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Lesson Theme: Communities

Grade: 2
Monday:
Lesson Title: Communities
Grade Level: 2

nd

Grade

Duration/Time: 45-60 minutes
Subject/Content Area: Social Studies/Writing
Overview:
- Today we will focus on communities in general. In this lesson, the students will be able to brainstorm
their ideas and thoughts that relate to communities. The students will then be able to use dictionaries to
compare their thoughts to specific definitions.
Materials:
- Post-It Notes
- Chart Paper
- Dictionaries
Objective:
The students will be able to define the term ―community‖ through a variety of methods such as brainstorm,
class discussion, interactive games, and classroom resources such as dictionaries which they will use to
make connections to the communities they belong to in their own lives.
Procedure:
Introduce: Take two minutes to write down all the words or pictures that you think of when I say the word
―Community.‖ Post chart paper with ―COMMUNITY‖ written in the middle.
Activity: Each student selects their top three suggestions and writes them on a post-it notes. Each table
adds their post-its to the chart paper. Have students take out their dictionaries and look up the word.
Work as a team to figure out how to find a word in the dictionary. One student at each table reads the
definition to the team. They decide how to rephrase it in their own words, as if explaining it to a little
brother or sister.
Discuss all definitions and contributions on the poster. Talk about the fact that communities can be
neighborhoods, churches, schools, classrooms, friends at work. List similarities between different types of
communities to develop a list of community characteristics. For example: people that feel they have
something in common, work together, have similar needs, etc. Talk about how a classroom can be a
community. What might they all have in common?
Play the game Two Truths and a Lie. Have students write down each of their truths and lies on separate

sheets of paper, with their names on them. After playing game, group slips of paper by similarities. You
will probably discover that there are a lot of similarities between students. Number of siblings,
neighborhood, where they went to school last year, where they grew up, age, etc. Make a web of things in
common.
Closure:
Have students discuss complete the cover to community book. On the cover, they will write the word
―COMMUNITIES‖ as well as their name. One the inside of the cover, have the students write a general
definition based on the activity completed during the lesson. Have the students collaborate with one
another and share their ideas with others students. Provide examples for students who seem to be
struggling with this concept. Ask students to write 2-4 sentences discussing what a community is and how
this term relates to their own life/classroom life.
Resources: Teachers Pay Teachers
http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Communities-788839

Lesson Title: Community Helpers
Grade Level: 2nd Grade
Duration/Time: 60 minutes
Subject/Content Area: Social Studies/Music/Reading
Overview:
- This lesson allows students to explore the various members in the community and
their contributions to making the area we live a good place.
Materials:
- Book: ―Percy’s Neighborhood‖ by Stuart J. Murphy
- Pantomime Poem: ―When I Grow Up‖
- Index cards
- Images of community helpers
- Paper bags (community helpers puppet)
- Craft supplies
Objective:
The students will be able to list and describe the different types of helpers that
contribute to a the well-being of the community and their community roles through a
music and movement activity.

Procedure:
Introduce: Ask students to think of what it means to be a community helper. Also ask
the students to think of various community helpers that they know or see around town.
Ask: How do you think these people help the community?
Create a list of community helpers based on what the students think and explain to the
rest of the class.
Read the book, ―Percy’s Neighborhood‖ by Stuart J. Murphy. Occasionally stop
throughout the book to ask students if there are any connections to be made in the book
to the class discussion.
Activity: Have each student draw an index card from a hat/box. Each card will be
labeled with a community helper’s job. This will be how students know what to make
their community helper puppet.
Model for the students how they will make their puppet. Provide students with time to
create their puppet. Have a variety of colored shirts, occupation hats, etc. You could
even have white cut outs and the students have to decorate them using crayons,
markers, etc.
Once the students have completed their puppet to fit their community helper, ask the
students to glue their description on the back of their paper bag. This will be what they
say during their portion of the song.
Each student will be given the opportunity to stand up and share their puppet with the
rest of the class, reading their portion of the poem and completing actions that match
what is being said in the song. Once each student is finished presenting, ask the rest of
the class to guess what community helper is being described. The students will take
turns sharing their puppet/pantomimes with the rest of the class. (The pantomime –
attached below -- can be adapted to fit any tune you would like to set it to)
Once the class is finished, ask if there were any community helpers that were not
presented that should have been.
Closure:
Use the approach ―I Care Why?‖ Have students think of how this lesson/concept is
relevant to their lives and how they might use this information. Have the students share
with a partner and then have groups share out loud with the whole class.
Resources:
Creative Approaches to Elementary Curriculum
by Margaret Merrion and Janet Rubin
Chapter 8, pg. 246-247
When I grow up I want to be a famous person on TV.

When I grow up I want to be a sailor on the rolling sea.
When I group up I want to be a locksmith fixing doors and keys.
When I grow up I want to be a forester protecting trees.
When I grow up I want to be making music in all keys.
When I grow up I want to be a tailor of dungarees.
When I grow up I want to be a beekeeper with honey.
When I grow up I want to be a writer telling fantasies.
When I grow up I want to be a zookeeper with chimpanzees.
When I grow up I want to be a surgeon mending knees.
When I grow up I want to be an astronaut feeling ―g‖s.
When I grow up I want to be elected by majority.
When I grow up I want to be a teacher of technology.
When I grow up I want to be a valuable employee.
When I grow up I want to see that I pleased others as well as me.

Lesson Title: Community Helpers
Grade Level: 2nd Grade
Duration/Time: 60-75 minutes
Subject/Content Area: Social Studies/Reading/Writing

Overview:
- In this lesson, students will be able to apply what they learned about community
helpers in the previous lesson and learn about real experiences from various community
members.
Materials:
- Community Members from the area
- Interview Questions
- Loose-leaf paper (Writing Journals)
Objective:
The students will be able to engage in verbal conversations with real community
members as well as write what they learned through this activity in their writing journal
and eventually share their reflections with small groups.
Procedure:
Introduce: Review the different community helpers discussed and learned in the
previous lesson.
At this point, the students were prepared for community helpers to visit their classroom.
The groups were pre-determined and the students took time to think of questions they
would like to ask their community helper.
Divide the students so they are in groups of 2-4 with a community helper. Each student
will be provided with a sheet with the various questions they are going to interview their
community member with. These should only last about 15-20 minutes. Provide the
community helpers with the questions before hand and ask for documentation of their
answers. You can use these as references later during the writing activity.
Once the students have finished their interviews, the community helpers will leave.
Have each of the students write a thank you letter to their community helper. In the
letter, have the students thank the helper for their time, explain what the student
learned, and maybe include a question if they still have one.
Then, divide the students (pre-determined) based on their community helpers and have
the students read their letters in their small groups. This will allow for the students to
hear what other community helpers discussed with their small groups. This will also
allow for students to practice reading and listening to others read.
Closure:
Have the students return to their desks and write on an exit slip completing the
statement: I learned… based on something they learned about another community
helper that was shared in their small group letter reading. Have the students turn in
these slips to you when finished.
Resources: BrainPOP Educators

http://www.brainpop.com/educators/community/lesson-plan/community-helpersactivities-for-kids/

Lesson Title: Community Helpers/Time Telling
Grade Level: 2nd Grade
Duration/Time: 45 minutes
Subject/Content Area: Social Studies/Math
Overview:
- The lesson will provide students with the opportunity to practice writing and telling time
and how it relates to real-life situations in the community.
Materials:
- Black strips of paper
- Circle time templates
- Community helpers scenarios
- Telling Time Worksheets
Objective:
The students will be able to practice writing and telling time through an interactive
activity with their classmates.
Procedure:
Introduce: Have a large clock display at the front of the room. Provide students with
three different times and write them on the clock. Ask the students to identify what time
it is. Then write a few different times on the board and ask students to write what time
this is on the clock.
Pass out different scenarios to each student with a different time included in the story.
For example: Dr. Jones just finished his monthly check-up with little Susie. It is time for
him to take his lunch break. When Dr. Jones walked down the hall toward the lunch
room and look toward the clock, he read that it was 12:10. Record this time on your
clock.

Each student will write this time on their clock template. Then each student will be
instructed to cut out the clock template and glue it on their black strip of paper.
Glue/Staple the black strip of paper in a circle so this clock can rest on the students'
heads like a hat.
Make sure that each time is correct according to the students' scenarios.
Now, each student will walk around to their different classmates and try to tell time.
They will record this time on their sheets by writing the students' names as well as the
time on their hats. It is important for the students to not tell each other their times and let
each student determine the time on their own.
Once all of the times are recorded, have the students gather as a large group and go
through each person to determine what time they had. Ask a student to share what they
thought and then ask the student with that time to confirm if that answer is correct or
not. Have the students write their answer in a different color if it is incorrect.
Complete this process until all times are shared.
Closure:
Quiz: Provide students with a sheet of 3-4 different scenarios. Ask the students to read
the scenarios and then record the time on the paper clock. They will work on this quiz
individually. The students will turn this in to you once they have completed the quiz.
Resources:
N/A

Tuesday:
Lesson Title: My School/My Neighborhood
Grade Level: 2nd Grade
Duration/Time: 45 minutes
Subject/Content Area: Reading/Writing
Overview: Today, we will be focusing on our school and neighborhood as communities. Therefore,
in this lesson, we will be using a mentor text to observe the different parts of a character’s
neighborhood that will allow us to compare various neighborhoods.
Materials:
 “Franklin’s Neighborhood” by Paulette Bourgeois


Prediction worksheet
Comprehension worksheet

Objective: The students will be able to identify the various places, parts, and aspects of a
neighborhood through a mentor text.
Procedure:
 Tell the students that we will be reading the book, “Franklin’s Neighborhood” by Paulette
Bourgeois.
 Before Reading:
o Hand out one prediction worksheet to each student.
o Ask the students to write down what they think they will see in Franklin’s
Neighborhood.
 During Reading:
o Tell the students to keep these questions in mind while I read the book:
 What things are you noticing in Franklin’s neighborhood?
 Are they some of the things that you predicted would be in his
neighborhood?
 Do you have some of the same things in your own neighborhood?
Closure:
 After Reading:
o When finished reading, hand out one comprehension worksheet for students to
make a list about the things and places they saw in Franklin’s neighborhood and to
write about what Franklin liked best about his neighborhood.
References: Franklin’s Neighborhood PowerPoint (Google)

Lesson Title: My School/My Neighborhood
Grade Level: 2nd Grade
Duration/Time: 60 minutes
Subject/Content Area: Writing/Social Studies
Overview: After reading “Franklin’s Neighborhood” by Paulette Bourgeois, we will be focusing on
our classroom as a community. Therefore, we will be creating a map of our classroom.
Materials:
 “Franklin’s Neighborhood” by Paulette Bourgeois
 Paper
 Shapes
 Writing utensils
 Glue
Objective: The students will be able to construct a map of our classroom using various shapes.
Procedure:
 Review with the students what are some objects or places that we saw in Franklin’s
neighborhood. (Do a picture walk if students need a reminder.)
 Review the different types of communities. (Neighborhoods and schools)
 Ask the students how you can show someone what your community looks like without
bringing them. (You can create a map.)
 Explain that today we will be creating a map of our classroom because our classroom is a
part of our school, which is a community.
 Pass out paper and shapes. Identify most prominent and important objects in the classroom
that should be represented in the map.
 Work together as a class to identify objects, choose shapes, and glue them in the
appropriate place according to the arrangement of the classroom.
 Explain the importance of and create a map key.
Closure:
 Have a class discussion about what else you could make a map of that would show someone
part of your community.
References: Sophomore Block

Lesson Title: My School/My Neighborhood
Grade Level: 2nd Grade
Duration/Time: 60 minutes
Subject/Content Area: Math
Overview: Because we focused on our classroom as a community, we will now be focusing on the
bigger picture, our school and the neighborhood surrounding our school. We will be taking a walk
outside while running a tally of how often we see common neighborhood objects.
Materials:
 Observation sheet
 Writing utensil
Objective: The students will be able to identify and record objects within the school neighborhood.
 The students will be able to calculate the number of times the students saw each object in
our class list.
Procedure:
 Through a class discussion, make a list of common neighborhood objects that you may see.
(Write the list on large paper.)
 Explain that we will be going on a walk today to look for these things.
 Before going on the walk, talk about behavior expectations.
 Split the class into partners or small groups and give each pair or group paper to write the
list that we just created.
 Explain that when students find something on the list, they will put a tally next to the object
and they must continue to write tallies as they find more. (Take a picture walk through
“Franklin’s Neighborhood” to use as an example if needed.)
 Begin the walk outside while carrying the paper so that all students can see the objects that
they should be looking for.
Closure:
 Have a class discussion on specific objects found in the school neighborhood and how many
of each object there were.
 Ask the students focus questions:
o Do you see these objects in your neighborhood?
o What are some objects that you see/don’t see in your neighborhood that we
did/didn’t see in the school neighborhood?
o What are some other neighborhoods that we could visit and identify some of these
common objects and places? (the park, the mall, grandma’s house, etc.)
References: http://www.messforless.net/2013/05/learn-throughmovement-i-spy.html

Lesson Title: My School/My Neighborhood
Grade Level: 2nd Grade
Duration/Time: 60 minutes
Subject/Content Area: Science
Overview: We will be creating texture maps illustrating what our school neighborhood looks like by
collecting materials from outside.
Materials:
 White paper
 Writing utensils
 Glue
 Scissors
 Crayons
Objective: The students will be able to collect materials from around the outside of the school.
 The students will be able to construct a model of the school neighborhood using outside
materials to represent the different areas.
Procedure:
 Review with the class that we created a map of our classroom using shapes. Talk about the
many different types of maps that someone could use or create.
 Explain that now we will be creating a texture map of the neighborhood around our school.
 Explain the behavior expectations for when we are outside collecting materials.
 Give each student a small bag to collect his or her materials. (Write their name on it.)
 Begin the walk around the perimeter of the school while monitoring students. (Set a time
limit and a perimeter limit.)
 Call students back to the classroom after the time limit is reached.
 Allow time for students to create their representation of the school’s neighborhood. Allow
the students to make it their own using any techniques. (Cutting, gluing, tracing, color
rubbing, etc.)
Closure:
 Have a class discussion about the different materials that everyone decided to use to
represent the neighborhood.
 Think-pair-share: One material that you used.
References: http://www.education.com/activity/article/texture-map/

Wednesday:
Kaitlin Delahaut

My City, My State
Lesson #1

Grade: 2nd
Standard:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.1
Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate
understanding of key details in a text.
Duration/Time: 45 minutes
Content Area: Reading & Art
Overview: Today, we will be learning about our city and our states communities. In this
lesson students will read about how people live now and in the past.
Materials:
 Worksheet- attached
 Pencil
 Crayons, Markers, Colored Pencils
Objective: Students will be about to read and know how people live in the past in the
present in our cities community.
Procedure:
 Review with students what a community is.
 Ask the students what they know about their community.
 Make a list on the board of what the students know.
 As a class we will read the short book and then each student will be assigned to a
partner to read with.
 After the students are done reading the story, they will cut the pages out.
 The students will then color the book.
Closure: Have a class discussion about what they learned.
Evaluation: Walk around the class and take observations.

Kaitlin Delahaut

My City, My State
Lesson #2

Grade: 2nd grade
Standard:
B.2.8 Compare past and present technologies related to energy, transportation, and
communications and describe the effects of technological change, either beneficial or harmful,
on people and the environment
Duration/ Time: 60 minutes
Content area/ Subject: Writing/ Social Studies
Overview: We will continue learning about my city and my state. In today’s lesson students
will be in a group, researching different communities in the city.
Materials:
 Past and present worksheet to fill out
 Internet
 Text book
 Pencil
Objective: the students will be able to know the difference between how the people in the
past and present lived in the city.
Procedure:
 Review with the students what a community is.
 Spilt the students into groups
 Either one or two people
 Explain to the students that they will be looking up on the internet so that they stay
on task.
 Pass out a worksheet out to each group.
 When the students are done looking up the information have the students present
the information that they found to the class.
Closure:
After the students are done presenting discuss what the students learned
Evaluation:
Observe the students by walking around while they are working on the assignment
and when the students present observe and take knows to see if they took away what they
were suppose to do.

Kaitlin Delahaut

My City, My State
Lesson #3

Grade: 2nd grade
Standard:
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.MD.C.8
Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and ¢
symbols appropriately. Example: If you have 2 dimes and 3 pennies, how many cents do you
have?
Duration/ Time: 60 minutes
Content area/ Subject: Math
Overview: We will continue learning about my city and my state. In today’s lesson students
will learn how much items cost in the past and the future
Materials:
 Past and present worksheet to fill out
 Fake money
 Text book
 Pencil
Objective: the students will be able to know the difference between the cost of items in the
past and the future.
Procedure:
 Review with the students what a community is.
 Give each table some fake money to work with
 Talk about the different prices of certain items
 Toothbrush
 Gas
 Milk
 Butter
 Sugar
 Pass out a worksheet out to each student
 Have the students use the fake money to show how much items cost.
Closure:
After the students are done presenting discuss what the students learned.
Evaluation:
Observe the students by walking around while they are working on the assignment
and have students volunteer to show the answers.

Thursday:
Lesson Title: American Heroes (Brigette)
Grade: 2nd
Time: 30 minutes
Content Area: Reading/Writing
Materials: What Do Heroes Wear? By Gary Bower, paper, pencils
Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.2.6
Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or
describe.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.2.5
With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing
as needed by revising and editing.
Objective: SWBAT recognize that heroes do not just wear capes, but that they are
everyday people willing to serve and sacrifice for others. SWBAT realize that there are
American heroes protecting them every day and will be able to express their gratitude to a
soldier in the form of a thank-you letter.
Procedure:
1. Read the story What Do Heroes Wear?
2. Discuss the story and have children think of heroes in their everyday life.
3. Tell the students that today, we are going to focus on heroes that serve our country as
American soldiers and we get the opportunity to say thank you to them for being our heroes.
4. Discuss sacrifices that soldiers make everyday and ways in which they serve our
country.
5. Distribute paper and pencils and have students write a rough draft thank you letter to
soldiers.
6. Self-edit, peer-edit, and then have students write a final copy.
Closure: Have a class discussion about students’ thoughts and feelings about soldiers and
the letters that they wrote to them.
References: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/American-Heroes-for-LittleLearnersFreebie-869368

Lesson Title: Sounds like the Liberty Bell (Brigette)
Grade: 2nd
Time: 30 minutes
Content Area: Science
Materials: 2 identical hand bells—one with a crack (use a hack saw if needed),
Objective: SWBAT make a hypothesis and recognize that different sizes and shapes of
material impact sound waves and vibrations.
Procedure:

1. Form a hypothesis and have class vote on if they think the crack in the liberty bell made
it sound different.
2. Test the bells for sound differences by ringing each one.
3. Discuss student theories on why the sounds are different.
4. Discuss how the crack causes the sound waves to vibrate differently, which causes it to
make a different sound.
Closure: Discuss with a partner the original hypothesis, if you were right or wrong, and why
the sounds are different.
References:
http://mrsjumpsclass.blogspot.com/2011_02_01_archive.html

Lesson Title: Mapping North America (Brigette)
Grade: 2nd
Time: 30 minutes
Content Area: Social Studies
Materials: Explore North America by Bobbie Kahlman, blank student maps of North
America, scavenger hunt page for each student, crayons/markers
Standard:
2.3.1d

Map Elements - Recognize that a map contains elements such as title, scale,
symbols, legends, grids, and cardinal and intermediate directions.

Objective: SWBAT identify their continent as North America. SWBAT create a map of
North America and it’s landforms.
Procedure:
1. Briefly discuss the 7 continents.
2. Read Explore North America.
3. Have a class discussion on the book and things that students learned about North
America.
4. Hand out remaining materials and tell students that they will create a map of North
America and it’s landforms by using the provided maps.
5. Remind students to include a map key, compass rose, and map title.
6. Allow students to color map based on the colors of the countries flag.
Closure: Have students share their map with a partner and describe what the landforms,
elements, and colors.
References: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/North-America-LandformMapping-Project-345816

Lesson Title: American Symbols Graphing (Brigette)
Grade: 2nd
Time: 30 minutes
Content Area: Math
Materials: American symbols cube (shown on the right), tally charts, graph paper, crayons
or markers to graph with
Standard: CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.MD.D.10
Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to represent a data set with up
to four categories. Solve simple put-together, take-apart, and compare problems using
information presented in a bar graph.
Objective: SWBAT tally how many times they rolled each symbol and will be able to
represent their data in a bar graph.
Procedure:
1. Show a PowerPoint with pictures of each symbol and it’s significance.
2. Explain to the students that they will have a partner and will take turns rolling the
cube. They will tally how many times they roll each symbol as well as the total of how many
times they have rolled. Once they have rolled 25 times, they will chart their data on a bar
graph.
Closure: Have students discuss their findings and share their graphs with another group.
References: http://www.mpmschoolsupplies.com/ideas/3552/patriotic-cube-game/
1

Friday:
Alyssa Wagner
Day 5 Lesson Theme: My World
Lesson Title: Keeping Current with Stories from Global Communities
Grade Level: 2nd Grade
Duration/Time: 60-75 minutes
Subject/Content Area: Reading, Writing, and Social Studies
Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.4
Describe how words and phrases supply rhythm and meaning in a story or poem.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.7
Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate
understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.2.4
Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
E.4.12 Give examples of important contributions made by Wisconsin citizens, United States
citizens, and world citizens
E.4.9 Explain how people learn about others who are different from themselves
Overview: In this lesson the students will first hear the story If the World Were a Village: A
Book About the World’s People by David Smith. The students will then be exposed to current
events happening around the world in different global communities. They will have the chance
to work on their reading fluency and comprehension with a partner, summarizing or touching on

an important aspect of their article through the creation of a haiku poem and reading it aloud to
their partner.
Materials:
 If the World Were a Village: A Book About the World’s People
 Current event articles
 Construction Paper
 Pencils
 Bulletin board
 Push pins
 Yarn
Objective:
The students will be able to read and summarize a current event from around the world and
create an original haiku poem.
Procedure:
 Begin the lesson by reading the story If The World Were a Village: A Book About the
World’s People.
 Discuss the story with the children and how everyone in the world comes from unique
communities that celebrate different traditions and live through different events that
define their community in a positive, or sometimes, a negative light.
 Review what a haiku poem is with the students. (there are 3 lines: 5 syllables, 7
syllables, 5 syllables)
 Discuss with the students how there are different events occurring in communities all
over the world every day and we can learn about them through reading newspapers or
magazines.
 Explain to the students they will be reading a current event article with a partner today
and then will write their own individual haiku poem to summarize it or hit on one
important aspect in the article.
 Pair the students with a partner by drawing their names from popsicle sticks in a cup.
 Give the students a piece of construction paper and a pencil and have them sit at a table to
read their article with their partner.
 When the students have completed reading the articles, they may begin to write their
poem.
 When the poems have been created, have the students practice reading their poems aloud
with their partners.
 When all students are finished practicing, have them come back and sit on the carpet for a
large group activity.
 Tell the students the articles they read are going to be put up on a bulletin board titled
“Events from Around the World”.
 A large picture of the earth will be positioned on the bulletin board. Each pair will be
able to go up to the board and put a push pin in the location where their article took place.


Use a globe to help the students find the location of the city or country.
As the push pins are placed on the Earth, tie a piece of yarn around the pin and connect
the string to the next pin. When all the pins are placed, the students will be able to see
the places near and far that they have traveled to and learned about today.
Collect all the student’s articles and place them on the outer edge of the bulletin board so
the students can read other current events when they have free time.

Closure:
 When the pins are placed and the articles are surrounding the bulletin board, and the
students are sitting on the carpet, allow the students the opportunity to share their poems
with the rest of the class.
 Once all the poems have been shared, collect the poems and tell the students the teacher
will be making them into a booklet they will be able to read during silent reading time.
 Review that every day, new events about traditions, cultures, war, government, natural
events, and people, sometimes good and sometimes sad, are happening in communities
all around the world, just like new events are constantly occurring in our own country and
local and state communities.
References:
http://www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/lesson/lesson072.shtml

Alyssa Wagner
Day 5 Lesson Theme: My World
Lesson Title: Let’s Get Moving and Sing About our World!
Grade Level: 2nd Grade
Duration/Time: 45 minutes
Subject/Content Area: Art and Music and Movement
Standard: A.4.2 Sing expressively with appropriate dynamics, phrasing, and interpretation.
Overview: The students will first listen to the song and watch the short video of Hello to All the
Children of the World. Then they will have the opportunity to sing and move to the song on the
video. Then the students will make the last page to their layered flip book labeling it with “My
World” and coloring a picture of the Earth.
Materials:
 Computer
 Projector
 Video
 Large paper circles
 Printed pictures of the Earth




Markers
Crayons
Glue
Pencils

Objective: The students will be able to sing the song Hello to All the Children of the World and
then create the last circle for their booklet on the world.
Procedures:
 Begin by having the students take a seat on the carpet.
 Tell the students a video song, Hello to All the Children of the World, will be played and
they must pay close attention to the words.
 Play the video song for the students.
 After it is finished, have the students stand up and sing along with the video.
 Then introduce hand motions to the children.
o Have the student’s wave one hand at a time starting with their left when they hear
the different ways to say hello in various countries around the world.
o When the song verses begin, have the students clap their hands to the beat and
march in place.
 Play the song once more and have the students include the motions.
 When the students have completed the song with actions, have them take a seat at their
work tables.
 Review with the students that this week they were learning all about the different
communities that make up the world. The students learned about their school and
neighborhood community, their city and state, their country and continent, and today will
be wrapping up the week learning about the world we live in.
 Explain to the students that the communities of the world are diverse in the way people
look, dress, live with family, celebrate traditions and holidays, the food they eat, and the
places they travel to and how, but each way of life is unique to them and should be
respected. As we saw from the video, communities in our world differ by the languages
we speak and how people communicate with one another. Our special talents and
abilities help make the world a great place to be!
 Have the students take out their layered community booklets.
 Explain to the students they will be creating the last page in their community booklet.
Tell the students they will receive a large paper circle and near the bottom they should
write the words “My World”. They will also receive a picture of the Earth to color.
 When the students have written the words and colored the picture, they may glue the
earth to the large circle.
 When the Earth circles are complete, they may punch a hole near the top of their paper
and connect the circle to their booklets as the last page.


When completed, the students will have a booklet that describes each of them and where
they live in the world.
Allow the students to work on their projects for 10 minutes.

Closure:
 When all of the booklets are complete and the supplies are put away, call all the students
to the carpet.
 Review with them their entire completed booklet.
 Review the concept that world is full of diverse communities, such as the ones we
created, and vary due to the cultures and traditions in each area around the world.
References:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpTR1wF4M6k

Alyssa Wagner
Day 5 Lesson Theme: My World
Lesson Title: Traveling Through Time Zones in Different Communities
Grade Level: 2nd Grade
Duration/Time: 45 minutes
Subject/Content Area: Math
Standard: CCSS.Math.Content.2.MD.C.7 Tell and write time from analog and digital clocks to
the nearest five minutes, using a.m. and p.m.
Overview: In this lesson, the students will be learning about the different time zones that people
live and function in, often differently from us. The students will be working on telling time,
practicing with the different time zones around the world and the USA. The students will work
on telling time with hour and minute hand clocks (analog) as well as digital clocks.
Materials:
 Analog clocks
 Digital clock
 Projector
 Pencils
 Time worksheets
Objective: The students will be able to record the correct time of different countries, in different
time zones, on both the analog and digital clocks.
Procedure:








Introduce that in the world, people live in different time zones depending on what
country they live in or the part of the country they live in. When we are sleeping, some
people are at work or school because it is morning, and when we are at school, some
people are sleeping.
Even in the United States, there are four major different time zones that people live in.
Explain to the students we live in the Central Time Zone, but there are also three other
time zones, Pacific Time Zone, Mountain Time Zone, and Eastern Time Zone. Alaska
and Hawaii are also in a different time zone. Show the students the picture of the time
zone break up on the projector.
Tell the students they are going to work on telling time today and recording the times of
certain places around the world on analog and digital clocks.
Bring the website up that identifies different time zones around the world.
Demonstrate the task to the children by completing an example. Point to Moscow with
the mouse. Say the current time in Moscow, putting the time on the analog clock and
then writing the time digitally on the board.
Give each of the students a small analog clock and a sheet with spots for them to fill in
the digital clock.
Begin by hovering the mouse over Rio de Janeiro. Ask the students to read the time
aloud. Then, have the student make the time on their analog clocks. To check their times,
have them lift their clocks up in the air.
Then have the students write the time on their worksheet digitally and include am or pm.
Continue this process for the remaining locations: New Delhi, Manila, Adelaide, Tokyo,
Berlin, Seattle, Montreal, and Guatemala.
When the students have completed recording the times, have them compare their
worksheets with a partner.
After the students have had time to share their answers with a classmate, regroup the
students for a large group discussion.
Review the times with the students (the teacher must write the times in as each location is
covered so the correct times are listed for the students to check and compare their
answers).

Closure:
 Discuss with the students how depending on the community you live in the world you
will be doing different things than people living in another time zone since our days and
nights may not be the same. As seen in the activity, some countries are hours and even a
day ahead or behind us in time. So time is a something we must keep in mind when
traveling or learning about events happening around the world.
References:

http://www.timeanddate.com/time/map/

Alyssa Wagner
Day 5 Lesson Theme: My World
Lesson Title: Spreading Kindness Around Our World
Grade Level: 2nd Grade
Duration/Time: 45 minutes
Subject/Content Area: Writing and Art
Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.2.5
With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as
needed by revising and editing.
C.4.7 Develop basic skills to produce quality art.
C.4.8 Explore the natural characteristics of materials and their possibilities and limitations.
Overview: The lesson will begin with the reading of the book Ordinary Mary’s Extraordinary
Deed by Emily Pearson. The students will receive a cut-out of a person and then be able to make
their clothing out of fabric, add physical features, and yarn hair to make the cut-out look like
them. Then the students will write how they can personally leave a positive foot print, or make a
positive impact in their world through random acts of kindness, and write their idea on a cloud.
Working as a team, the students will put an earth puzzle together, and when it is complete, it will
be hung on the wall with their cut-outs around it and their idea for positivity above.
Objective: The students will be able to write how they can make a positive impact in the world
and learn a small act of kindness can make a big difference to help others in local and global
communities.
Materials:
 Ordinary Mary’s Extraordinary Deed
 People cut outs









Clouds
Earth puzzle pieces
Fabric
Yarn
Markers
Pencils
Soil
Flowers to plant
Cups

Procedures:
 Teach the students that we are all one big global community and the things we do even in
our small local community, can make a positive impact in our world. One act of kindness
can spread and encourage others to do good works and reach people nationally and
worldwide. All we need to do is our best and put others and their needs before our own,
sharing the idea of random acts of kindness.
 Read the book Ordinary Mary’s Extraordinary Deed by Emily Pearson.
 After the book is read, discuss with the students how like Mary, they can all do great
things to help others.
 Explain to the students they will be decorating a paper person cut-out today to look like
themselves. They will be able to use fabric for their clothes, yarn for hair, and markers to
add facial features. Remind the children to do their best work, as this is a depiction of
how they want others in the world to see them.
 Then explain the next step is to write something on a cloud they can do to make a
positive impact in the lives of others. Examples might include raking leaves, shoveling
snow, giving hugs, making cards, helping their parents or siblings, donating food, clothes,
or toys to charity drives, buying a present to donate during the holiday season etc.
 Ask the students if they have any questions.
 Then, pass out the people cut-outs to the students and lay out the supplies on the table for
them to use.
 Let the students begin the project.
 When the students complete the cut-out of themselves and their positive impact cloud,
gather all the students and explain the next step of the activity.
 Tell the students that teamwork is an important action to take, especially when there is a
bigger project to do or a problem to solve. Today they are going to work on their
teamwork skills by working cooperatively together on a world puzzle.
 Once the puzzle is complete, have the students work together to tape the pieces together
and put the Earth visual on the wall.
 When the Earth is taped to the wall, discuss the next step of the activity with the students.






Tell the students they will now tape their cut-outs around the earth and then place their
cloud above the cut-out.
Explain to the students this will be a visual reminder of the promise they made to help
make a positive impact in the world.
As a concluding activity, the students will be doing a random act of kindness for the
senior citizens in the community by planting flowers.
The teacher will deliver the flowers after school.
Take the students outside so they can scoop the dirt into the cups and plant their flower.
Once all the students have a flower planted, have the students come back into the school
and take a seat on the carpet in the room.

Closure:
 Review with the students that a small random act of kindness can spread and continue to
help or make a person’s day here in their local community, state, country, continent, and
even the world. The flowers planted will make the senior citizens’ day a little brighter
and may continue to have a positive effect on them and their visitors, putting smiles on
their faces and in their hearts!
References:
http://mrstsfirstgradeclass-jill.blogspot.com/search/label/MLK%20Jr.