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Lesson #1

About Electricity

Date

November 2, 2014

Subject/Grade
Level

Grade 5 Science

Time
Duration

~ 33 minutes

Unit

Electricity and Magnetism

Teacher

Mr. Stephen Bore

OUTCOMES FROM ALBERTA PROGRAM OF STUDIES
General
Learning
Outcomes:
Specific
Learning
Outcomes:

5.5 Demonstrate safe methods for the study of magnetism and electricity, identify methods for
measurement and control, and apply techniques for evaluating magnetic and electrical properties
of materials.
1. Recognize and appreciate the potential dangers involved in using sources of
electrical currents:
• understand that household electrical currents are potentially dangerous and not
a suitable source for experimentation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Students will:
1. Understand that household electrical currents are potentially dangerous and not a suitable source for
experimentation
2. Never work with lights or appliances that are plugged into the wall.
3. Stay away from downed power lines. Let an adult know right away if you see a broken wire from a house
or from a utility pole.

ASSESSMENTS
Observations:
Key Questions:
Products/Performances:






Watching students during lesson and activities
How engaged students are in completing worksheet
What is electricity?
What does electricity do?
Worksheet on static and current electricity
KWL chart with help from class

LEARNING RESOURCES CONSULTED


http://www.pinterest.com/explore/sciencenotebook-rubric/
http://www.teachnology.com/web_tools/rubrics/general/
National Sciences Resources Center. 1991.
Electric Circuits: Student Activity Book. Carolina
Biological Supply Company. Burlington, North
Carolina.
Elementary Science Assessment Kit. No date.
Educational Distributors. Calgary, Alberta.
Found on Lesson Plan Databasehttp://www.uleth.ca/education/resources/curricul
um-laboratory/great-sites/digitalresources/lesson-plandatabase#http://www.uleth.ca/education/resourc
es/curriculum-laboratory/great-sites/digitalresources/lesson-plan-database#

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT



Golf ball
Balloon
Smartboard
PowerPoint presentation

1







Topic A: Electricity and Magnetism. 1996.
Edmonton Public Schools. Edmonton, Alberta.
Alberta Education Grade 5 Science Program of
Studies:
http://www.wpclipart.com/science/atoms_molec
ules/atom_diagram.png.html
http://www.qrg.northwestern.edu/projects/vss/d
ocs/power/2-whats-electron-flow.html
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UE7R9AF0W
pw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gixkpsrxk4Y
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZAFW4zdXp
bY

PROCEDURE
Prior to lesson
Introduction
Attention Grabber
Assessment
Knowledge

of

Time

Prior

Expectations
for
Learning and Behaviour

Advance
Organizer/Agenda
Transition to Body
Body
Learning Activity #1

Watch video that gives an overview of electricity:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZAFW4zdXpbY
Ask class: what do you know about electricity?
I will record several of the students’ answers on the board at the front of
the class, in a KWL type format.
Students will be engaged in the lesson and lesson activities. I expect that
the class will ask lots of questions for understanding, and I will
encourage the class to ask questions.
I expect students to be respectful listeners.
Tell the class we are going to learn about electricity. We will see some
pictures and watch a short video to help us learn about electricity.
Create a KWL chart with information from students.

2 minutes
2 minutes

1 minute
Time

Provide an overview of electricity, and how it works, and use pictures
to reinforce learning concepts, then end with Static and Current
Electricity worksheet. (In conjunction with asking class what they
already know about electricity.)
Say: All matter is made of tiny particles called atoms. Atoms are made
up of even smaller particles called protons, neutrons and electrons.
Protons are positively charged particles found in the nucleus (center) of
the atom. Electrons, which are much smaller than protons, move around
the nucleus. Electrons that orbit the farthest away from the middle of the
atom can break free and travel to other atoms. In an electrically neutral
atom, the number of electrons is equal to the number of protons.

10 minutes

If an electron were to leave this atom, it would have more protons than
electrons; therefore, the atom would be positively charged. If an electron
were to join this atom’s orbit instead, there would be more electrons than
protons; therefore, the atom would be negatively charged.
Show labelled diagram of an atom.

2

Say: It is very difficult to imagine the size of an atom. If we could take
the nucleus of an atom, and make it the size of a golf ball (show golf
ball) the electrons would be smaller than popcorn kernels (show
popcorn kernels) and the entire atom would be about 3 kilometers in
diameter! That is about the same distance as from the school to the
highway overpass at Kipp by the train yards!
Electrical energy, or what we call electricity, is the result of the
movement of electrons. In some materials, the attraction between the
electron and the nucleus is very strong. These electrons are not easily
removed from the atom. Materials with tightly bonded electrons are
good insulators (materials that prevent the flow of electricity). Other
materials have loosely bonded (weakly attracted) electrons. Adding
heat, chemical, light or other forms of energy to these materials gives the
weakly bonded electrons enough energy to move away from the
nucleus of the atom. For example, static electricity is generated by using
heat energy produced by friction when you rub a balloon on your hair.
The loosely bonded electrons in hair absorb the heat energy and escape
their nucleus to move on to the surface of the balloon, thus building up
a negative electrostatic charge on the surface of the balloon.
Static electricity is the buildup of a stationary negative electric charge
(electrons) on the surface of an object.
Show picture of balloon and then demonstrate how static electricity is
produced by rubbing the balloon on your head with 2 or 3 students.

Electric energy or electricity comes in two forms: static electricity or
current electricity.
Static electricity is the electrical charge that is produced when two
things rub together which we have just seen from our example with the
balloon.
Ask: who can think of another way to create static electricity? (e.g.
shuffling stocking feet along a carpeted floor.)
Did you know that you can also see static electricity in the dark?
Our main focus will be on current electricity.
Current electricity is very useful. It can be transformed into light, heat
and motion energy.
Say: A current (electrons flowing) is produced when electrons absorb
energy (e.g. chemical, heat, light) and move along a continuous path
through an object. Current moving in a wire can be compared to water
moving through a garden hose. While the tap is turned on, water enters
the hose through one end and pushes the water already in the hose
further along until it leaves through the other end. Similarly, electrons
moving through a wire will bump into other electrons in the wire and
push them along the circuit.

3

Show picture of electrons moving inside of a wire.
So what happens is that electricity can then be changed or converted
into other useful forms of energy by electrical devices.
For example, electrical energy is converted into heat by a toaster, light
and heat by a light bulb, sound by a stereo, or motion by a motor.
Electrical energy can only be produced through the conversion of some
other form of energy. The continuous pathway through which
electricity flows is called a circuit. In order to work, a circuit needs a
source of electrical energy.
For this unit in future lessons, we will use batteries to supply electrical
energy. Electrical energy flows from the negative terminal, through the
circuit to the positive terminal of the battery. We will get to use those
in future lessons.

Teacher Notes: Assessments/
Differentiation

Learning Activity #2

Teacher Notes: Assessments/
Differentiation

Learning Activity #3

Teacher Notes: Assessments/
Differentiation

Consolidation of
Learning:

Watch for which students provide answers. Provide time between
questions being asked and when students provide answers. Let students
know that they will have some time to think about their answers.
Watch how well students are working together.
Have students write 2-3 sentences at the end of the activity about what
they liked as well as disliked about the activity. For some students in the
class, they may only be able to identify 1 aspect the lesson.
Have class members fill out worksheet on Static and Current Electricity.
Say: I have a worksheet for each of you to complete. This is to help you
understand the differences between current and static electricity. If you
have any questions about this exercise, raise your hand and I will come
over to what help you need.
Observe how focused students are on the exercise. Move about
classroom watching for students who may need assistance or
clarification.
Show video of Bill Nye the Science Guy explaining electricity
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gixkpsrxk4Y
This video is meant to be a summation of the concepts about electricity
presented in a fun way to engage students and enhance understanding.

10 minutes

7 minutes

Watch how well students are engaged in the video.
Closure
Understanding of the topic:
Students demonstrate understanding of the topic by following
instructions.
Students are able to carry out the activity without constant direction
from the teacher.
How well students show interest in the topic.

Time

Interpretation of Activities and Experiments
Student interpret results in an accurate and clear manner.
Works cooperatively in a group or independently with little
supervision depending upon the particular activity.

4

Students follows instructions with little difficulty.
Written and oral language skills
Students are able to express themselves well, and express their ideas
clearly.
Students show understanding of questions by accuracy of answers to
specific questions.
Students use correct spelling, grammar and punctuation appropriate
for their grade level.

Feedback From Students:
Feedback To Students
Transition To Next
Lesson

Other Areas
Students are able to understand the scientific terms, concepts and
process without difficulty.
Exit slip with 2 or 3 comments as to what they liked or didn’t like
about the activities.
Say thank you for the good work, class participation and respectful
listening.
There are a lot of things that use electricity and a lot of things that can
be done using electricity, but first, we need to learn about safety and
electricity.

2 minutes

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November 2, 2014

Lesson #2

Electricity Safety

Date

Subject/Grade
Level

Grade 5

Time
Duration

~ 30 minutes

Unit

Electricity

Teacher

Mr. Stephen Bore

OUTCOMES FROM ALBERTA PROGRAM OF STUDIES
General
Learning
Outcomes:
Specific
Learning
Outcomes:

5.5 Demonstrate safe methods for the study of magnetism and electricity, identify methods for
measurement and control, and apply techniques for evaluating magnetic and electrical
properties of materials.
1. Recognize and appreciate the potential dangers involved in using sources of
electrical currents:
• understand that household electrical currents are potentially dangerous and not
a suitable source for experimentation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Students will:
Understand how dangerous electricity can be.
Understand the need for safe practices when working with electricity

ASSESSMENTS
Observations:
Key Questions:
Products/Performances:

 The answers to the questions
 How engaged class is
 Does class understand how dangerous electricity is if not handled properly?
Exercise on unsafe electrical situations- pictures with scenarios and explanations to
be answered

LEARNING RESOURCES CONSULTED



http://www.atcoelectric.com/Community/In-YourCommunity/Documents/Power_Safe_2012_2.pdf
http://www.pinterest.com/explore/science-notebookrubric/
http://www.teachnology.com/web_tools/rubrics/general/
National Sciences Resources Center. 1991. Electric
Circuits: Student Activity Book. Carolina Biological
Supply Company. Burlington, North Carolina.
Elementary Science Assessment Kit. No date.
Educational Distributors. Calgary, Alberta. Found on
Lesson Plan Databasehttp://www.uleth.ca/education/resources/curriculumlaboratory/great-sites/digital-resources/lesson-plandatabase#http://www.uleth.ca/education/resources/c
urriculum-laboratory/great-sites/digitalresources/lesson-plan-database#
Topic A: Electricity and Magnetism. 1996. Edmonton
Public Schools. Edmonton, Alberta.

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT


Smartboard
Game board and game pieces
PowerPoint presentation

PROCEDURE
Prior to lesson
Introduction

Time

8

Attention Grabber
Assessment of Prior
Knowledge
Expectations for
Learning and Behaviour

Transition to Body

Learning Activity #1

Show video about electrical safety:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UE7R9AF0Wpw
Review of information about electricity learned in previous lesson.
Ask: What are the particles called that move and create electricity?
(I’m looking for someone to answer with Electrons.)
Students will be engaged in the lesson and lesson activities. I expect
that the class will ask lots of questions for understanding, and I will
encourage the class to ask questions.
I expect students to be respectful listeners.
Hand out electrical safety sheet and game and let students know they
will be working with these in the class.
Body
Say: Electricity is very dangerous because the human body is an
excellent conductor. Since our bodies consist of about 70 per cent water,
electricity travels through us very easily. While most people recognize
that high voltage electricity in a transmission line can kill a person, few
realize that more people in North America die from lower voltage home
electricity accidents than higher voltage accidents. So we all need to
learn how to live safely with electricity, both outdoors and indoors.
Outdoor wires should never be touched by anything, particularly
anything connected to the ground. For example, birds can sit safely on
wires because the bird is not creating a path for electricity to flow to the
ground. If a person standing on the ground or touching a transmission
tower poked a stick at a bird sitting on an electric wire, both the bird and
the person would become part of the path to the ground and receive a
shock and possibly be killed. This is an example of an electrical circuit,
and we will learn more about those in a different lesson.

3 minutes

1 minute
Time

15 minutes

Show picture demonstrating concept.
We will now get into groups of two to work on an exercise to help us
understand more about electrical safety.
(Pair off class into groups of 2 students each, pairing a grade 4 student
with a grade 5 student. Pairing to be done by choosing popsicle sticks
with a grade 4 name and a grade name).
Each group will work together to complete the unsafe electrical
situations exercises and answer the related questions in preparation for
creating the electrical safety posters. (Due to the odd number of
students in the class, one group will likely have three members.)

Teacher Notes: Assessments/
Differentiation

Watch for which students provide answers. Provide time between
questions being asked and when students provide answers. Let
students know that they will have some time to think about their
answers.
Watch how well students are working together.
Have students write 2-3 sentences at the end of the activity about what
they liked as well as disliked about the activity.

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Learning Activity #2

Teacher Notes: Assessments/
Differentiation

Consolidation of
Learning:

Say: Now we are going to play a game called Volts and Jolts. This will
help to learn about electrical safety in a fun way. Combine the groups
of two into larger groups of 4 each. (Due to the odd number of
students in the class, one group will likely have three members.)
Observe how groups play well and take turns. Observe if students
have any questions about how the game is to be played.
Move about classroom checking on student participation and
understanding, and ask is they understand the importance of safety
when using electricity.
Closure
Understanding of the topic:
Students demonstrate understanding of the topic by following
instructions.
Students are able to carry out the activity without constant direction
from the teacher.
How well students show interest in the topic.

10 minutes

Time

Interpretation of Activities and Experiments
Student interpret results in an accurate and clear manner.
Works cooperatively in a group or independently with little
supervision depending upon the particular activity.
Students follows instructions with little difficulty.
Written and oral language skills
Students are able to express themselves well, and express their ideas
clearly.
Students show understanding of questions by accuracy of answers to
specific questions.
Students use correct spelling, grammar and punctuation appropriate
for their grade level.

Feedback From Students:
Feedback To Students
Transition To Next
Lesson

Other Areas
Students are able to understand the scientific terms, concepts and
process without difficulty.
Exit slip with 2 or 3 comments as to what they liked or didn’t like
about the activities.
Say thank you for the good work, class participation, respectful
listening, and working well in groups.
In the next lesson, we will begin to learn how to apply our
understanding of electricity by learning about and then building a
simple electric circuit.

2-3 minutes

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Lesson #3

Electrical Circuits

Date

November 2, 2014

Subject/Grade
Level

Grade 5 Science

Time
Duration

~30 minutes

Unit

Electricity

Teacher

Mr. Stephen Bore

OUTCOMES FROM ALBERTA PROGRAM OF STUDIES
General
Learning
Outcomes:
Specific
Learning
Outcomes:

5.5 Demonstrate safe methods for the study of magnetism and electricity, identify methods for
measurement and control, and apply techniques for evaluating magnetic and electrical
properties of materials.
1. Recognize and appreciate the potential dangers involved in using sources of
electrical currents:
• understand that household electrical currents are potentially dangerous and not a suitable
source for experimentation.
•understand that small batteries are a relatively safe source of electricity for experimentation
and study, but that care should be taken to avoid short circuits; and
• understand that short circuits may cause wires to heat up, as well as waste the limited amount
of energy in batteries.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Students will:
1. Build and test a simple electric circuit

ASSESSMENTS
Observations:
Key Questions:
Products/Performances:




Watching students
Are students practicing safety during lesson activities.
Do students understand the difference between the 2 basic types of circuits?
Completion of a simple electric circuit

LEARNING RESOURCES CONSULTED

http://www.electrical-designer-guide.com/simpleelectrical-circuits.html
National Sciences Resources Center. 1991. Electric
Circuits: Student Activity Book. Carolina Biological
Supply Company. Burlington, North Carolina.
Magnets and Electricity. 1995. Step-by-Step Science
Series: Grades 4-6. Carson-Dellosa Publishing
Company, Inc. Greensboro, North Carolina.

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT




D cell Batteries
Small light bulb
Wires
Alligator clips
PowerPoint presentation

PROCEDURE
Prior to lesson
Attention Grabber
Assessment of Prior
Knowledge
Expectations for
Learning and Behaviour

Advance
Organizer/Agenda

Introduction
Show a picture of a basic electric circuit and tell class that we will be
building a circuit.
Review what we have learned about electricity and electrical safety
Create KWL chart as part of review about electrical safety
Students will be engaged in the lesson and lesson activities.
I expect students to be respectful listeners.
I expect that the class will ask lots of questions for understanding, and
I will encourage the class to ask questions.
Have components ready to build a circuit to help gain students interest
and attention.

Time
1 minute
3 minutes

15

Transition to Body
Body

Time

Learning Activity #1
Electrical circuits: Circuits can be as complex as the inner workings of a
computer or as simple as a battery, switch and light bulb.
A basic electric circuit consists of three components connected by wire
(leads): a power source (e.g., battery or generator), a control device (for
example, a switch or a resistor), and a load that converts electrical
energy into another form of energy (e.g., a light bulb or motor).
The parts are connected in a loop, or circuit. Starting at the negative
terminal of the cell, the wire goes to the switch, then to the light bulb
and finally connects to the positive terminal of the cell.
Show picture of simple circuit.
Remember that we learned about electrical safety? Here are some other
tips to remember.
When experimenting, be wary of creating one particular type of circuit,
the short circuit. If a wire is connected between the two cell terminals,
the electric current opts to take this shortcut rather than continue around
the larger loop of the original circuit that contains the load.
Because a load is missing from this path, all of the electrical energy is
converted to heat. This drains the cell very quickly, and the wire
carrying the electric current becomes VERY HOT. In fact, if a high
energy power source like household current is used, a short circuit can
burn out the wire and start a fire. In many circuits, like those used in a
house or in consumer electronics, fuses or circuit breakers are
incorporated that open the circuit, creating a gap, thus protecting the
wires and power source in the event of a “short.” In this way, a fuse is a
special kind of switch.

7 minutes

Show picture of short circuit.
Notice how electric cables and wires are usually covered with an
insulating material. This is done for several reasons. First, the insulating
layer protects you from coming in contact with the potentially “live”
wire.
Second, the coating keeps short circuits from forming and starting fires.
Teacher Notes: Assessments/
Differentiation

Look for evidence of learning from the lesson. Watch students to see if
they are paying attention to presentation.

Learning Activity #2

Now we are going to make a real electrical circuit. We will do this
groups. (Pair off class into groups of 2 students each, pairing a grade 4
student with a grade 5 student. Pairing to be done by choosing
popsicle sticks with a grade 4 name and a grade name).
Using the lesson in the Step-by-Step Science Series book, I will
demonstrate how to build a simple circuit, then have the class work in
groups to build their own circuit.

20 minutes

16

Teacher Notes: Assessments/
Differentiation

Consolidation of
Learning:

Observe if students were able to successfully complete a circuit. Watch
for input from both group members.
Have students write 2-3 sentences at the end of the activity about what
they liked as well as disliked about the activity.
Closure
Understanding of the topic:
Students demonstrate understanding of the topic by following
instructions.
Students are able to carry out the activity without constant direction
from the teacher.
How well students show interest in the topic.

Time

Interpretation of Activities and Experiments
Student interpret results in an accurate and clear manner.
Works cooperatively in a group or independently with little
supervision depending upon the particular activity.
Students follows instructions with little difficulty.
Written and oral language skills
Students are able to express themselves well, and express their ideas
clearly.
Students show understanding of questions by accuracy of answers to
specific questions.
Students use correct spelling, grammar and punctuation appropriate
for their grade level.

Feedback From Students:

Feedback To Students

Transition To Next
Lesson

Other Areas
Students are able to understand the scientific terms, concepts and
process without difficulty.
Have students’ rate effectiveness of activity on a 3 point scale using
their thumbs. A thumbs up means a three, a sideways thumb means a
2, and a thumbs down is a 1, meaning that the lesson and/or lesson
activity wasn’t very effective and I will need to make adjustments for
the next lesson.
Say thank you for the good work, class participation, respectful
listening, and working well in groups. Also, emphasize that I noticed
how well they were being safe during the activities.
In the next lesson, we will continue to apply our understanding of
electrical circuits by preparing for a bigger activity on designing
different electrical circuits.

30 seconds

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Task Title
Performance
Task Overview

Mr. Stephen Bore
Science
Electricity/Electrical safety

Scenario: a local power company wants our class to teach other students about the
dangers of electricity by creating posters about electrical safety.

Materials

Teacher
Subject
Topic/Focus

Safety First and Electrical Safety Poster
handout
Paper, markers, crayons

Learner Outcomes
General Outcomes
Specific Outcomes

5.5 Demonstrate safe
methods for the study of
magnetism and
electricity, identify
methods for
measurement and
control, and apply
techniques for
evaluating magnetic and
electrical properties of
materials.

1. Recognize and appreciate the potential
dangers involved in using sources of
electrical currents:
• understand that household electrical
currents are potentially dangerous and
not a suitable source for
experimentation.
•understand that small batteries are a
relatively safe source of electricity for
experimentation and study, but that care
should be taken to avoid short circuits;
and
• understand that short circuits may
cause wires to heat up, as well as waste
the limited amount of energy in batteries.

Computer (for image searches)

Assessment Criteria
Students provide evidence of their learning as they…

Accuracy and completeness of safety
poster, use of explanations about
electrical safety.
How well questions from classmates are
answered.
Use of past assignments and activities in
creating poster.

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Student Task Description
A local power company wants our class to teach other students about the dangers of electricity
by creating posters about electrical safety.
The power company heard we are learning about electricity and electrical safety, and thought we
would be great to create some posters to tell other students about the dangers of electricity and
how to use electricity safely.
In the same groups from the previous lesson(s), each group will create an electrical safety poster.
The power company wants the poster to be in the format that shows an unsafe electrical situation,
and a solution to the unsafe situation. There are two options:
Option A: Your poster could be a picture of an unsafe situation, with a written description of why
it is unsafe, and the electrical safety rule to follow for that situation.
Option B: Your poster could be a cartoon that shows how household electrical currents are
dangerous and should not be used for experimentation.
For both options, you will present your poster to the class, and will discuss the unsafe situation
and the solution. Please use the handout for some ideas as you create your poster.
Each poster should meet the following criteria:




Cleary shows an unsafe electrical situation and a solution
Visually appealing and effectively use colour, lines, headings, etc.
Drawings and graphics are neat and complete
Written and visual information is accurate and detailed
Information is effectively organized

Refer to the unsafe electrical situations activity for some ideas and hints.
Each group will work together to create the poster, and provide solutions to the unsafe situations.
Then, working individually, students will write 3 to 5 sentences about why they chose the
particular scenario for the poster and how they well they worked as a group.
Two class periods will be available to produce the posters and have the presentations. More time
can be allotted if necessary.

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References:

http://www.pinterest.com/explore/science-notebook-rubric/

http://www.teach-nology.com/web_tools/rubrics/general/

National Sciences Resources Center. 1991. Electric Circuits: Student Activity Book.
Carolina Biological Supply Company. Burlington, North Carolina.

Elementary Science Assessment Kit. No date. Educational Distributors. Calgary,
Alberta. Found on Lesson Plan Databasehttp://www.uleth.ca/education/resources/curriculum-laboratory/great-sites/digitalresources/lesson-plan-database#http://www.uleth.ca/education/resources/curriculumlaboratory/great-sites/digital-resources/lesson-plan-database#

Topic A: Electricity and Magnetism. 1996. Edmonton Public Schools. Edmonton,
Alberta.

Alberta Education Grade 5 Science Program of Studies:
http://education.alberta.ca/teachers/program/science/programs.aspx

http://www.wpclipart.com/science/atoms_molecules/atom_diagram.png.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UE7R9AF0Wpw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gixkpsrxk4Y

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZAFW4zdXpbY

Davies, Anne. 2011. Making Classroom Assessment Work. Third Edition.
www.connect2learning.com. Courtenay, BC.

Shepherd, Lorrie. The Role of Assessment in a Learning Culture. Educational
Researcher, Vol. 29, No. 7 (Oct. 2000), pp. 4-14.

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