results of 
this study were the questions regarding ADHD and insomnia or colic affecting infants of mothers 
who consumed too much caffeine. It is understandable that these two additions could be 
perceived as being bias as to proving that college­aged surveyors do not comprehend why 
overconsumption of too much caffeine during pregnancy can be negative. However, these two 
ideas had to be added to the questions because it was important to have a mixed set of answers. It 
was also important because studies have concluded that there is little to no evidence that caffeine 
consumption during pregnancy has any effect on the child’s risk of ADHD or insomnia. With 
that in mind, it was important to add a few misconceptions into the final question to truly 
understand what ideas college­aged subjects have about pregnancy and caffeine.  

Jacoby 13 

All in all the objective of this study was to explore the ideology associated with 
college­aged subjects and their beliefs on pregnancy and caffeine. The results concluded that 
although a majority of surveyors believed that lower levels of caffeine are safe for the 
development of the fetus they were still unsure of what risks are primarily associated with it. 
Leading risks, in regards to caffeine and pregnancy, would include premature birth, miscarriage, 
and potential birth defects. The ideas of the surveyors reflect that of misconception or not being 
correctly informed. As this study concludes, it has come to the attention that misleading 
information should be concerning and alarming. It is important for people, especially those who 
are close to conceiving children, to understand why caffeine and pregnancy are not as alarming 
as some healthcare professionals might make it sound. While the subject should be handled 
delicately, the fact remains that there is still no conclusive evidence that caffeine is directly 
associated with heighted risk of premature birth, low birth weight, colic, increased risk of 
ADHD, or several other associated birth issues. In conclusion, it is recommended that 
professionals and researchers advance their studies in the search for evidence against caffeine 
and pregnancy. Thus far there has been little evidence that caffeine is directly associated with 
fetus growth and/or development. As a result of this study, there is a growing importance for 
young adults to learn more about why caffeine has the potential of harming a pregnancy rather 
than assuming it will and that decreased amount should be consumed by expecting mothers.  
 
 
 
 

Jacoby 14 

References 
1. Maslova E, Bhattacharya S, Lin SW, Michels KB. Caffeine consumption during 
pregnancy and risk of preterm birth: a meta­analysis. Am J Clin Nutr [Internet]. 
2010 Nov [cited 2013 Nov 10]; 92 (5): 1120­32. Available from: The American 
Journal of Clinical Nutrition  
2. Sengpiel V, Elind E, Bacelis J, Nilsson S, Grove J, Myhre R, et al. Maternal caffeine 
intake during pregnancy is associated with birth weight but not with gestational 
length: results from a large prospective observational cohort study. BMC Med 
[Internet]. 2013 [cited 2013 Nov 10]; 11 (42): 11 [approx. 18p.] Available from: 
BMC Medicine  
3. Kuczkowski KM. Caffeine in pregnancy. Arch Gynecol Obstet [Internet]. 2009 Feb 
[cited 2013 Nov 12]; 280 (5): 695­8. Available from: Springer  
4. Greenwood DC, Alwan N, Boylan S, Cade JE, Charvill J, Chipps KC, et al. Caffeine 
intake during pregnancy, late miscarriage, and stillbirth. Eur J Epidemiol [Internet]. 
2010 [cited 2013 Nov 12]; 25 (4): 275­80. Available from: Springer  
5. Loomans EM, Hofland L, Van der Stelt O, Van der Wal MF, Koot HM, Van den 
Bergh BRH, et al. Caffeine intake during pregnancy and risk of problem behavior in 
5­to­6­year­old children. Pediarics [Internet]. 2012 July [cited 2013 Nov 15]; 130 
(2): 305­13. Available from: Pediatrics 

Jacoby 15 

6. Santos IS, Matijasevich A, Domingues MR. Maternal caffeine consumption and 
infant nighttime waking: prospective cohort study. Pediatrics [Internet]. 2012 Apr 
[cited 2013 Nov 12]; 129 (5): 859­69. Available from: Pediatrics 
7. Markussen­Linnet K, Wisborg K, Secher NJ, Thomsen PH, Obel C, Dalsgaard S, et 
al. Coffee consumption during pregnancy and the risk of hyperkinetic disorder and 
ADHD: a perspective cohort study. Acta Paediatr [Internet]. 2009 Jan [cited 2013 
Nov 16]; 98 (1) 173­9. Available from: The National Center for Biotechnology 
Information  
 
  

Jacoby 16