You are on page 1of 9

Leon1 

Stephanie Leon  
Ganzler  
History (H) 
30 October 2014  
                Inside the Kingdom: My Life in Saudi Arabia by Carmen Bin Ladin  
Inside the Kingdom is an autobiography by Carmen Bin Ladin who was married into the 
Bin Laden family as a young adult. This book speaks about her experience in Saudi Arabia at 
that time.  
The book starts off with chapter one titled 9/11. Carmen Bin Ladin was shocked to see 
the Twin Towers fall. New York was like a second home to her and her daughters. She knew 
Osama Bin Laden was behind this. Osama was her ex­husband, Yeslam’s younger brother. Her 
daughters couldn’t go out in public without people attacking them. Rumours were spreading 
about Wafah, Carmen’s eldest daughter, knowing about the attack during the summer and how 
she didn’t protect the ones she loved in New York. Although that wasn’t true since Wafah had 
spent the summer with her mother in Switzerland. People were scared of Carmen and her 
daughters even though they had nothing to do with the attack nor the Bin Laden family.  
Chapter two, Secret Garden, Carmen states that she didn’t want to marry a 
Middle­easterner. She loved the idea of America, the American life, the freedom. Her Swiss 
father had left when she was nine years old, and her mother missed him terribly although she 
didn’t want to admit it. After that, Carmen was afraid to fall in love and get married. She was 
scared of the idea of her marriage failing like that of her parents. To Carmen truth was important. 
Her Muslim mother was very strict, and only cared about appearances. Carmen and one of her 

Leon2 

sisters smoked to rebel against their mother. Their mother bribed them with clothes and cars to 
make them stop. Carmen’s sister accepted the car, although she didn’t stop smoking, and Carmen 
didn’t accept the bribe because she knew she wouldn’t give up smoking.  
In chapter three, Falling in Love, Carmen had met Yeslam Bin Laden over the summer. 
Yeslam was serious, and only opened up to Carmen. They took many, many adventures over the 
summer. Carmen was starting to fall for Yeslam. In 1973, they traveled to America and attended 
the University of Southern California. Carmen grew close with the foreign directors wife, Mary 
Martha. Although she quickly fell in love with Yeslam and it was no longer a summer fling, she 
was still scared of marriage. But nonetheless, her mother was happy to see Carmen engaged.  
Chapter four, My Saudi Wedding, talks about the process of getting married in Saudi 
Arabia. First they needed the King’s approval to get married, since Carmen was a foreigner. 
Carmen was planning on getting married in Geneva, Switzerland, but in order to be respected by 
Yeslam’s family they needed to get married in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. In Saudi Arabia, women 
had to cover everything from head to toe. They weren’t allowed to speak to men in public. They 
couldn’t unveil themselves in public to be seen by men outside of their family. “Women didn’t 
exist in this world of men”. Women are also forbidden to pray in public, while men had to drop 
everything they’re doing to pray at a certain time. Carmen began questioning herself if she 
should have gotten married.  
In chapter five, America, Carmen and Yeslam flew to America a few days after the 
wedding. They were both happy, and Carmen felt free. They attended parties, took adventures to 
different places such as Las Vegas. Carmen loved how everyone was respected, how the values 
were different, and how there was freedom. On November first, Carmen found out she was 

Leon3 

pregnant with her first child. In March of 1975, King Faisal had been killed, and Yeslam tried to 
finish quickly so he could return to Saudi Arabia. In the meantime, Wafah had been born. 
Yeslam walked out once he found out it was a girl, since they had been wanting a boy. Mary 
Martha had been a huge help, also being their for Wafah’s birth. After the oil embargo of 1973, 
Saudi Arabia’s money expanded which became great for business. Therefor they moved back to 
Saudi Arabia.  
Carmen begins to talk about her life in Saudi Arabia in chapter six, titled Life with the Bin 
Ladens. Carmen wore an abaya whenever she was in Saudi. It was a symbol for respect for 
women. Carmen thought it was an insult to her intelligence. Everything she did seemed to be 
haram (sinful) or abe (shameful). For Bin Laden women it was both to leave the house. Their 
faces were to never be seen by men. Shopping was for servants, there weren’t any books, no 
cinema, no concerts, there was no reason to go out. If they needed to go out it was to a specific 
location. They also couldn’t drive nor walk. Carmen became desperate, she took a trip to Geneva 
and Yeslam was understanding about it.  
In chapter seven, The Patriarch, it talks about how Saudi was still in medieval times. The 
country was wealthy yet cultivated. Families were headed by patriarchs. They were expected to 
be obedient. Saudi men were allowed to marry multiple women. Sheik Mohamed, Yeslam’s 
father, had twenty­two wives and forty­four children. He started poor then became one of the 
most powerful men in the kingdom. Wives couldn’t do anything without their husbands’ 
permission. Women lived their life in obedience and isolation, they were afraid of being an 
outcast or divorced. If a man divorces his wife, he has the right to forbid their wife from seeing 
their children. If the child disobeys they can be killed.  

Leon4 

In chapter eight, Life as an Alien, Osama was strict on Saudi rules. He and his family 
were extremely religious. Carmen was Christian and Muslim, although she wasn’t a strong 
Muslim. At parties, there usually wasn’t small talk. The women talked about their children and 
sometimes clothes. That was about it. Yeslam treated Carmen differently than his brothers. They 
were “more or less equal”. There were new book stores and more English channels, but 
everything was censored. Carmen traveled to Geneva for her second privacy because she didn’t 
feel as safe in Jeddah. If a couple only has daughters, and husband dies then the closest male 
relative will be the guardian for that family. If it’s a family full of women then only half of the 
inheritance goes to them and the rest goes to family and siblings, whereas if there was a son all 
estate went to him and he would be a guardian.  
Two Mothers, Two Babies, chapter nine, Carmen saw how Osama treated his children. 
She was scared of who would look after her children if something were to happen to Yeslam. 
When she told Yeslam, he shrugged it off. She was no longer a carefree mother.  
In chapter ten, My Own Chief Inmate, Carmen began to do things her way when her 
mother­in­law and sister­in­law moved out. She tried speaking to male servants. While trying to 
redecorate, the man wouldn’t face her nor take orders from her until Yeslam’s secretary forced 
them to listen to Carmen. In a different situation with decorating the house, the carpenter 
wouldn’t look at her and immediately said he does not take orders from a women. Carmen’s 
sister­in­law copied Carmen with the redecorating, but she never commented on Carmen’s house 
because she is a foreigner. Saudi had changed over the last five years with more clothes, cars, 
electronics, and even a Safeway. Although women were still looked down upon. They couldn’t 
leave Saudi without written permission from husband, father, or son. Women were never a legal 

Leon5 

adult. Women also weren’t supposed to have emotions. The Bin Laden’s did not share birthdays, 
it was haram. Christman was the only birthday. Only Christians did birthdays.  
In chapter eleven, The Brothers, it talked about the situation between the Bin Laden 
brothers. They were all apart of the Bin Laden Organization, which was really powerful. The two 
eldest brothers were in competition of who should rule the organization after Mohamed died. Ali, 
the second eldest child, broke away from the Organization and the whole Bin Laden family 
because he didn’t want to deal with competition. Salem and Bakr, who shared the same mother, 
now “ran the show”. When Yeslam’s brothers went to his house, Carmen had to leave or they 
wouldn’t go because her face was always unveiled. Yeslam worked his way up in the 
Organization only to have Bakr take all the credit. He couldn’t confront Bakr because, 
“Confrontation was not a Saudi habit”. There was no escape from the traditions of the ancestors.  
Chapter twelve, 1979, was everything that had occurred that year. In 1979 everything was 
going good and things turned for the worst as a revolution broke out in Iran. One of the perks of 
being a Bin Laden meant that they could leave at anytime of an emergency. Women became 
forced to wear veils that covered every inch of their body or police would beat them. The only 
thing saving Carmen was the Bin Laden name. Dolls became a contraband because they had a 
human face. Osama went to support the mujahideen in Afghanistan. He imported machinery and 
such. He was no longer just the seventeen year old brother, he was now Osama, a Saudi hero. 
1979 became a turning point for the Islamic world and also for Yeslam, he became fearful, 
childish, and a stranger.  
In chapter thirteen, Yeslam, Yeslam had become more frightful by everything that was 
happening. He had frequent nightmares and he hadn’t been happy since the Mecca Revolution. 

Leon6 

Saudi Arabia had a lot of money, but it kept going back to it’s traditional, old days. Carmen 
encouraged Yeslam to fight for what he believed in. She was scared he was going to give into all 
the rules. In 1980, he stopped going to the office and began his own company in Switzerland, 
which was a success. His brothers begged for him to come back and offered him a salary. 
Yeslam was now worth $300 million unlike before when he was only worth $15 million. He was 
now one of the wealthier brothers, along with Salem and Bakr. Despite all the money and 
success, Yeslam still wasn’t happy. He went to the office earlier in the morning and wouldn’t go 
home until nine or ten in the morning. Yeslam started to become a stranger. He was filled with 
anxiety. In 1981, Carmen had become pregnant again, but this time Yeslam told her to get an 
abortion. Carmen agreed because she was scared he would resent the baby especially if it was a 
girl. She became depressed after that and felt that it was the “beginning to the end”.  
In chapter fourteen, Little Girls, Carmen tried to raise her daughter how she wanted. They 
took frequent trips to Switzerland. In Saudi, there is no legal obligation for girls to attend school. 
SInce the girls were Bin Laden’s they had to attend school in Saudi Arabia. Carmen just couldn’t 
keep them away from Yeslam’s culture. Children in Saudi were taught a strict social code at a 
young age. There was no depth to the classes. Religious classes were the most important taking 
up more than half of the day. Carmen had a private tutor at home because she wanted her 
daughters to understand the material rather than just learn it. Girls can begin to wear a veil as 
young as the age of nine, but it’s not mandatory until the girl receives her first period.  It was a 
major conflict raising daughters with Western values when they were being taught eastern views 
in school.  

Leon7 

In chapter fifteen, A Saudi Couple, it talks about how relationships work in Saudi Arabia. 
Carmen and Yeslam had a very straight forward relationship. Women avoided direct behavior, 
they learned how to manipulate their husbands into getting what they wanted. Saudi women 
would buy certain things to better the stuff of another woman. Divorce was easy for a man, 
whereas for a woman it was difficult. They had to go to court and have a good reason. It had to 
be for un­Islamic behavior, but adultery and beating did not count. The first born in a Saudi 
household usually doesn’t get disciplined. They were taken care of by the servant day and night. 
If the baby cried it was usually the servants fault.  
In chapter sixteen, Sisters in Islam, the Islam sisters are extremely close to each other. 
Sheikha, Yeslam’s sister, could ask about him, but Carmen couldn’t ask about her husband 
because that shows intimacy. The Saudi’s are the strictest muslims, there is no separation of law 
and state. Wealthy Saudis pressured those who received financial aid to enforce strict rules. No 
other religion was allowed and no bibles were to be brought in. Foreigners can’t leave without 
sponsor's signature. They also may not own property. If they want to start a business the must 
have a Saudi as a partner. Carmen also realized that by not teaching her daughter Saudi ways, 
she was teaching her to be a rebel.  
In chapter seventeen, Princes and Princesses, Carmen’s friend, Latifa, who was a 
princess, had no freedom whatsoever. It didn’t matter that she was royalty. When Carmen lived 
in Saudi there was only about 5,000 princes, now there are about 25,000. Princesses were found 
to have bone density due to lack of exercise and sunlight. They were lonely, they never had a 
true connection with men, let alone their husbands. They sought comfort with each other and 
began to have affairs with one another due to lack of affection from their husbands. Men who 

Leon8 

found out about these affairs didn’t care enough to stop them since women didn’t matter to them. 
They only cared for them as a possession, they didn’t care what the women did amongst 
themselves. Although homosexuality was forbidden in Saudi Arabia men also have affairs with 
each other when they are younger, but nothing is said to stop them as well. When Yeslam and 
Carmen traveled to Geneva, and royals followed they still had their strict ways. Most of them 
were rude to Carmen since she was a foreigner.  
Chapter eighteen, Leaving Saudi Arabia, everything in Saudi was expanding especially 
money. Yeslam had become more childish and more of a stranger. Yeslam was now more 
concerned in the way his girls were dressing rather than their well being. The Bin Laden family 
began to look down on Carmen. In 1985, Switzerland became their home for good. After 
summer ended, Carmen enlisted the girls in school. It was a great opportunity for the girls. When 
Ronald Reagan arrived in Switzerland, Yeslam demanded to fly to London since he felt it was 
dangerous in Switzerland.  As the girls grew older, Yeslam no longer interacted with them. He 
only felt well when the Saudi Princes were there. He started to become more Saudi now that they 
were in Europe. Yeslam had even cheated on Carmen, although he denied it so they made up. 
Carmen became pregnant once again, and once again Yeslam asked for an abortion. This time 
Carmen said no. This was the first time Yeslam felt let down. It was the start of the end of their 
marriage. On New Year’s Day in 1988 Carmen told Yeslam to leave. After Noor’s birth, the 
third daughter, Yeslam seemed happy but it was because of another woman. After that, the Bin 
Laden’s rejected Carmen and her daughters. Yeslam had threatened to take Noor and when he 
lost the case he said he wasn’t the father. When Yeslam walked in to the clinic and Wafah 
confronted him he ignored her and that was the last time he ever spoke to any of his daughters. 

Leon9 

Since Yeslam charged Carmen with adultery, she can no longer step in any middle­eastern 
country connected with Saudi or she will be killed. They decided to keep the Bin Laden last 
name, but changed the spelling because Bin Laden was a terrorist symbol. But they didn’t 
change it since they had nothing to hide.  
In chapter nineteen, Conclusion, the Bin Laden’s had cut off Osama completely after 
9/11. No Saudi has nor will admire Western society. Saudi Arabia is filled with hypocrisy, but 
“for the Saudis...what is hidden does not exist”. There is no room to grow for them, they are 
always angry with the west. Carmen fought for freedom for her daughters. All she wanted was 
freedom for her daughters now she can say they are.